Cactus Parakeet (Eupsittula cactorum) - Exotic birds | Pets
Posted by pets | 19 September 2017

Cactus Parakeet

Cactus Parakeet

Cactus Parakeet


Description:

25 cm.. length and 75-90 g. of weight.

Cactus Parakeet

The Cactus Parakeet (Eupsittula cactorum) has the forehead, lores and lower cheeks dull brown; crown with slaty tinge; sides neck, the nape and the upperparts up to the rump grass-green.

The primary coverts They are bluish green in the outerweb, the remaining are green grass. Flight feather (above) green on innerwebs, blue green on outerweb, blue black at the tips (below) gray. Underwing-coverts greenish yellow. Throat and upper breast dull brown; lower breast and belly fairly bright orange-yellow, thighs and vent greenish-yellow color. uppertail green, four distal blue central feathers; undertail gray. Upper mandible horn, greyish at base and on lower mandible; perioftálmico patch naked white; iris brown-orange; gray-gray legs.

Both sexes similar. Immature paler than adult, with crown green, more olive upper breast and the throat, and the iris darker.

  • Sound of the Cactus Parakeet.

Subspecies description:
  • Eupsittula cactorum cactorum

    (Kuhl, 1820) – Nominal.

  • Eupsittula cactorum caixana

    (Spix, 1824) – Generally paler than nominal, with belly yellow instead of orange.

Habitat:

Its distribution area closely matches the dried vegetation and prickly caatinga Northeast Brazil, but it encompasses higher drier semi-desert areas created by overgrazing and dry forests (caatinga arborea) and seasonal savannah lusher (closed). Usually in pairs or (mainly outside the breeding season) flocks of up to 20 birds, most abundant where food is abundant (as rice crops).

Reproduction:

Crianza undocumented released. Clutch six eggs in captivity.

Food:

The diet includes seeds, fruits (including cactus), berries, dried fruits, flowers and cocoons, taken both trees and shrubs and soil. Sometimes it attacks crops (for example rice, grapes and corn).

Distribution and status:

Extensión de la población (cría/residente): 1.220.000 km2

Distributed by the interior Northeast Brazil. The Cactus Parakeet extending from the drier parts of Bay and adjacent northeast Minas Gerais, Brazil north through Piauí and Southeast of Maranhão, up to Pernambuco and Paraíba, passing by Rio Grande do Norte and Ceará. Absent in coastal areas: a record of Belém at the mouth of Amazon in For It seems wrong or possibly refers to a leak.

It is usually common (the most common parrot in some locations) with a stable population, although the decline is inevitable in some areas due to massive loss of habitat by agriculture and plantations of exotic trees. Continuing degradation and conversion caatinga by grazing and cultivation they represent a long-term threat. Present in the Serra da Capivara National Park. Any Local persecution due to predation crop. Atrapada to trade small numbers in captivity.

Distribution of subspecies:
Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

• Population size : Unknown.

Justification of the red list category

The trend population seems to be stable and, therefore, the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population trend (> 30% decrease in ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un descenso continuo estimado en >10% in ten years or three generations, or specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification of the population

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common(Stotz et to the. (1996).

Justification trend

It is suspected that the population is stable the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threat.

Threats

Local persecution because of the invasion of crops. This species is also trapped for pet bird trade.

In captivity:

Young birds are removed from their nest before they can fly, and then sold, for example, at the fair in inner cities.
These birds can become very tame, and it is not rare to see a Cactus Parakeet living “on freedom” in the owner's house, as a member of the family so to speak. It however is seeing a rare bird in captivity outside their range. Not as common as other species more familiar aratinga. In addition, usually they reach very high prices.

The illegal trade It has greatly reduced the population of these Aratingas in nature, and threatens the survival of the species in many areas. Habitat destruction appears to be a minor problem.

For more information – Loro Parque

Alternative names:


- Caatinga Conure, Caatinga Parakeet, Cactus Conure, Cactus Parakeet (inglés).
- Conure des cactus, Perriche des cactus, Perruche des cactus (francés).
- Kaktussittich (alemán).
- Aratinga-vaqueira, giguilim, Jandaia-gangarra, merequém, periquito-da-caatinga, periquito-gangarra (portugués).
- Aratinga Cactácea, Aratinga de los cactos, Periquito de los Cardones (español).

Kuhl, Heinrich

Heinrich Kuhl

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Eupsittula
- Nombre científico: Eupsittula cactorum
- Citation: (Kuhl, 1820)
- Protónimo: Psittacus cactorum

Images Cactus Parakeet:

————————————————————————————————

Cactus Parakeet (Eupsittula cactorum)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – The pet Caatinga Parakeet in Riachão do Jacuípe, Baiano northeast, Brazil By Paulo Marcos from Painted-BA, Brazil (Periquito MartinsUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Caatinga Parakeet (also known as Cactus Parakeet) in Brazil By Phillipe (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Eupsittula cactorum – Conura cactus – Cactus conure – conure cactus by Florin FeneruFlickr
(4) – Parakeet CAATINGA (Eupsittula cactorum) by WITH Cantosdanatureza
(5) – Parakeet cactuses - aratinga cactácea by Animal Encyclopedia 2
(6) – Cactus parakeet – conographie parrots :.Paris :P. Bertrand,1857.. biodiversitylibrary.org/page/47804387

Sounds: Robson Silva e Silva, XC248141. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/248141

Filed under: AB, Birds, Birds, C | No comments »
Posted by pets | 19 September 2017

Olive-throated Parakeet

Olive-throated Parakeet

Olive-throated Parakeet

Description:

20 to 26 cm. long and 72-85 grams. It is one of the smallest Aratingas.

Olive-throated Parakeet

The Olive-throated Parakeet (Eupsittula nana) has the head and top dark green; feathered area of cere yellow to orange-red.

Upperwing-coverts dark green, outer more emerald. The Outer secondaries and the inner primaries deep dark blue tipped black above; the outer primary blue only towards tips. The greater underwing-coverts and underside of the flight feather dull slate or brownish-grey; the remaining coberteras are light green. Chin, throat and sides neck chocolate-brown they are merging with brownish olive on top of breast which turns yellow at the bottom and the belly; undertail-coverts light green. uppertail dark green with blue diffusion, especially towards the tip; undertail metallized yellow-olive. Bill brown with the tip paler; iris yellow to orange; legs blackish-gray.

All plumages are similar but immature has iris brown.

  • Sound of the Olive-throated Parakeet.

Subspecies description:

three subspecies Panamanian and Honduran birds previously bore the respective names outmost and melloni, but light regional variations in Central America (p. e.g.. birds in southern paler and those of Tabasco, Mexico and Honduras They are darker) not justify more separations as described below.

  • Eupsittula nana astec

    (Souance, 1857) – Similar to the nominal but the throat and (especially the underparts) more pale brown, the bill perhaps smaller average.

  • Eupsittula nana nana

    (Vigors, 1830) – Nominal.

  • Eupsittula nana vicinalis

    (Bangs & Penard,TO, 1919) – Slightly larger than the subspecies Eupsittula nana astec, up brighter and greener down

NOTE The continental population is sometimes treated as a full species under the name A. astec, although the differences are minimal Jamaican birds.

Habitat:

They live mainly in forests and forest edges (especially adjacent lowland) in wet areas (to 1.100 m in Honduras, to 700 m in Costa Rica and a 300 m in southern Mexico), It is less frequent in large tracts of rainforest; reported in arid areas (Veracruz) and pine forests (Honduras), open country with scattered trees (including acreages) and plantations. More common in Jamaica in wet limestone forests midlevel. Usually it remains below the canopy. larger groups can be formed (c. 30) after breeding or when food is plentiful. mixed flocks with Crimson-fronted Parakeet reported in Costa Rica.

Reproduction:

Arboreal termitarium prefer to lay their nests, where birds excavate the cavity; also used treeholes. Nests often on the edge of a river or forest. Breeding season in March, Jamaica; April May, Belize and Guatemala. The implementation is of 3-4 eggs that hatch in 26-27 days. After hatching, it takes about 50 days until the chicks are ready for independence.

Note: In most birds, male / female relationships occur only during the breeding season and only work in coordinating parental care. La monogamy perenne, or linking partner throughout the year, It occurs in at least a dozen families of birds, including cockatoos and parrots.

Food:

Registered foods include higos ficus, Psidium, Inga, Hura, fruit of Hieronyma and guilt of tamarindo unripened. attacking crops, especially corn, and it is considered highly destructive in some areas.

Distribution:

Extensión de su área de distribución (cría/residente): 1,373,500 km2

distributed by the Gulf and the Caribbean slope of Central America and Jamaica; a population in Hispaniola (Sierra de Bahoruco, Dominican Republic) It comes from a recent introduction from Jamaica. In Mexico, the Olive-throated Parakeet It extends from eastern San Luis Potosí and South of Tamaulipas, through South Veracruz until Oaxaca, North of Chiapas and Yucatan; then by the wet north Guatemala and the Caribbean slope of Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica to western Panama. It is located along Jamaica except in high mountains and wet Range John Crow in the East.

Locally common resident and abundant (commonly the most abundant parrot in some locations) although it is likely to be decreased in some areas (p. and. Jamaica and Costa Rica) due to the loss of habitat. Less common in southern Costa Rica and rare in Panama, where possibly a seasonal visitor Southern Lemon.

Caught for live bird market, but rare in international trade.

Subspecies description:
  • Eupsittula nana astec

    (Souance, 1857) – Veracruz, Mexico, to Panama

  • Eupsittula nana nana

    (Vigors, 1830) – Nominal. Jamaica, apparently in most areas except in the high mountains and the wet mountain range John Crow

  • Eupsittula nana vicinalis

    (Bangs & Penard,TO, 1919) – East of Mexico south of Veracruz, contact area with the latter species unknown

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

• Population size : 500,000-4,999,999 individuals.

Justification of the red list category

Although the demographic trend appears to be declining, It not believed to be declining fast enough to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable at the discretion of the demographic trend (> 30% decrease in ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and therefore does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un descenso continuo estimado en >10% in ten years or three generations, or specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

The subspecies Eupsittula nana nana It is endemic to Jamaica, where still widespread but probably has a moderately small population (approximately 10.000 mature individuals), all in one subpopulation, inferring that is in continuous decline due to a variety of threats including loss and degradation of the habitat, pursuit and capture for trade. Therefore, It has been classified as Near-threatened.

Justification of the population

Partners in Flight They estimate that the total population is 500,000-4,999,999 individuals (A. Panjabi a slightly. 2008).

Justification trend

They suspected that the population is declining due to continuing habitat destruction and unsustainable levels of exploitation.

In captivity:

Uncommon in international trade. Their life expectancy is over 15 years.

It is included in the Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora Silvestre (CITES).

The Olive-throated Parakeet It is important to attract tourists with hotel advantages in the Caribbean and tropical areas that offer free bird tour with reservations. It is one of the reasons that this beautiful bird should remain free.

Alternative names:


- Dwarf Conure, Dwarf Parakeet, Jamaican Conure, Jamaican Parakeet, Olive-throated Parakeet, Olive-throated Parakeet (Jamaican) (inglés).
- Conure aztèque , Conure naine, Conure naine (nominal), Conure naine (nominale), Conure naine (race nominale) (francés).
- Aztekensittich, Jamaikasittich (alemán).
- Periquito-da-jamaica (portugués).
- Aratinga jamaicana, Aratinga Pechisucia, Perico Amargo, Perico azteco, Perico Pechiolivo, Perico Pechisucio, perico pecho sucio, perico pecho-sucio, Periquito pechisucio (español).
- Perico azteco (Costa Rica).
- Perico Amargo (Dominican Rep.).
- Periquito pechisucio (Honduras).
- Perico Pechisucio, perico pecho sucio, perico pecho-sucio (México).
- Perico Pechiolivo (Nicaragua).

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Eupsittula
- Nombre científico: Eupsittula nana
- Citation: (Vigors, 1830)
- Protónimo: Psittacara nana

Images Olive-throated Parakeet:

————————————————————————————————

Olive-throated Parakeet (Eupsittula nana)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Jamaican Parakeet (aka Olive-throated Parakeet or Aztec Parakeet) in captivity in Costa Rica By http://www.birdphotos.com (Own work) [CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Aratinga nana astec in Belize By Dominic Sherony [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Aratinga (nana) astec in Tikal, Guatemala By Aztec_Parakeet_(Aratinga_astec)_-Guatemala-8.jpg: Walter Rodriguez from Berlin, Germanyderivative work: Snowmanradio [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Aratinga (nana) astec in Tikal, Guatemala By Walter Rodriguez from Berlin, Germany (parakeetUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Eupsittula nana. Celestún Biosphere Reserve, Yucatan, México By Katja Schulz from Washington, D. C., USA (Olive-throated Parakeet) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – A painting of an Olive-throated Parakeet, also known as the Olive-throated Conure, (originally captioned “Psittacara nana. Dwarf Parrakeet Maccaw.”) by Edward Lear 1812-1888 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Guy Kirwan, XC284214. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/284214

Filed under: AB, Birds, Birds, MNOP | No comments »
Posted by pets | 18 September 2017

Glaucous Macaw †

Glaucous Macaw

Glaucous Macaw

Description:

72 cm.. length.

Glaucous Macaw

The plumage general of the Glaucous Macaw (Anodorhynchus glaucus) It is light blue, almost turquoise top, with strong grayish hue in head and underparts.

uppertail Blue-Green; undertail gray.

The bill It is dark blackish gray, the naked flames in the base lower mandible they are yellow, but paler than the periophthalmic skin; the iris is dark brown, the periophthalmic skin Nude yellow; the legs They are dark.

Habitat:

probably he occupied Gallery subtropical forests with cliffs, but also used lightly wooded savannas and rich in palm trees. The few contemporary records suggest it was naturalists gregarious.

Reproduction:

It has been reported that anidaba on steep slopes or cliffs, or less generally in the cavities of trees and the average size of laying It was probably two eggs

Food:

Its diet It was probably basic nuts palm Butia horizontal (nearest equivalent in rank to size nuts Syagrus used by the Indigo Macaw, It is having the same dimensions peak).

Distribution:

Extensión de su área de distribución (cría/residente): 1 km2

the Glaucous Macaw They were distributed at the time by the south-eastern South America, where apparently they were recorded in average growth of major rivers, including Parana River, the Uruguay river and the Río Paraguay, with most of the evidence of a prior distribution in the province of Currents, to the North of Argentina; cases were also recorded in western Uruguay and Southeast of Brazil (Rio Grande do Sul and Paraná), and evidently in the south and east of Paraguay. The records of Bolivia They seem wrong. It is almost certainly extinct after a precipitous drop in the early nineteenth century. Only two records in the twentieth century.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: In Critically Endangered.

• Population trend: Unknown.

• Population size : 1-49 individuals.

Justification of the red list category

This species was recorded in the last decade 1960 and it is likely that its population has declined dramatically as a result of hunt, Besides the degradation and habitat destruction. However, you may still exist, since not all its wide range of data, above wide, It has been adequately studied, and there have been persistent and convincing local reports. Any remaining population is likely to be small, and for these reasons it is treated as in Critically Endangered.

Justification of the population

It is assumed that any remaining population is small (counting less than 50 individuals) due to lack of confirmed records since the early 1960.

Threats

The settlement of the major river basins within its range was allegedly accompanied by the widespread loss of palms, whether by direct cleaning for agriculture or suppression of regeneration by livestock settlers. The palma de Horizontal, of the species probably fed, It was chosen to be cleared by early settlers because it was an indicator of good soil quality (Necklace et to the. 2014). Widespread loss of gallery forests could also have had an impact on the species (Necklace et to the. 2014). The size and appearance of the bird probably made him a prime target for hunters, and even capture pups as pets It could have been important. There is some evidence that were sold, but few to support various claims that there have been recent trade of live specimens.

Any current trade in eggs, skins and live specimens would obviously be extremely damaging.

Conservation actions underway

    Appendix I of CITES and protected by Brazilian law.

    – There have been several attempts (so far unsuccessful) to rediscover the species.

    – There are proposals for funding under way to try to fund a work program to confirm the presence of this species in the wild.

Conservation Actions Proposed

    – Conducting interviews with the local population, especially with parrots and ancient hunters assets, to assess the likelihood of any population remains.

    – Getting ready to follow up any positive data from these interviews.

In captivity:

There is some evidence that were sold, but few to support various claims that there have been recent trade of live specimens.

Alternative names:


- Glaucous Macaw (inglés).
- Ara glauque (francés).
- Türkisara (alemán).
- arara-azul-pequena, arara-celeste, guacamaio (portugués).
- Guacamayo Azul, Guacamayo Glauco, Guacamayo Violáceo, Papagayo violáceo (español).
- Guacamayo azul (Argentina).
- Papagayo violáceo (Paraguay).
- Guacamayo Azul (Uruguay).

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Anodorhynchus
- Nombre científico: Anodorhynchus glaucus
- Citation: (Vieillot, 1816)
- Protónimo: Macrocercus glaucus

Images Glaucous Macaw:

————————————————————————————————

Glaucous Macaw (Anodorhynchus glaucus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – digital recreation of glaucous macaw. Butia yatay background with courtesy of http://floradeluruguay.blogspot.com/2010/05/butia-yatay.html , Andrés González. By Rod6807 (Martin Rodriguez Bridges) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Anodorhynchus glaucus by Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis Biodiversity Center [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Anodorhynchus glaucus by Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis Biodiversity Center [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Anodorhynchus glaucus By Vieillot, 1816 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Anodorhynchus glaucus by Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis Biodiversity Center [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Early illustration of the Glaucous Macaw illustration from Bourjot Saint-Hilaire, 1837-1838 By Bourjot Saint-Hilaire [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

 

Posted by pets | 16 September 2017

Burrowing Parakeet

Burrowing Parakeet

Burrowing Parakeet


Description:

39-52 cm. length between 260 and 280 g. of weight.

Burrowing Parakeet

The Burrowing Parakeet (Cyanoliseus patagonus) has the forehead, crown, lores, cheeks and nape olive brown with slight yellowish tinge; sides of neck, of mantle and back Brown olive; rump and uppertail-coverts bright canary yellow.

Blades brown, some slightly blue; covered primary blue, other yellowish olive brown. Primaries and Outer secondaries dark blue with edges innerwebs distal; inner secondary bluish brown. Underwing-coverts Yellow olive; underside of flight feather brown. Breast olive brown with white-cream area at the top of breast; rest of the underparts yellow-orange red patch through central belly. uppertail brown tinted blue, especially next to the tips; undertail brown.

The bill It is grayish-black; the periophthalmic skin skin whitish; the iris is pale yellow; the legs They are pale yellowish brown.

Both sexes similar. Immature has horn upper mandible and the iris brown.

  • Sound of the Burrowing Parakeet.

Description Burrowing Parakeet subspecies
Habitat:

The species usually inhabit areas open pastures, although it has also been reported in Savanna, wooded valleys cliffs and farmland some 2.000 m. Usually in a fairly arid land, although often it found near elevations or streams. Gregarious, forming large flocks, sometimes exceeding 1.000 birds, with common roosts trees, on wiring (sometimes in villages) and tunnels dug to nest.

Reproduction:

It reproduces colonially in warrens carved into cliffs (usually limestone or sandstone Chile) often with stunning views. In San Luis, Argentina, reproduction is reported in the wet season (November–April), the birds return to nest in the cliffs lay eggs in September and November to December in San Luis, spreading of bird breeding sites in April; apparently earlier in Chile. Clutch 2-4 eggs. The male takes care of feeding the female during the incubation period. The young leave the nest to 2 months of age, However, They continue to be fed by their parents until 6 months of age.

Food:

The diet of the Burrowing Parakeet It consists mainly of seeds and fruits predominance of fruit in the summer months (November to February). Food reported include berries of buckthorn joke and Discaria, fruit of Geoffroea decorticans, Prosopis caldenia, P. chilensis and P. flexuosa and seeds of Carduus mariana. Sometimes damaged grain crops; often it feeds on the floor or around.

Distribution:

Extensión de su área de distribución (cría/residente): 1.590.000 km2

The Burrowing Parakeet They are distributed by the South South America, extending from northern Santa Cruz and Chubut in Argentina, passing by Rio Negro and the Pampa, up to Buenos Aires, San Luis and Córdoba, San Juan, La Rioja, Catamarca, Tucumán and Salta, reaching westward across southern Uruguay.

They were recorded in the early 1920 from the center of Formosa, Argentina, away from Andes mountains, and above the center Chile from the North of The lakes to north of Atacama, but now they are confined to a few localities in the foothills of the Andes, for example in Bio Bio.

Will produce some seasonal movements, including the northward migration of birds south in the Argentine winter and shifts down Chile.

In Argentina It is locally common or abundant, although in some places (p. e.g.. in Córdoba and Buenos Aires Eastern) They are rare or occasional. Few and far between in Uruguay. drastic decline during the twentieth century Chile, so that the subspecies Cyanoliseus patagonus bloxami It is considered at risk, with an estimated population of less than 3.000 individuals at the end of the decade 1980. The decrease in parts of the Argentina It is attributed to the catch for the trade, the hunting for food, converting grassland and arable land persecution as crop pest. Probably continues to decline overall.

Burrowing Parakeet subspecies distribution
Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

• Population size : 95000 individuals.

Justification of the red list category

Although the demographic trend It appears to be declining, It not believed to be declining fast enough to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable at the discretion of the demographic trend (> 30% decrease in ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and therefore does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un descenso continuo estimado en >10% in ten years or three generations, or specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification of the population

The species is still common in many parts of its range in Argentina, with only small contractions reported in range Córdoba (R. M. Fraga a slightly. 2003). The population size of four subspecies was estimated as follows by MASELLO et al. (2011): Cyanoliseus patagonus patagonus 43.330 nests, Cyanoliseus patagonus conlara 1.700 individuals, Cyanoliseus patagonus andinus 2.000 nests, Cyanoliseus patagonus bloxami 5.000-6.000 individuals. Based on these figures, the population Total overall can be about 95.000 mature individuals.

Justification trend

They suspected that the population is declining due to continuing habitat destruction and unsustainable levels of exploitation.

Threats

The species has been the subject of a intense trade: from 1981, year it was included in the Appendix II of the CITES, they have been 122.914 individuals caught in international trade (UNEP-WCMC CITES CITES Trade Database, January 2005).

Conservation actions underway

The species is included in the Appendix II of the CITES.

In captivity:

The average life expectancy is of 15-20 years in captivity. Protected by Appendix II of the CITES.

To help conservation Burrowing Parakeet, You can report your hunt, sale, trade and illegal possession, thus, We will be cooperating with the conservation of this species and not be complicit in the decline of their populations and their future extinction of wild.

Alternative names:


- Burrowing Conure, Burrowing Parakeet, Burrowing Parrot, Patagonian Burrowing Parrot, Patagonian Conure, Patagonian Parrot (inglés).
- Conure de Patagonie, Perriche de Patagonie, Perruche de Patagonie (francés).
- Felsensittich, Felsen-Sittich (alemán).
- Periquito-das-barreiras (portugués).
- Loro Barranquero, Loro de la Patagonia, Loro Patagonico, Tricahue (español).
- Loro barranquero (Argentina).
- Tricahue (Chile).
- Loro barranquero, Loro Patagonico (Uruguay).
- Perico Barranquero (México).

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Cyanoliseus
- Nombre científico: Cyanoliseus patagonus
- Citation: (Vieillot, 1818)
- Protónimo: Psittacus patagonus

Burrowing Parakeet Pictures:

————————————————————————————————

Burrowing Parakeet (Cyanoliseus patagonus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A Burrowing Parrot captive in Madeira By Rakkhi Samarasekera from London, United Kingdom (P6122982Uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Two Burrowing Parrots in Limari Province, Chile By Gerzo Gallardo (Flickr: Parrots) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Tricahues couple burrowing parrot on the RN River Cypresses By BioVipah (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Burrowing Parrot (also known as the Patagonian Conure) to Lille Zoo, France By Olivier Duquesne (originally posted to Flickr as Perroquet) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A Burrowing Parrot at Birds of Eden, an aviary in Western Cape, South Africa By Dick Daniels (http://carolinabirds.org /) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – A painting of a Burrowing Parrot, also known as Patagonian Conure, (originally captioned “Psittacara patagonica. Patagonian Parrakeet-Maccaw”) by Edward Lear 1812-1888 – Wikipedia

Sounds: Cristian Pinto, XC380836. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/380836.

Filed under: AB, Birds, Birds, JKL | No comments »
Posted by pets | 5 August 2017

Slender-billed Parakeet

Slender-billed Parakeet

Slender-billed Parakeet


Description:

40 to 42 cms. length and 200 to 250 g. of weight.

Slender-billed Parakeet

The Slender-billed Parakeet (Enicognathus leptorhynchus) has the lores, forehead and a narrow ring feathers around the eyes bright crimson red; cheeks and sides neck, green; feathers of the crown, the nape, the of mantle and the back, with dark green margins producing a scalloped effect (more pronounced in the crown, where the feathers are brighter and more emerald).

Scapulars, rump and uppertail-coverts They are green. Primary coverts green with blue suffusion; other coverts green. Flight feather green-blue above with dark margins in innerwebs near the tips; light gray below. Underwing-coverts brighter yellowish green. Underparts yellowish green with patch dull red in centre of belly. Upper, the long tail red is off; greenish toward the tip; undertail, dull red suffused greyish.

The upper mandible It is dark gray with colored tip horn, the lower mandible is horn; Strait bare periophthalmic grey; iris orange-red; legs grey.

Both sexes are similar.

Immature darker, with the upper mandible shorter, less red in the face little or no red on belly.

  • Sound of the Slender-billed Parakeet.

Habitat:

The Slender-billed Parakeet dwells in wooded areas, mainly Nothofagus and Araucaria, although they can be seen in more open cultivated fields or pastures, especially in winter. Its range is located from sea level in winter 2.000 meters in summer. Usually in flocks, of a few individuals to several hundred, even during the breeding season; large communal concentrations sometimes composed of several thousand birds.

Reproduction:

Nests generally treeholes, often at a certain height and several couples using the same tree; very deep holes fill them with twigs to raise the base level. Occasionally nidifican in rock crevices, building the nest with twigs (for example, Bamboo thicket This chusquea) if there is no tree cavities available. Breeding season in November-December. Clutch 5-6 eggs.

Food:

Its diet It consists of seeds of wild and cultivated plants (They are sometimes considered a pest), including grains and thistles, seed cones araucaria (March April) open with its elongated peaks, acorns, seeds of Nothofagus and bulbous roots. generally place vigilantes while the rest of the birds feed.

Distribution and status:

Área de distribución (cría / residente): 195.000 km2

The Slender-billed Parakeet It is confined to the center Chile, from the South of Santiago through coastal lowlands and valleys on the slopes of hills Pacific, south to the Chiloe Island and maybe Palena river in the North of Aysen; They can also be seen in Isla Mocha off the southwest coast Bío Bío.

made some movements altitudinal seasonal, with moving from coastal lowlands to the foothills of the hills between spring and autumn bird (September-May).

Fairly common, although in recent decades its population has decreased due, fundamentally, deforestation, his capture and the Newcastle disease.

Less frequent and perhaps only sporadic in the northern and southern ends of its range.

Caught locally as pets, although quite rare in captivity outside Chile.

Conservation:
  1. Current category Red List UICN: Least concern.
  2. The population trend: Stable.
  3. Population size : Unknown.

(classified in Appendix II of CITES)

Justification of the Red List Category

This species has a range very large, and as a result does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (extent of occurrence <20.000 km2). La tendencia de la population seems to be stable, and therefore the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion population trend (> 30% decrease of more than ten years or three generations). The population size It has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con una disminución continua estima en> 10% in ten years or three generations, or in a particular population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification of the population

The world population It has not been quantified, but the species according to sources is locally common (pit et to the., 1997).

Justification trend

The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

In captivity:

Virtually unknown until 1976.

It is a nice and noisy bird, whose docility and cunning behavior have meant it to be hunted down and captured to commercialize as pets, common practice but absolutely unlawful, because they are removed from their natural means of inhabitancy in South Chile, which they can not be replaced in urban areas and in captivity. People who do sell through a network of illegal trafficking. However, it is a rare bird watching in captivity outside Chile.

In captivity, According to sources, a specimen lived 15,3 years.

Alternative names:


- Chilean Parakeet, Long-billed Conure, Long-billed Parakeet, Slender billed Parakeet, Slender-billed Conure, Slender-billed Parakeet, Slight-billed Conure, Slight-billed Parakeet (inglés).
- Conure à long bec, Perriche à long bec, Perruche à long bec (francés).
- Langschnabelsittich, Langschnabel-Sittich (alemán).
- Periquito Delgado-faturado (portugués).
- Choroy, Cotorra Choroy (español).

Admiral Phillip Parker King

Admiral Phillip Parker King

Scientific classification:


Orden: Psittaciformes
Familia: Psittacidae
Genus: Enicognathus
Nombre científico: Enicognathus leptorhynchus
Citation: (King, PP, 1831)
Protónimo: Psittacara leptorhyncha

Images Slender-billed Parakeet:

————————————————————————————————

Slender-billed Parakeet (Enicognathus leptorhynchus)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife
  • surmagico

Photos:

  • (1) Enicognathus leptorhynchus (Slender-billed parakeet), Vogelpark Walsrode Taken sometime during 1985 by Rüdiger StehnFlickr
  • (2) Enicognathus leptorhynchus Paso Mamuil by Malal xerofitoFlickr
  • (3) they choroy, recovering after being stoned Austral By Blizzard (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
  • (4) Slender-billed Parakeets rehabilitating in a Parque Tumbes in a large aviary, Talcahuano, Bio Bio Region, Chile. In January 2012, about a 100 parrots were rescued from a pet shop in La Granja, Santiago Province, Chile. They were rehabilitated for about three months before being released to the wild. By Municipality of Talcahuano [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
  • (5) Enicognathus leptorhynchus – thin nose cones – Slender-billed conure – conure Beaked by Florin FeneruFlickr
  • (6) A painting of a Slender-billed Parakeet (originally captioned “Psittacara leptorhyncha Long-billed. Parrakeet-Maccaw.”) by Edward Lear 1812-1888 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Ross Gallardy, XC296142. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/296142

Filed under: Birds, Birds, C, QRST | No comments »
Posted by pets | 30 July 2017

Austral Parakeet

Austral Parakeet

Austral Parakeet


Description:

28–36 cm. length.

Austral Parakeet

The Austral Parakeet (Enicognathus ferrugineus), It is mostly green; the lores and the forehead rather dull brick-red; the front of the crown with yellow and green feathers in the center, and edges dark green olive feathers central part of the crown.

The feathers of the upperparts They are olive green with darker edges, giving a scalloped effect. The upperwing-coverts They are olive color with dark margins. Flight feather green with metallic blue suffusion. Underwing-coverts green with dark tips; Bottom of the flight feather pale grey. The underparts They are mainly pale green olive, with darker margins (except in the thighs) and a large opaque red spot on the central belly. In the long run tail It is dark red off above; pale grayish below. The upper mandible horn is dark colored with a black tip; the bottom is dark horn-colored; iris reddish brown; legs dark gray.

Both sexes are similar. The immature It has a duller red on the head and a patch in the belly red less dense and less extensive.

  • Sound of the Austral Parakeet.

Subspecies description:
  • Enicognathus ferrugineus ferrugineus

    (Statius Müller, 1776) – Nominal.

  • Enicognathus ferrugineus minor

    (Chapman, 1919) – Smaller and darker than the nominal, with a abdominal patch Red less extensive (sometimes absent).

Habitat:

The Austral Parakeet occurs mainly in forests, including forests of Nothofagus, Araucaria and Quercus, but also in more open habitats with shrubs Berberis darwinii and Drimys winteri, also they visit cultivated areas, mainly at sea level in the southern part of the range, may reach 1200 meters and even 2.000 meters north. Observed in flocks of 10-15 individuals, coming to meet more than 100 birds outside the breeding period; flocks of 10 or more in Fire land with reports of attacks caused by Red-backed Hawk (Geranoaetus polyosoma).

In April and before the arrival of winter flocks leave the mountains to take refuge in lower valleys of lower altitude.

Reproduction:

They nest in the cavity of the trees, filling very deep holes with twigs and branches where building nests are no cavities available. The breeding season It comprising the months of November to December. Clutch 4-8 eggs. To the 26 days are born nestlings, emplumándose to 7-8 weeks.

Food:

predominantly eat seeds (can cause damage to grain crops). Its diet It includes herbaceous seeds and bamboo, Drimys winteri, acorns and nuts Araucaria, fruit, berries and sprouts p. Nothofagus and bulbous roots.

Distribution and status:

Extensión de su área de distribución (reproducción / residentes): 2.010.000 km2

Distributed by the south end of South America, psittacine distribution is the southernmost in the world.

They can be observed from Land of Fire north through Chile to province O'Higgins and east of Andes in Argentina, extending through Santa Cruz, Chubut, Rio Negro Western and Neuquén Western.

Generally residents, even in the extreme south, although the foothills move to raise (at least in Land of Fire) with some predictable local movements in the north. Generally common, It is very abundant in the wooded coast Land of Fire. Large areas remain intact habitat and inhabiting several large protected areas.

Very rare in captivity.

Distribution of subspecies:
Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

• Population size : Unknown.

Justification of the Red List Category

This species has a very large range, and therefore does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion. The trend population seems to be stable, and therefore the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion population trend (> 30% decrease of more than ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con una disminución continua estimada en> 10% in ten years or three generations, or in a particular population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification of the population

The world's population has not been quantified, but this species is described as ‘quite common(Stotz et to the. (1996).

Justification trend

The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

In captivity:

Very rare in captivity.

Chilean law prohibits the purchase, sale and possession of this magpie.

If you have a Austral Parakeet I recommend you give it to SAG or the Center for Rehabilitation of Wildlife of Codeff ([email protected], background: 777 25 34 – Santiago), because in that place you will come across many other parrots of the same species that suffered the same process, and specialized people who care very well, For then return to the wild.

Alternative names:


- Austral Conure, Austral Parakeet, Emerald Conure, Emerald Parakeet, Magellan Conure, Magellan Parakeet (inglés).
- Conure émeraude, Conure magellanique, Perriche magellanique, Perruche magellanique (francés).
- Smaragdsittich, Smaragd-Sittich (alemán).
- Periquito-austral (portugués).
- Cachaña, Cachaña austral, Cotorra Austral, Cotorra Cachaña (español).

Scientific classification:

Antiguamente separada del género monoespecífico Microsittace.

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Enicognathus
- Nombre científico: Enicognathus ferrugineus
- Citation: (Statius Mulller, 1776)
- Protónimo: Psittacus ferrugineus

Images Austral Parakeet:

————————————————————————————————

Austral Parakeet (Enicognathus ferrugineus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Austral Parakeet (also known as Austral Conure or Emerald Parakeet) in Torres del Paine National Park, Chile By Miguel Vieira [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Two Austral Parakeets in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina By Francesco Veronesi [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Austral Parakeet (Enicognathus ferrugineus) seen near Laguna Onelli, Glaciers National Park, Santa Cruz, Argentina By Fabienkhan (Personal Picture) [CC BY-SA 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons – credit : Fabien Dany – www.fabiendany.com
(4) – Cachañas in San Martin de los Andes, Province of Neuquen, Argentina By Ignsal (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – An Austral Parakeet in Magallanes Province, Chile By Paulo Fassina (Parrot EatingUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Austral Parakeet – Torres del Paine National Park, Chile by Eleanor BriccettiFlickr

Sounds: Bobby Wilcox, XC236937. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/236937

Filed under: AB, Birds, Birds, C | No comments »
Posted by pets | 25 July 2017

Sulphur-winged Parakeet

Sulphur-winged Parakeet

Sulphur-winged Parakeet

Description:

23 cms. length and 84 g. of weight.

Sulphur-winged Parakeet

The Sulphur-winged Parakeet (Pyrrhura hoffmanni) It, mostly, green with some individual variations in plumage.

It has a distinctive tail long and round about ear-coverts crimson red. Yellow at the top of the wings, largely hidden when the bird is at rest, but perfectly visible in flight.

The feathers of the forehead, crown, cheeks and nape, They are green with yellow centers (the proportion of the yellow color is higher in the forehead, lower in the back of the crown). Above predominantly green, It is the leading edges of the wings, sometimes, yellow. The lesser coverts and median are, generally, green, sometimes with some yellow in outer median coverts and feathers alula.

Yellow at the base of the outerweb of the greater coverts. Outerwebs of primaries, to a great extent, blue; primaries and secondaries with bright yellow patch, especially on the basis of innerwebs; flight feather with black tips. Under, the wings with the lesser coverts green, the majors, greenish yellow; a central portion flight feather yellowed with greyish tips.

Chin reddish; throat, sides neck and the top breast, green with yellow tips on feathers, which gives an overall light effect Scaled. The belly, the flanks and the undertail-coverts, are green. Upper, the tail is green, below, reddish.

The bill and cere They are pink colored horn; bare periophthalmic white or yellowish white; the iris brown; legs pale grey.

Both sexes are similar, but the male player has yellow stripes on pens crown.
The Immature It has less yellow in head, the breast and the wings.

  • Sound of the Sulphur-winged Parakeet.

Subspecies description:
  • Pyrrhura hoffmanni gaudens

    (Bangs, 1906) – Very similar to nominal, although feathers crown and the nape They have yellower, with their ends red or red and orange (in some birds, red ends of the feathers may extend over the back, the throat and the breast). Underparts slightly darker.

  • Pyrrhura hoffmanni hoffmanni

    (Cabanis, 1861) – Nominal.

Habitat:

Observed, mainly, in mountainous areas, preferring montane forests in the subtropical zone, mainly 1.000 to 2.400 meters above sea level, although views 550 meters in the region Almirante Bay, Panama and a 3.000 metres in Costa Rica.

They appear to tolerate a considerable disturbance of habitat, including managed forests, areas and the second growth partially cleared, forests and wooded pasture shrubs. Usually seen in pairs or small flocks of 5-15 birds. You can perform altitudinal movements daily to feed, returning to the mountains to rest. Forage occurs in the canopy or smaller trees and bushes near the edge of the woods.

Reproduction:

They nest in tree hollows, including old nests woodpeckers, to 8-20 meters of land. With reproduce dry season (January June). Clutch six eggs in captivity.

Food:

Its diet includes fruit of Ficus, Croton, Leandra, Myrtus and Miconia.

Distribution and status:

Extensión de su área de distribución (reproductores / residentes): 18.400 km2

Confined south of Costa Rica and western Panama.

The species is found in the highlands of the southern half of Costa Rica, including the slopes of Caribbean, the mountains of the central plateau south and the two sides of the Cordillera de Talamanca, sometimes the region Cartago and Paradise and the Irazu volcano.

In western Panama They are mainly distributed in the west and center Chiriquí and areas adjacent in Bull's mouths, in the highest mountains (including the Chiriqui volcano and the high ridges on Boquette) and at lower elevations around, for example, of the Chiriqui Lagoon and Admiral Bay.

The easternmost Panamanian registry was found east of the central mountain range in 1868.

Some altitudinal movements (higher in the dry season). Birds are perhaps only sporadic in the extremities of their range. Apparently, It is common in middle to high elevations Cordillera de Talamanca and in isolated areas, and it is believed to be quite numerous throughout the main range.

Its Habitat It is now highly fragmented, though still apparently numerous, even in areas where the forest is partly cloudy. Rare in captivity.

Distribution of subspecies:
  • Pyrrhura hoffmanni gaudens

    (Bangs, 1906) – West of Panama and Caribbean slope of Bull's mouths.

  • Pyrrhura hoffmanni hoffmanni

    (Cabanis, 1861) – Nominal. South of Costa Rica.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

• Population size : Unknown.

Justification of the red list category

Although this species may have a small range, it is not believed that approximates the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criteria of size range (Extension <20,000 km2 combinada con un tamaño de rango decreciente o fluctuante, extensión / calidad del hábitat o tamaño de la población y un pequeño número de lugares o fragmentación severa). La trend of the population It appears to be stable, so that the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criteria of population trend (> 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size It has not been quantified, but it is not believed to be close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un declive continuo estimado> 10% in ten years or three generations or a population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Justification of the population

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

They suspected that the population of Catana Cotorra is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

In captivity:

Rare in captivity. Quieter than other parakeets. In Panama the export of these birds is prohibited from 1980.

Alternative names:


- Hoffmann's Conure, Hoffmann's Parakeet, Hoffman's Conure, Hofman's Conure, Sulfur-winged Parakeet, Sulphur winged Parakeet, Sulphur-winged Conure, Sulphur-winged Parakeet (inglés).
- Conure de Hoffmann, Perriche de Hoffmann, Perruche de Hoffmann (francés).
- Hoffmann Sittich, Hoffmannsittich, Hoffmann-Sittich (alemán).
- Tiriba-de-asa-amarelada (portugués).
- Cotorra Catana, Perico aliazufrado, Perico de Hofman (español).
- Perico aliazufrado (Costa Rica).

Jean Louis Cabanis

Jean Louis Cabanis

Scientific classification:


Su nombre hace referencia al naturalista alemán Karl Hoffman.

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Pyrrhura
- Nombre científico: Pyrrhura hoffmanni
- Citation: (Cabanis, 1861)
- Protónimo: Conurus hoffmanni

Sulphur-winged Parakeet Images:

————————————————————————————————

Sulphur-winged Parakeet (Pyrrhura hoffmanni)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Sulphur-winged Parakeet (Pyrrhura hoffmanni). Photographed at Savegre, in Costa Rica By Dominic Sherony [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Parakeet HOFFMAN (Pyrrhura hoffmanni) Loro Parque, Tenerife by ZOOTOGRAFIANDO
(3) – A Sulphur-winged Parakeet at Savegre, Costa Rica By Dominic Sherony [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Sulphur-winged Parakeet (Pyrrhura hoffmanni) at Savegre Lodge, near San Gerardo, Costa Rica By Michael Woodruff [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Sulphur-winged Parakeet or Hoffmann’s Conure (Pyrrhura hoffmanni) by elite-pets
(6) – Conurus hoffmanni = Pyrrhura hoffmanni by Joseph Smit [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Mike Nelson, XC107214. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/107214

Filed under: Birds, Birds, C, QRST | No comments »
Posted by pets | 21 July 2017

Red-crowned Parakeet

Red-crowned Parakeet

Red-crowned Parakeet


Description:

22 cm.. in length and a weight ranging from 54 and 70 g..

The Red-crowned Parakeet (Pyrrhura roseifrons) has the head pinkish red. The neck and the area of ​​the upper breast They are dark with whitish scales. The bill is black. The tail and the central area of belly They are red. The tip of his tail It is dark red. The wings they are blue. Orbital ring dark gray bordered by a yellowish white. the legs are grey.

The immature It has reddish forehead and dark tones in the rest of the head. The pinkish red head in adults it is distinctive. Losl youth They may resemble subspecies Pyrrhura roseifrons peruviana or the Deville's Parakeet (Pyrrhura lucianii), but it lacks of the ear-coverts pale.

  • Sound of the Red-crowned Parakeet.

Description 4 subspecies
Habitat:

He lives mostly in small groups of a dozen members and remains in partner during the period breeding. They lead a life Nomad, little little is known about the behavior of this species in the wild.

Reproduction:

build their nest in tree cavities. The laying is of 5 to 7 eggs incubated by both parents for 26 days (captive breeding data). Offspring remain in the nest 2 months, becoming independent at the age of 3 months.

Food:

It feeds on fruits, seeds, leaves and flowers.

Distribution:

Tamaño de su área de distribución (reproducción / residentes): 1.000.000 km2

It is located in the west of the Amazon, from the state Amazon about the Juruá, in Brazil, and the lowlands of eastern Peru in the North of Bolivia. In Brazil, They spread south and west of habitat Deville's Parakeet (Pyrrhura lucianii)

Distribution 4 subspecies
Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

• Population size : Unknown.

Justification of the Red List Category

This species has a very large range, and therefore does not approach the thresholds for vulnerable under the range size criterion (extent of occurrence <20.000 km2 combinan con un tamaño gama disminución o fluctuante, hábitat medida / calidad, o de la población tamaño y un pequeño número de localidades o fragmentación severa). A pesar de que la tendencia de la población parece estar disminuyendo, el descenso no se cree que es suficientemente rápido como para acercarse a los umbrales para Vulnerables según el criterio tendencia de la población (> 30% decrease of more than ten years or three generations). The population size It has not been quantified, but it is not believed to be reason to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con una disminución continua estima en> 10% in ten years or three generations, or a specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification of the population

Recent world population is unknown given taxonomic divisions.

Justification trend

This species is suspected that there may be lost 7,0-7,3% of habitat within its distribution over three generations (18 years) based on a model of deforestation of the Amazon (Soares-Filho et to the. 2006, Bird et to the. 2011). Given the susceptibility of this species to hunting and / or entrapment, it is suspected that its population can decrease <25% en tres generaciones.

In captivity:

little presence in captivity and found only in some aviaries, where however they reproduce very well. After acclimation is a strong bird that can live outdoors. It is a bird suspicious although curious and playful nature, especially if they feel safe. Young birds in captivity quickly lose their fear and are very attached to their caregivers. It´s noisy, especially in the morning and sleeps in the nest. The female is very aggressive during the breeding period with other other birds.

Alternative names:

-
Red-crowned Parakeet, Rose-fronted Parakeet, Rose-fronted Parakeet (Rose-fronted) (inglés).
- Conure à calotte rouge, Conure rougissante (francés).
- Rotscheitelsittich (alemán).
- Tiriba-de-cabeça-vermelha (portugués).
- Cotorra frentirrosa, Perico de Frente Rosada (español).

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Pyrrhura
- Nombre científico: Pyrrhura roseifrons
- Citation: (Gray, GR, 1859)
- Protónimo: Conurus roseifrons

Images Red-crowned Parakeet:

————————————————————————————————

Red-crowned Parakeet (Pyrrhura roseifrons)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Painted Parakeet (Pyrrhura picta) – the subspecies on this photo, roseifrons, is now often considered a separate species, the Rose-fronted Parakeet (Pyrrhura roseifrons) By http://www.birdphotos.com (http://www.birdphotos.com) [CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Micah Riegner, XC208597. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/208597

Filed under: Birds, Birds, C, QRST | No comments »
Page 1 of 15512345...102030...Última »
Print Friendly, PDF & Email



Anatomy of the Psitacidae


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Especies del género Pyrrhura

raton

Use of cookies

This web site uses cookies so that you have the best user experience. If you continue browsing you are giving your consent for the acceptance of the aforementioned cookies and the acceptance of our cookies policy, Click the link for more information.plugin cookies

TO ACCEPT
Notice of cookies
WordPress lightbox