Rusty-faced Parrot
Hapalopsittaca amazonina

Rusty-faced Parrot

Description:

23 cm.. height and a weight between 97 and 115g.

The Rusty-faced Parrot or Parrot mountain (Hapalopsittaca amazonina) It is distinguishable by the dirty red of his face and crown. Its bill is pale with to the base of the lower mandible and the chin of color red orange. Headphones coverts reddish brown with yellow lines that extend behind the nape and the neck. The rest of upperparts they are green. Its chest This is olive green, with red spots in the shoulders similar to their Wing coverts internal minors. The rest of your wing-coverts they are blue-green and the remiges bluish-black. Its tail It is mainly dull red with wide blue apexes.

It has no sexual dimorphism. The youth are green-yellow color, with the face pale red and the secondaries grey.

Description 3 subspecies:

  • Hapalopsittaca amazonina amazonina

    (Des Murs, 1845) – Nominal.

  • Hapalopsittaca amazonina theresae

    (Hellmayr, 1915) – The plumage with more olive tones and the face dark red.

  • Hapalopsittaca amazonina velezi

    (Serious,GR & Restrepo, 1989) – With part of the crown and nape, brighter yellowish green; forecrown red; list fine near to the ear; below and behind the eye, green. More information.

Habitat:

It inhabits in mountains with forests semi-moist and cloud, between the 2000 to 3600 m, with the presence of Oak (Quercus humboldtii) and Alder (Alnus acuminata).
Fly high in the forest canopy, in groups of 5-30 individuals. Presents aggregation behaviors for the night, establishing communal bedrooms in groups of between 2-35 individuals.

Reproduction:

Are unknown, many aspects of the reproductive biology of the Rusty-faced Parrot. Probably nests in tree hollows of Oak dead.

Food:

Consumes fruits of the “matapalo“, flowers and seeds, including the of Clusia sp. and some GUIs of which is fed with high frequency.

Distribution:

Tamaño del área de distribución reproducción/residente): 234.000 km2

Is located in Colombia and Venezuela and Peru. In Colombia lives between 2000 and 2700 m above the sea level in the Cordillera Oriental and in the The upper Magdalena valley (South of the Department of the Huila). Between 3100 and 3600 m of height in the Cordillera Central in Caldas (where it is considered Bird emblem), in the basin of the Rio Blanco in the municipality of Manizales. In the Cordillera Oriental is known only in Norte de Santander and the southwest of Bogotá. Has also been recorded in the departments of Risaralda, Tolima, Huila (Cueva de los Guácharos, Meremberg nature reserve) and Cauca (Puracé National Park).

Distribution 3 subspecies:

  • Hapalopsittaca amazonina amazonina

    (Des Murs, 1845) – Nominal. East of the Colombian Andes.

  • Hapalopsittaca amazonina theresae

    (Hellmayr, 1915) – Eastern edge of the Andes of Colombia and Northwest of Venezuela.

  • Hapalopsittaca amazonina velezi

    (Serious,GR & Restrepo, 1989) – Center of the Colombian Andes. More information.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Vulnerable.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

From makes several years appears in the book red of species threatened by fault of the destruction of their habitat, including, the Palm of wax (Ceroxylon quindiuense).

Justification of the red list category

This species is classified as Vulnerable Since its small population consists of subpopulations very small and scattered that probably will be experiencing declines continuous due to the loss widespread of habitat.

Justification of the population

Renjifo et to the. (2002) estimated that in Colombia the population can count 2,500-10,000 individuals, based on a hypothetical C.1 density of individuals / km2, and the 25% occupation of the approximately 13.890 km2 of habitat suitable. This may be an overestimation and the population could be at the turn of a few thousand mark in Colombia (P. Salaman in litt., 2005). There are also much smaller populations in Venezuela. Its location in the Ecuador is uncertain. Be placed better in the band 2.500-9.999 mature in general individuals, which is equivalent to 3.750-14.999 individuals, round here 3.500-15.000 individuals.

Justification of trend

Se sospecha una lenta y continua disminución de la población del Rusty-faced Parrot sobre la base de la continua destrucción y fragmentación del hábitat.

Lorito Amazonino en cautividad:

No encontrado en avicultura.

Alternative names:

Rusty-faced Parrot, Bogota Parrot, Little Amazonian Parrot, Rusty faced Parrot (English).
Caïque à face rousse, Caïque à face rouge (French).
Caïque à face rousse (German).
Rusty-faced Parrot (Portuguese).
Cotorra Montañera, Lorito Amazonino, Lorito Multicolor, Loro fantasma (Spanish).
Cotorra Montañera, Lora montañera (Colombia).
Perico Multicolor (Venezuela).

Marc Athanase Parfait Oeillet Des Murs
Marc Athanase Parfait Oeillet Des Murs

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Hapalopsittaca
Scientific name: Hapalopsittaca amazonina
Citation: (Des Murs, 1845)
Protonimo: Psittacus amazoninus

Rusty-faced Parrot Images:


Rusty-faced Parrot (Hapalopsittaca amazonina)

Sources:

Avibase
Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Iconographie ornithologique By Marc Athanase Parfait Œillet Des Murs (1804-1878) (Iconographie ornithologique) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds:

Restrepo, Daniel Uribe

* – Restrepo, Daniel Uribe

Daniel has been chasing birds since he was 9-years old, growing on a farm in the Central Andes of Colombia, with his bedroom walls covered with colorful prints of John James Audubon’s birds. Daniel graduated in Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science and has pursued bird and nature photography as his main passions in life.

He is co-founder of the Sociedad Caldense de Ornitología (SCO) based in Manizales. Dedicated mainly to conservation and sustainable development projects, Daniel has consulted for many of the most prominent environmental organizations in Colombia and currently assists private nature reserves in Colombia in the establishment of agritourism and ecotourism services.

Coconut Lorikeet
Trichoglossus haematodus

Coconut Lorikeet

Description:

26 cm.. of length and weight 100-157 g.

The Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) are colourful birds that find us almost all the colours of the Rainbow in their plumage.

Have the front of the crown, face and throat Dark bluish mauve, with violet stripes on the front of the crown, ear-coverts and part low of them cheeks; the rest of the head is dark blue with the bases of feathers brown-black color, especially around the rear of the crown and throat, and with greenish stripes at the rear of the crown.

The upperparts are of color green brilliant with specks of color reddish in the center of the the mantle (bases of feathers), and collar back brighter yellowish green.

The primaries with the tips blackish; a patch bright yellow in the innerwebs of the flight feather, that tends to orange in the secondaries; outerweb of the primaries and under wing-coverts, green. Underwing-coverts orange-red; the flight feather dark gray in tips.

The Breast , the upper part of the abdomen and flanks bright reddish orange top, barred dark blue, tending to green at the bottom of the chest; abdomen with brands of color green in the Center, sometimes forming a discrete patch or interspersed with reddish orange; abdomen and the thighs with a beaming green and yellow with bases of color yellow; undertail-coverts of color yellow with tips of color green glossy. Upper, the tail of color green with them innerwebs of the lateral feathers yellowish: undertail, the tail greyish green in the outerweb, yellow in the innerwebs.

The bill orange red: the irises orange-red; legs gray or greenish gray.

Both sexes are very similar.

The immature they are more muted than adults, with the bill and the irises Dark Brown and the tail more pointed.

  • Sound of the Coconut Lorikeet.

Description of subspecies of Trichoglossus haematodus
  • Trichoglossus haematodus caeruleiceps

    (Albertis & Salvadori, 1879) – The blue of the head is more pale, Red is orange-red with the lined in very narrow and dark blue. Abdomen Blackish and band of the neck yellow.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus deplanchii

    (Verreaux,J & Des Murs, 1860) – 26 cm.. of length and a weight of 140 gr.

    The Coconut Lorikeet (deplanchii) (Trichoglossus haematodus deplanchii) is a variation of the nominal (Trichoglossus Haematodus)

    Similar to the nominal Haematodus, but plumage slightly paler. The head has a very bright blue. Reddish orange on the chest, similar to the Trichoglossus haematodus massena, only that more alive. The abdomen is of color green beige and is extends to the part back from the neck. The the thighs and the feathers under the tail yellow and the upper part of the tail olive green.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus flavicans

    (Cabanis & Reichenow, 1876) – Something bigger, 27 cm approximately in length. Its plumage varies from green to olive green and yellow opaque. Breast and neck reddish colour with fine dark edges. Front and contour of eyes violet blue.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus haematodus

    (Linnaeus, 1771) – The nominal

  • Trichoglossus haematodus intermedius

    (Rothschild & Hartert, 1901) – 26 cm approximately in length. The blue of the head extends slightly less. The neck is yellow and the abdomen dark green.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus massena

    (Bonaparte, 1854) – 25 cm.. length.

    The Coconut Lorikeet (massena) (Trichoglossus haematodus massena) is a variation of the nominal (Trichoglossus Haematodus).

    The plumage is similar to the of the Ornate Lory except that it is usually paler. The head is blue, ending at the nape with dark brown feathers interspersed with more Brown clear. The chest is of color reddish with a narrow edging blue dark. In some cases, You can see some areas yellow in the plumage of the chest. The abdomen is green; but can have some type of mark in the part inferior of the abdomen blue-violet.

    The eyes are of color orange in the adult and Brown in the youth. The bill is red orange.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus micropteryx

    (Stresemann, 1922) – Somewhat smaller, 25 cm approximately in length. The plumage is something more pale, the chest reddish orange with narrow edging of dark blue. Abdomen dark green. Band of the neck greenish yellow.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus nesophilus

    (Neumann, 1929) – 26 cm approximately. Very similar to the Trichoglossus Haematodus Flavicans but with feathers underneath of the tail are green.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus nigrogularis

    (Gray,GR, 1858) – Something bigger, 28 cm., approximately, length. Is similar to the Trichoglossus Haematodus Caeruliceps, but the blue of the head It is more dark and often have more red feathers on the neck.

Habitat:

The Coconut Lorikeet they are parrots of the Plains and Highlands. They are distributed by a wide variety of habitats such as mangrove forests, Moors and heathland near the coast, wooded meadows, galleries of trees, reforestation during regeneration and rainforests.
In all cases, they need places with abundant flowers.

The Coconut Lorikeet they have also colonized habitats formed by man: coconut plantations, orchards and gardens on the outskirts of cities. They mark a greater preference for edges and clearings inside the dense jungles. Gladly tolerate the areas with degraded vegetation and plantations of small size in the small atolls.

They are birds sedentary, that does not prevent to do short trips looking for trees in flower. Because of these movements, populations appear to vary locally. Very gregarious, they live in pairs or in bands that can vary from a few birds to several hundred, Depending on the availability of food resources.

These birds are very active and noisy, flying a bit randomly above the tops of the trees or climbing up the branches in search of flowers or fruits.

During his search for food, the Coconut Lorikeet they often share space with other species of frugivorous.
When they are hidden among the leaves, their cries of call reveal their presence.

They adopt a flight very quick and direct.
Are monogamous. During courtship, the couple is side-by-side, swaying, the neck forward and the pupil dilated. They wave irregularly wings to reveal the clear band that crosses its sub-wing.

Reproduction:

The breeding season carried out at different times according to the area of distribution.
The species nominal eat your laying between September and December. Both members of the couple set up their nests in a tree cavity, usually a eucalyptus. Several nests, two or three may be in the same tree, but the entrance of the nest will fiercely defend against any intrusion.

In the the Admiralty Islands, the Coconut Lorikeet Sometimes they nest in the ground. The female normally lays 2 eggs on a bed of wood rotting chips. She incubated alone for a few 25 days.

The young chicks are altricial and need to 8 weeks to fend for if same. As soon as they are autonomous, they bind to the bedrooms and common bands.

Food:

The Coconut Lorikeet they have a bill acute equipped with a language composed of some structures similar to hairs tiny called papilla it help excavate the pollen and the nectar from the flowers.
Also eat fruits, berries, seeds, outbreaks and insect larvae.

In Australia, they forage primarily in eucalyptus trees and trees of the genus Banksia, in particular, coastal Banksia (Banksia integrifolia) and River Banksia (seminuda), trees that often exceed the 15 metres in height.
They are also found in farmland, since they are particularly cultivated fruits and seeds Milky enthusiasts.
Easily entering gardens to steal fruit and not disdain approaching feeders

Distribution:

Size of its range (breeding/resident ): 5,310,000km 2

Endemics Oceania, at the edge of the Asian continent.
Can be found in Australia, in the East of Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, New Caledonia, the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu.

In Australia, they are mostly on the coast, to the North of Queensland in the South of Australia and Tasmania.

Distribution of subspecies Trichoglossus haematodus

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

The species has undergone intense trade: from 1981 When it began trading in CITES Appendix II and through the year 2005, 100.388 individuals were captured in the wild and reported in the international trade.

In some places of Australia, It is hunted for food and feathers are later used in ritual ceremonies

Lori de cocotero en cautividad:

I recommend to read first hand information:

KNOWING THE Coconut Lorikeet

Alternative names:

Coconut Lorikeet, Rainbow Lorikeet (Coconut) (English).
Loriquet à tête bleue (French).
Allfarblori (German).
Lóris-arco-íris (Portuguese).
Lori Arcoiris, Lori de cocotero, Tricogloso de Pecho Rojo (Spanish).

Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Trichoglossus haematodus
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1771)
Protonimo: Psittacus haematod . [sic]

Coconut Lorikeet images:


Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)

    Sources:

    Avibase
    – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    – Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    Birdlife
    Oiseaux.NET

    Photos:

    (1) – Rainbow Lorikeet perching on a wooden post at Tanganyika Wildlife Park, Kansas, USA. by Snowmanradio- Wikipedia
    (2) -To Green-naped Lorikeet, T. h. haematodus, a sub-species of Rainbow Lorikeet, Trichoglossus haematodus at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore. by Benjamint444- Wikipedia
    (3) -A Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus moluccanus) in Melbourne, Australia. by Alfred- Wikimedia
    (4) -Lorikeets feeding on the flowering tree, Corymbia ' Summer Beauty ' (cultivar). Photographed in suburban Brisbane, Australia. by Tatiana Gerus- Wikimedia
    (5) -Two birds preening each other. Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Australia by Arnie Hollyman- IBC.lynxeds.com

    Sounds: Patrik Aberg, XC215305. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/215305

Blue-rumped Parrot
Psittinus cyanurus


Lorito Dorsiazul

Description:

Of 18 cm.. of length and a weight of 85 g..

Ilustración Lorito Dorsiazul

The Blue-rumped Parrot (Psittinus cyanurus) is a small Parrot, robust and with a tail very short.

Since the crown up to the nape is a bluish grey, glossy on the front of the crown; the lower cheeks and chin grayish brown; the nape sharply demarcated from the the mantle black, with a strongly mottled grey; the low back and rump Blue light violet, brighter than the blue of the head. The patch in the shoulders reddish brown; upperwing-coverts medium Green, the edges of yellowish-green, especially in internal and great stockings coverts; primary coverts blue; flight feather green, with the primaries finely lined with yellow along the inner edges; carpal edge Blue and yellow. Lower parts of the wings Dark, with bright red feathers on the underwing-coverts and axillary.

Underparts grayish brown, becoming a blue-green shutdown, with yellow marks in the vent. Uppertail greenish blue in the Center, inner featherss of yellow light with vane outer greener; undertail-coverts yellow

A long bill with red notches in the upper mandible, lower mandible duller; irises yellowish white; legs bluish grey.

The female has the head and upper mandible brown; lacks black on the back and shows just a little blue in the rump; the underparts are light green, Gray as in the male Brown not.

The youth are like females, but with the head green.

Subspecies description:
Subspecies
  • Psittinus cyanurus abbotti

    (Richmond, 1902) – Males with green spread at the front of the crown, the back of neck black, Green mantle and the rump green (marked with turquoise), the underparts greenish. Female with the head green. Larger than the subspecies Psittinus cyanurus pontius.

  • Psittinus cyanurus cyanurus

    (Forster,JR, 1795) – The species nominal

  • Psittinus cyanurus pontius

    (Oberholser, 1912) – As well as the species nominal but larger.

Habitat:

There is some evidence of possible regular movements in the North of its distribution area, with a view to passing birds above Fraser Hill in Malaysia, 1,300 m.

The Blue-rumped Parrot is also seasonal in parts of the South visitor of Burma.

They are distributed in lowland forests (usually below 700 m) and related habitats, including open forests, secondary growth, huertas, mangroves, dry forests, swamp forest, cultivated areas, including oil palm plantations (Elaeis guineensis), near forests (where are the post-cria concentrations considered pests in some areas), dense thickets and groves of coconut (Cocos nucifera).

The Blue-rumped Parrot they are not shy, and can be found in groups of up to 20 birds, whether eating in silence at the canopy level, quickly flying above the forest, or above the tops of the trees hacuendo calls continuously.

Reproduction:

The breeding season of the Blue-rumped Parrot extends from February to may in Malaysia, and from June to September in Borneo, Although some birds have been seen inspecting possible nesting cavities at other times of the year.

During the courtship the grooming each other is common; the male jumps by placing both feet on the back of the female during mating. The implementation is up to three eggs, which are deposited in a hole in the top of a tree, little more is known about the reproductive cycle.

Food:

The diet of the Blue-rumped Parrot is composed of seeds, fruits and flowers.

Distribution:

Its distribution ranges from around the 11° N in Peninsular Thailand and South of Tenasserim, Burma, through the peninsula of Malaysia, Singapore, Sumatra and Borneo (Kalimantan, Sarawak, Sabah and Brunei). Also found in the Riau (including Bintan) and groups of Lingga Islands to the North of the South of Sumatra, in BANGKA, and, in West Sumatra, in Simeulue and the Group Mentawai including Siberut, Sipura, Pagai Utara and Pagai Selatan.

It is only locally common and less abundant than other sympatric species of Psittaculas in most of its range.

Distribution of subspecies:
Subspecies

Conservation:

• Current red list of UICN: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the world population Blue-rumped Parrot He has not formally quantified, but it is believed that they are more than 100.000 individuals (Juniper and Parr 1998), and the species is described as common in primary habitats and rare in secondary habitats and plantings (pit et to the. 1997).

In general, the loss of the forest cover between 2000 and 2010 It has been estimated in 23,7% in the case of Sumatra, the 12,0% in Borneo and the 8,2% for Peninsular Malaysia (Miettinen et to the. 2011).

In Sumatra, It has been estimated that you close to of the 36% primary forest cover in 1990, lost in 2010 (including degraded primary forest) (Margono et to the. 2012).

Descents are compounded by the pressure of the capture; However, the Blue-rumped Parrot uses of forest fragments, forest exploitation, secondary vegetation, other modified habitats and habitats at elevations, What has prevented a faster decrease in its population. However, many lowland forests have been logged.. Therefore, suspected of may be suffering a decrease in the moderately rapid population.

Conservation Actions Underway:

Lorito Dorsiazul in captivity:

Pretty rare in captivity.

The Blue-rumped Parrot It is not a bird which like to interact with humans, nor is it a particularly playful bird. Are described as docile I love to sing in rainy days. Due to its melodic voice, they are often alone as songbirds. However, not all of them are born as birds cantadoras, in fact, Some are dumb.

It is recommended to buy the younger, since they are more likely to sing. However, in general it's parrots very quiet with occasional whistles and high-pitched vocation, that it can be irritating when held captive in an apartment.

They have very limited ability to speak. Some of them learn to speak – but most never make it.

Unfortunately, they are easy to catch, since they remain immobile when frightened. Hunters have only to shoot into the air or make some noise on turning the birds when they are resting so that they can be easily caught. This has led to its State endangered extincion ..

With regard to its longevity, According to sources, a Lorito Dorsiazul was still alive after 10,2 years in captivity. Taking into account the longevity of the similar species, maximum longevity is probably underestimated in this species.

The Blue-rumped Parrot It is a beautiful bird when it is in its natural habitat, its potential as a pet it is said that it is limited. Usually do better in an environment of Aviary, with plenty of space so that you can explore the surrounding area. It is even better protect their natural habitat and let them enjoy freedom.

Alternative names:

Blue-rumped Parrot, Blue rumped Parrot (English).
Perruche à croupion bleu, Perroquet à croupion bleu (French).
Rotachselpapagei, Rotachsel-Papagei (German).
Papagaio-de-rabadilha-azul (Portuguese).
Lorito de Lomo Azul, Lorito Dorsiazul (Spanish).

Johann Reinhold Forster
Johann Reinhold Forster

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Psittinus
Scientific name: Psittinus cyanurus
Citation: (Forster, JR, 1795)
Protonimo: Psittacus cyanurus

Blue-rumped Parrot images:


Blue-rumped Parrot (Psittinus cyanurus)

Sources:

Avibase
Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Blue-rumped Parrot Psittinus cyanurus. Bird Park Kuala Lumpur by Bernard DUPONT – Flickr
(2) – Bird Park Kuala Lumpur By Bernard DUPONT from FRANCE (Blue-rumped Parrots Psittinus cyanurus) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Blue-rumped Parrot in a cage By TJ Lin (originally posted to Flickr as DSC01255) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Male blue-rumped parrot (Psittinus cyanurus) by Chlidonias – zoochat
(5) – Female blue-rumped parrot (Psittinus cyanurus) by Chlidonias – zoochat
(6) – Psittacus Malaccensis. (Latham, not Gmellin) Blue-rumped Parrot By William Swainson, F.R.S., F.L.S. (Zoological Illustrations, Volume III.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Martjan Lammertink (Xeno-canto)

Senegal Parrot
Poicephalus senegalus


Lorito Senegalés

Description:

Of 25 cm.. length and a weight between 130 and 150 g..

Lorito Senegalés

The Senegal Parrot (Poicephalus senegalus) has the forecrown, crown, lores and nape dark slate gray; clear the chin and cheeks; ear-coverts Silver. Mantle, scapulars and back bright green; rump and uppertail-coverts lighter with yellowish tint. Upper, the wing-coverts bright green ; secondaries and primaries of color Brown dark with edges green to them vane outer. Under, the wing-coverts Yellow. Throat grey, merging with the chest green (green lighter on the upper parts); low area chest and belly bright yellow with orange dye plant; the thighs green, undertail- coverts bright yellow. Tail greenish brown.

Bill grey: irises yellow with bare periophthalmic black; Chere blackish: Legs dark brown.

Sexes similar in plumage.

Immature generally paler than the adult with the head in brown tone off, has the ear-coverts Silver; sometimes extends the green on the bottoms shaped yellow patches on the flanks. Iris dark brown.

  • Sound of the Senegal Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lorito Senegales.mp3]

Subspecies description:

  • Poicephalus senegalus mesotypus (Reichenow, 1910) – Similar to the species nominal, but with the green plumage paler and green color chest It is extending into the abdomen, the abdomen It is orange.
  • Poicephalus senegalus senegalus (Linnaeus, 1766) – The nominal species
  • Poicephalus senegalus versteri (Finsch, 1863) – Similar to the species nominal but the green color the mantle and wings is darker; the lower regions of chest and the abdomen are yellow orange to red in the middle of the abdomen.

Habitat:

The Senegal Parrot They are found in a variety of forest habitats ranging from open field with scattered and palm trees to the dense forests closed.

Its optimal habitat It seems to be the forest savannah, relatively open, with numerous Adansonias typed or Parkia filicoidea.

In Ghana river seen in forests and swamps.

They are probably just below 1.000 meters above sea level.

Gregarious, at least outside the breeding period.

Usually they are seen in couples or groups of up to 20 birds, Larger groups can meet locally to exploit abundant food areas.

They perform diurnal movements and of longer duration in relation to the food supply;. As a result, of the pobalación Senegal Parrot fluctuates widely in parts.

Reproduction:

The Senegal Parrot usually they build a nest in the cavity of a tree branch (of Adansonia or Parkia), at a height of 10 m, sometimes more.

The breeding season It seems to vary depending on location. In wetter areas, the breeding season can be extended. In the region of Gambia and the rio Senegal, they have been egg production in the months of April, may, August and september, also from November to February. In drier areas (as Mali) the éopca breeding is probably limited by the rainy season (May to October).

They put of 2 to 4 eggs on alternate days and the period of incubation is of 25 to 28 days, female being fed by the male until hatching. The juveniles to leave the nest 9 weeks of age.

Food:

The diet of the Senegal Parrot It is composed of a variety of fruits, seeds and sprouts leaves.

Registered foods include fruits and seeds Khaya senegalensis, Pterocarpus erinaceus, Ficus, Parkia, Sclerocarya birrea, Butyrospermum Parkt, Vitex cienkowskii, Adansonia, Ximena American and Acacia white. Also feed on of cultivated plants, including millet and peanuts.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 3.590.000 km2

The Senegal Parrot they are endemic in West Africa. From Guinea (including the The islands), Senegal, Gambia, South of Mauritania and South of Mali through forest-savanna mosaic of Ivory Coast. Burkina Faso, South of Niger, Ghana (also on the coast). Benin and Togo until Nigeria, Cameroon and Southwest Chad.

Partially sedentary but seasonal visitors in some areas (especially further north), for example, some birds move south on the Niger River in Mali with the beginning of the drier periods. In the rainy season visitantan Southern Mauritania and some movements Nigeria, with the driest north unemployed, outside wet season.

Distribution of subspecies:

  • Poicephalus senegalus mesotypus (Reichenow, 1910) – East and Northeast Nigeria, South of Niger, North of Cameroon, southwest end Chad and possibly the extreme northwest Central African Republic.
  • Poicephalus senegalus senegalus (Linnaeus, 1766) – The nominal species
  • Poicephalus senegalus versteri (Finsch, 1863) – Ivory Coast and this from Ghana through Togo and Benin to western Nigeria, North of llorin, Zaria

Conservation:

• Current red list of UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The size of the world population Senegal Parrot It has not been quantified, but the species, According to sources, It is often abundant (pit et to the. 1997).

The population is suspected to be stable and may even benefit from the widespread loss of closed canopy forests in the West Africa.

This species has been heavily traded: 1994-2003, more than 410,000 wild individuals were exported from the range States (Trade Database, in October of 2005 UNEP-WCMC CITES). It is one of the most popular pet birds, since it is regarded as a quiet little bird in captivity. Due to the large amount of this kind traded, It was the subject of a review of significant trade of the CITES, in which was listed as “possible concern” (Inskipp et al. 1988). However, despite international exports of a large number of birds, trade seems to have not seriously affected this species in general, without significant decreases in reported national population.

EXPORTS:

    Guinea exported in the dates between 1994 and 2003 a few 164.817 specimens.
    Mali exported in the dates between 1994 and 2003 a few 60.742 specimens.
    Senegal exported in the dates between 1994 and 2003 a few 173.794 specimens.
    Liberia not considered diffusion area, however it is known that among 1999 and 2003 some were exported 4.860 specimens, so you become the fourth country with more exports of Africa.

Lorito Senegalés en cautividad:

The Senegal Parrot It, After the Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus), African parrot most traded and raised in captivity. You might say whole sentences and whistle songs. Thanks to its size it is considered a quiet pet and very manageable when it's raised hand (papillero). They are not noisy and create a bond with the family members.

Import adult birds always displayed even when reserved spend time with their caregiver / a. Young, on the other hand, They are docile and affectionate, and then adapt to the people.

With regard to its longevity, According to sources, a specimen lived 40 years in captivity.

Alternative names:

Senegal Parrot, Yellow-bellied Parrot (English).
Perroquet youyou, Youyou, Youyou du Sénégal (French).
Mohrenkopf (German).
Periquito-massarongo (Portuguese).
Lorito del Senegal, Lorito Senegalés, You-You (Spanish).

Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Poicephalus
Scientific name: Poicephalus senegalus
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1766)
Protonimo: Psittacus senegalus

Senegal Parrot Images:

————————————————————————————————

Senegal Parrot (Poicephalus senegalus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
Wikipedia

Photos:

(1) – An adult Senegal Parrot at Artis Zoo, Amsterdam, Netherlands. The extent of yellow tends to indicate that it is probably a male By Arjan Haverkamp [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – An adult Senegal Parrot in Maspalomas, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, By Juan Emilio Spain from Las Palmas, Spain [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Poicephalus senegalus senegalus, the Senegal Parrot By Charlesjsharp (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – A pair of Senegal Parrots in a tree. One parrot (probably the male) is feeding the other (probably the female). Thomas J. Haslam, http://www.flickr.com/photos/tjhaslam/ On 24 February 2007, I took the photos for this montage at the birding site Technopole in Dakar, Senegal. Licensed to Wikipedia under CC-BY 2.5 and GFDL. Published to my Flickr account under the same license.
(5) – A juvenile Senegal Parrot By Brian Holsclaw (originally posted to Flickr as IMG_2807) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Bram Piot (Xeno-canto)

Red-bellied Parrot
Poicephalus rufiventris


Lorito Ventrirrojo

Description:

22 cm.. length and an average weight of 130 g..

The Red-bellied Parrot (Poicephalus rufiventris) has the crown, nape and lores brown ash, the cheeks sometimes with orange tips; ear-coverts slightly paler. Mantle and scapulars brown ash; the back blue-black; rump iridescent pale blue or bluish green. Upper, the wings slightly darker than the head and back: the primaries brown. Under, the feathers of orange wings; underside of feathers Light brown flight. Throat and the chest ash brown with orange tint; top of the chest orange; belly up to undertail- coverts pale green sometimes shows Orange-tinged feathers. Tail dark brown ash.

Bill, cere and orbital skin black; irises orange-red; legs black.

The female You have the upper chest grey, the pale green underside sometimes dyed orange. The head paler and grayer than male. Feathers of the wings greyish.

Immature, generally, similar to females, but the young males have orange feathers Wings below and can show brown marks on the chest.

Description 2 subspecies:

  • Poicephalus rufiventris pallidus

    (Someren, 1922) – head of color Brown and throat clearer than the one of the species nominal..

  • Poicephalus rufiventris rufiventris

    (Ruppell, 1842) – The species nominal.

Habitat:

Usually associated with semiarid vegetation, including areas of dry scrub and forest steppe Acacia Commiphora. It tends to avoid the dense foliage and, often it perches on dead branches.

In the south of the range, He prefers savannas Adansonia.

Where it is sympatric with the Meyer's Parrot (West range) the Red-bellied Parrot riparian forests and avoid living in the most open savannas.

In Ethiopia They can be observed in areas of savannah Acacia-Chrysopogon, up to 2,000m. altitude.

In Somalia They are subject to seasonal altitudinal movements in relation to the food supply, moving in altitude of about 2,000m from July to September in search of wild figs Ficus. Otherwise, generally below 1,400m.

Usually, seen in pairs or in family groups 3-4 birds; rarely in larger flocks.

Reproduction:

Nest in cavities within terrestrial termite mounds, between 2 and 3 meters above ground or 10 meters or more, in a dead tree.

The female incubates the eggs while the male goes in search of food, these eggs hatch after a few 28 days and start flying to the 60 days after hatching.

A female It was registered in breeding conditions during the month of March (Tanzania) and feeding immature in July and October. Registered one laying in the months of May and June Ethiopia; In Somalia, between January and May; also recorded half-grown chicks in January. In Somalia in colonial times, with individual couples baobab, between 100 and 200 meters away. The implementation is of 1 to 2 eggs.

Food:

They feed on, besides the figs, seed (including Acacia), fruits of Egyptian balanites, Cordia ovation and Dalbergia melanoxylon, including the maize.

They drink frequently and often they can be found near the water.

Due to the limited food that is in their respective regions, the Red-bellied Parrot They reach the fields and harvest crops eaten, so they are often hunted by farmers.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 1.540.000 km2

Endemic East Africa, from the North-East of Tanzania, eastern and northern Kenya, in the Horn of Africa in the southern and eastern Ethiopia (included Rift Valley) and western and northern zone Somalia.

Generally common within its range. Absent in the coastal lowlands, mainly sedentary with seasonal movements in some areas.

Distribution 2 subspecies:

  • Poicephalus rufiventris pallidus

    (Someren, 1922) – It is found exclusively in eastern Ethiopia.

  • Poicephalus rufiventris rufiventris

    (Ruppell, 1842) – The species nominal.

Conservation:

• Current red list of UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The Red-bellied Parrot It is included in the Appendix II According to CITES (The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) from 1981 and established as a lesser concern in the Red List of Threatened Species of the UICN since the population has fallen by more than 30% in the last 10 years. The Red-bellied Parrot it began exporting significant quantities primarily in Tanzania over the years 80. Years before it began to export to Great Britain in very small quantities.

Lorito Ventrirrojo en cautividad:

In captivity is rare, although Spain Some important breeding centers have managed to bring them up without difficulty. This parrot can be purchased directly from a specialized breeding.

As pet They are very cheerful, Playful, Intelligent and affectionate, a generally peaceful nature.

They are not very noisy. He likes to climb and climb, great need to crack and it is always advisable a regular supply of fresh branches. They like to bathe.

With regard to its longevity, According to sources, a specimen lived 33,4 years in captivity.

Alternative names:

Red-bellied Parrot, African Orange-bellied Parrot, Orange-bellied Parrot, Red bellied Parrot (English).
Perroquet à ventre rouge (French).
Rotbauch-Mohrenkopf (German).
Papagaio-de-ventre-vermelho (Portuguese).
Lorito de Vientre Rojo, Lorito Ventrirrojo, Loro Abisinio (Spanish).

Eduard Rüppell
Eduard Rüppell

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Poicephalus
Scientific name: Poicephalus rufiventris
Citation: (Rüppell, 1842)
Protonimo: Pionus rufiventris

Images Red-bellied Parrot:


Red-bellied Parrot (Poicephalus rufiventris)

Sources:

(1) – Red-bellied Parrot; a male juvenile pet parrot on a wooden perch stretching By Ruth Rogers [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Mature breeding pair of Red-Bellied Parrots (Poicephalus rufiventris) on a perch in a cage. Picture taken by user:Fruitwerks at home By Fruitwerks at English Wikipedia(Original text: User:Fruitwerks on en wiki) (Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – A adult male pet Red-bellied Parrot perching on a bright red perch. Photography: one SB-600, diffused, hand held to the left and below Joey, fired with CLS, on TTL with no Compensation. By Bram Cymet [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Red-bellied Parrot; a juvenile male pet parrot on a wooden perch. Shows back By Ruth Rogers [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A Red-bellied Parrot at San Antonio Zoo, USA. In the male the abdomen is red-orange and in the female the abdomen is green, but the abdomen is not visible making it difficult to sex this parrot from the view shown By Zach Welty (originally posted to Flickr as Parrot 2) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Rueppell's Parrot
Poicephalus rueppellii


Lorito de Rüppell

Description:

22 cm.. length and a weight between 105 and 132 g..

Lorito de Rüppell Ilustración

The Rueppell's Parrot (Poicephalus rueppellii) has the head, generally, dark brown, clearer in the sides of the face with ear-coverts Silver. Nape, the mantle and scapulars brown with slightly paler and rather diffuse silver tips in most feathers (especially in the nape); rump brown with blue wash, occasionally feathers Bright blue. Upper, the under wing-coverts brown. Leading Edge wing , Since the carpal joints at the base of the primaries bright yellow. The primaries and secondaries brown above, paler below. Wing feathers bright yellow.

The underparts, above all, uniformly brown, clearly lighter than the upperparts; the thighs bright yellow; undertail- coverts and posterior flanks with blue wash, sometimes a few feathers with bright blue tips. Tail darker brown than the rest of the plumage.

Bill greyish black; cere black; irises orange-red; perioftalmico ring black ; legs black.

The females They have lower back, rump, uppertail-coverts, lower abdomen, undertail- coverts and the back of the flanks bright blue..

The immature They are similar to females but duller blue and less extensive, lighter brown in the body, the thighs brown. Wing feathers and set carpiano yellowish brown brown; clear margins in the wing-coverts.

  • Sound of the Rueppell's Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lorito de Ruppell.mp3]

Habitat:

They live in forests along water courses dry, dry forests (including forests Euphorbia), dry steppe thorny veld, showing a preference for areas with Adansonia or other tall trees; also in formations Acacia / Commiphora in Escarpment Namibia. Not registered above 1.250 metres in Angola.

Usually they found near water, in small flocks (until 20 birds); sometimes in greater numbers when food is abundant.

Reproduction:

The nest usually it located in the old hole of a carpenter, at a height of up to 5 meters above the ground. It is believed that usually they breed from the months of February to May, but juvenile birds have been observed in September: the breeding It may be more closely linked to precipitation of the season. Of 3 to 5 egg white, rounded form the usual commissioning.

Food:

They feed yolks, outbreaks, nectar, flowers, seeds, guilt, etc… (the endocarpio It is believed to be very important in your diet), of the Acacia karoo, A. erubescens, Prosopis juliflora, Faidherbia whitish, Terminalia prunoides, Combretum beardless, Grewia, Loniceroides, Ficus and melons; insect larvae They have also been registered in your diet.

The Rueppell's Parrot quake, normally, morning and afternoon.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 940.000 km2

Distributed by Southwest Africa, from the southwest of Angola (Luanda) to Damaraland, West of Ovamboland and North of Namaqualand (region Rehoboth), in the North of Namibia.

Some local nomadic movements in relation to the food supply, otherwise residents. Usually they reported as locally common but fluctuations can occur with nomadic movements.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red List: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, although it is estimated below 30.000 individuals.

The species according to information, It quite common within suitable habitat.

The population is suspected of being in decline due to unsustainable levels of exploitation. Also their population numbers are threatened by the cage bird trade – an estimated between 600 and 1000 birds are exported annually to South Africa and Europe, approximately 60-70% of them die during transport.

Lorito de Rüppell en cautividad:

Very rare in captivity.

Take it easy, It is a species in which males seem to speak better than females, usually they have easy to mimic sounds of other birds.

In terms of their longevity, According to sources, a specimen lived 34,3 years in captivity.

Alternative names:

Rueppell’s Parrot, Ruppell’s Parrot, Rüppell’s Parrot (English).
Perroquet de Rüppell (French).
Rüppellpapagei, Rüppell Papagei, Rüppell-Papagei (German).
Papagaio de Rüppell, Papagaio-de-rüppell (Portuguese).
Lorito de Ruppell, Lorito de Rüppell (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Poicephalus
Scientific name: Poicephalus rueppellii
Citation: (Gray, GR, 1849)
Protonimo: Psittacus Rüppellii

Rueppell's Parrot images :

————————————————————————————————

Rueppell's Parrot (Poicephalus rueppellii)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – An adult female Rüppell’s Parrot near Hobatere Lodge, Kamanjab, Namibia By Ron Knight from Seaford, East Sussex, United Kingdom (Ruppell’s ParrotUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – In captivity by Udo Berg –> Heggy – Wikipedia
(3) – Rüppel parrot – papageien.org
(4) – Poicephalus rueppellii rueppells parrot – Birds-pet-wallpapers
(5) – Poicephalus rueppellii in Erongo Mountains, Namibia – Buckham Birding
(6) – Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1882 by Joseph Smit [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Charles Hesse (Xeno-canto)

Meyer's Parrot
Poicephalus meyeri


Lorito de Meyer

Description:

21 cm. and a weight of 100-130 g..

The Meyer's Parrot (Poicephalus meyeri) has the forecrown, lores, cheeks, ear-coverts and ash Brown nape; crown bright yellow. The mantle feathers ash brown edges blue or cyan dye in some birds; scapulars brown ash, some individuals show Tips blue or greenish blue; rump bright turquoise or teal; uppertail-coverts green. Outermost children and wing-coverts above bright yellow, other variables showing green tints, especially towards Tips. The primaries and high schools ash Brown with paler narrow margins to vane outer.

Feathers of the wings, undertail, bright yellow in some birds, but grayish-brown in larger in other. The chin, the throat and top of the chest brown ash; remaining chest and belly turquoise or teal; the thighs yellow; undertail- coverts turquoise blue or greenish blue. Tail brown ash.

Bill dark gray or black; cere black; irises orange-red; periophthalmic skin desnuda negruzca; legs blackish.

Both sexes similar.

Youth more generally greenish brown. No yellow in the crown or the the thighs and the yellow area in the wings, at the top, It is lower. Wing coverts, undertail, green and brown with little or no yellow. The underparts más greenish. Iris dark brown.

  • Sound of the Meyer's Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lorito de Meyer.mp3]
Description Meyer's Parrot subspecies
Subspecies
  • Poicephalus meyeri damarensis (Neumann, 1898) – No Yellow crown. Paler than subspecies reichenowi. Intergrades with transvaalensis subspecies in the region of the delta del Okavango, Botswana and with subspecies reichenowi in Angola.
  • Poicephalus meyeri matschiei
    matschiei by Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Poicephalus meyeri matschiei (Neumann, 1898) – Brown is paler than in the subespecie satisfied and cyan dye to the margins of the scapulars less pronounced than in the species nominal. Green colors are blue (especially below). The female spot shows yellow feathers at the base of the lower mandible.
  • Poicephalus meyeri meyeri (Cretzschmar, 1827) – Species nominal
  • Poicephalus meyeri Reichenow (Neumann, 1898) – Similar to the subespecie matschiei but with the yellow crown generally absent. Paler blue in the rump. Size larger than the subespecie matschiei.
  • reichenowi by Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    reichenowi by Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Poicephalus meyeri saturatus (Sharpe, 1901) – Darker than the species nominal (especially the brown parts), rump less blue than the nominal, showing a bit of green in the feathers. The dark centers feathers on the bottom, giving it a mottled appearance. Intergrades with the subspecies matschiei in Tanzania.
  • Poicephalus meyeri transvaalensis (Neumann, 1899) – Brown clearer than in the subespecie matschiei, bluer still in rump and below. Yellow areas in the crown They are often reduced and, sometimes completely lacking (especially in males). It is thought that can hybridize with the Poicephalus cryptoxanthus.

Habitat:

The Meyer's Parrot It is in a range of habitats from dry savannah forests to gallery forests and riparian forests of secondary growth around crops. Observed in forests dominated by Terminalia laxiflora and Doka Isoberlinia, thickets Combretum acacia grasslands; also Brachystegia and riparian forests Syzygium-Adina.

Avoid lowland rainforests in the basin Congo rainforests and other areas including the eastern highlands district Zimbabwe and Cork in Malawi.

Show a preference for the tallest trees in the drier savannah habitats – in particular specimens Adansonia. They may be restricted to gallery forests in the drier parts of its range and are usually found near the water.

Where it is sympatric with the Red-bellied Parrot (Poicephalus rufiventris), the Meyer's Parrot It is limited to riparian forests.

In Kenya, which it is largely in areas with higher annual rainfall 500 mm.

Sometimes observed in suburban areas.

In general, in the lowlands at altitudes of 1,250m in Ethiopia, 2.200m in east Africa and 1.500 meters in the highlands of eastern Zimbabwe.

They are distributed in pairs or small groups 3-5 birds (possibly couples); until 50 birds can congregate in areas where food sources in breeding season. Roosts in tree cavities. Generally shy and cautious.

Reproduction:

Solitary nesters in tree cavities at a height between 3 and 10 meters above the ground, during the season, dry (for example Mar-June Zimbabwe, from May to September Zambia and Malawi, July Angola and in December or January Sudan).

The implementation is of 2 to 4 eggs.

Food:

The diet of the Meyer's Parrot fruit is, nuts and seeds, including Ficus, Sound abyssinica, Uapaca nitidula, Monotes glaber, Combretum, Grewia, Sclerocarya, Pseudolachnostylis, fruit of the great growth and riparian trees afzelia quanzensis and Melia volkensii, grown oranges and flowers Schotia brachypetala.

The pulp of the fruit is less important than the hard seeds and the arbolados share, the Meyer's Parrot is one of the few species consume seeds Brachystegia and other leguminous trees.

They also consume grain and is considered as crop pests in some areas.

Eat some insects, including caterpillars.

You can vary widely from areas in search of food during droughts.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 5.840.000 km2

The Meyer's Parrot They are distributed throughout the central and eastern Africa. From the North-East of Cameroon and South of Chad through the North of the Central African Republic, center Sudan and South and West Ethiopia, to the south through Uganda, Kenya Western, East of Democratic Republic of the Congo and Tanzania, coming to Malawi, Zambia, Angola, Northeast of Botswana, Zimbabwe, western end of Mozambique, Namibia and northeast of South Africa.

A wild population, possibly, is distributed in the eastern province of Cape Town, South Africa, even if they are probably extinct.

Nomad in some areas during periods of drought, when they distributed outside the normal range; normally resident with local movements.

Meyer's Parrot subspecies distribution
Subspecies
  • Poicephalus meyeri damarensis (Neumann, 1898) – South of Angola, Northeast of Namibia and North of Botswana.
  • Poicephalus meyeri matschiei (Neumann, 1898) – Southeast Kenya through eastern and central Tanzania to Southeast Democratic Republic of the Congo, North of Malawi, Zambia and northeast of Angola.
  • Poicephalus meyeri meyeri (Cretzschmar, 1827) – Species nominal
  • Poicephalus meyeri Reichenow (Neumann, 1898) – North and Central Angola from Malange and sierra central until Huila, possibly also adjacent parts of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Poicephalus meyeri saturatus (Sharpe, 1901) – The Far East Democratic Republic of the Congo, through Burundi, Rwanda and east of Uganda, in West and Central East Kenya towards Meru and Local inside Tanzania to the South of the Parque Nacional Ruaha.
  • Poicephalus meyeri transvaalensis (Neumann, 1899) – Areas of northern and central Mozambique to northern Save river across the South of Zambia and central and southern Zimbabwe to northeast Botswana and West of Transvaal

Conservation:

• Current red list of UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The Meyer's Parrot It, in general, Common to very common and is the most abundant parrot in parts of its range (for example, Zimbabue and Angola), although few in other areas and absent from some apparently suitable habitats.

Its population has declined in some parts (for example Transvaal) where is thought to be a result of habitat destruction. I also persecuted in some locations due to crop damage (for example, in the center of Zambezi because of the damage inflicted to the maturation of the berries Boolean).

Lorito de Meyer en cautividad:

The Meyer's Parrot, is a bird common in captivity, quiet, tender, easy to carry and with a stable temperament.

They are birds social and they tend to bond with everyone in the family, unlike other species that may prefer one person to another. In general, No es voluble – once you liked someone, the person is a friend for life.

They are not as dependent on humans for entertainment like most parrots and therefore no son tan demanding.

They like being handled and petted on the head and neck. A baby fed by hand into an adult soft if treated properly, and it is not prone to bite, although it may provide a powerful bite if provoked.

You can learn a few words, although They are not known for their ability to speak. They can learn to whistle, making noises, and occasionally they will offer strong squeals. Fortunately, They are not likely to scream or make loud squawks, making good birds for apartment life. Some individuals learn household noises, as the beep of the microwave.

The Meyer's Parrot they are ready to breed at the age of 3 to 4 years and reproduce easily in captivity.

With regard to its longevity, According to sources, Meyer lived a parrot 34,2 years in captivity.

Alternative names:

Meyer’s Parrot, Brown Parrot (English).
Perroquet de Meyer, Perroquet brun, Youyou de Meyer (French).
Goldbugpapagei, Goldbug-Papagei (German).
Papagaio de Meyer, Papagaio-de-meyer (Portuguese).
Lorito de Meyer (Spanish).

Philipp Jacob Cretzschmar
Philipp Jacob Cretzschmar

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Poicephalus
Scientific name: Poicephalus meyeri
Citation: (Cretzschmar, 1827)
Protonimo: Psittacus Meyeri

Meyer's Parrot images :

————————————————————————————————

Meyer's Parrot (Poicephalus meyeri)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A Meyer’s Parrot at Birds of Eden, Western Cape, South Africa. It is eating what looks like a piece of bread By SandyCole (mailto:[email protected]) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Two Meyer’s Parrots in Zimbabwe By Oce Eeco (DSC_0108Uploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Brown parrot also known as Meyer’s Parrot (Poicephalus meyeri) by Papooga – Flickr
(4) – A Meyer’s Parrot near Kwara Camp, North-West District, Botswana By Benjamin Hollis from Seattle, WA, USA (Meyer’s parrotUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A Meyer’s Parrot in Akagera National Park, Rwanda By Lip Kee Yap [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Derek Solomon (Xeno-canto)

Niam-Niam Parrot
Poicephalus crassus

Description:

25 cm.. length.

The Niam-Niam Parrot (Poicephalus crassus) has the head and nape Brown olive; the ear-coverts Silver. Feathers of the the mantle and tertiary Brown with dark green margin; back, uppertail-coverts and bright green.

Lorito nianiam
Upper, wing-coverts dark green; secondary more internal dark green; rest of the flight feather Brown with vane dark green external. Throat and top of the chest Brown olive opaque; bottom of the chest, the belly, the the thighs and undertail- coverts green.

Feathers of the tail dark brown tipped with dark green margins.

Bill yellowish, upper mandible darker than black-tipped; irises yellow; legs blackish.

Both sexes similar.

Hood grayish brown of the immature It shows strong brands of color yellow olive; the the mantle is greener. Underparts paler and more yellowish in adults. Secondary internal lined with yellow. More pale the upper mandible the adults and with grey tip.

It was thought that the Niam-Niam Parrot (Poicephalus crassus) It could form a species within the Group of the Poicephalus meyeri, Poicephalus rueppellii and Poicephalus cryptoxanthus, and possibly other. In the past, treated as species Poicephalus cryptoxanthus, that is morphologically very close.

Habitat:

Frequents wooded areas of Savannah, forest-savanna mosaic, wet sheets and Syzygium-Adina forests in the savanna to the 1.000 m.

Common in areas close to water. Observed in pairs or in small groups. Regular daily movements take place even in the mountainous areas where the Niam-Niam Parrot visit tall trees to feed.

Reproduction:

Few details about the reproductive biology, but believes that nest between August-September during the rainy season.

Courtship and implementation not described.

Food:

Its diet It is little known but includes a wide variety of seeds; reported foods include millet, and beans.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 343.000 km2

North of Central Africa to the South of the Sahara. Believed to inhabit also in Cameroon Eastern (where is the status unclear) through the Center and South of the Central African Republic, South-West end of Chad and the north end of the upper area of the Democratic Republic of the Congoto the southwest of Sudan (Bahr-el-Ghazal).

Sedentary with local movements. Little-known state, but thinks it's usually common, Although most scarce in the southwest of Sudan.

Conservation:

• Current red list of UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The size of the world's population has not been quantified. This species is one of the lesser known African parrots, but it is assumed that it is common in its area of distribution.

The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

Lorito nianiam en cautividad:

Very rare in captivity.

It is a parrot of middle voice, shy and suspicious. Young birds are more accustomed to the caregiver.
New birds susceptible to the stress or illness.

Is necessary for their well-being a regular supply of fresh wood; susceptible during the acclimatization period; resistant once acclimated.

Alternative names:

Niam-Niam Parrot, Niam niam Parrot (English).
Perroquet des Niam-niams, Perroquet des niam-niam (French).
Niamniampapagei, Niamniam Papagei (German).
Papagaio Crassus (Portuguese).
Lorito Niam niam, Lorito Niam-niam, Lorito nianiam (Spanish).

Richard Bowdler Sharpe
Richard Bowdler Sharpe

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Poicephalus
Scientific name: Poicephalus crassus
Citation: (Sharpe, 1884)
Protonimo: Pionias crassus

————————————————————————————————

Niam-Niam Parrot (Poicephalus crassus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Photography: Caijin Wen – link

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