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Shawl-collared Lorikeet
Trichoglossus rosenbergii

Shawl-collared Lorikeet

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description (1)

26 cm.. length and a weight between 132 and 150 gr.

The Shawl-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus rosenbergii) is very similar to the Trichoglossus haematodus, but with a stronger blue in the head.

The edges of the breast feathers they are much wider, It has a broad yellow stripe on the neck, ending at the highest point with a red band narrow, their abdomen Violet is blue also has a wide orange stripe inside the flight feather.

The bill is red-orange. The irises They are orange-red and legs grey.

Variation of the nominal (Trichoglossus Haematodus).

Habitat:

They are in a wide range of habitats, including settlements in forests, coconut plantations, savannahs and mangroves.

In their natural habitats, They form small groups noisy that feed on the upper canopy. Often they are seen in mixed flocks with other species of parrots. At night, Community are hundreds of birds.

Son pollinators important species coconut.

Reproduction:

Within its natural range, usually they begin breeding between September and October – although breeding has been recorded in most months.

The average clutch it consists of 2 to 3 eggs. The female incubated eggs for about 24 to 27 days and the young become independent when they are about 80 days old.

Food:

Its diet natural It consists mainly nectar and pollen, but also it includes fruits like figs, citrus, papaya and mangoes open fruit bats. They may also feed on moth pupae and insects.

Distribution:

Distribucion-Lori-de-Biak
The reflection of both in the province of Papua, Indonesian.

Conservation:


Vulnerable

The Shawl-collared Lorikeet has a single small population, that can be seen to be decreasing as a result of the loss and degradation of forests, by agriculture and logging subsistence and perhaps also for the capture for trade. So, is qualified as Vulnerable.

The bird population is assumed that can range from 3000-4000 birds.

Alternative names:

Shawl-collared Lorikeet, Biak Lorikeet, Rainbow Lorikeet (Biak) (ingles).
Loriquet de Biak (French).
Biaklori (German).
Loris Arco-Íris Rosenbergii (Portuguese).
Lori de Biak (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Trichoglossus rosenbergii
Citation: Schlegel, 1871
Protonimo: Trichoglossus Rosenbergii

Images "Shawl-collared Lorikeet"

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    (1) – Subspecies Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)

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“Shawl-collared Lorikeet” (Trichoglossus rosenbergii)


Sources:

Avibase
– BirdLife.org

Photos: Rosenberg’s Lorikeet – animalphotos.me

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Stephen's Lorikeet
Vini stepheni

Stephen's Lorikeet

Content

Description

19 cm.. length and a weight between 42 and 55 g..

The plumage of the Stephen's Lorikeet (Vini stepheni), in general is green.

The upper part of the head is light green. The region of the windows of the nose, the cheeks, the ear-coverts, the neck, the chest and the abdomen They are red. It has a belt Variable greenish purple size chest. Thighs and bottom of the abdomen They are purple. The Hip is yellowish-green. The feathers wing-coverts They are red and green; the primaries, longer, are black. The upper part of the tail It is yellowish green and the bottom darker yellow with green.

The irises It is reddish brown, the legs and the bill are orange.

The immature they have the underparts green with purple and red marks on the throat and the abdomen. Tail dark green. The bill and eyes They are brown.

Habitat:

Its usual habitat are dense shrubs and trees, Palm trees, handles, coconut and banana plantations.

They make daily trips from the forest into the coastal strips to feed in coconut palms.

They live in pairs or small groups outside of the breeding season.. They are very active and hard to see in dense vegetation; the easiest way to see them is in flight, they are easy to distinguish by their bright red plumage. Its flight is fast with a characteristic buzz of the wings.. They are not shy and allow you to see them up close, are especially when eating.

Reproduction:

There are no data about its reproduction in the wild.

Food:

The Stephen's Lorikeet is omnivore, consumes nectar, pollen and fruits of a wide variety of plants. The flowers of the plants Scaevola sericea and Timonius polygamus They provide the main sources of nectar. Arthropods are part of the diet, including lepidopteran larvae found in the sporangia fern Phymatosorus

Distribution:

Stephen distribution of Lori


The Stephen's Lorikeet is limited to Henderson island in the Pitcairn Islands, a small island uninhabited and surrounded of coral limestone cliffs, in the south-central zone of the Pacific Ocean.

The Pitcairn Islands, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno There are four volcanic islands in the southern pacific ocean. These islands are a British overseas territory (formerly a British colony), the last one left in the peaceful.

In 1987, the total population It was estimated between 720 and 1.820 specimens.


Conservation:


Vulnerable


• Current IUCN Red List category: Vulnerable

• Population trend: Stable

This species may be the only member of its genus whose habitat and population size have been little affected by adverse changes in its environment.. But, is qualified as vulnerable, Since it is only on a small island.

It seems to have adapted to the presence of the only introduced predator., the pacific rat (Rattus exulans). In August of 2011, a rat eradication operation was carried out in the Henderson island to eradicate R. exulans of the island. But, the accidental introduction of a more aggressive predator, as other species Rattus, could be devastating. Diseases such as malaria avian and smallpox are another potential threat. The introduction of exotic plant species could have serious consequences for native vegetation and, Therefore, for this species.

– Rat eradication could save seabirds on Henderson Island

Averted a potentially serious threat in 1983 When an American millionaire sought to make a home in the Henderson island. The request was rejected by the Government of the United Kingdom. Henderson is now a world heritage site.

"Stephen's Lorikeet" in captivity:

There are currently no known Stephen's Lorikeet in captivity. VULNERABLE.

Due to its endangered status, any specimen that can not be returned to their natural habitat (natural range) should preferably be placed in a well-managed breeding program to ensure the survival of the species.

Alternative names:

Stephen’s Lorikeet, Henderson Island Lorikeet, Henderson Island Lory, Henderson Lorikeet, Henderson Lory, Stephen’s Lory, Stephens’s Lory (ingles).
Lori de Stephen (French).
Hendersonlori, Henderson Lori (German).
Stephen Lori (Portuguese).
Lori de Stephen (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Vini
Scientific name: Vini stepheni
Citation: (North, 1908)
Protonimo: Calliptilus ? stepheni

Images “Stephen's Lorikeet”:

Videos "Stephen's Lorikeet"

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“Stephen's Lorikeet” (Vini stepheni)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife

Photos:

1 – by © Pawl Warren – UK OVERSEAS TERRITORIES CONSERVATION FORUM
2 – By Peter Fitzgerald, Andrew J.Kurbiko, Hansbaer, Openstreetmap (File:Pitcairn Islands map.svg) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Mark Todd (Xeno-canto)

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Striated Lorikeet
Charmosyna multistriata

Striated Lorikeet

Content

Description

They weigh around 40 to 50 g. and length of 18 cm..

The plumage of the Striated Lorikeet (Charmosyna multistriata) It is predominantly green with yellow stripes on the belly and in the chest.

The throat, the forecrown and sides of the head They are slightly more yellow. The neck and the back of the head They are brown with some orange yellow stripes. The tail is olive green on top and having a tip dark yellow. The bottom of the tail It is greenish yellow with some red feathers around the vent. The most characteristic feature of Striated Lorikeet is the bill two colors. Upper bill is blue-gray with a touch of red orange, While the bottom is completely reddish-orange. Only one other Lori with a peak of two colors and that is the Musk Lorikeet. The irises It is red and legs They are gray with black nails.

Both sexes are the same color, the male is slightly larger and has a bill longer. They are also a little colored in the head.
The immature They have the same colors as adults, only the bill it is more black and darker stripes.

Habitat:

It inhabits in the mountains and hills and forest edges. Mainly found between 180 and 1.800 m, but they have been at much lower altitude, about 80 m. Found in pairs or in small groups of up 20 birds, sometimes fellowship with the Red-flanked Lorikeet and the Fairy Lorikeet (observed in mid-February in mixed flocks with these species). similar to the behavior Red-flanked Lorikeet, the consorts, but although they have observed flocks Striated Lorikeet fly with the Red-flanked Lorikeet, they usually form discrete individual groups.

Reproduction:

Habits of nesting and breeding unknown.

Food:

Prefer treetops in bloom where it feeds on pollen and nectar, but they may also feed on epiphytes.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident) 170,000 km2

Endemic to the montane forests of the center of West Papua New and Papua New Guinea, South of the cordillera central. The world population It is believed to be of less than 10.000 specimens, but it is probably stable. A small number in captivity.

Conservation:


Status


• Current IUCN Red List category: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

Its habitat is locally threatened by logging and clearing for agriculture. Reports of the species in Ok Tedi They show that the population of the Striated Lorikeet has fallen dramatically after the severe drought in 1997-1998 (P. Gregory in litt., 2010).

The species may be threatened by the presence of a large copper and gold open pit mine in Ok Tedi, but the impacts of this mine are currently unknown. It is likely to be tolerant of uneven and degraded forests and although it may have a small population in general, do not believe that it is declining very rapidly.

"Striated Lorikeet" in captivity:

In aviculture the Striated Lorikeet It has become one of the rarest species. These birds have not been imported in large quantities, and many of the birds that survived the journey later died due to infections by fungi and other diseases. Few breeders were able to raise them on a regular basis.

Alternative names:

Striated Lorikeet, Streaked Lorikeet, Yellow Streaked Lory, Yellow-streaked Lorikeet (ingles).
Lori strié (French).
Streifenlori (German).
Lori Estriado (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Charmosyna
Scientific name: Charmosyna multistriata
Citation: (Rothschild, 1911)
Protonimo: Charmosynopsis multistriata

Images “Striated Lorikeet”:

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“Striated Lorikeet” (Charmosyna multistriata)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife
– loryclub

Photos:

1 – Author: Jaroslav Chloupekbiolib.cz
2 – by DavyVanthuyne’s Bucket
3 – Birds-pet-wallpapers – link
4 – Author iggino – lynx
5 – tierportraet.ch – link

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Red-collared Lorikee
Trichoglossus rubritorquis

Red-collared Lorikee

Content

Description Red-collared Lorikeet:

Red-collared Lorikee

26 cm. in length and 103–140 grams in weight.

The Red-collared Lorikee (Trichoglossus rubritorquis) they have the head violet / blue with purple / blue streaks on face; throat and sides of the nape blackish; neck orange / red; chest yellow / orange without sweeping; abdomen dark green; the thighs green / yellow until undertail-coverts; upperparts and tail green; underwing-coverts orange; yellow and broadband under the wing . Bill orange / red. Eyes dark orange.
The youth they are similar to adults.

    taxonomy:

Occasionally he treated in Australian literature as a separate species of Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), but this is only appropriate review, as here, the whole complex of Rainbow Lorikeet: differs from Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus moluccanus) in his collar Orange Fire vs. pale green; Blue neck vs. green; vs belly black. blue; and of the Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus forsteni) in his collar Orange Fire vs. yellowish green; nape blue vs. red crab; nape blue vs. dark blue or green; larger size.

Species Monotypic.

  • Sound of the Red-collared Lorikee.

Habitat:

There have been no large-scale seasonal movements are common throughout the year in some places.

It's more common in lowlands, but it is up 2400 meters above sea level. They can be observed in a wide variety of areas including settlements, forests, coconut plantations, Savanna, eucalyptus forests and mangroves. They are in mixed flocks with other parrots; small and noisy groups. Nomads, since they depend on flowering trees. It perches communally in groups of hundreds of birds.

Reproduction:

Reproductive biology very similar to that of the Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus). May-January season in Northern Territory. The laying Typically two or three eggs.

Food:

Diet very similar to the Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) which feeds on nectar, fruit, flowers and insects, including Pandanus spiralis. It can also be found around artificial feeding stations.

I necked Lori distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding/resident): 1.100.000 km2

North Autóctono Australia, which they inhabit the lowlands. Integrated or hybridized with Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) on queensland peninsula, Australia, in southwest Cape York.

Red-collared Lorikeet Conservation:

Rationale for the Red List category

1. Current red list category of the UICN: Least Concern..


Status

2. The population trend: Decreasing.

3. Population size : It is unknown.

This species has a extremely large distribution area, and therefore does not approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criterion of size range (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a decreasing area size or fluctuating distribution, extension / habitat quality, or population size and a small number of places or severe fragmentation).

While the trend of the population seems to be decreasing, the decline is not believed to be rapid enough to approach the Vulnerable thresholds according to the population trend criterion (decrease of more than 30% in ten years or three generations).

The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 mature individuals with an estimated> 10% continuous decline in ten years or three generations, or with a specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is assessed as Least concern.

    Justification of the population

Global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as abundant (pit et to the. 1997).

    Justification trend

It is suspected that the population is declining due to unsustainable levels of exploitation.

    Threats

The species has been the subject of a intense trade: from 1981, When it was included in the Appendix II of the CITES, they have been 100.388 individuals caught in international trade (UNEP-WCMC CITES Trade Database, January 2005).

In captivity:

In Europe, this species of lori has been largely imported from early last century, and in 1910 it managed to raise in the zoo London (four years later, the first calf in France). Currently it is rare outside Australia. Life expectancy: 20 years in nature, 15-25 years in captivity.

Alternative names

Australian rainbow lory, Rainbow Lorikeet (Red-collared), Red collared Lorikeet, Red-collared Lorikeet (English).
Loriquet à col rouge, Loriquet à collier rouge, Loriquet à tête bleue (à col rouge), Loriquet à tête bleue (rubritorquis) (French).
Australischer Blauwangenallfarblori, Darwin-Allfarblori, Rotnackenlori (German).
Periquito-arco-íris (rubritorquis), Lóris-de-colar-rojo (Portuguese).
Lori cuellirrojo, Lori Arcoiris (rubritorquis) (español).

scientific classification:


Thomas Horsfield
Thomas Horsfield

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Gender: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus rubritorquis
Subpoena: Vigors & Horsfield, 1827
Protonimo: Trichoglossus Rubritorquis

Images “Red-collared Lorikee”:

Videos "Red-collared Lorikee"


“Red-collared Lorikee” (Trichoglossus rubritorquis)

    Sources:

    1. Avibase
    2. Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    3. Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    4. Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – A Red-collared Lorikeet at Cincinnati Zoo, Ohio, USA by Fr. Ted Bobosh [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (2) – A Red-collared Lorikeet at Cincinnati Zoo, Ohio, USA by Ted [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Red-collared Lorikeet standing on a man’s cap at Lion Country Safari, Florida, USA by derivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)Trichoglossus_haematodus_rubritorquis_-Lion_Country_Safari-6.jpg: Duncan Rawlinson from Vancouver, BC [CC BY 2.0 or CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus rubritorquis) in the Walsrode Bird Park, Germany by Quartl [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons
    (5) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (6) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (7) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus rubritorquis) by Graham WinterfloodFlickr
    (8) – Trichoglossus haematodus rubritorquis Location taken: Lion Country Safari, Loxahatchee, Florida Photo by David J. pole [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (9) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (10) – A painting of a Red-collared Lorikeet (originally captioned “Trichoglossus rubritorquis. Scarlet-collared Parrakeet by Edward Lear [Public domain]

    Sounds: Phil Gregory, XC287820. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/287820

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Coconut Lorikeet (massena)
T. haematodus massena


Coconut Lorikeet (massena)

Content

Description (1)

25 cm.. length.

The Coconut Lorikeet (massena) (Trichoglossus haematodus massena) is a variation of the nominal (Trichoglossus Haematodus).

The plumage is similar to the of the Ornate Lory except that it is usually paler. The head is blue, ending at the nape with dark brown feathers interspersed with more Brown clear. The chest is reddish color with a narrow dark blue edging. In some cases, You can see some yellow zones in chest plumage. The abdomen is green; but there may be some kind of marking on the lower abdomen blue-violet.

The eyes are orange brown in juveniles and adult. The beak is orange-red.

Distribution:

Bismarck Archipelago, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu.

Conservation:

This species is endangered due to habitat loss and capture for the pet trade.

Alternative names:

Coconut Lorikeet (massena) (ingles).
Loriquet à tête bleue (massena) (French).
Allfarblori (massena) (German).
Lóris-arco-íris (massena) (Portuguese).
Lori Arcoiris Massena, Tricogloso de Pecho Rojo (massena) (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Trichoglossus haematodus massena
Genus: Trichoglossus
Citation: Bonaparte, 1854
Protonimo: Trichoglossus massena

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    (1) – Subspecies Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)

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“Coconut Lorikeet (massena)” (Trichoglossus haematodus massena)


Sources:

Avibase

Photos: animalphotos.me

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Ultramarine Lorikeet
Vini ultramarina

Ultramarine Lorikeet

Content

Description

The Ultramarine Lorikeet (Vini ultramarina) has a length of 18 cm.. and an approximate weight of 35 g..

Forehead bright navy blue iridescent; crown and nape Mallow dark blue with streaks of light blue; lores and spots on ear-coverts, white (bases of ear-coverts, purple and blue color). Mantle and covert wing, Navy blue; rump and tail coverts, dark blue light. The flight feather, light blue, blackish internal. Blue off the Underwing coverts. Throat dark blue with white speckles; in the band chest mauve blue with área subterminal pale blue feathers. Belly blank slate bases in feathers, giving a mottled appearance; the thighs dark blue malva; coverts, Turquoise.

The uppertail-coverts, whitish blue with navy blue light diffuse in the outer margins;
undertail coverts whitish merged with navy and some irregular gray markings.

Bill yellow orange, upper jaw, blackish brown at the base; irises brownish yellow; the orange legs.

Both sexes are equal but the female It is slightly smaller.

The immature adult differ by the absence of white on underparts, they are uniformly blackish. Also by bill black, irises Dark Brown and legs orange-brown.

Habitat:

In the Decade of 1970 in Nuku Hiva, these parrots were found only in pristine forests (that they have not been touched and that it is in its original condition) on the 700 m.

There is a similar habitat preferences in UA Pu, where are located mainly in montane forests between 700 and 1.000 m. Populations have also been of Ultramarine Lorikeet in banana plantations, coconut and mango (Mangifera indica), in coastal areas.

The species seems to have a wider range of habitat preferences in UA Pu., being found at altitudes ranging from the coast to wooded crests.

They feed in trees with flowers, especially coconut trees and Erythrina.

Loud and lively; the birds move freely between the canopy and lower floors, allowing the human approach. They usually travel in pairs or groups of up to a dozen of individuals. Most of its flights are made below the level of the trees, but for longer distances they rise spiral up to considerable heights.

Extremely Active, rarely long they stay in a tree and feeds using the peak acrobaticamente support.

Reproduction:

The nesting of these birds is from June to August.

It nests in hollow trees, preferring Artocarpus altilis, Pometia, Pandanus tectorius and Hibiscus tileacus. Sometimes they use the old nest of another species. They lay two white eggs.

A captive breeding record gives the chick eight weeks to become independent.

Food:

It feeds on a great variety of trees in flower, nectar and pollen. Within your preferences are the flowers of the coconut palm, the native tree and banana Hibiscus tileaceus.

It also feeds on fruits, especially mango and insects.

Distribution:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 100 km2

The Ultramarine Lorikeet is endemic of the Marquesas Islands, of Nuku Hiva, UA Pu and UA Huka, Although fossil remains show that previously most widely spread.

In UA Pu the population was estimated at 250-300 couples in 1975. But in 1988 had shrunk around the 60%, probably due to the spread of rats Rattus rattus, and a hurricane in 1988, Although its effects on the population of birds are uncertain.

In Nuku Hiva the small population of around of 70 birds that inhabited the high valleys and ridges in the northwestern part of the island, between 700 and 1.000 d., You can that they are now extinct.

The majority of the population, to this day, remains in UA Huka, where the species was introduced in 1940. This population would have grown from 200 to 250 couples in the late 1970s and was considered abundant in 1990 at altitudes environment to the 500 d., with a population estimated between 1.000 and 1.500 birds. The main threat to the species, here, is the potential arrival of rats, and between 1993 and 1994, 14 Ultramarine Lorikeet they were moved to Fatu Hiva in an attempt to keep them safe from rats; But, habitat deterioration by grazing mammals and avian malaria, also they have been and are still potential factors to increase the vulnerability of this species.

Conservation:


Endangered


• Current IUCN Red List category: Danger.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

CITES Appendix I. in danger of extinction.

The entire population is located on an island where the species is stable, in other islands recently has been extinguished. The general trend is suspected to be a slow and continuous decrease. If the black rats come to UA Huka the decrease will be quick and severe.

Other threats included are logging in some sectors of the habitat of the Ultramarine Lorikeet to plant crops, fruit trees, and use the trunks for woodcarvings for tourism.

"Ultramarine Lorikeet" in captivity:

Extremely rare.

Alternative names:

Ultramarine Lorikeet, Marquesas Lorikeet, Ultramarine Lory (ingles).
Lori ultramarin, Lori de Goupil, Lori des Marquises (French).
Ultramarinlori (German).
Loris Vini Ultramarine (Portuguese).
Lori Ultramar, Lori Ultramarino (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Vini ultramarina
Citation: (Kuhl, 1820)
Protonimo: Psittacus ultramarinus

Images “Ultramarine Lorikeet”:

Videos "Ultramarine Lorikeet"

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“Ultramarine Lorikeet” (Vini ultramarina)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife

Photos:

1 – Miles to the wild – link
2 – Miles to the wild – link
3 – Miles to the wild – link
4 – An adult bird perched on a palm tree – Author Josep del Hoyo – IBC.lynxeds.com
5- A juvenile bird feeding in a tree. – Author Josep del Hoyo – IBC.lynxeds.com

Sounds: Mark Todd (Xeno-canto)

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Red-throated Lorikeet
Charmosyna amabilis

Red-throated Lorikeet

Content

Description

18 cm.. length.

The head of the Red-throated Lorikeet (Charmosyna amabilis) is green with lores and chin red. Upperparts green. Wings internal and ends with green feathers flight feather color black. Throat red, bordered below by a narrow yellow collar; rest of the underparts with a yellowish green that upperparts, particularly in the center of belly; the thighs red. The tail above green a little darker than the rump, with yellow ends; undertail yellow. Bill orange; irises yellow; legs orange-red.

Male and female are equal.

Immature generally duller. The the thighs dull purple. The yellow band throat much weaker than in adults and the red facial and marks throat more restricted.

Habitat:

Move by tropical forests, mainly over the 500 m. Son nomads and fly in pairs or small flocks of 5-8 birds in search of flowering trees, uniting to feed on flowers, nectar and pollen. They prefer to feed in the canopy, and although it is apparently ejected away from the areas of power by the aggressive Collared Lory, Holyoak He found two species feeding on the same tree during his remarks in 1973.

Reproduction:

Breeding and nesting habits unknown.

Food:

They feed actively, to often hung upside down to get to flores.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 37.100 km2

endemic to the Fiji Islands where it is rare and usually only moves above 500 meters and below 1.000 m. Is distributed between in Viti Levu, Ovalau (where it may now be extinct), Vanua Levu and Taveuni. In 1973 Holyoak found at a Red-throated Lorikeet on a wooded Ridge around 250 metres in Viti Levu, species you saw or heard on five different days while exploring Taveuni thinking that the species was widespread in the rainy forests at an altitude between 550 and 1,000 m. The species was also recorded in rainforests between 120 meters and 980 feet by Martyn L. Gorman (1975), but it is said that they are rare. These records are among the few documented sightings of this century. The world's population is believed to be of less than 10.000 specimens. Despite its apparent rarity, This species may be overlooked due to their unobtrusive plumage and behavior.

Conservation:


Critically Endangered


• Current IUCN Red List category: Critical Hazard

• Population trend: Decreasing

Threats to the lowlands and hills of the forest is slowly being erased much of Fiji. But, the rarity and assumed decline of this species is probably largely the result of predation by introduced mammals, especially Black Rat (Rattus rattus) , as it is the case with the closely related New Caledonian Lorikeet (Charmosyna diadema).

Increases in course in the logging and the expansion of the road network, especially around the Highlands of Monasavu and Serua in Viti Levu, It is likely that you have caused an increase of the density of these rats (Watling 2000, G. Dutson in litt. 2005). The Indian Brown Mongoose (Herpestes fuscus) introduced, is also present in the areas of distribution of the Red-throated Lorikeet and it can be a threat (V. Masibalavu in litt. 2012).

Agricultural expansion is encroaching on primary forest in Taveuni. Have a distribution in mountains close to the maximum altitude within its distribution area, It also makes this potentially susceptible species to climate change (BirdLife International).

Is species is protected by the laws of Fiji. In Viti Levu, dwells within the Tomaniivi nature reserve, but this is not large enough to maintain a resident population and, Despite the creation of the extension Wabu proposal to make a reservation of adequate size, this would not provide better protection against rats if the reserve is kept unmanaged (D. Watling in litt. 2000)

"Red-throated Lorikeet" in captivity:

Unknown in captivity.

Alternative names:

Red-throated Lorikeet, Red throated Lorikeet (ingles).
Lori à gorge rouge (French).
Rothöschen (German).
Lori de Garganta Roja, Lori Gorgirrojo (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Charmosyna amabilis
Citation: (Ramsay, 1875)
Protonimo: Trichoglossus (Glossopsitta) amabilis

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“Red-throated Lorikeet” (Charmosyna amabilis)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife

Photos:

1 – (Photo by Bill Beckon, 1973)
2 – Charmosyna amabilis By Artwork by John Gerard Keulemans (1842-1912). [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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Coconut Lorikeet (deplanchii)
T. haematodus deplanchii


Coconut Lorikeet (deplanchii)

Content

Description (1)

26 cm.. of length and a weight of 140 gr.

The Coconut Lorikeet (deplanchii) (T. haematodus deplanchii) is a variation of the nominal (Trichoglossus Haematodus)

Similar to the nominal Haematodus, but slightly paler plumage. The head has a bright blue. Reddish orange on the chest, similar to the Trichoglossus haematodus massena, only that more alive. The abdomen is yellowish green and extends to the back of the neck. The thighs and the feathers under the yellow tail and tail olive green top.

Distribution:

New Caledonia and Loyalty Islands.

Alternative names:

Coconut Lorikeet (deplanchii) (ingles).
Loriquet à tête bleue (deplanchii) (French).
Allfarblori Deplanche (German).
Loris Arco Iris Deplanchii (Portuguese).
Lori Deplanche, Lori Arcoiris Deplanche (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Trichoglossus haematodus deplanchii
Genus: Trichoglossus
Citation: Verreaux,J & Des Murs, 1860
Protonimo: Trichoglossus Deplanchii

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    (1) – Subspecies Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)

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“Coconut Lorikeet (deplanchii)” (T. haematodus deplanchii)


Sources:

Avibase

Photos: by Klaus Rudloff (kdrudloff@web.de) – biolib.cz