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Hyacinth Macaw
Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus


Hyacinth Macaw

Content

Description:

Hyacinth Macaw illustration

90 to 100 cm.. of length and a weight of 1,5 to 1,7 kg.

The Hyacinth Macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) is the largest parrot; has a distinctive coloration, mostly blue intense, with different colors. Wings and tail below black. The basis of the bill and periocular ring, naked and yellow. The tail is very long, and its powerful bill Black is deeply curved and pointed.

The species Anodorhynchus glaucus, similar but smaller, extinct in the early 20th century, It may have been present in Bolivia.

Habitat:

The Hyacinth Macaw take advantage of a great diversity of habitats rich in various species of Palm trees with large seeds, of which feeds.

In the Brazilian Amazon avoid areas of more moisture, preferring lowland forests and seasonally wet formations with clear zones. In the drier parts of the northeast of Brazil inhabits areas of Plateau cut by Rocky valleys, steep with closed deciduous woodland, gallery forest and swamps with Mauritia flexuosa.

In the the Pantanal region birds frequent gallery forest with palm trees in areas covered with wet grass.

Apparently performs migratory movements.

Usually seen in pairs, family groups or small flocks (usually up to 10); much larger flocks reported before the decline.

Reproduction:

They nest in large tree hollows, in cracks in rocks from cliffs in the northeast of Brazil or in moriche or aguaje (Mauritia).

The favorite for nesting trees in the Mato Grosso, Brazil, include Enterolobium and Sterculia striata. In Northeast Brazil, the nest is located in Palms Mauritia dead or on cliffs.

They usually put one or two eggs, although only one young usually survives if the second egg hatches a few days after the first, since the smaller calf cannot compete with the larger for food.

The incubation period lasts about a month, and the male will assist his partner while she incubates the eggs.

Young people remain with their parents up to three months of age. They reach maturity and begin to play on the seven years.

The breeding season is from August to December, Maybe a little later in areas of pantanal.

Food:

The diet Hyacinth Macaw consists mainly of nuts, locally available of various Palms, including (on Amazonia) Maximiliana regia, Orbignya martiana and Astrocaryum, in the northeast of Brazil, of the Syagrus coronata and Orbignya eicherir, in areas of wetlands of Bone collectors and Acrocomia.

The palm nuts they take them from the own soil or plant (especially after a fire or when available as undigested remains in livestock droppings).

Other fruits that have information are the from the Ficus sp., as well as aquatic molluscs Pomacea.

Birds drink liquid from green palm fruits.

Distribution:

Its distribution includes the Centre of South America, Perhaps in several spacious separate areas.

In the Amazonia in For from the Tapajos River, to the East of the basin of the Tocantins River, extending to the South, possibly to the Northwestern area of Tocantins. At least before present North of the Amazon River (in Amapá, amazon and Roraima, Brazil) and perhaps some specimens can still inhabit, Although there is no known recent records.

Distributed, as well, through the Northeast interior of Brazil, more or less centered on the Microregion of the Chapadas das Mangabeiras in the union between Maranhão, Piauí, Goiás and Bay, Brazil (the region Gerais).

A third important population focuses on habitats wetlands of the upper basin of the Paraguay River in the southwest of Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, and extending into the adjacent area of the East of Bolivia and North end of Paraguay.

Reported as probable for the Mapori River to the South-East of Colombia (Vaupés).

Movements General residents but perhaps seasonal in the Amazon in relation to the ecology of the plants on which they feed.

The territory between the three current major distributions, can still be busy even though recent trends given, They seem to indicate that this seems unlikely.

Formerly common in some areas (for example, Mato Grosso). Now they are rather unevenly distributed, with the recent and likely declines continuous in its population due mainly to the illegal trade internal and to the smaller, but significant, international market of live birds. Also hunted for its feathers (especially Pari) and as food. Declining in some areas (for example Eastern Amazonia), because of the alteration or loss of habitat.

Total estimated wild population in 3000 (1.992). CITES Appendix I.

VULNERABLE.

Conservation:


Vulnerable

• Current Red List of UICN: Vulnerable

• Population trend: Decreasing

The Hyacinth Macaw It has been subjected to a massive illegal trade. At least 10.000 birds were captured in the wild, in the decade of 1980, with a 50% destined to the Brazilian market (Mittermeier et to the. 1990).

Among 1983-1984, more than 2.500 birds were moved out of Black Bay, Paraguay, with others 600 extra at the end of 1980 (J. Pryor in litt., 1998). Although these numbers are now much smaller, illegal trade continues (for example 10 bird went through a pet market in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, in August 2004 until July 2005, where the birds were changing hands for 1.000 $ US and went to Peru [Herrera and Hennessey 2007]). More recently it has been noted that there appears to be almost no illegal trade in this species in Bolivia (B. Hennessey in litt. 2012).

Through its area of distribution, There is something of the local game for use as food and for its feathers.

In the Amazon, habitat loss has occurred for cattle ranching and hydroelectric power systems in the rivers Tocantins and Xingu.

In the Pantanal, only the 5% trees S. apetala have suitable cavities (Guedes 1993, Johnson 1996). Young trees are used as food for livestock and burned by frequent fires (Newton 1994).

The Gerais is it being quickly transformed by mechanized agriculture, ranching and plantations of exotic trees (Conservation International 1999).

In Paraguay, the preferred habitats of the Hyacinth Macaw are considered seriously threatened (N. Kochalka Lopez in litt. 2013) and the Paso Bravo National Park suffering from illegal logging.

Conservation Actions Underway:

    – CITES Appendix I and II, protected under Brazilian and Bolivian law and prohibition of exports from all countries of origin.

    – Many landowners in the Pantanal (more and more in the Gerais) they do not allow hunters on their property.

    – There are several studies long-term and conservation initiatives (for example. Anon 2004).

    – In the Refuge Caiman ecological in the Pantanal, the Hyacinth Macaw Project has used artificial nests and hatchling management techniques and raised awareness among farmers (Anonymous 2004).

Conservation Actions Proposed:

    – Study of the range, the current status of the population and the scope of the negotiation of the different parts of its area of distribution (Snyder et to the., 2000).

    – Assess the effectiveness of artificial nesting boxes (Snyder et to the., 2000).

    – To enforce the legal measures that hinder trade.

    – Experiment with ecotourism in one or two sites to encourage donors (Snyder et to the., 2000).

"Hyacinth Macaw" in captivity:

Rare up to 1970; then, starting at 1980, increased considerably in number of captive birds due to increased breeding.

Despite the prohibitions, many of these Macaws they are still trading at high prices (10.000 euros or more), due to its beauty and ease to mimic human language.

Rearing this species can be difficult and, Unfortunately, many chicks die each year in inexperienced hands.

From this page we strongly preserve these beautiful birds in their natural environment, sincerely not us seems reasonable to his tenure as a pet.

Alternative names:

Hyacinth Macaw, Blue Macaw, Black Macaw (English).
Ara hyacinthe (French).
Hyazinthara, Hyathinzara (German).
Arara-azul-grande, arara-azul, arara-hiacinta, arara-preta, arara-roxa, arara-una, canindé (Portuguese).
arara-azul, Arara-azul-grande, arara-hiacinta, arara-preta, arara-roxa, Ararauna, arara-una, canindé (Portuguese (Brazil)).
Guacamayo Azul, Guacamayo Jacinto, Papagayo azul (español).
Jacinta azul, Paraba azul (Bolivia).
Vihina (Desana).
Kaheta (Carijona).
Guaía-hovy (Guarani).
Arara-úna (Tupi Guaraní).

John Latham
John Latham

scientific classification:


Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Anodorhynchus
Scientific name: Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus
Citation: (Latham, 1790)
Protonimo: Psittacus hyacinthinus


Images Hyacinth Macaw:

Videos "Hyacinth Macaw"



Species of the genus Anodorhynchus

“Hyacinth Macaw” (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife
– Parrots, Parrots and macaws (Neotropical)

Photos:

(1) – Hyacinth Macaw also known as Hyacinthine Macaw at Disney’s Animal Kingdom Park by Hank Gillette [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – A Hyacinth Macaw at Brevard Zoo, Florida, USA By Rusty Clark from merritt usland FLA (Brevard Zoo Hyacinth Macaw) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Hyacinthine Macaw at Melbourne Zoo, Australia By derivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)Anodorhynchus_hyacinthinus_-Australia_Zoo_-8.jpg: Erik (HASH) Hersman [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Hyacinth Macaws at Stone Zoo, Stoneham, Massachusetts, USA By Eric Kilby (originally posted to Flickr as Squawking Heads) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Hyacinthine Macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) By Ana_Cotta (originally posted to Flickr as ARARA) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Hyacinth Macaws, Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus at the Aquarium of the Americas in New Orleans, Louisiana By Derek Jensen [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(7) – A pair of Hyacinth Macaws and thier nest in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil By Geoff Gallice from Gainesville, FL, USA (Hyacinth macaws) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(8) – A Hyacinth Macaw preening at the Aquarium of the Americas, New Orleans, USA By Quinn Dombrowski (originally posted to Flickr as Dainty) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(9) – Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus by Hans – Pixabay
(10) – Illustration Guacamayo Jacinto By Lear, Edward [CC BY 2.0 or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Niels Poul Dreyer (Xeno-canto)

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Grey-cheeked Parakeet
Brotogeris pyrrhoptera

Catita Macareña

Content

Description:

20 cm.. height.
The Grey-cheeked Parakeet (Brotogeris pyrrhoptera) discovered in 1801. Is difference for them cheeks and sides neck grey, crown up to almost the nape, blue, bill yellowish, armpit reddish orange (only visible in flight), tail long and pointed, the rest of the body green.

The immature they have the crown greenish blue and the bill blackish.

hybrid species:

    Brotogeris [erythrogenys x pyrrhoptera] (hybrid)
    Brotogeris [chevroned x pyrrhoptera] (hybrid)
    Brotogeris [pyrrhoptera x jugularis] (hybrid)

Habitat:

Video – "Grey-cheeked Parakeet"

It inhabits in humid forest, semi-wet, secondary, formations of semi-deciduous forest and cultivated areas, until 1500 m. Has also seen it is in the banana plantations. Flies in pairs or small groups up to of 12 individuals, sometimes associated with other parrots.

Reproduction:

Nest in hollows and termite mounds on large trees and apparently be reproduced between January and March. It is still unknown why the termites tolerate their presence.

Their eggs, they are around for 2 cm.. x 1,6 cm.. they settle in sunsets of four to six eggs in a nest filled with MOSS. The female incubates them for a few 25-26 days, While the male mounts guard out of the nest.

Food:

Feeds of flowers and seeds large trees including Erythina, Chorisia and cavanillesia platanifolia, Cecropia catkins, fruits of Ceiba and Ficus figs. Sometimes they feed of banana.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 9.300 km2

The Grey-cheeked Parakeet distributed over the southwest of Ecuador and Northwest corner of Peru, from the Valley of the chone river, Manabi, to the South up to Gold and Loja in Ecuador, and Tumbes and Piura in Peru.

The populations more large is found in the coast of Manabi and Guayas, and at the border between Ecuador and Peru (Juniper and Parr, 1998).

There was a large decrease in the population during the 20TH century, at the beginning of the year 1980 (Best et to the., 1995, Juniper and Parr 1998), with 59.320 birds imported by countries CITES between 1983-1988. In 1995, the population Wild was estimated in 15.000 birds, mainly in Ecuador (Best et to the., 1995). This represents a very crude c.70% decline in 10 years, although it is still locally common in some remains of its habitat. (Juniper and Parr 1998).

Counts of investigations in the Cerros de Amotape National Park and in the Tumbes national reserve they revealed a descent of the 33,2% between 1992 and 2008 (Anon. 2009).

Conservation:

State of conservation ⓘ


Critically Endangered critically endangered (UICN)ⓘ

• Current category of the Red List of the UICN: In danger of extinction.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

The main threat to this species is the wild bird trade. The habitat It is also losing out by logging, Agriculture and overgrazing. Its persecution as a pest crops can be also significant.

Is expected that the rate of decline is more slow in the next 10 years.


"Grey-cheeked Parakeet" in captivity:

Most of the existing populations are found in the houses of individuals such as pets. Because of this, effort has been made to save this species of Brotogeris.

Alternative names:

Gray-cheeked Parakeet, Gray cheeked Parakeet, Grey cheeked Parakeet, Grey-cheeked Parakeet (English).
Toui flamboyant, Perroquet à flancs orangés, Perroquet de Perico, Perruche ou (French).
Feuerflügelsittich (German).
Periquito-de-bochecha-cinza (Portuguese).
Catita Macareña, Periquito de Alas Naranjas (español).
Perico de Mejilla Gris (Peru).


scientific classification:

John Latham
John Latham

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Brotogeris
Scientific name: Brotogeris pyrrhoptera
Citation: (Latham, 1801)
Protonimo: Psittacus pyrrhopterus


Images Grey-cheeked Parakeet:



Species of the genus Brotogeris

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Parrot Book, parrots and macaws Neotropical

Photos:

(1) – Grey-cheeked Parakeet (also known as the Fire-winged Parakeet) at El Empalme (also known officially as Velasco Ibarra), a town located in Guayas, Ecuador By markaharper1 [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Periquito macareño (Brotogeris pyrrhoptera), Quito, Ecuador by Diego Delso [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Grey-cheeked Parakeet (Brotogeris pyrrhoptera) in captivity in Cuenca, Ecuador By Beatrice Murch (originally posted to Flickr as Grey headed parrot) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – A pet Grey-cheeked Parakeet By Juano80 (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Grey-cheeked Parakeet Brotogeris pyrrhoptera in Río Milagro in Yaguachi. Prov. Guayas. ECU by Ronald Navarrete-AmayaFlickr

Sounds: (xENO-singing)

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Caica Parrot
Pyrilia caica


Lorito Caica

Content

Description:

23 cm.. height.

The head of the Caica Parrot (Pyrilia caica) totally black is it more distinguishable from this species, together with a collar Golden cafesoso that extends up to the chest.

The rest of the body usually Green, more clear in the belly and the inside of the tail; wing with blue stain and dark ends, Tip of the tail black.

Bill color bone; ring eyepiece bare of color grey pale; Orange irises.

The youth with crown green, face Dark greenish yellow, and collar not very notorious gold in neck and almost absent in chest.

  • Sound of the Caica Parrot.

Habitat:

Inhabits little disturbed humid forests, firm ground, in Tepuis, from the 50 to the 1100 m.
gregarious, They walk in small groups. They feed in the canopy of the forest.

Reproduction:

Currently with little information about the reproduction.

Food:

In the wild, It believes that its diet consists mainly of eucalyptus flowers, fruit, nectar and pollen.

Distribution:

Can be observed in the South-East of Venezuela, Guyanas and northeast of the brazilian amazon.

Conservation:


Status


• Red List category of the UICN current: Near-threatened

• Population trend: Stable

Justification of the population:

The size of the world population Caica Parrot It has not been quantified, although this species is described as 'rare’ (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification trend :

This species is suspected that it may lose 13,6-17,2% of habitat within its distribution over three generations (21 years) based on a model of deforestation of the Amazonia (Soares-Filho et to the., 2006, Bird et to the. 2011).

Given the susceptibility of this species to the hunting and/or entrapment, It is suspected that its population will decrease at a rate close to the 30% in three generations.

"Caica Parrot" in captivity:

They adult acclimatised quite easily to a new environment and are very resistant … Conversational skills (in comparison with other species).
They are very quiet in an Aviary, with a personality friendly and Gentile. They are very sociable and it should be with a partner or in a group environment. In any way, It is not easy to see to the Caica Parrot in captivity.

Alternative names:

Caica Parrot, Hooded Parrot (English).
Caïque à tête noire (French).
Kappenpapagei, Kappen-Papagei (German).
curica-caica, curica, papagainho, periquito-de-pescoço-marrom (Portuguese).
Lorito Caica, Lorito de Cabeza Negra (español).
Perico Cabecinegro (Venezuela).


scientific classification:

John Latham
John Latham

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrilia
Scientific name: Pyrilia caica
Citation: (Latham, 1790)
Protonimo: Caïca parrot


Images "Caica Parrot"

Videos "Caica Parrot"

————————————————————————————————

“Caica Parrot” (Pyrilia caica)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – lynxeds

Sounds: controles-canto.org

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Red fan Parrot
Deroptyus accipitrinus

Deroptyus accipitrinus
National Zoo - Washington DC

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

35 to 41 cm.. height and between 190 and 277 g. of weight.

The Red fan Parrot (Deroptyus accipitrinus) is unmistakable for its showy colours. Has the forecrown and crown yellowish white, fading is back to Brown with striped pale in the part back from the neck and a bordered of feathers elongated in form of collar of color red Bordeaux in its base and blue bright in the tips; lores brown; cheeks, throat, sides neck and supercilii area, brown, strongly striped with shades yellow.

The upperparts are green. The under wing-coverts medium-sized and small are green; primary coverts of color blue dark dark. Primaries blackish, secondaries Green with dark tips. Under, the wings green, flight feather blackish. Sides of chest and belly green; center of chest and the belly red Bordeaux with blue tips, creating an effect bleached blue and Red, sometimes with a little bit of green, especially in the part superior of the chest; the thighs and undertail-coverts green. Upper, the tail green with blue tips, outer feathers with blue in the outerweb and Red hidden in the base of the innerwebs; undertail, the tail black. Bill blackish, paler at the tip; cere black; yellow the irises; legs dark grey.

It is not possible to determine the sex safely by their appearance.

Immature has lower jaw of color Horn and a rainbow Brown warm.

Description 2 subspecies

  • Deroptyus accipitrinus accipitrinus

    (Linnaeus, 1758) – Nominal. With the forecrown whitish.


  • Deroptyus accipitrinus fuscifrons

    (Hellmayr, 1905) – With the forecrown dark brown.

Habitat:

The Red fan Parrot living in the jungle tropical of land low, preferring the formations of land firm, including the ground slightly wavy or of the hills (perhaps due to a greater diversity of plants of which is fed). Apparently prevents them forests and marshes, edge of forest and clear, but there is a report of birds in forest flooded in the drainage of Morona River, Peru, and feeds mainly on riverine forests in Venezuela. Only comes to them 400 meters in the southeast of Colombia and a 200 metres in Venezuela.

Not is very gregarious, are distributed in pairs or small groups of 3-4. On rare occasions, until 10. Pre-breeding aggregations appear to break up into pairs or trios at the onset of nesting. Rest in the cups give the trees in small groups (Perhaps alone in tree cavities). It feeds mainly in the canopy.

Not are very sociable. They show an appearance of Raptor, Deploying the feathers of the back of the head fan.

Reproduction:

Nest in tree holes, including an old nest of Woody Woodpecker, for example of a Woodpecker grebes (Campephilus rubricollis). The rapid flapping of wings, followed of a mild decline of sliding, they give a deeply undulating display flight during the breeding period. Breeding March-June, Venezuela; January-March, Guiana; February-April, Suriname; December-February, Brazil. Clutch 2-3 in captivity.

Food:

Feeds of leaves and outbreaks of Bombacopsis, unripe fruits of Dialium, fruits of Euterpe, Attalea, fagifolia, Astrocaryum; Also takes Inga and guava in cultivated areas.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 4.240.000 km2

Discontinuous. Amazonia, from the South of Venezuela to the northeast of Ecuador and Peru, the Guianas and Amazonia Brazil.

Distribution 2 subspecies:

  • Deroptyus accipitrinus accipitrinus

    (Linnaeus, 1758) – Nominal. From the South-East of Colombia to Venezuela, the Guianas; Northeast of Peru and North of Brazil.


  • Deroptyus accipitrinus fuscifrons

    (Hellmayr, 1905) – Brazil, to the South of the amazon rivers (from For to the North of Mato Grosso) possibly Bolivia.

Conservation:


Status


• Current category of the Red List of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

It is suspected that this species has lost 24-31.3% of habitat suitable within their distribution during three generations (23 years) based on a model of Amazon deforestation (Soares-Filho et to the., 2006, Bird et to the., 2011). But, given the tolerance of the species to the effects of fragmentation / degradation / edges and / or the magnitude of the losses global, It is suspected that will decrease in <25% en tres generaciones.

"Red fan Parrot" in captivity:

The Red fan Parrot or Parrot Hawk is a bird very Intelligent, playful and very beautiful. However and, Despite its undeniable appeal, It is not ideal to have captive species. Are extremely nervous and in occasions this is translated in that is start or bite them feathers or even can get to self-harm is.

Are parrots extremely noisy and having a copy inside the house does not seem too tolerable and yes, a tough test for our patience.

Alternative names:

Red fan Parrot, Hawk-headed Parrot, Red-fan Parrot, Red-fen parrot (English).
Papegeai maillé, Perroquet accipitrin, Perroquet maillé, Perroquet papegai (French).
Fächerpapagei (German).
Anacã, curiba-bacabal, maracanã-guaçu, papagaio-de-coleira, vanaquiá (Portuguese).
Lora Gavilana, Loro Cacique, Quinaquina (español).
Loro Cacique, Jia-Jia (Venezuela).


scientific classification:

Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Deroptyus
Scientific name: Deroptyus accipitrinus
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Protonimo: parrot accipitrinns


Images of “Red fan Parrot” :

Videos "Red fan Parrot"

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“Red fan Parrot” (Deroptyus accipitrinus)


Sources:
– Parrot Book, Parrots and macaws Neotropical
avibase
– mundoexotics.com
Birdlife

– Photos: Dennis Avon, National Zoo - Washington DC, sutterkane.Tumblr.com, www.zoochat.com

– Sounds: Roger Ahlman

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Little corella
Cacatua sanguinea


Cacatua sanguinea

Content

Description

It measures 35-40 cm.. and weighs approximately 500 g..
In the Little corella (Cacatua sanguinea), the head and crest (that most of the time stays low) are white. The pink base of the feathers are almost completely hidden and yet barely visible small flakes in the cheeks.
Dissemination of salmon-rosa color to the area around the eyes. The upperparts and coverts of the wing are white. There is a remarkable spread of yellow color on the bottom of the flight feather and of the tail.
The bill is grayish white. The skin nude around the eyes is blue grey. The irises is dark brown, the legs grey.

Both sexes are identical in all aspects, including the color of the irises.

The immature have a look more white and the skin of the periphery eyepiece less prominent.

Subspecies description
  • Cacatua sanguinea gymnopis

    (Sclater,PL, 1871) – Features with more naranja-rosa around them eyes and in the bases of the feathers of the head, neck and top of the chest. Its orbital skin is darker.

  • Cacatua sanguinea normantoni

    (Mathews, 1917) – Is smaller.

  • Cacatua sanguinea sanguinea

    (Gould, 1843) –

  • Nominal.

  • Cacatua sanguinea transfreta

    (Mees, 1982) – Displays below the wings and tail infiltrations slightly yellow pulling a Brown.

  • Cacatua sanguinea westralensis

    (Mathews, 1917) – It has bright orange-red colors around the eyes and the bases of feathers, also in the the mantle and in the part inferior of the abdomen.

Habitat:

Video – "Little corella" (Cacatua sanguinea)

The spectacular BLOODED COCKATOO - BIRD VETERINARY

It nests in riparian forests bordering permanent pasture and cropland. In the breeding season, they can be found in a wide variety of habitats, including areas of acacias and eucalyptus bushes of short grass or pasture with groups of scattered trees. During this time, they are also present in the rice fields, cane extensions, areas of shrubs, at the edges of mangrove areas, in the pastures for horses, on roads and gardens on the outskirts of cities.

Behavior:

The Bloody Cockatoos they often form large gatherings in crops and pastures.

Out of it breeding season, It is not uncommon to see flocks of up to 70.000 birds.
At night they fly to their bedrooms, located near the water.

Early in the morning, they drink before heading to the feeding sites often many kilometres from the bedroom.
During the hottest hours of the day, they seek shelter in the shade of the leaves..

Reproduction:

In Australia they can be played back in any month of the year, When are conditions good. But, the nesting seems to be further developed early in the North (from May to October) and in the Southeast (August-December).

In Queensland, the implementation is carried out mainly from December to April and from July to October. Reproduction is strongly influenced by climate, usually begins 2 or 3 months after the end of the rainy season in northern districts.

There may be two or three broods per season. Couple ties are very strong and seem to last for life. They are loyal to the same nesting sites year after year. The nest is usually placed in a eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) between 3 and 10 meters above the ground.

The cavity is approximately one meter in depth. It is fairly easy to detect since crust is often removed around inlet. They also nest on cliffs or termite mounds..

They put 2-4 eggs in a bed made from chips of wood that is replaced each year.

In general, two chicks manage to break the shell after 25 days. They remain in the nest for nine weeks, After this take off.

Food:

It has a diet mainly vegetarian. They feed on seeds you are in the trees of the genus EMEX, green areas or fields of melon (cucumber myriocarpus). They also eat nuts, fruit, berries, flowers, estate, bulbs, shoots as well as insects and larvae.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 5.300.000 km2

The Little corella lives in New Guinea and Australia. In Australia, We found in the Northwest, on the plateau of Kimberley and Arnhem in the this of the Cape York Peninsula. They are absent from the east coast and the entire southwestern part of the country..

Subspecies distribution
  • Cacatua sanguinea gymnopis

    (Sclater,PL, 1871) – Within the Centre and it's Australia.

  • Cacatua sanguinea normantoni

    (Mathews, 1917) – To the West of the cape york peninsula

  • Cacatua sanguinea sanguinea

    (Gould, 1843) –

  • Nominal.

  • Cacatua sanguinea transfreta

    (Mees, 1982) – Plain to the South of New Guinea.

  • Cacatua sanguinea westralensis

    (Mathews, 1917) – Basin of the murchison river, Western Australia.

Conservation:

State of conservation ⓘ


Status Minor Concern ⓘ (UICN)ⓘ

• Current IUCN Red List category: Least concern.

• Population trend: Growing.

Its population is estimated at more than 1 million of birds and it believes that is in constant increase, especially in the South of Australia.

Its growth and expansion depends on the development of agriculture and the availability of artificial reservoirs. It is a Bird protected, except in the the Australia South. In this last area, the landowners are allowed to kill birds to prevent the formation of large destructive meetings for crops.

"Little corella" in captivity:

The Australian poultry to the blood cockatoo is it considered common.
They are very docile and Welcome to as pets, but you must pay them attention.

Alternative names:

Little Corella, Bare-eyed Cockatoo, Bare-eyed Corella, Blood-stained Cockatoo, Blue-eyed Cockatoo, Corella, Dampier’s Corella, Little Cockatoo, Short-billed Cockatoo, Short-billed Corella (ingles).
Cacatoès corella, Cacatoès à oeil nu (French).
Nacktaugenkakadu (German).
Cacatua-corella-pequena (Portuguese).
Cacatúa Sanguínea (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Cacatuidae
Genus: Cockatoo
Scientific name: Cacatua sanguinea
Citation: Gould, 1843
Protonimo: Cacatua sanguinea

Blood Cockatoo Images:



Species of the genus Cacatua

Sources:
Avibase
– Photos: Wikipedia, John H. Boyd, murrundi.org
– Sounds: Nigel Jackett (Xeno-canto)

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Ornate Lory
Trichoglossus ornatus

Lori Adornado

Content

Description

Of 25 cm.. length and 100 to 120 gr. weight.

The general plumage of the Ornate Lory (Trichoglossus ornatus) is green. The front, the head and feathers that cover the ears are blue. It has a small red stripe that goes from the upper right corner of the eye to the nape of the neck, It also has a yellow stripe on the sides of the neck. The throat and chest are orange-red and in each pen has a bluish-black wide table. Underwing feathers are yellow.

The rest of the bottom is green with yellowish scales.
Belly pale green with dark green bars. Green-yellow under the tail is bright green ends. The upper part of the tail is dark green with yellow edges in outer feathers. The base of the outer tail feathers is pink.

The circle around the eyes is narrow and dark gray. The iris is red, the legs are grey and orange beaks.

Habitat:

The Ornate Lory they usually visit the swamps and marshy woodlands where there is fresh water. They are also found in the forest, the plots during the regeneration near the edges, scattered shrubs in cropland, including coconut plantations.

Usually, They appreciate the open areas and do not venture far from the primary forests.

In the North and center of the main island, These birds live from sea level up to the 1.000 meters above the sea level, While in the South, You can climb up to the 1.500 m. Its preferred habitat is between 300 and 500 m.

The Ornate Lory They mainly live in pairs or in small groups. Sometimes, when feeding in fruit trees or at the edges of the forest, are associated with the Yellow-and-green Lorikeet (Trichoglossus flavoviridis).

Benefiting from stable climate, These birds are probably sedentary.

Reproduction:

We really know very little about the reproductive habits of this species in the wild.

Most of the birds are able to breed in the months of September and October. There is no information on the construction and composition of the nest.

Spawning usually consists of 3 eggs that are incubated during 27 days. The chicks are nidicolous and depend on their parents during 80 days after hatching.

Food:

The Ornate Lory they are vegetarian birds, most of its menu is made up of nectar, pollen and fruit. When feed, these birds may concentrate in large numbers on flowering trees. The seeds of the trees of the genus Tectona and Casuarina they are also part of their diet.

Distribution:

Distribution Lori adorned
This species is endemic to Indonesia , where is widespread in Sulawesi and surrounds the coast islands including Togian, Peleng, Banggai and the archipelago Tukang Besi. It has been reported that it is no longer common in parts of northern and central Sulawesi, but still seems to be common on the islands Togian and in the lowland forest in Torout (Bogani Nani NP) and to a lesser extent in Tangkoko.

Conservation:


Status

– Current IUCN Red List category: Least concern

– The population trend: Decreasing

It has been described as common and locally very common., with a total population of over of 50.000 specimens.

The trend has not been quantified, but slow descents can be seen due to some pressure from capture, and although it does not require primary forest it is more common in the lowlands and therefore may be affected by habitat loss.

It seems that the Ornate Lory is trapped in national parks as Tangkoko and Lore Lindu, and they are commonly seen in bird markets.

"Ornate Lory" in captivity:

Due to its state of decline in its population, any specimen that can not be returned to their natural habitat (natural range) should preferably be placed in a well-managed breeding program to ensure the survival of the species.

Alternative names:

Ornate Lorikeet, Ornate Lory (ingles).
Loriquet orné (French).
Schmucklori (German).
Lóris-ornado (Portuguese).
Lori Adornado, Tricogloso Adornado (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
familia: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Trichoglossus ornatus
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Protonimo: parrot furniture

Images “Ornate Lory”:

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“Ornate Lory”” (Trichoglossus ornatus)


Sources:

Avibase
Oiseaux.NET

Photos:

– Ornate Lorikeet at San Antonio Zoo, Texas, USA. by George Coller – Wikimedia
– by © 2004 Jeff Whitlock – Jacksonville Zoo
– by iggino – IBC.lynxeds.com
– Trichoglossus ornatus parrot eating banana – free-pet-wallpapers.com

Sounds: Mike Nelson (Xeno-canto)

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Blue-crowned Lorikeet
Vini australis


Blue-crowned Lorikeet

Content

Description

19 cm.. of length and a weight of 40 to 55 g..

The Blue-crowned Lorikeet (Vini australis) has a plumage mostly green. The upper part of the head is dark blue with light blue streaks. The region of the windows of the nose, the cheeks, the ear-coverts, the neck and the abdomen They are red. the lower part of abdomen and the thighs they are purple blue. The back is green, the interior of the tail is yellowish-green. The irises is reddish brown. The legs are of color red and the bill is orange.

The youth are equal to adults, but with less red in the face and throat, little or none abdominal patch, stripes blue shorter in the crown, no purpura on the thighs, brown the eyes.

Habitat:

It is found in forests, coconut palms or any habitat where flowering trees; coastal mountains, gardens and agricultural areas. Nomad, sometimes traveling between the Islands.

Daily movements in search of food. Aggressive but gregarious, they often move in flocks of up to 12 individuals, except during the breeding season they live with their partners.

In Samoa it is common around villages and plantations and less common in moist forests, higher elevations in the rain forest and secondary growth.

Reproduction:

Nests in holes or hollows of trees, It has also been reported that they dig burrows in the banks of Earth, Although it has not confirmed. The laying is one or two white eggs. Breeding registered in June and August. In captivity the incubation It has been calculated in 23 days.

Food:

It feeds on nectar, pollen and red fruits. It particularly prefers Erythrina, Wild hibiscus and coconut.

Distribution:

Samoa distribution of Lori
Extends over the archipelagos of Samoa, Tonga and LAU, distributed by Islands: Love, Futuha'a, Fulago, Futuna, Ha'afeva, You're young, Moce, Niue, Ofu, Olosega, Samoa, Salt, Tafahi, Say, Tofua, Tungua, Fire, It's cool, Varoa, I'm sorry and Voleva. In the past was also in ‘USA, Tongatapu and Mata-Utu but there it is extinct.

Conservation:


Status

– Current IUCN Red List category: Least concern.

– The population trend: Decreasing.

The world population It has not been quantified, but the species is informed that it is common in much of its restricted area of distribution.

The population is suspected to be in decline due to the predation by species invasive.

Still fairly common throughout its range, but it has become extinct on many islands and it is decreasing in Tonga (probably because of the rats).

"Blue-crowned Lorikeet" in captivity:

Like the others Vini lories, the Blue-crowned Lorikeet still quite rare in poultry farming, probably as a result of the protection they receive in their native South Pacific countries.

Alternative names:

Blue-crowned Lorikeet, Blue crowned Lorikeet, Blue-crowned Lory (ingles).
Lori fringillaire (French).
Blaukäppchen (German).
Loris Vini Australis (Portuguese).
Lori de Samoa (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Vini
Scientific name: Vini australis
Citation: (Gmelin, 1788)
Protonimo: Psittacus australis

Images “Blue-crowned Lorikeet”:

Videos "Blue-crowned Lorikeet"

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“Blue-crowned Lorikeet” (Vini australis)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – “Vini australis-London Zoo, England-8a” by William Warby from London, England – Unknown-Tropical BirdUploaded by Snowmanradio. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
2 – “Vini australis-two on a perch-8a-4c” by Vini_australis_-two_on_a_perch-8a.jpg: TJ Lin – originally posted to Flickr as Dscn6140 and uploaded to commons at Vini_australis_-two_on_a_perch-8a.jpg. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
3 – By Duncan Wright (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
4 – By Steven G. Johnson on commons (same as unnormalized on flickr) (Dsc_0014uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
5- by Zambar – zoochat.com

Sounds: Samuel Jones (Xeno-canto)

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Blue-fronted Lorikeet
Charmosyna toxopei

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

16 cm.. length.

Blue-fronted Lorikeet

The forecrown of the Blue-fronted Lorikeet (Charmosyna toxopei) is bright green, the front of the crown, above the eyes is bright blue; rest of the head green. Upperparts green, bright in the rump. Wings Green with blackish inner feathers. The underwing-coverts green; flight feather Blackish with yellow band in the whole lower part of the secondaries. The underparts brighter yellowish green. Tail green, with red bases and blackish stain. The bill orange; the irises yellow orange; legs orange-red.

Habitat:

If recent observations were in fact of the Blue-fronted Lorikeet, species can be nomadic, moving from high to low altitude on the basis of the availability of food (like some other small parrots). This could explain the paucity of records, especially for a species already by itself it is distributed sparsely. The other possibility is that the birds are distributed only in the forested hills.

Interviews with local residents suggest that the species moved to the lowlands during the two annual seasons of heat, in March-April and August-November.

Reproduction:

There is no data.

Food:

The locals who live in the plateau frog They reported that the bird feeds on nectar and pollen from the trees in flower.

Distribution:

Endemic to Buru, Indonesian. Obviously, is a rare species, and virtually nothing is known of its State. The original specimens were collected in the wooded hills between 850 m and 1.000 m.

In 1980 the species was reported to be quite common in plantations, secondary and primary forest, but this record has been suggested as a reference to the Red-flanked Lorikeet (Charmosyna placentis) (the record of this species from Buru It is in fact wrong). In 1989 two flocks of five to six birds, supposedly this species, they were seen during a selective felling of forests to 600 meters on the Teluk Bara. There is also a report of 1993 of four small unidentified parakeets seen in the same area as the observations of 1.980. The species are now considered endangered by Birdlife International, although a thorough search must be carried out before its status can be fully determined. VULNERABLE.

Conservation:


Critically Endangered

• Current IUCN Red List category: Critical Hazard

• Population trend: Decreasing

• Population size: 50-249 mature individuals

Although there are few records (confirmed or unconfirmed) of the species, It is suspected that it is declining due to loss of forests in the lowlands.

Most of the forests in the coastal lowlands of Buru have they been clarified, and much of the forest in the northern part of the island has been connected shape selective or degraded and fragmented by migratory agriculture, in such a way that only a few small patches of lowland primary forest remain. But, the island's gardens still contain many indigenous tree species. In 2010, There was at least one search operation on a large scale above Buru, located in the lowlands. But, extensive forests of mountain of the island remain largely without being scanned. The topography of the mountain range Kaplamandan is the hope that almost all of the montane forest is inaccessible to loggers (A. Gray in litt. 2010).

All of the original specimens were captured alive using lime, However, the species is not kept as a pet, does not seem to be listed. Have a distribution of mountain which is close to the maximum altitude within its distribution area, does this species is potentially susceptible to climate change (BirdLife International data not publ.).

"Blue-fronted Lorikeet" in captivity:

Not found in captivity.

Alternative names:

Blue-fronted Lorikeet, Blue fronted Lorikeet, Buru Lorikeet (ingles).
Lori de Buru (French).
Burolori, Burulori (German).
Lori de Buru (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Charmosyna
Scientific name: Charmosyna toxopei
Citation: (Siebers, 1930)
Protonimo: Hypocharmosyna toxopei

Images "Blue-fronted Lorikeet"

————————————————————————————————

“Blue-fronted Lorikeet” (Charmosyna toxopei)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife