White-capped Parrot
Pionus seniloides

White-capped Parrot

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description:

28 - 30 cm.. high and about 229 g. of weight.

The White-capped Parrot (Pionus seniloides) is easily identifiable by the “bill” yellow, head usually white, with the crown with reddish speckles, feathers of the nape and sides of the head with dark blue edges and red dyes which gives the appearance of flake.

Breast with greenish blue edges, under belly and internal base tail red.

Iris of color Brown and legs gray-green.

The youth have crown and chest green, and green spots on the sides of the head and neck.

Note:

Previously he was treated as a subspecies of the species Pionus tumultuosus, namely, Pionus tumultuosus seniloides. A midyear 2014 it is considered as own species.

Habitat and behavior:

White-capped Parrot

It is a kind rare.
It inhabits in rainforest and borders, from the 1900 - 3000 m. It is mainly a species of temperate zone, but you can descend to lower elevations.

Like most parrots highland, the White-capped Parrot are rather nomads, widely wandering in search of fruits and seeds (now perhaps more as a result of extensive deforestation). Usually observed in flocks 3-25 birds, sometimes more. More active with grey weather, overcast skies. Hard to see while feeding or resting in the upper canopy. Its silhouette in flight resembles a Amazon but with the beating of wings deepest.

Reproduction:

It nests in tree hollows.

Food:

Feeds of seeds, fruit of Turpinia paniculata and plants of the family Clusiaceae; sometimes in cornfields, causing damage to their crops.

Distribution:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 1.020.000 km2

Live west of Venezuela (from the border TrujilloLara) through the East of the Andes of Colombia (rare in the western Andes), and on both sides of the Andes in Ecuador and Northwest of Peru (west to Cajamarca and this, at least until Freedom)

Conservation:


Status


• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common“, but irregular distribution (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

They suspected that the population is declining due to the continuous habitat destruction.

"White-capped Parrot" in captivity:

Rare in captivity. In Europe they arrived first at the beginning of the century 20 and then the early 70. In captivity, However, They were raised for the first time in the second half of the 80.

Alternative names:

White-capped Parrot, Speckle-faced Parrot (White-capped), White-headed Parrot (English).
Pione givrée (French).
Greisenkopfpapagei, Glatzenkopfpapagei, Greisenkopf-Papagei (German).
White-capped Parrot (Portuguese).
Loro de Cabeza Blanca, Loro seniloide, Loro gorriblanco (Spanish).
Cotorra Cabeciblanca (Venezuela).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pionus
Scientific name: Pionus seniloides
Citation: (Massena & Souancé, 1854)
Protonimo: Psittacus seniloides

Images “White-capped Parrot”:

Videos "White-capped Parrot"

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White-capped Parrot (Pionus seniloides)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Book parrots, Parrots and macaws Neotropical
parrots.org

Photos:

(1) – By Francesco Veronesi [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons White-capped Parrot (Pionus seniloides), Ecuador by
(2) – Iconographie des perroquets :Paris :P. Bertrand,1857 by Biodiversity Heritage LibraryFlickr

Sounds: Andrew Spencer

Yellowish-breasted Racquet-tail
Prioniturus flavicans

Yellowish-breasted Racquet-tail

Content

Yellowish-breasted Racquet-tail

Description

37 cm.. length.

The head of the Yellowish-breasted Racquet-tail (Prioniturus flavicans) is bright green, brighter around the lores and the base of the bill.

The front of the crown is green, rest of bright blue with red spot in the center crown. Mantle ocher yellow, well delimited from the blue nape the green of the wings and back; Back and rump green. Wings green, with vane Dark internal to the flight feather and blue to primaries longer. green's Underwing coverts; underside of primaries marked dark blue.

Underparts brighter yellowish green, ocher yellow in the chest. Upper, the outer feathers of the tail green with black and turquoise tips on vane outside of the outer feathers; below, the tail Dark, bathed in blue at the edges of the vane inner; spatulas blackish.

Bill horn; the dark brown irises; the gray legs.

Female less blue, no red dot on the crown, the underparts and the mantle, greener and rackets (a thin extension of the central tail feathers, almost as hair, It is ending with a more oval-shaped racket) shorter.

Young without rackets.

Habitat:

Found in the primary forest usually below the 1,000 m. But times may vary up to the 1.900 m. They are also observed in trees in cultivated areas.

Reproduction:

Little is known of their reproductive habits.

Food:

Birds they feed on the ground, among the plants of lowland and Hill forests, flocking often in fruit trees. They eat slowly along with other frugivorous birds.

Distribution:

Size of its range (breeding/resident ): 66.700 km2

Are distributed in the North of Sulawesi, Indonesia and on the Islands around, including BANGKA, Lembeh and Togian. The species also, possibly, It is distributed in groups of Islands Sangir and Banggai. Although its population may be declining due to habitat loss and trade in birds, It is not considered threatened and is still, relatively, common in the reserve Dumoga-Bone. It overlaps, Although it is less common, with the Golden-mantled Racquet-tail.

Conservation:


Status


• Current red list category of the UICN: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The population It has been estimated in the order of 45.000 individuals (Walker and Cahill 2000).

It is suspected that this species has diminished recently at a moderately fast pace, due to the continuing loss of forests.

Conservation Actions Proposed:

    – Evaluate the threats to this species. Calculate loss of forests in the lowlands of the North of Sulawesi.
    – Investigate the level of dependency of the forest habitats of the species.
    – Protect effectively important tracts of forest right in key places, both in the areas of strict protection areas of multiple use.

"Yellowish-breasted Racquet-tail" in captivity:

Not found in captivity.

Alternative names:

Yellow-breasted Racquet-tail, Yellow-breasted Racket-tail, Red Spotted Racket-tailed Parrot, Red-spotted Racket-tailed Parrot, Red-spotted Racquet-tail, Red-spotted Racquet-tail Parrot, Red-spotted Racquet-tailed Parrot, Yellowish breasted Racquet tail, Yellowish-breasted Racket-tail, Yellowish-breasted Racket-tailed Pa, Yellowish-breasted Racquet Tail, Yellowish-breasted Racquet-tail, Yellowish-breasted Racquet-tailed P (English).
Palette de Cassin, Perroquet à raquette de Cassin (French).
Flaggenschwanzpapagei, Flaggen-Schwanzpapagei (German).
Prioniturus flavicans (Portuguese).
Lorito momoto Amarillento, Lorito Momoto Amarillo, Lorito-momoto Amarillento (Spanish).


Scientific classification:

John Cassin
John Cassin

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Prioniturus
Scientific name: Prioniturus flavicans
Citation: Cassin, 1853
Protonimo: Prioniturus flavicans


Images “Yellowish-breasted Racquet-tail”:

Videos "Yellowish-breasted Racquet-tail"

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“Yellowish-breasted Racquet-tail” (Prioniturus flavicans)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – By © Simon van der Meulen – Oriental Bird Images
(2) – «Prioniturus flavicans» poor John Gould[1]. Available under the public domain license via Wikimedia Commons.

Sounds: Mike Nelson (Xeno-canto)

Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot
Micropsitta keiensis

Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

9,5 cm. length between 11 and 14 g. of weight.

The crown of the Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta keiensis) is yellow ocher, with a warm brown in forecrown; lores, chin and area under the eyes, brown; coverts outpus, dark green, tending to lighter green on cheeks and throat.

Upperparts, dark green with center at wing-coverts and feathers of black color with a black colored margin extrecho; flight feather black with vane Green external; feathers wings green. The underparts are yellowish-green, with fine dark stripes; undertail-coverts yellow and green. Upper, the tail It is iridescent, slightly greenish blue in the Center, Foreign feathers blackish with yellow spot on the ends. Under, the tail dark blue and yellow.

Bill dark grey; irises brown; legs dark gray.

Both sexes similar.
Immature like females but with bill pale yellow.

Description 3 subspecies

  • Micropsitta keiensis keiensis

    (Salvadori, 1876) – the subspecies nominal.


  • Micropsitta keiensis viridipectus

    (Rothschild, 1911) – Similar a nominal, but darker.


  • Micropsitta keiensis chloroxantha

    (Oberholser, 1917) – The mature more muted. The underparts with red markings male, dyed yellowish in female.

Habitat:

Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot

It inhabits in the forests of lowlands, in secondary growth and, sometimes around inhabited areas and coconut trees. The ecology species is similar to that of the Buff-faced Pygmy-Parrot. The birds are alone, in pairs or in small groups, and they can be distributed by undergrowth to some 20 meters above the ground. They climb on trunks and branches, and they can go down head, in inverted position, sometimes.

Reproduction:

Nest and roost Termites in tree cavities, the cavity they dig for themselves; the passageways of the tunnel going upwards and can be folded before arriving at the nido-camara. up the laying two white eggs deposited in a cavity unlined (dimensions around 20 cm x 15 cm.), and they can be occupied by other adults roost (up to four) during the breeding season. The exact role of these visiting birds is unknown, It is thought that they can help with the tasks of nest. nesting It has been recorded from October to March

Food:

With feed lichen, fungi, seeds, fruits and insects. Most of the Lichen directly collected it from the surface of the bark of the trees.

Distribution:

Size of its range (breeding/resident): 763.000 km2

The Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot is distributed among the Islands of Papua, in the West area, including Waigeo, Gébé, Kofiau, Salawati and Misool; through Vogelkop and Onin peninsula (West Papua Province); in the Kai and Aru Islands, and in the South of New Guinea between Mimika and the Fly River. The species is common to scale local.

Distribution 3 subspecies:

Conservation:


Status


• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, It is estimated over the 100,000 specimens.

The species, According to sources, It is considered very common within its range (pit et to the. 1997).

The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

"Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot" in captivity:

Not usually survive in captivity.

Alternative names:

Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot, Yellow capped Pygmy Parrot, Yellow-capped Pygmy Parrot (English).
Micropsitte pygmée (French).
Gelbkappen-Spechtpapagei (German).
Micropsitta keiensis (Portuguese).
Microloro de Kai, Microloro de las Kai (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Micropsitta keiensis
Citation: (Salvadori, 1876)
Protonimo: Nasiterna keiensis

Images “Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot”:

Videos “Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot”:

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Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta keiensis)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Parrot-birds – link
(2) – «NasiternaPygmaeaFKeulemans» by John Gerrard KeulemansOrnithological Miscellany. Volume 1. Licensed public via domain Wikimedia Commons.

Sounds: Hans Matheve (Xeno-canto)

Yellow-throated Hanging-Parrot
Loriculus pusillus

Yellow-throated Hanging-Parrot

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

12 cm.. length between 25 and 30 g. of weight.

The head of the Yellow-throated Hanging-Parrot (Loriculus pusillus) is bright green.

Upperparts green with yellow orange washing pale in the mantle; rump and uppertail-coverts, bright red. Wings green above, undertail, Turquoise with coverts green. Throat bright yellow, rest of the underparts bright green. Feathers of the tail green above, with side coverts yellowed and pale blue below. The bill orange; irises yellowish white; legs oranges.

Female and immature with yellow throat very small.

Habitat:

Reported along the edges of the forest, and in the marshy forests of the lowlands to 1.850 meters above sea level.
Possibly Nomad in response to the local plant phenology.

The species shows great activity, climbing acrobaticamente on the canopy at time of collection, and resting and sleeping mouth below as well as other members of the genus.

The birds are alone, in pairs or in groups of up to eight individuals.

The largest groups sometimes gather in trees to feed. Although discrete, the Yellow-throated Hanging-Parrot They attract attention, since when flying between the trees beat their wings emitting a characteristic hum, accompanied by shrill calls.

Reproduction:

The laying tends to be of two eggs, deposited in the hollow of a tree, Palm or arbol-helecho, from time to time in an old nest of a barbet or Woodpecker. The nesting in West Java It was recorded between March and May.

Food:

They feed on nectar, fruit (including the Ficus figs), leaves and flower buds, as Cassia and Erythrina.

Distribution:

Size of its range (breeding/resident): 167.000 km 2

Endemic of Java and Bali, where it is usually rare. The world's population is thought to be superior to 10.000, but it may have decreased due to the logging of forests

Conservation:




Status

• Current IUCN Red list category: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The world population It has not been quantified, It is thought to be above 10.000 specimens. The species is generally described as rare throughout its area of distribution (pit et to the., 1997).

There are no data on population trends; However, the species is suspected decreasing at a moderately fast pace, due to the loss and degradation of its habitat.

"Yellow-throated Hanging-Parrot" in captivity:

Rare in captivity.

Alternative names:

Yellow-throated Hanging-Parrot, Javan Hanging-Parrot, Little Hanging-Parrot, Yellow throated Hanging Parrot, Yellow-throated Hanging Parrot (English).
Coryllis à gorge jaune (French).
Elfenpapageichen (German).
Lorículo do Java (Portuguese).
Lorículo de Java, Lorículo Javanés (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Loriculus pusillus
Citation: Gray,GR, 1859
Protonimo: Loriculus pusillus

Videos "Yellow-throated Hanging-Parrot"

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“Yellow-throated Hanging-Parrot” (Loriculus pusillus)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

(1) – The Bali Children's Project
(2) – By Jiří Hruška – biolib

Sounds: Frank Lambert (Xeno-canto)

Wallace's Hanging-Parrot
Loriculus flosculus

Wallace's Hanging-Parrot

Content

Description

11 - 12 cm.. length.

The head of the Wallace's Hanging-Parrot (Loriculus flosculus) is green. Upperparts green with faint orange on the back of the neck; rump and uppertail-coverts red.

Wings green above. Chin red; rest of the underparts green, lighter in undertail-coverts. The tail, at the top, green color with a lighter Green Tip; ends of the lateral feathers, orange-red: Under, the tail bluish green. The bill red; Orange the irises; legs yellowish-orange.

Female with red chin reduced or nonexistent.

Immature with the red chin smaller. The color of the bill and legs more off.

Habitat:

Seem to need the humid mountain forests semi-evergreen. Birds have been seen in fruit trees, and outside the breeding season gather in small flocks of up to 20 birds. Its altitudinal distribution seems to be closely linked to the distribution of fruiting figs.

They easily unnoticed due to its small size and green plumage, and they are most often in flight when they can be identified by the size, strident calls and the buzz of the rapid flapping. They are most frequently, flying above the canopy.

Reproduction:

There are no data from the reproductive process in nature.

Food:

Most of the sightings in 1993, the Wallace's Hanging-Parrot they were in the fig tree in fruit trees, and dependence or specialization in this food resource is more than likely.
Its diet includes, In addition, nectar, outbreaks, flowers and seeds.

Distribution:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 13.400 km2

Endemic of Flowers. Found at semi-annual primary forest at an altitude between 400 and 980 m (more between 850 and 980 meters during the fructification of the Ficus figs) During observations on 1993. These birds were recorded in the area of Tanjung Kerita Mese, about Paku, to the East of Flowers and proposed as protected area.

Conservation:


Endangered


• Current IUCN Red list category: Danger

• Population trend: Decreasing

The habitat destruction through the combined effects of collecting firewood, the logging, timber extraction for construction materials and authorization for Agriculture, together they represent more relevant threats. Loss and fragmentation of forests is already widespread in Flowers, where there are semi-annual forest below 1.000 meters included within officially protected areas. These threats are exacerbated by the expansion of human population, large amounts of needed timber for the construction of housing, and the fact that there is little or no government enforcement of laws. Moist deciduous forest, currently it is destroying extensively through the appropriation of land and the establishment of agricultural areas, a factor that is inevitably shrinking the reach and the population of this species. The logging of forests continues in the coastal strip to make way for crops, and Illegal logging continues in protected areas.

The population It is estimated in a number of 2,500-9,999 mature individuals based on an assessment of the known records, descriptions of the abundance and range size.

Two recent studies have focused on endemic birds of Flowers. Two sites in which inhabits this species for the establishment as protected areas are proposed: Tanjung Kerita Mese and Egon Iliwuli (in Gunung Egon).

"Wallace's Hanging-Parrot" in captivity:

Very rare in captivity.

Alternative names:

Wallace’s Hanging-Parrot, Flores Hanging-Parrot, Wallace’s Hanging Parrot (English).
Coryllis de Wallace (French).
Florespapageichen, Flores Papageichen (German).
Lorículo do Flores (Portuguese).
Lorículo de Flores (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Loriculus
Scientific name: Loriculus flosculus
Citation: Wallace, 1864
Protonimo: Loriculus flosculus

Images:

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Wallace's Hanging-Parrot (Loriculus flosculus)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

(1) – by © Hanom Bashari – Oriental Bird Club

Sounds: Allen T. Chartier (Xeno-canto)

Yellow-billed Lorikeet
Neopsittacus musschenbroekii

Yellow-billed Lorikeet

Content

Yellow-billed Lorikeet

Description

23 cm.. length and a weight between 43 and 55 g..

The head of the Yellow-billed Lorikeet (Neopsittacus musschenbroekii) is green, strongly impregnated with olive brown, veined in ear-coverts and showing a shaft of yellow stripes on the crown; darker line in lores, above the bill; forecrown green.

Upperparts green intermediate. The wings green above with vane blackish internal to the coverts and black on the tips of the flight feather. Rojas the Underwing coverts. Flight feather blackish with wide red central band. Throat greenish yellow yielding to red chest to the top of the the thighs. Flanks yellowish green to the sides of chest, with a central area in the bottom area chest and belly, red; coverts more yellowish than the rest of the underparts.

Cover top of queue, green, yellow tips, Brown shafts with red bases on the side of the feathers; undertail yellow-orange, showing red bases in lateral feathers when they deployed.

Bill pale yellow; irises red; Grey legs.

Sexes alike.

Immature duller than adults with brands head less clear and red on the underparts restricted to spots in the center of belly and in the chest. Bill brownish-orange, irises yellow brown or orange. Young birds also show feathers tail pointy, which they are rounded as adults.

Description 2 subspecies

  • Neopsittacus musschenbroekii musschmbrorkii

    (Schlegel, 1871) – The nominal.


  • Neopsittacus musschenbroekii mayor

    (Neumann, 1924) – Slightly larger than the nominal and paler in upperparts.

Habitat:

It inhabits in montane forests, edges of forests, partially cleared areas of secondary growth, mainly between 1.400 and 2.500 m, even if you are also registered at altitudes as low as 1.100 meters and as high as 3,000 m. Also it is common in disturbed areas or groves of Casuarina or eucalyptus in garden areas.

It seems that they have adapted well to the impacts of the man. But it is absent from the places where the forest has been removed completely over large areas.

Visible and noisy, they are in pairs, small flocks and in larger congregations of up to 50 birds in flowering trees. Over most of New Guinea, This species is replaced at higher altitudes by the smaller Orange-billed Lorikeet, commonly found in company with the latter in the top band of its altitudinal range (except Vogelkop).

Most frequently found in flowering trees, often in the company of other species such as the Papuan Lorikeet, also in the fructification of the Schefflera and feeding is sometimes lower levels even on the weeds at ground level.

Reproduction:

Observed to be moving like a rodent along branches. The laying It is two eggs in a hole in the trunk of a tree. Period unknown but an immature nesting was observed in the West Papua Province in late August and a fledgling in the same area in the middle of November.

Food:

Feeds of pollen, nectar, small fruits and berries. It is also thought that feed on seeds as part regular your diet, while the Orange-billed Lorikeet It is confined to nectar. As other parrots can eat insects and their larvae, deliberately or accidentally.

Distribution:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 587.000 km2

New Guinea in Irian Java (Indonesia) and Papua New Guine-. Is distributed from East of Vogelkop up to the Huon peninsula and scattered areas in the Southeast. In Vogelkop, Despite the absence of the Orange-billed Lorikeet, the population of the Yellow-billed Lorikeet is relatively low. A small amount in captivity.

Distribution 2 subspecies

  • Neopsittacus musschenbroekii musschmbrorkii

    (Schlegel, 1871) – The nominal.


  • Neopsittacus musschenbroekii mayor

    (Neumann, 1924) – Live from the East of the region of Sepik to the Huon peninsula and areas southeast.

Conservation:


Status


• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern.

• Population trend: Growing.

The world population It has not been quantified, Although it is probably superior to the 300.000 specimens.

The species reportedly is usually common.

The population is suspected can be increased. As the degradation of the habitat is permanent, new suitable habitat areas are being created.

"Yellow-billed Lorikeet" in captivity:

Rare in aviculture.

More distant other parrots. Average noise level. Shy.

Alternative names:

Yellow-billed Lorikeet, Musschenbroek’s Lorikeet, Yellow billed Lorikeet, Yellow-billed Mountain Lory (English).
Lori de Musschenbroek (French).
Gelbschnabel-Berglori, Gelbschnabelberglori (German).
Lori Montano Grande, Lori Moteado Grande (Spanish).

Hermann Schlegel

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Neopsittacus musschenbroekii
Genus: Neopsittacus
Citation: (Schlegel, 1871)
Protonimo: Nanodes Musschenbroekii


Images “Yellow-billed Lorikeet”:

Video

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“Yellow-billed Lorikeet” (Neopsittacus musschenbroekii)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

(1) – Animal Photos – link
(2) – “Neopsittacus musschenbroekii-two captive-8a” by TJ Lin – originally posted to Flickr as Dscn8852. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
(3) – papageien.org – link
(4) – Animal Photos – link
(5) – neopsittacus musschenbroekii, male By iggino – lynx
(6) – Illustration

Sounds: Frank Lambert (Xeno-canto)

White-naped Lory
Lorius albidinucha

Content

Description

The White-naped Lory (Lorius albidinucha) has a length of 26 cm.. and a weight between 152 and 164 g..

White-naped Lory

Similar to the Purple-bellied Lory with which sympatry between 500 and 750 meters in the South of New Ireland.

The White-naped Lory It has a distinctive patch white in nape. The underparts They are entirely red except yellow markings on the sides of chest. It lacks dark violet broadcast belly and of the undertail-coverts, If shown by the Purple-bellied Lory. Seen at close quarters, the cere Dark also separates this species from the Purple-bellied Lory, what does he have cere white.

Lori Nuquiblanco illustration

The White-naped Lory It is also less Beefy that the Purple-bellied Lory and has a whistle call which differs considerably with the distinctive snore nasal call of the Purple-bellied Lory.
Has the crown black, violet slightly marked by the white patch nape; rest of head bright red. The upperparts red. The wings They are green with a yellow band on the lower part and violet with white spots on the curvature. The upperparts They are red with yellow markings on the sides of the chest and blue marks on the the thighs. Tail red on the outside and yellow on the inside part. Bill orange with dark base in the upper mandible; cere black; irises yellow to reddish brown; legs greyish black.

Habitat:

Known only in the mountains to the South of New Ireland between 500 and 2.000 m, mainly on 1.000 m.
Usually found in pairs while feeding on fruits or wild flowers “Palm oil”. Been seen feeding on the same tree as the Purple-bellied Lory without harming it.

Reproduction:

No data reproduction in its natural habitat.

Food:

Feeds of fruit and flowers of the oil palm plantations.

Distribution:

Distinctive species, little known and restricted to the forests of the hills of New Ireland in the Bismarck Archipelago (Papua New Guinea).

Conservation:


Status


• Current IUCN Red list category: Near-threatened.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Fairly common at all limits within range of altitude. The world population probably it is lower to the 10.000 specimens.
No information on population trends; However, the species is suspected falling slowly, as a result of logging.

The conservation actions proposals:

• Effectively protect forests hill.
• Determine the tolerance of the exploited forests at different altitudes.
• Monitor key populations at sites.

"White-naped Lory" in captivity:

None known.

Alternative names:

White-naped Lory, White naped Lory (English).
Lori à nuque blanche (French).
Weißnackenlori (German).
Lorius albidinucha (Portuguese).
Lori Nuquiblanco, Tricogloso de Nuca Blanca (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Lorius
Scientific name: Lorius albidinucha
Citation: (Rothschild & Hartert, 1924)
Protonimo: Domicella albidinucha

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“White-naped Lory” (Lorius albidinucha)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

1 – lorihaven.dk – link
2 – Illustration: HBW.com

Ultramarine Lorikeet
Vini ultramarina

Ultramarine Lorikeet

Content

Description

The Ultramarine Lorikeet (Vini ultramarina) has a length of 18 cm.. and an approximate weight of 35 g..

Front bright navy blue iridescent; crown and nape Mallow dark blue with streaks of light blue; lores and spots on ear-coverts, white (bases of ear-coverts, Purple and blue). Mantle and covert wing, Navy blue; rump and tail coverts, dark blue light. The flight feather, light blue, Blackish internal. Blue off the Underwing coverts. Throat dark blue with white speckles; in the band chest mauve blue with área subterminal pale blue feathers. Belly blank slate bases in feathers, giving a mottled appearance; the thighs dark blue malva; coverts, Turquoise.

The uppertail-coverts, whitish blue with navy blue light diffuse in the outer margins;
undertail coverts whitish merged with navy and some irregular gray markings.

Bill yellow orange, upper mandible, blackish brown at the base; irises brownish yellow; the orange legs.

Both sexes are equal but the female It is slightly smaller.

The immature adult differ by the absence of white on underparts, they are uniformly blackish. Also by bill black, irises Dark Brown and legs orange-brown.

Habitat:

In the Decade of 1970 in Nuku Hiva, These parrots were found only in pristine forests (that they have not been touched and that it is in its original condition) on the 700 m.

There is a similar habitat preferences in UA Pu, where are located mainly in montane forests between 700 and 1.000 m. Populations have also been of Ultramarine Lorikeet in banana plantations, coconut and mango (Mangifera indica), in coastal areas.

The species seems to have a wider range of habitat preferences in UA Pu., being found at altitudes ranging from the coast to wooded crests.

They feed in trees with flowers, especially coconut trees and Erythrina.

Loud and lively; the birds move freely between the canopy and lower floors, allowing the human approach. They usually travel in pairs or groups of up to a dozen of individuals. The majority of flights performed below the level of the trees, but for longer distances they rise spiral up to considerable heights.

Extremely Active, rarely long they stay in a tree and feeds using the peak acrobaticamente support.

Reproduction:

The nesting of these birds is from June to August.

It nests in hollow trees, preferring Artocarpus altilis, Pometia, Pandanus tectorius and Hibiscus tileacus. Sometimes they use the old nest of another species. They lay two white eggs.

A record of breeding in captivity gives chick a period of eight weeks to become independent.

Food:

It feeds on a great variety of trees in flower, nectar and pollen. Within your preferences are the flowers of the coconut palm, the native tree and banana Hibiscus tileaceus.

It also feeds on fruits, especially mango and insects.

Distribution:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 100 km2

The Ultramarine Lorikeet is endemic of the Marquesas Islands, of Nuku Hiva, UA Pu and UA Huka, Although fossil remains show that previously most widely spread.

In UA Pu the population was estimated at 250-300 couples in 1975. But in 1988 had been reduced on the 60%, probably due to the spread of rats Rattus rattus, and a hurricane in 1988, Although its effects on the population of birds are uncertain.

In Nuku Hiva the small population of around of 70 birds that inhabited the high valleys and ridges in the northwestern part of the island, between 700 and 1.000 d., You can that they are now extinct.

The majority of the population, the day today, remains in UA Huka, where the species was introduced in 1940. This population would have grown from 200 - 250 couples in the late 1970s and was considered abundant in 1990 at altitudes environment to the 500 d., with a population estimated between 1.000 and 1.500 birds. The main threat to the species, here, is the potential arrival of rats, and between 1993 and 1994, 14 Ultramarine Lorikeet they were moved to Fatu Hiva in an attempt to keep them safe from rats; However, the deterioration of habitat by grazing and malaria mammals avian, also they have been and are still potential factors to increase the vulnerability of this species.

Conservation:


Endangered


• Current IUCN Red list category: Danger.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

CITES Appendix I. in danger of extinction.

The entire population is located on an island where the species is stable, in other islands recently has been extinguished. The general trend is suspected to be a slow and continuous decrease. If the black rats come to UA Huka the decrease will be quick and severe.

Other threats included are logging in some sectors of the habitat of the Ultramarine Lorikeet to plant crops, fruit trees, and use the trunks for woodcarvings for tourism.

"Ultramarine Lorikeet" in captivity:

Extremely rare.

Alternative names:

Ultramarine Lorikeet, Marquesas Lorikeet, Ultramarine Lory (English).
Lori ultramarin, Lori de Goupil, Lori des Marquises (French).
Ultramarinlori (German).
Loris Vini Ultramarine (Portuguese).
Lori Ultramar, Lori Ultramarino (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Vini ultramarina
Citation: (Kuhl, 1820)
Protonimo: Psittacus ultramarinus

Images “Ultramarine Lorikeet”:

Videos "Ultramarine Lorikeet"

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“Ultramarine Lorikeet” (Vini ultramarina)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

1 – Miles to the wild – link
2 – Miles to the wild – link
3 – Miles to the wild – link
4 – An adult bird perched on a palm tree – Author Josep del Hoyo – IBC.lynxeds.com
5- A juvenile bird feeding in a tree. – Author Josep del Hoyo – IBC.lynxeds.com

Sounds: Mark Todd (Xeno-canto)