Stabyhoun
Holanda FCI 222 . Spaniel type

Stabyhoun

The Stabyhoun is very similar to the Dutch Partridge Dog, but smaller. It is practically unknown outside the Netherlands.

Content

History

The Stabyhoun, o Stabijhoun, it is one of the five rarest dog breeds in the world. Created in the 19th century, is recognized as the national treasure of the Netherlands. How could it be otherwise with just 1.000 live specimens? It comes from the forest lands of Friesland. Poor farmers, they couldn't afford more than one dog, they really needed a versatile worker. From hunting to livestock surveillance and protection, it was also able to eliminate rodents. In fact, could do almost anything.

It is possible that it descended from Spaniels imported to the Netherlands by the Spanish and crossed with the Dutch Partridge Dog. He would also have family ties with him Small Münsterländer.

It is very little known outside its country of origin.

Photo: “Stabyhoun” by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Stabyhounlayingingrass.jpg

Physical characteristics

The Stabyhoun has a robust complexion and beautiful black fur, brown or orange, sometimes with white markings. The straight hair is of medium length, smooth and silky to the touch. They are medium-sized dogs.

Height and weight

    Male size: Of 53 - 53 cm.

    Female size: Of 50 - 50 cm.

    Male weight: Of 15 - 20 kg

    Female weight: Of 14 - 20 kg

Character and skills

If you are lucky enough to meet a Stabyhoun, you will surely appreciate his docile character. Calm and patient, they are intelligent dogs that can sometimes be stubborn. Extremely patient with children and other animals, this breed is, with the proper education, both obedient and loyal to its owner. Although the Stabyhoun has a calm temperament on the inside, requires a lot of exercise and physical activity.

They are distrustful of strangers, but they are not aggressive by nature. His education is easy to work with because he is obedient in nature. However, it must be started from its first months with benevolent and consistent methods.

The Stabyhoun he is a dog very close to his master, making it hard for him to bear loneliness. Periods of loneliness can cause anxiety and lead to behavioral disorders such as destruction or barking. He is also a loud dog that barks regularly., which can lead to neighborhood problems.

With his hunting instinct he can be a fugitive to follow a trail, if your property is not properly fenced.

Health

The Stabyhoun it is a strong and robust dog that is not affected by any particular pathology. However, fear heat and should not stay in a shady spot during a heat wave, as you are at risk of severe heat stroke.

Grooming

The Stabyhoun it is a resistant dog that does not require much maintenance. Its coat should be brushed regularly to avoid knots.

Looking at your eyes and ears, they must be cleaned regularly, especially if it is a dog that lives abroad.

Characteristics “Stabyhoun”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Stabyhoun” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “Stabyhoun”

Photos:

1 – “Stabyhoun” by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stabyhoun.jpg
2 – 10 month old adolescent Stabij by Molliever, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – A picture of a stabyhoun wetterhoun pup for the stabyhoun wiki page by Daisai Gaming, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – Stabijs – world dog show 2010 by MJ Klaver
5 – “Stabyhoun” by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Binky_Stabyhoun.jpg
6 – “Stabyhoun” by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stabyhoun_with_11_puppies.jpg

Videos “Stabyhoun”

Stabyhoun puppy, mum and Welsh Springer Spaniel playing
Working Stabyhoun

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 222
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type
  • AKCHound
  • FSSFoundation Stock Service
  • UKCGun Dog

FCI breed standard “Stabyhoun”

FCIFCI – “Stabyhoun”
Frisian loser FCI

Alternative names:

    1. Stabij, Beike, Stabijhoun, Fryske Stabij (English).
    2. Stabyhoun (French).
    3. Stabijhoun (German).
    4. (em alemão: stabyhoun) (Portuguese).
    5. Perro de muestra frisón, Perro de muestra de Frisia (Spanish).

Dutch Partridge Dog
Holanda FCI 224 . Spaniel type

Dutch Partridge Dog

A peculiarity of Dutch Partridge Dog It consists in the fact that during the search the tail makes a rotating movement faster and faster as the dog approaches the prey.

Content

History

The Dutch Partridge Dog it is an ancient canine breed, that can be found in paintings painted centuries ago.

Originaria de Drenthe, a dutch province, the breed was developed during the 16th century from dogs from Spain, what were called Spionenen or Spaniolen. In the Netherlands they were given the name Patrijshond, what does retriever mean.

In the east of the country, especially in the province of Drenthe, these dogs were bred as pure breeds, without any mix with other foreign races, as it happened in other places. This isolation allowed the Perdiguero to remain unchanged during 3 or 4 centuries.

The 15 in May of 1943, was recognized by the Raad van Beheer op Kynologish Gebied of the Netherlands, a recognition strongly encouraged by Baroness van Hardenbroek and Messrs. van Heek junior and Quartero.

The responsible breed club was founded on 5 in June of 1948, with the name of Nederlandse Vereniging of Drentsche Patrijshond.

Related to him Small Münsterländer and the French Spaniel, the Dutch Partridge Dog it is quite limited in number, and the breed is almost unknown outside its borders.

Photo: “Drentsche Partridge Dog” macho by Stefanie Joksch, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Dutch Partridge Dog he is a well proportioned dog, with dry muscles, pure in its lines. His body reveals power and also the ability to run at the speed that suits a hunting dog. Wedge-shaped muzzle is slightly shorter than skull. The lips are quite dry and are not hanging. Her body, slightly longer than the height of the withers, is slightly elongated. Although the fur is not really long on the body, gives the impression of being so because of the well-populated ears, more abundant hair on the neck and chest, the fringes on the front and back legs and on the bushy tail, abundantly populated on all sides.

They have a dense coat that covers the body well. Not curly. The hair is not really long, but as it is longer in some parts, the dog, as a whole, gives the impression of having long hair. On the neck and chest, the hair is longer. In the ears, the hair is long and preferably wavy. The ears, the back of the front and back legs and the back of the thighs are fringed. Hair preferably wavy on the upper part of the body and tail. Except for its base, the tail is abundantly provided with long hair on all sides. These hairs are gradually shortened towards the tip.

COLOR: White fur with brown spots, mottled or not. Coats with a mix of brown and white hairs, with or without marks, are less desirable, like the cloak coats. The ears are brown, like the hair around the eyes.

SIZE:

Males: 58 - 63 cm..
Females: 55 - 60 cm..

Weight: Of 20 - 25 kg

Character and skills

They are ideal for hunting in a wide variety of terrain. They hunt with pistol shooting. Maintaining contact with the hunter is apparently an innate quality. A characteristic feature of many dogs of this breed is that, during the hunt, the tail describes a circular motion, especially when the dog is aware of the closeness of the prey. When he's close to hunting, the dog waits for the hunter to approach and when the hunter is late, turn your head to look for the game. Thanks to its adaptability, the dog is capable of hunting all kinds of animals on the plains and swamps. It is also a good retriever and excels in the search for lost game.. These characteristics are innate. For this reason, does not require long training.

The Dutch Partridge Dog it is also a very good companion dog because it is faithful, friendly, attentive. Your education should be done smoothly, without aggressiveness or too much firmness.
This dog requires regular maintenance. It will be an accomplice of the children and it is possible to leave them together. under surveillance, of course. Apartment living will get you down, he needs to have at least one garden for him. to let off steam and also for daily walks.

Health

The Dutch Partridge Dog he is a robust dog, but can be injured while hunting (fracture, sprain, tendinitis, wound…). His ears are drooping, poorly ventilated, prone to ear infections. Some dogs may be affected by hip-femoral dysplasia, a malformation of the hips that causes lameness and pain.

Grooming

The Dutch Partridge Dog should be brushed once a week to remove dead hairs and dirt. You can bathe once a month with a suitable shampoo.

Inspect and clean floppy ears once a week. When we come back from the hunt, we will check that he is not injured. Good antiparasitic and vacation coverage will be launched.

Characteristics “Dutch Partridge Dog”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Dutch Partridge Dog” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “Dutch Partridge Dog”

Dutch Partridge Dog
Drentsche Patrijshond Bowi the Gloucester during upland game hunt in Idaho by DutchID, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Dutch Partridge Dog
Dutch Partridge Dog by mjk23, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Videos “Dutch Partridge Dog”

Spyker – Partridge Dog (Spaniel) – 4 Week Residential Dog Training at Adolescent Dogs
Drentsche patrijshond Indy: avonturen deel 27

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 224
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type
  • UKCGun Dog

FCI breed standard “Dutch Partridge Dog”

FCIFCI – “Dutch Partridge Dog”
FCI Drenthe Retriever

Alternative names:

    1. Drentse Patrijshond, Drent (English).
    2. (en néerlandais : Drentse Patrijshond), épagneul à perdrix de Drente, épagneul hollandais de Drente (French).
    3. Drentscher Hühnerhund (German).
    4. (em neerlandês: Drentsche patrijshond) (Portuguese).
    5. Drentsche Patrijshond, Drent (Spanish).

Pont-Audemer Spaniel
Francia FCI 114 . Spaniel type

Pont-Audemer Spaniel

The Pont-Audemer Spaniel he is a gentle dog, very balanced and obedient. Energetic, smart and loyal, they are easy to train.

Content

History

The Pont-Audemer Spaniel is originally from the Pont-Audemer region, looking for the Marais Vernier, in normandy, where it is traditionally used for hunting waterfowl. In 1886, the Kennel Club of Le Havre began to select him. After World War II, only a few copies of this small brown spaniel remained and crosses were made with the Irish Water Spaniel to save the race.

The Pont-Audemer Spaniel It's very weird. The total population of the breed is about three hundred individuals in France. Some breeders perpetuate the breed, mainly in Normandy and Picardy.

Photo: Riga, Baltic Winner 2013, 9-10 Nov by Tomasyna, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Pont-Audemer Spaniel he is a stocky and vigorous Spaniel, whose body is almost square. Placed almost level with the line of the loins, the tail is carried quite straight. It is usually cut in the third; when the tail is not cut, It should be of medium length, a little curved. Dark amber or hazelnut, the eyes are rather small. The upper part of the skull and the long ears are well provided with curlers that frame the head, giving the impression of wearing a wig.

Hair is slightly rough on the body, wavy, neither flat nor curly. The fur is brown, preferably brown and speckled gray, with reflections of dead leaves.

Height and weight

  • Male size: Of 52 - 58 cm.
  • Female size: Of 52 - 58 cm.
  • Male weight: Of 19 - 20 kg
  • Female weight: Of 17 - 19 kg

Character and skills

The Pont-Audemer Spaniel is loving and displays unwavering loyalty to his masters. However, if they don't get their regular dose of care, these dogs can often get anxious, which is an important trait of his personality.

These dogs are especially good with children and are very sociable. They are also great playmates and family companions.. However, if you are looking for a good watchdog, it may not be the best option, as they are too friendly and quiet to keep an eye on something or someone.

This breed gets along very well with other dogs, but does not get along with dogs of the same breed that do not belong to the same pack or group. It is also not very friendly with other pets.. However, puppies of this breed are easily mixed with other pets and are known to have a friendly demeanor towards them.

Training and education

The training of the Pont-Audemer Spaniel It is easy. This dog is very obedient and loyal to the orders of the master. However, training sessions should be short, since the dog hates any long and repetitive task.

Exercise of Pont-Audemer Spaniel

This dog has aggressive exercise needs, which means that even long walks don't usually satisfy you. The greatest satisfaction you would get would be from any long hunting session. However, if hunting is not a reality, this dog should be allowed to frolic in controlled areas so that he burns enough calories and meets his exercise requirements.

Health

Like the rest of the animals, this breed has health conditions to watch out for. Canine hip dysplasia, a condition related to the hip cavities, can cause arthritis in dogs. These dogs are also prone to Von Willebrand's disease (a bleeding disease related to clotting), and hyperthyroidism (overproduction of hormones in the thyroid).

Apart from these problems, patella luxation and dental problems are the most common in this breed. Alopecia, a skin disease caused by ringworm or other parasites, can also affect these dogs.

In summary, the following health problems are not uncommon in the breed Pont-Audemer Spaniel:

  • Canine hip dysplasia
  • Von Willebrand disease
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Dental disease
  • Patella dislocation
  • Alopecia

Grooming

These dogs' fur and fur might look like they need a lot of grooming, but in reality, this breed needs little to no maintenance. A regular brushing once or twice a week is all you need.

However, the dog's ears need to be cleaned whenever necessary and are at risk of infection if not kept clean.

Characteristics “Pont-Audemer Spaniel”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Pont-Audemer Spaniel” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

How much does it cost to have a Pont-Audemer Spaniel?

Cubs Pont-Audemer Spaniel usually cost between 1000 and 1300 EUR.

Images “Pont-Audemer Spaniel”

Photos

1 – “Pont-Audemer Spaniel” at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
2 – The Epagneul Pont Audemer is a french pointing dog by Alephalpha, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – Head profile of a Pont-Audemer Spaniel male by Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – A Pont-Audemer Spaniel male by Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
5 – Pont-Audemer Spaniel male by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
6 – “Pont-Audemer Spaniel” by https://worlddogfinder.com/es/razas/spaniel-de-pont-audemer

Videos “Pont-Audemer Spaniel”

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 114
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type
  • Central Canine SocietyGun Dog

FCI breed standard “Pont-Audemer Spaniel”

FCIFCI – “Pont-Audemer Spaniel”
Spaniel de Pont-Audemère FCI

Alternative names:

    1. Epagneul Pont-Audemer, Setter of Pont-Audemer (English).
    2. Épagneul de Pont-Audemer (French).
    3. Epagneul de Pont-Audemer (German).
    4. (em francês: epagneul de Pont-Audemer) (Portuguese).
    5. Epagneul du Pont-Audemère (Spanish).

Saint Germain Pointer
Francia FCI 115 . Braque Type

Saint Germain Pointer

The Saint Germain Pointer it is little known outside the French borders.

Content

History

A versatile hunting dog that has been used not only for aiming, but also to throw and recover, the Saint Germain Pointer can work with a variety of hunting, including rabbits and pheasants. Unlike most hunting dogs, traditionally, this breed has been popular at shows and has been bred to have a very uniform and specific appearance.

Originally bred in France mixing English Pointer with the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size, This breed is believed to have developed in the early 1830 and claims to have a very elegant heritage. King Charles X of France was given two dogs English Pointer who were very talented hunters. The female, call miss, she was raised with a dog Braque Francais local, and the legacy of Saint Germain Pointer started. Initially, the breed was called Compiegne Pointers due to the location of the kennels in which they were raised, but this name was later altered when the kennels were moved to the region of Saint Germain. Many of the dogs produced were shown at dog shows throughout France and, at that time, they were the race of Pointer most displayed in her native country.

The race Saint Germain Pointer was initially very popular and in 1913 a club was formed that aimed to increase its prevalence in France, as well as improve the breed. Unfortunately, the size of the breed's population Saint Germain Pointer was greatly reduced in every world war. They have never fully recovered from the drastic decline in population size that occurred in the first half of the 20th century., but they are still a breed that has a loyal follower and are not in danger of extinction today.

En los últimos años, the English Pointer enter the genetic pool of Saint Germain Pointer to increase their numbers and add some genetic diversity. Even though few, if there is any, of the breed members have been exported internationally, the UKC granted full recognition to the breed in 2006 within your group of hunting dogs.

Photo: Braque_saint-germain at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

Braco Saint Germain
Braque saint-germain at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

The appearance of Saint Germain Pointer is particularly important for breeders, although it is mainly a hunting dog. Historically, have participated in a large number of French dog shows. Breed members must be of medium build, with good muscles and heavy bones. The dog's skull should be round and the same length as its muzzle.

Your pink nose should have wide open nostrils, while your big golden eyes should show a placid and relaxed expression. Their ears are curved at the tip and should not reach beyond eye level. The shoulders of the Saint Germain Pointer they are impressively long and their limbs must be robust and heavy. They have a broad chest and a straight back, although your rump will bow slightly. The dog's sharp tail is carried at a distinctive horizontal angle when in motion.

The short coat of the Saint Germain Pointer should be faded white with orange markings, and the ears are preferred to be orange everywhere. Unlike in the English Pointer, black hair is not tolerated. The males measure between 56 and 62 height cm, while the smaller females reach heights between 53 and 60 cm.. Most members of the breed will weigh between 18 and 27 kg.

Character and skills

While it is true that Saint Germain Pointer has traditionally excelled on the show floor, is primarily a hunting dog and, as such, has the character expected of a working animal. This breed is easy to train and loves to be kept active and given a task to do. They must have a “soft mouth”, meaning they do not hurt or harm the prey they retrieve. They also tend to work in packs, which means that they normally get along with other dogs. Although it is undeniable that they have a natural instinct to chase small animals, anecdotally they get along well with the small pets in their house that they have been introduced to since childhood.

The Saint Germain Pointer he is truly a family dog ​​and does best when kept indoors with human company. He is particularly affectionate towards those he trusts and will bond closely with each member of his family. They are not typically a breed that displays any aggression, which means they are adapted to children, though they wouldn't be good watchdogs. While it is true that this breed will be willing to befriend any child it meets, Caution is advised with very young children who may not be able to resist brisk greetings and rowdy play!

Education

More than many other dog breeds, the Saint Germain Pointer can be a real treat to train. He is a dog willing to please his master and has the intelligence to complete most of the tasks entrusted to him with relative ease.. Trainers will be most successful when they focus on the breed's most natural behaviors, like recovery.

It is often said that the Saint Germain Pointer it is a hardy dog ​​that is much less sensitive than other closely related breeds. Trainers have the option of using firmer methods than they might expect, However, will continue to achieve the best results with the use of positive reinforcement techniques (instead of negatives).

Exercise

Not far behind when it comes to exercise, the Saint Germain Pointer is a dog that loves to be out of the house. Has great endurance when working and is able to travel long distances for long periods of time without seeming to tire. If kept solely as a companion animal, owners should be able to provide an hour or two of solid exercise each day and should also keep the dog stimulated with various games and training sessions.

Any attempt to keep this breed in a small apartment or house or to exercise it for less time than recommended, will likely lead to a frustrated dog that will become a difficult pet. Anxiety is likely to develop in these situations, hyperactivity and destructive behaviors.

Health

Unfortunately, there is no specific information on the health of the Saint Germain Pointer, and to date there have been no studies on the breed. A working dog, it is generally accepted as a hardy breed. The prudent owner would be aware of these possible health conditions:

Hip Dysplasia

    Hip scoring should be performed by responsible breeders to ensure that the small population of the Saint Germain Pointer stay healthy. A simple x-ray of the hips will allow a vet to assess the quality of the hip joints and inform the breeder if they are good enough to allow breeding.

Ear infections

    When the ear canal becomes clogged with a buildup of smelly debris, an infection is likely present. Ears may also be red, hot and sensitive. Affected dogs tend to shake their heads and rub their faces against the ground. Infections occur mainly due to the proliferation of bacteria and yeast, although they can also be due to a foreign body, like a grass seed inside the ear canal or ear mites.

Grooming

The short coat of the Saint Germain Pointer does not need to be brushed more than once or twice a week. Toenails may need to be trimmed every few months, particularly if you don't walk on hard surfaces. The breed's clear claws make claw clipping easy, since the cut is visible, making it more avoidable than in dogs with dark pigmented claws.

The Most Important Grooming Duty An Owner Should Not Neglect, is the maintenance of good ear hygiene. The ears should be cleaned every one to two weeks with a dog ear cleaner. Owners should also ensure that the ears are dry inside and out after being exposed to water..

Characteristics “Saint Germain Pointer”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Saint Germain Pointer” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 1 out of 5
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “Saint Germain Pointer”

Saint Germain Pointer

Saint Germain Pointer Dog Breed – Braque Saint Germain

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 115
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • UKCGundog

FCI breed standard “Saint Germain Pointer”

FCIFCI – “Saint Germain Pointer”
Braco Saint-Germain FCI

Alternative names:

    1. St. Germain Pointing Dog (English).
    2. Braque Saint-Germain (French).
    3. Braque Charles bzw. Braque Compiegne (German).
    4. (em francês: Braque Saint-Germain) (Portuguese).
    5. Braco de Saint Germain (Spanish).

French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size
Francia FCI 133 . Braque Type

French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size

Some even say that the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size it is a dog that was born trained.

Content

History

The type French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size grew up in the region of Gascony which bears his name. He is a direct descendant of the oldest known race of pointing dogs already described by Gaston PHEBUS, Count of Foix. This excellent pointing dog has managed to preserve its stamina. In the same way, It has maintained the efficiency of the days when dogs were raised only for the services they provided.

Photo: Pyrenean Pointer at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

Nose and muzzle
Has a big brown nose. Has a wide muzzle, rectangular, sometimes slightly convex.

Eyes
Has a frank look. Your brown or dark yellow eyes are wide.

Ears
The ears of the brave French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size they go well up to the tip of your nose. Slightly bent, turn round at the tip.

Hair
His hair French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size it is very thick. Their head and ears have finer hair.

Their fur can be brown, Brown and white, mottled or spotted brown and white or brown with tawny markings above the eyes, lips and limbs.

Tail
The French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size has a generally docked tail, follows well the prolongation of the convex line of the croup. A long tail is not considered a defect, as long as it is well managed; neither the short tail of
birth

Character and skills

Smart, obedient and very attached to their master, the kind dogs French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size they are soft and calm. Some even say it is a dog that was born trained.

Your training will be smooth and early, since it is a very sensitive dog, even shy, and you have to get used to city noises very quickly. Let's not forget that you are an athlete and that you need “Unburden” regularly. Soft and calm, adapts very well to the city, as long as you get used to it at a young age. The French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size must live with his caregiver and is very affectionate with children.

Education

The reputation of French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size is well established. Like his cousin, the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) , “born trained”, say his followers. Intelligent and very attached to his teacher, he will know how to learn all the tricks of a good education.

It is a sensitive dog with which you must use gentleness. This dog must understand the commandments to assimilate them. One of the reasons why coercive methods should be banned. This is also true for all dog breeds.

The French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size can be perfectly adapted to living in the city. However, will have to be introduced to noise and crowds at a very young age.

Characteristics “French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 1 out of 5
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size”

Braque Francais-type Gascogne
Braque Francais-type Gascogne

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 133
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type

FCI breed standard “French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size”

FCIFCI – “French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size”
French arm type Gascony FCI

Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size)
Francia FCI 134 . Braque Type

Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size)

The Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) he is sensitive and loving, he likes children and feels comfortable both in the city and in the country.

Content

History

The origins of the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) are the same as the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size. They are the best representatives of the old lines of Brachets and “Braques” southerners.

Already in the fifteenth century, the “Braque Francais” can be found on canvases depicting venus scenes. It is scattered throughout French territory during the French Revolution, and the regionalization of breeding allows the appearance of races such as the Ariège Pointer or the Auvergne Pointer.

A breed that was abandoned in favor of British dogs, the breeding of the Braque Francais was revived between the two wars, when the two guys became different. Developed in the Pyrenees, the race descends from the old Spanish Braque and of the now extinct Southern Hound.

A more elegant version than the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size, the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) has legs about 12,5 cm shorter than Gascony.

Photo: Un braque francais, type pyrénées by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) presents the same proportions and gender characteristics of the type French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size, only that its dimensions are smaller and its body structure is lighter. The differences are as follows:

  • It is a rustic dog, not heavy, but muscular enough. His skin is more stretched than the "Gascony" type.
  • The lips are less drooping than those of the "Gascony" type or less convex.
  • The forelimbs are lighter than those of the “French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size”
  • Finer and shorter hair than the Gascony type.
  • Character and skills

    Sensitive and affectionate, He is affectionate with children and feels comfortable both in the city and in the country.

    Your education should be smooth and early, because the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) he is a very sensitive dog, even shy. Therefore, must get used to city noises very quickly.

    Has a natural gift for hunting and very good stamina.

    He cohabits easily with his companions and can stay alone for a day. Fits well with apartment living, as long as you get used to it from a young age. However, you need to exercise very regularly.

    Some say he was born trained.

    Low maintenance required.

    Characteristics “Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) ”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) ” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos “Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) ”

    Braque Francais Type Pyrenees NAIBE MIRA MAYA
    Vidéo Braques Francais Du Milobre de Bouisse

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 134
    • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
    • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type

    FCI breed standard “Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) ”

    FCIFCI – “Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) ”
    FCI Pyrenees French Pointer

    Bourbonnais Pointing Dog
    Francia FCI 179 . Braque Type

    Bourbonnais Pointing Dog

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog at birth it is frequently tailless, it is also called “Glue cutter”.

    Content

    History

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog it was already known in 1598 like an expert quail hunting dog. The authors of the time described him as a pleasant companion for the hunter, rustic and healthy looking, born with a short tail, with a white fur, whole and finely speckled with light brown or fawn trout.

    After the first world war, a group of dedicated breeders formed the first Club du Braque du Bourbonnais in 1925 with the goal of reviving the race and restoring its pre-war prominence. The first breed standard was published in the first club newsletter in 1930. Although the organization and these breeders made considerable progress, his efforts were again almost wiped out by World War II. In addition, strict adherence to a natural tailless dog and strict color requirements resulted in a dog based on appearance rather than performance.

    The result of this selection in reverse leads to a total disaffection of the breeders. Of 1963 - 1973, there were no registrations in the L.O.F. (Book of French Origins) . In 1970, under the impulse of Michel Comte, a team of breeders set themselves the mission of ensuring the survival of the Bourbonnais Pointing Dog.

    Today, French breeders strive to produce a Bourbonnais Pointing Dog that conforms to the breed standard, but of equal importance, the Bourbonnais Pointing Dog should now be proficient in the field as pointers, retrievers and trackers. Since the beginning of the 1970, the breeders of Bourbonnais Pointing Dog have substantially and rapidly improved the conformation of the breed and its performance in the field.

    One second Club du Braque du Bourbonnais it was created in 1982 by Michel Comte, with the official recognition of the Central Canine Society (SCC), French affiliate of the FCI, in 1985. The goal of reviving the race had been achieved, the breed standard relaxed, spotting and docked tails were found acceptable and the breed's remarkable hunting instincts were restored. The new breed standard was fully recognized by the SCC and the FCI in 1991. The standard was translated and published on the FCI website at 1998.

    Photo: Braque_du_bourbonnais at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Physical characteristics

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog is a robust, compact and muscular mid-size braque. Gives an impression of robustness and strength. The female has a slimmer and more elegant silhouette. Some dogs are born without a tail (anurus) or with a naturally short tail (brachyura). Tail docking is practiced in countries where it is allowed.

    The head is pear-shaped, namely, rounded in all directions, with rounded side walls, well developed parietals and zygomatic arches. The pear-shaped head is typical of the breed. The axes of the skull and muzzle are parallel or slightly divergent. Neither too light nor too heavy, the head is in proportion to the body. The eyes are large, rather rounded, hazelnut or dark amber, according to coat color. Medium-length drop ears are located at or just above the eye line.

    The coat is fine, dense and short. It is finer on the head and ears, a little thicker and sometimes a little longer on the back. White spots are very invasive, finely speckled with brown (known as “wine lees” or “withered lilac”) the leonado (known as “peach blossom”) in all its variants. White and colored hairs can blend into a roan pattern. The ear generally wears the basic color more or less mottled. Color patches should be few in number and small in size: must not exceed the size of the palm of the hand on the body and must never encompass both eyes at the same time on the face.

    Character and skills

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog is described in the breed standard as gentle and affectionate, but also passionate and intelligent when hunting. Easily adapts to the most varied terrain and games. Naturally seeks high emanation and shows useful and accurate stopping ability.

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog they are mostly a Pointing Dogs versatile.

    Exercise and training

    Options for exercise could include backyard playtime, preferably fenced, or be taken for walks several times a day. Exercise can also be done in the form of indoor activities, like the hideout, chase a ball rolling on the ground or learn new tricks. Certain outdoor activities such as swimming, hiking and retrieving balls or flying discs can provide a good outlet for expending energy. Training for dog sports such as agility, obedience and rallying can also be a great way to give your dog some exercise.

    Health

    The majority of the Bourbonnais Pointing Dog they are healthy dogs. Working with a responsible breeder, those who wish to own a Bourbonnais Pointing Dog they can get the education they need to know about specific health concerns within the breed. Good breeders use health exams and genetic testing of their breeders to reduce the likelihood of disease in their puppies.

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog requires relatively gentle handling. Has the ability to perceive the mood of the manipulator, seeking eye contact at all times.

    Grooming

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog has a fine, dense and short coat. It's a little thicker, and sometimes longer, in the back. On the head and ears, the hair is thinner and shorter.

    Beyond periodic brushing, the occasional bath will keep your Bourbonnais Pointing Dog clean and looking its best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog.. The breed's strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or nail polish to prevent overgrowth, breakage and cracking. The ears should be checked regularly to avoid accumulation of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

    Characteristics “Bourbonnais Pointing Dog”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Bourbonnais Pointing Dog” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images “Bourbonnais Pointing Dog”

    Photos:

    1 – Braque_du_bourbonnais at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – Braque_du_bourbonnais at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – Braque du Bourbonnais sur fond blanc by Desaix83, from the work of Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – Braque du Bourbonnais – world dog show 2010 by mjk23, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    5 – Braque du Bourbonnais – world dog show 2010 by mjk23, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons
    6 – Braque_du_bourbonnais by The original uploader was Michael Comte at French Wikipedia., CC BY-SA 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons

    Videos “Bourbonnais Pointing Dog”

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 179
    • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
    • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type

    FCI breed standard “Bourbonnais Pointing Dog”

    FCIFCI – “Bourbonnais Pointing Dog”
    FCI Bourbon Braco

    Alternative names:

      1. Bourbonnais Pointer, Braque du Bourbonnais (English).
      2. Braque du Bourbonnais (French).
      3. Braque du Bourbonnais (German).
      4. (em francês: Braque du Bourbonnais) (Portuguese).
      5. Braco de Borbón, Braco de Bourbonnais (Spanish).

    Auvergne Pointer
    Francia FCI 180 . Braque Type

    Auvergne Pointer

    Even today, the Auvergne Pointer is most often bred to become a hunting dog.

    Content

    History

    The precise origins of Auvergne Pointer are not clearly determined. This dog has been around for many years and was most likely developed in Auvergne, more precisely in the Cantal region, in central France.

    Already in the seventeenth century, to satisfy your needs, French hunters tried to cross and develop short, smooth-haired Pointer breeds, commonly known as “pointers” (the term “pointer” comes from the vocabulary of hunting and means “point”).

    The Braque Francais is considered his ancestor, but its own origins are uncertain. In any case, It has been proven that it was the origin of the development of different races of Braques developed in all regions of the country, some of which gained in popularity, as the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size or the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) . In Cantal, selective breeding resulted in Auvergne Pointer.

    According to some historians, the Auvergne Pointer is one of the oldest, with the exception of his own Braque Francais. However, contradictory assumptions have been made about it.

    According to Jean Servier, former president of the Club of French braques and author of the World Dog Encyclopedia 1971, it is a cross between the Braque Francais, the Gascony type French Pointer and the Pyrenees French Pointer.

    On the other hand, according to David Hancock, historian of dog breeds and author of the book The Heritage of the Dog, published in 1990, it is said to come from an imported breed when the Knights of the Order of Malta passed through Auvergne in the 16th century. The soldiers there developed a dog near the Auvergne Pointer, which is said to descend. There is no consensus on this hypothesis, but nevertheless it is accepted by certain organizations such as the Réunion des Amateurs du Braque d’Auvergne (RABA), the official breed club created in 1913.

    Although the origins of Auvergne Pointer remain relatively unclear, in any case, most specialists agree that its development dates back to the beginning of the 18th century.

    In the early 20th century, almost every, If not all, the Auvergne Pointer they were in france. The breed was relatively rare, although among their owners they were highly appreciated for their hunting qualities, especially for game birds. In fact, the breeding work that led to its development gave it excellent style and great resistance, allowing you to follow long tracks in forests or dense vegetated terrain. They are also versatile: are able to get, track back, aim and bring the hunt back to its master. Therefore, can stand alone for several specialized dogs in a particular area. Perhaps its main flaw is its rather slow pace, meaning it works closely with its owner rather than independently, running from one side to the other. This does not take away from the hunting qualities that made it popular in France throughout the 19th century., as well as in the decades leading up to World War II.

    During World War II, like many french breeds, the Auvergne Pointer was threatened with extinction. In effect, the conflicts and the occupation of part of the French territory by Germany wreaked havoc on the canine population: many of their representatives were killed or abandoned when their owners no longer had the resources to care for them.

    However, at the end of hostilities, an enthusiast, André de Tournay, managed to locate a little more than 20 specimens in different parts of the country. They were at the origin of various bloodlines and therefore played an essential role in the renewal of the breed..

    The postwar rebirth of the breed by Mr.. de Tournay led to his recognition in 1955 by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI), which coordinates the official bodies of more than one hundred countries – among them the Société Royale Saint-Hubert (SRSH) Belgian, the Swiss Kennel Club (SCS) y the Société Centrale Canine (SCC) french. However, the latter had taken the initiative to recognize the Braque d'Auvergne already in 1913.

    The prestigious and influential British Kennel Club took much longer to do the same, since he had to wait until 2016.

    In 1987, a first article about this breed of dog was published in the North American Gun Dog Magazine. However, we don't know exactly when the first ones were imported Auvergne Pointer to the United States. In any case, they were probably delayed and limited in number. In 2016, a new article was published in the same magazine on the investigation of the origins of the establishment of this dog in the country, after fans surveyed Nelson Hooe, one of the first proven owners in the country.

    In any case, the recognition of Auvergne Pointer in North America is still incomplete. Has been recognized by the United Kennel Club (UKC) from 2006, as well as by the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC), but it is not the case of the other reference organization in the United States, the American Kennel Club (AKC).

    Photo: Braque_d’auvergne at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Popularity

    In France, the popularity of Auvergne Pointer is relatively stable in the long term, and has been at least since the early 1990s. 1970: there are around of 350 entries per year in the French Book of Origins (LOF). This number sometimes reaches a maximum of around 500 births per year, how was the case, for example, in the mid 70. On the other hand, has never durably fallen below 250.

    Although the Auvergne Pointer is relatively popular in your home country, it has only been exported and distributed to some extent outside of France, even in countries bordering France.

    In Switzerland, for example, statistics from the Amicus database show that its population is limited to about thirty individuals.

    In Belgium, it is just as discreet, as evidenced by the absence of breeding on national soil.

    The same observation can be made, for example, in Italy, whence las estadísticas of the National Ente della Cinofilia Italiana (ENCI) show an average of about ten registrations per year during 2010, or again in Spain, where the Royal Canine Society of Spain (RSCE) only count one birth between 2014 and 2019.

    There are a handful of farms in Canada and the United States, but the Auvergne Pointer also still hard to find in those countries.

    Physical characteristics

    The Auvergne Pointer has a robust and noble appearance. His shapely body is well aligned, with a straight constitution – your back, from the tip of the shoulder to the tip of the buttock, is the same length as its front legs – and a long chest that descends to elbow level, midway between the withers and the lower part of the front legs. It is robust, strong but without heaviness, which gives it an elegant look. Their solid constitution gives them the stride and the resistance for which they are highly appreciated in hunting..

    Both the front and back legs are straight, well aligned with the body, and the thighs and forearms are well muscled.

    The tail stands quite high, carried horizontally and reaches the point of the hock. It can also be shortened at birth, and then barely exceeds 15 - 20 cm.. However, this practice, call “tail docking”, it is banned in many countries, including France, Belgium, Switzerland and Quebec.

    The head of the Auvergne Pointer is well balanced. Seen from the front, the muzzle is square and its length is equal to or slightly less than that of the skull. Finish off with a pretty strong black nose, dominating solid jaws of equal length. In addition, the upper lip covers the lower.

    Positioned slightly toward the back of the skull, ears are drooping, flexible and with a slightly satin texture.

    The eyes are dark hazel, oval and quite large. They give this dog an expressive look, frank and gentle.

    The fur of Auvergne Pointer consists of a sparse undercoat and short, smooth topcoat with a glossy appearance that is softer than other Braques. It is mottled black or grayish white, more or less present. The head is black, but the muzzle may have the same white markings as the body – a white border may also be present on the top of the skull, prolonging the color of the muzzle. Black fur can also tend to be blue, which is why these dogs are rarely called Auvergne Pointer blue.

    There are also charcoal-colored dogs. However, this variety is rare and is not recognized by the breed standard.

    Sexual dimorphism is not very pronounced in these dogs: the male is certainly on average a few centimeters taller than the female, but it's not particularly massive.

    Character and skills

    Even today, the Auvergne Pointer is most often bred to become a hunting dog. However, his affectionate character, Gentile, patient and smart also makes them great pets, and they are becoming more and more popular as such. In fact, fit perfectly into family life, they usually try to please their humans and are very loyal to them.

    They are especially fond of children of all ages and are affectionate and playful provided they are not excessively boisterous. However, it should never be forgotten that a dog of any breed should never be left alone with a small child without adult supervision.

    The downside of being so close to his family is that he cannot tolerate loneliness and needs to be in the company of humans as often as possible.. If left alone for too long, can become a destructive or particularly loud reminder of your presence. No need to say, therefore, that does not suit people who are absent for days or more. The close bond he has with his teachers also makes him very sensitive to reprimands and is easily affected by possible punishments..

    It is not only the humans in his family that he Auvergne Pointer inclines to appreciate. In effect, although at first glance I am shy with strangers, quickly treats them like new friends, especially since it is totally devoid of aggression. Ready to greet newcomers with affection, may even tend to follow an intruder instead of defending your home or territory, which makes him a poor caretaker. However, is very capable of sounding the alarm when he hears something unusual.

    In any case, He is not one of those who barks from morning to night, expressing yourself only when you have a good reason to do so: to raise the alarm, to express boredom, to seek attention, or to express any anxiety.

    Sharing your home with a partner is a great way to reduce the risk of you suffering from the absence of your masters. In fact, such cohabitation generally goes very well, and he appreciates not living alone.
    On the other hand, his hunting instinct is too ingrained in him to consider the possibility of peacefully coexisting with another pet smaller than him, like a bird, a rodent or even a cat: unless you were raised with him from a young age, chances are high that one day or another he will end up attacking him. This character trait also means that he is best kept on a leash when going out to places where he is very likely to meet small animals., and where it would be dangerous for him to chase them.

    This is all the more true since you don't lack energy, to the point that you need to spend at least an hour a day to be well on your legs and on your head. Your resistance, However, allows you to go much further, since it is capable of chasing a prey for miles. Therefore, it is ideal to plan long walks that include times when you can run freely and safely, especially if you don't have a chance to hunt. In any case, this dog is perfectly suitable for an active owner who likes to jog, cycling or hiking, and he would like nothing more than to take his pet with him – provided that it is kept on a leash when necessary.

    Another great way to allow him to expend his energy is to train him for one or more dog sports.. Their intelligence and willingness to cooperate are particularly well expressed in agility and obedience tests.. More broadly, imply that it is quite easy to train him for all kinds of activities and teach him different tasks.

    By the way, if your pilgrimages take you to pass near a water space where you can swim safely, She loves water – he is even a good swimmer – and generally appreciates taking a dip as soon as you get a chance to.

    In any case, its high level of activity makes apartment living unsuitable for the Auvergne Pointer. Even a house with a small yard probably wouldn't be enough to make you happy.: the ideal environment for him is clearly a house with a large fenced garden, although this cannot replace long daily walks to satisfy your need for exercise.

    Education

    The Auvergne Pointer is known for his intelligence and the sweetness of his temperament. He is also eager to please his owners, so it reacts positively to training: learns quickly and is generally an easy dog ​​to train.

    However, it is important to use the right methods. In fact, its sensitivity means that the use of coercion or even punishment is strongly discouraged: would have every chance of undermining the trust that he normally gives to his beloved master. On the other hand, positive dog training methods, based on repetition, the gratification and rewards, are very effective in taking full advantage of the great potential of this animal.

    In fact, its obedient and cooperative nature makes it not difficult to train it for hunting, sports with dogs or any other task. This is all the more true since he is always happy to share activities with his master: unlike many races, prefers to work in complicity with his master rather than independently. Therefore, It is an ideal option for those who like to spend time educating their partner and working alongside him, whether for hunting or dog sports. For example, is an excellent candidate for agility and obedience competitions. Your sense of smell can also be used to track events, but its relatively slow speed limits its potential in this area.

    For things to run smoothly, it is important to establish rules at an early age about what you are and are not allowed to do. They are not particularly stubborn by nature, and in fact they are quite obedient, but they can also do it when they are more flexible and responsive: this will make it easier and faster for them to assimilate the rules. In addition, he assimilates them more easily because they are the same from one day to the next and among the different people in the house: It is not about the gentleman authorizing today what the lady prohibited the day before.

    In addition, teaching your dog to stay alone should be one of the priorities in the education of a Auvergne Pointer. In effect, how you like company and are prone to separation anxiety, must get used to enduring absences from his family without reaching a state of discomfort.

    It is also beneficial to start learning to call back soon, so that it can be allowed to unleash when conditions permit, limiting the risk of becoming deaf to his master's commands when he sees or smells a small passing animal.

    You also have to be careful to quickly channel your tendency to chew what is within your reach., directing him to the right toys. This avoids the risk of damage and injury to the animal.

    At last, like any dog, we must not wait to offer you quality socialization from your first months. By letting you meet all kinds of humans, congeners and representatives of other species, but also face a multitude of different situations in various places, we make it a comfortable companion in all circumstances, performed in its environment and among humans.

    Health

    The Auvergne Pointer is generally a robust dog with few health problems. Your life expectancy of 12 - 15 years is quite honorable given its size.

    In addition, they are quite flexible in terms of weather, able to cope with both the summer heat and the winter cold of temperate or Mediterranean climates. If you are required to sleep outside when temperatures are low, a niche is necessary to provide shelter. In any case, their fur is not adapted to polar temperatures.

    However, like any dog, are more prone to certain diseases, which in this case are :

  • hip dysplasia, whose appearance may be favored by a hereditary predisposition, and that corresponds to a malformation of this joint. Leads to pain, lameness and osteoarthritis when the animal ages;
  • dislocation of the patella, which is a malformation of the knee joint that causes the kneecap to slip out of position. Probably hereditary, causes a more or less severe limp. May require surgery in the most severe cases, although success is not guaranteed;
  • aortic stenosis, a potentially inherited heart defect manifested by reduced blood flow. Leads to heart failure, that can manifest, for example, in a state of general weakness, and it also increases the risk of heart attack. Not curable, but medications can reduce the effects of heart failure;
  • progressive retinal atrophy, which corresponds to a degeneration of the retina and is of hereditary origin. It affects both eyes and causes a progressive loss of vision in the dog;
  • Dilation-torsion of the stomach, which mainly affects breeds with a large chest and occurs when the stomach folds in on itself, blocking the evacuation of gases and interrupting blood circulation. It is fatal if a vet does not intervene quickly;
  • otitis, an ear infection favored by the hanging shape of the ears.
  • Since a certain number of the conditions to which the breed is predisposed are or may be of hereditary origin, adopting a quality breeder from Auvergne Pointer can be a determining factor in obtaining a healthy puppy, and one that continues to be, in addition to having been well socialized from his first weeks. In effect, A professional worthy of the name sees to it that genetic testing is routinely performed on your breeding stock, to rule out those who run the risk of transmitting this or that inherited condition to their offspring. Therefore, must be able to present the results of these tests, as well as the dog's health history, to witness the vaccinations administered and to be helpful in planning the next ones to be carried out, as well as withdrawals. At the same time, a certificate drawn up by a veterinarian attests to the good health of the animal at the time of adoption.

    Once the adoption is complete, it is important that the new owner respect the growth of his protégé: until it reaches adult size, what happens around two years of age, avoid strenuous physical exertion or overly strenuous and prolonged exercises. This reduces both the risk of short-term injuries and that of sequelae or deformation of the bones or joints., that are particularly fragile throughout this period.

    Last but not least, one way to keep your dog in good health is to take him to the vet regularly for a full checkup – At least once a year, and even more when he gets older. This will help prevent or detect potential health problems as soon as possible., as well as will provide the opportunity to reinforce your dog's vaccinations.

    It is also important not to neglect the protection against fleas, worms, ticks and other undesirable pests, renewing your child's antiparasitic treatments throughout the year, whenever necessary. This is especially crucial for an individual who spends a lot of time, either hunting or in other activities.

    Grooming

    As his undercoat is not very thick and his top coat is short, the fur of the Auvergne Pointer requires little maintenance: a short brushing session with a soft bristle brush once a week is enough to keep you healthy, shiny and soft to the touch, especially since your hair loss is not very pronounced.

    During shedding periods, in spring and autumn, it is much more pronounced, so more frequent brushing is necessary. However, 2 or 3 times a week should be enough. After brushing it, the coat can be polished with a clean soft cloth to make it even more shiny.

    It is neither necessary nor advisable to bathe your dog too often: 3 or 4 times a year is usually more than enough, unless, of course it is, that has gotten very dirty. In any case, you should always use a shampoo intended for dogs.

    Dangling ears require more attention, as their shape makes them prone to ear infections. Therefore, it is important to examine them weekly and wipe them with a clean, slightly damp cloth to avoid the risk of infection.

    Your eyes need some attention too. The weekly maintenance session should be an opportunity to examine them, and wipe them gently with a damp cloth if there is dirt.

    Looking at its claws, regular physical activity that satisfies your need for fairly high levels of activity will normally allow you to naturally smooth them out. However, this does not mean that you should not check from time to time that this is the case. On the other hand, if your age or a health problem prevents you from being active enough, they generally need to be trimmed every 6 u 8 weeks to avoid being too long and bothering you, or even breaking and injuring you.

    The first time, a visit to a professional groomer can be a good way to learn how to care for a Auvergne Pointer, in order to operate efficiently and safely, while limiting the risks of hurting you. For its part, you will be calmer and more cooperative during care if it is part of your daily routine from a very young age: therefore, it is recommended to expose it to delicate handling from an early age.

    This is all the more true since it is also wise to get used to examining it after every long time spent outdoors. (especially after a hunting trip, for example), to detect possible injuries, thorns, parasites, spikes…

    Buy a “Auvergne Pointer”

    Either male or female, the price of a puppy Auvergne Pointer is generally between 650 and 1100 EUR. The average is about 800 EUR, no significant differences between males and females.

    However, it is difficult to find it outside its country of origin, France, even in neighboring countries with the latter.
    The same is true in North America, although there are a handful of breeders in Canada and the United States.

    The import from France is, therefore, sometimes the most suitable solution to avoid possible waiting times and have a maximum of choice. However, It must be taken into account that various expenses are added to the purchase price of the puppy: transportation expenses, administrative expenses, etc. In addition, it is necessary, of course, make sure you know and respect the regulations regarding the importation of a dog from abroad.

    In any case, whatever the place, the price charged varies according to the prestige of the breeding, the lineage the animal came from, but also and above all its intrinsic characteristics, in particular its greater or lesser conformity with the norm. This last point also explains why there are sometimes significant differences within the same litter..

    Characteristics “Auvergne Pointer”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Auvergne Pointer” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images “Auvergne Pointer”

    Photos:

    1 – Braque d’Auvergne sur fond blanc by Desaix83, from the work of Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – Riga, Baltic Winner 2013, 9-10 Nov by Tomasyna, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – Braque d’Auvergne during the Rzeszów International Exhibition, Poland. Marian Surma is the breeder and owner of Poland by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – Braque d’Auvergne during the Rzeszów International Exhibition, Poland. Marian Surma is the breeder and owner of Poland by Wikimedia
    5 – Braque d’Auvergne during the Rzeszów International Exhibition, Poland. Marian Surma is the breeder and owner of Poland by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    6 – Braque_d’auvergne at the Universal Exhibition in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Videos “Auvergne Pointer”

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 180
    • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
    • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
    • UKCGun Dog

    FCI breed standard “Auvergne Pointer”

    FCIFCI – “Auvergne Pointer”
    Braco de Auvernia FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Braque d’Auvergne (English).
      2. Bleu d’Auvergne (French).
      3. Braque d’Auvergne (German).
      4. (em francês: Braque d’Auvergne) (Portuguese).
      5. Azul de Auvernia (Spanish).