Little Lion Dog (Löwchen)
Francia . Little Lion Dog

Little Lion Dog

The Little Lion Dog It is little known, so much that in 1960 was defined as the rarest dog in the world.

Content

History

The origins of Little Lion Dog, also called Löwchen they are old and controversial. The most widespread theory places its origins in northern Europe (Germany, Belgium and France) and claims that he is related to the race “Poodle” Dwarf, while another theory places its origins in the Mediterranean regions of Spain and France and claims that it is closer to the Bichon.

Some give it a much more exotic origin, claiming that it is descended from dogs that came from Tibet through Russia: However, this theory seems unlikely and is most certainly due to a mispronunciation, since his name is sometimes pronounced “Low Chen” in the Anglo-Saxon world, what gives it Asian sounds. Another hypothesis based on linguistics states that his name is not a reference to the king of the animals., but to the city of Lyon, from which it would originate.

Although its origins are unclear, the truth is that the Little Lion Dog It was already a highly sought after companion dog in the Middle Ages. This animal with its characteristic fur appears in numerous paintings, engravings and tapestries from the 15th centuries, 16Th and 17TH. One of the first representations of the breed can be seen in France, in the cathedral of Amiens, built in the 13th century, where two little lion dogs are carved in stone, perfectly representative of the breed.

Its famous lion's mane shearing is linked to the values ​​of the aristocracy during the Renaissance. As the lion represents strength and courage, the men used the Little Lion Dog as a status symbol. As for women, they appreciated being able to warm their feet against their little companion's bare skin and spend time grooming him this way.

Thus, it is this peculiarity relative to the animal's fur that is at the origin of its name, even if it is not natural.

In the 18th century, both the Earl of Buffon (1707-1788) in his famous Natural History as the Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778), known as Carl von Linné for his ennoblement and author of Systema Naturae, they described the Löwchen and highlighted its rarity.

The breed gradually declined during the 19th century, and it was rare in 1897, when Mr.. by Coninick, a breeder of Dieghem (Belgium), sold a bitch of Little Lion Dog white to young Madelaine Bennert (1876-1972), also from Belgium, who fell in love with this nice dog.

The two world wars were about to suppose the death of this race. However, in 1944, Madelaine Bennert vowed to save the Löwchen starting a breeding program. Found two females, respectively in Lille and in the Dieghem region, and then a male named Ulan. The first litter was born in 1948. Later, a new female named Sirginia joined the program, and Hans Rickert, a german vet, teamed up with Mrs. Bennert to relaunch the breed. The dogs they used and gave birth to are the origin of the Löwchen that we know today.

His efforts paid off in 1961 When the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) officially recognized the breed, designating France as your country of origin.

However, It was from Germany that the first specimens were exported to Great Britain in 1967 and then to the United States in 1971, which undoubtedly explains why this dog is now much better known with its Germanic name than with the French. However, at that time it was still a very rare breed: with less than 50 registered copies (half of them in Germany), was even designated “the rarest dog breed in the world” by the Guinness Book of Records.

While the British Kennel Club quickly recognized the Little Lion Dog (already in 1971), the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC), the American Kennel Club (AKC) and the United Kennel Club (UKC) they waited until 1994, 1995 and 1999, respectively, to give you full breed status.

Today, although it is still rare, the Little Lion Dog It is no longer an endangered breed and can count on a loyal fan base. The Löwchen is at the bottom of the popularity ranking in the United States (around the stall 170 of 190), but it enjoys a certain popularity in Britain, where some are registered 80 births per year. However, this figure tends to erode, since around 2010 I was well above 100. In France, the Livre des Origines Français (LOF) records an average of 70 new Löwchen per year, and the trend has been stable since the early 1990s. 2000.

Photo: Lowchen by Jappitoo, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Little Lion Dog it is a small dog breed with a robust appearance and solid bones. His body is square in shape, as high as long, and her back is straight, like its front legs. The tail, placed just below the back line, it is carried high and curved.

The head of the Löwchen it is relatively wide and short, with a wide muzzle ending in a black nose. The big eyes, dark and round should be well positioned forward and express drive and intelligence. The ears are low set, at the height of the eyes, and they fall quite low.

The coat is long and silky, and consists solely of a dense, wavy top coat. It is important to know that the appearance of “Lion's mane” so typical of the breed is not natural, but it is due to the cutting of part of its fur. Although this is mandatory for individuals participating in dog shows, a Löwchen confined to the role of companion dog he can perfectly maintain his long hair all over his body.

The breed standard allows all colors and color combinations, but the white, cream and black are the most popular.

Last but not least, there is little sexual dimorphism in this breed.

Size and weight

▷ Male size: Of 25 – 33 cm.
▷ Female size: 25 – 33 cm.
▷ Male weight: 5 – 7 kg
▷ Female weight: 5 – 7 kg

Character and skills

The Löwchen has been used as a pet for many centuries, and is extremely loving and attached to his family. They love spending time with their owners, either playing with them or just lying next to them. This attachment makes it a breed of dog that does not tolerate loneliness well.: if left alone frequently for several hours at a time, you are likely to suffer from separation anxiety. This can lead to excessive barking., scratches on the door or even destructive behavior.

Rather distrustful, the Little Lion Dog not very sociable with strangers, those he greets with barks. However, They accept them quickly once they realize that they are friends of the family and that they too get their share of attention.

Playful dog, he likes to have fun with the children he knows, but he is less receptive to those he does not know. As with all dogs of any size, should not be left alone with young children, especially if one or more of them are unknown.

Used to getting all the attention from your family, to the Little Lion Dog does not particularly like to share his home with other animals, whether they are companions or representatives of other species. On the other hand, accepts perfectly those with whom he has grown up and whom, Therefore, consider part of the family, although there is a risk that rodents will one day awaken their hunting instincts.

Regardless of its small size, not afraid to provoke other dogs much bigger than him, without being aware of the danger. Therefore, a certain vigilance is necessary during walks, and particularly during encounters with unfamiliar dogs.

Despite the tendency to bark when he hears or sees something out of the ordinary, what can cause neighborhood problems, fits very well in apartment living, as long as you walk at least 20 minutes a day. However, to prevent something bad from happening to you, it is better that this walk be done on a leash. In addition, if you have access to a garden, make sure that the latter is perfectly closed, since wandering the big world alone is quite risky for him, in particular because of its small size and its tendency to attack those bigger and stronger than it.

Intelligent, affectionate and endearing, the Löwchen it does not take long to win the hearts of his family, that you may even end up realizing that you have adapted your lifestyle to that of this new member, reserving your favorite spot on the couch or matching your bedtime and waking time with theirs. Many owners admit that “belong” to your Little Lion Dog… but they are absolutely delighted with him.

Curious and sometimes stubborn, this little bundle of joy delights singles and large families alike. He knows how to make himself loved and fills the lives of those who have time to dedicate to him, but his place is as close to his master as possible: does not about, for example, to make him spend the nights in another place that is not inside the home.

In short, although their barking and possible difficulty learning grooming can cause difficulties, his affectionate character, His obedient nature and boundless attachment make him an ideal companion dog - as long as you have time to dedicate to him -, and this even without experience. It is undoubtedly a good option for a first dog to adopt.

Education

The socialization of Löwchen should be started at an early age, so that it is perfectly balanced in adulthood. In addition to meeting all the members of his family (including other animals in the house), you must get used to all the stimuli and situations that you may encounter later: other people and animals, vehicles, city ​​noises, etc.

Cleaning training should also be undertaken as soon as you arrive at your new home., at the risk of never being able to correct the bad habits acquired. It is important to take him out as often as possible to relieve himself outside and be vigilant when he is inside, to identify the places you have chosen as toilets.

Another aspect that must be worked on as soon as possible is that of barking, since the Little Lion Dog tends to bark more than it should. Good socialization and work at this level as part of your education can quickly solve this problem.. To do this, an inexperienced owner may need the help of a professional dog trainer.

However, this dog is smart and learns quickly. His desire to please his owner makes him an easy dog ​​to train, even without much experience. With a little patience, a beginning owner can teach you all the basic commands, as “Sit down” and “below”, and even go further in his education teaching him more advanced tricks.

In addition, If you can have the vocation to participate one day in a dog show and then you will have to lift a skin in a lion's mane, it is necessary to accustom your partner to shearing when he is still a puppy, so that from then on you will not be afraid of these grooming sessions.

Being a very emotional dog, the Löwchen can be traumatized by traditional dog training methods. It is advisable to use the positive reinforcement method, rewarding good behavior with lots of caresses, affection and treats.

Health

Thanks to the rigorous breeding program carried out over the years 70, the Löwchen it is a very robust breed of dog, who is normally immune to serious inherited diseases, as long as, of course, a breeder of Löwchen responsible.

The most common health problems of this dog are:

  • Canine eye diseases, like the falls, progressive retinal atrophy or distichiasis, a condition that causes hair to grow on the inside of the eyelids and can be surgically corrected;
  • Hip Dysplasia;
  • Patellar dislocation;
  • Congenital deafness, a relatively rare problem outside certain lines.
Life expectancy

12 - 14 years

Grooming

The Little Lion Dog requires some maintenance effort. In fact, although she changes very little, if it does (which often makes it a recommended dog breed for allergy sufferers), it is recommended to brush him every two to three days to keep his beautiful coat in good condition and avoid knots, that are as unsightly for their owner as they are uncomfortable for him. It is also useful to bathe him about once a month, being careful to use a specific shampoo for dogs.

When brushing your dog's hair, check your eyes and ears to make sure they are clean and not at risk of infection.

In addition, how he usually spends most of his time indoors, natural wear and tear on the nails is seldom enough, so it is necessary to trim them regularly to avoid embarrassment or even injury.

Any owner who wants their dog to participate in dog shows should plan to take their companion to the groomer every two months or so, so you can wear the beautiful mane so typical of the breed. However, It should be remembered here that the dog's coat allows it to conserve heat: if you live in a cold region, shaving it in winter is not necessarily ideal…

Utility

The Little Lion Dog has always been a companion dog, and this is still its main function today: be with your family and bring them love and happiness.

However, can also be useful as an alert dog, barking at the approach of a stranger. Brave, does not hesitate to defend his family, but its size does not allow it to play the role of watchdog.

They can also be trained to be admirable athletes in obedience and agility competitions..

He is also a regular at dog shows, where fans can admire the most beautiful specimens of the breed.

Last but not least, his cheerful and optimistic demeanor allows him to be used as a therapy dog.

Characteristics "Little Lion Dog (Löwchen)"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Little Lion Dog (Löwchen)" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “"Little Lion Dog (Löwchen)"“

Photos:

1 – Little Lion Dog by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/perro-lowchen-l%C3%B6wchen-paja-1330537/
2 – Basil Smile (un perro de Löwchen, Ch Taywill Brillant Roman Basilia) mostrando su rostro by John M. P. Knox from Austin, USA, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – Lowchen by Jappitoo, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – Adult Lowchen Gaiting by Jk9dat, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
5 – This is a 9 month old Lowchen puppy by Jk9dat, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
6 – Lowchen-10-Ch-Boondock Musicbox Don’t Roll Those Eyes At Me! 02 by Petful

Videos “"Little Lion Dog (Löwchen)"“

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
  • Group :
  • Section : .

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 9: Companion and Toy Dogs – Section 1.3: Little Lion Dog
  • AKCNon-Sporting
  • ANKC Group 1(Toys)
  • CKCGroup 6 (Non-Sporting)
  • ​KC – Toys
  • NZKCToys
  • UKCCompanion Breeds


FCI breed standard "Little Lion Dog (Löwchen)"

FCIFCI - "Little Lion Dog (Löwchen)"
Petit

Alternative names:

    1. Löwchen (English).
    2. Löwchen (French).
    3. Petit chien lion (German).
    4. Löwchen (Portuguese).
    5. Löwchen (Spanish).

Stabyhoun
Holanda FCI 222 . Spaniel type

Stabyhoun

The Stabyhoun is very similar to the Dutch Partridge Dog, but smaller. It is practically unknown outside the Netherlands.

Content

History

The Stabyhoun, o Stabijhoun, it is one of the five rarest dog breeds in the world. Created in the 19th century, is recognized as the national treasure of the Netherlands. How could it be otherwise with just 1.000 live specimens? It comes from the forest lands of Friesland. Poor farmers, they couldn't afford more than one dog, they really needed a versatile worker. From hunting to livestock surveillance and protection, it was also able to eliminate rodents. In fact, could do almost anything.

It is possible that it descended from Spaniels imported to the Netherlands by the Spanish and crossed with the Dutch Partridge Dog. He would also have family ties with him Small Münsterländer.

It is very little known outside its country of origin.

Photo: “Stabyhoun” by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Stabyhounlayingingrass.jpg

Physical characteristics

The Stabyhoun has a robust complexion and beautiful black fur, brown or orange, sometimes with white markings. The straight hair is of medium length, smooth and silky to the touch. They are medium-sized dogs.

Height and weight

    Male size: Of 53 - 53 cm.

    Female size: Of 50 - 50 cm.

    Male weight: Of 15 - 20 kg

    Female weight: Of 14 - 20 kg

Character and skills

If you are lucky enough to meet a Stabyhoun, you will surely appreciate his docile character. Calm and patient, they are intelligent dogs that can sometimes be stubborn. Extremely patient with children and other animals, this breed is, with the proper education, both obedient and loyal to its owner. Although the Stabyhoun has a calm temperament on the inside, requires a lot of exercise and physical activity.

They are distrustful of strangers, but they are not aggressive by nature. His education is easy to work with because he is obedient in nature. However, it must be started from its first months with benevolent and consistent methods.

The Stabyhoun he is a dog very close to his master, making it hard for him to bear loneliness. Periods of loneliness can cause anxiety and lead to behavioral disorders such as destruction or barking. He is also a loud dog that barks regularly., which can lead to neighborhood problems.

With his hunting instinct he can be a fugitive to follow a trail, if your property is not properly fenced.

Health

The Stabyhoun it is a strong and robust dog that is not affected by any particular pathology. However, fear heat and should not stay in a shady spot during a heat wave, as you are at risk of severe heat stroke.

Grooming

The Stabyhoun it is a resistant dog that does not require much maintenance. Its coat should be brushed regularly to avoid knots.

Looking at your eyes and ears, they must be cleaned regularly, especially if it is a dog that lives abroad.

Characteristics "Stabyhoun"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Stabyhoun" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “"Stabyhoun"“

Photos:

1 – “Stabyhoun” by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stabyhoun.jpg
2 – 10 month old adolescent Stabij by Molliever, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – A picture of a stabyhoun wetterhoun pup for the stabyhoun wiki page by Daisai Gaming, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – Stabijs – world dog show 2010 by MJ Klaver
5 – “Stabyhoun” by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Binky_Stabyhoun.jpg
6 – “Stabyhoun” by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stabyhoun_with_11_puppies.jpg

Videos “"Stabyhoun"“

Stabyhoun puppy, mum and Welsh Springer Spaniel playing
Working Stabyhoun

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 222
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type
  • AKCHound
  • FSSFoundation Stock Service
  • UKCGun Dog

FCI breed standard "Stabyhoun"

FCIFCI – "Stabyhoun"
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Alternative names:

    1. Stabij, Beike, Stabijhoun, Fryske Stabij (English).
    2. Stabyhoun (French).
    3. Stabijhoun (German).
    4. (em alemão: stabyhoun) (Portuguese).
    5. Perro de muestra frisón, Perro de muestra de Frisia (Spanish).

Dutch Partridge Dog
Holanda FCI 224 . Spaniel type

Dutch Partridge Dog

A peculiarity of Dutch Partridge Dog It consists in the fact that during the search the tail makes a rotating movement faster and faster as the dog approaches the prey.

Content

History

The Dutch Partridge Dog it is an ancient canine breed, that can be found in paintings painted centuries ago.

Originaria de Drenthe, a dutch province, the breed was developed during the 16th century from dogs from Spain, what were called Spionenen or Spaniolen. In the Netherlands they were given the name Patrijshond, what does retriever mean.

In the east of the country, especially in the province of Drenthe, these dogs were bred as pure breeds, without any mix with other foreign races, as it happened in other places. This isolation allowed the Perdiguero to remain unchanged during 3 or 4 centuries.

The 15 in May of 1943, was recognized by the Raad van Beheer op Kynologish Gebied of the Netherlands, a recognition strongly encouraged by Baroness van Hardenbroek and Messrs. van Heek junior and Quartero.

The responsible breed club was founded on 5 in June of 1948, with the name of Nederlandse Vereniging of Drentsche Patrijshond.

Related to him Small Münsterländer and the French Spaniel, the Dutch Partridge Dog it is quite limited in number, and the breed is almost unknown outside its borders.

Photo: “Drentsche Partridge Dog” macho by Stefanie Joksch, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Dutch Partridge Dog he is a well proportioned dog, with dry muscles, pure in its lines. His body reveals power and also the ability to run at the speed that suits a hunting dog. Wedge-shaped muzzle is slightly shorter than skull. The lips are quite dry and are not hanging. Her body, slightly longer than the height of the withers, is slightly elongated. Although the fur is not really long on the body, gives the impression of being so because of the well-populated ears, more abundant hair on the neck and chest, the fringes on the front and back legs and on the bushy tail, abundantly populated on all sides.

They have a dense coat that covers the body well. Not curly. The hair is not really long, but as it is longer in some parts, the dog, as a whole, gives the impression of having long hair. On the neck and chest, the hair is longer. In the ears, the hair is long and preferably wavy. The ears, the back of the front and back legs and the back of the thighs are fringed. Hair preferably wavy on the upper part of the body and tail. Except for its base, the tail is abundantly provided with long hair on all sides. These hairs are gradually shortened towards the tip.

COLOR: White fur with brown spots, mottled or not. Coats with a mix of brown and white hairs, with or without marks, are less desirable, like the cloak coats. The ears are brown, like the hair around the eyes.

SIZE:

Males: 58 - 63 cm..
Females: 55 - 60 cm..

Weight: Of 20 - 25 kg

Character and skills

They are ideal for hunting in a wide variety of terrain. They hunt with pistol shooting. Maintaining contact with the hunter is apparently an innate quality. A characteristic feature of many dogs of this breed is that, during the hunt, the tail describes a circular motion, especially when the dog is aware of the closeness of the prey. When he's close to hunting, the dog waits for the hunter to approach and when the hunter is late, turn your head to look for the game. Thanks to its adaptability, the dog is capable of hunting all kinds of animals on the plains and swamps. It is also a good retriever and excels in the search for lost game.. These characteristics are innate. For this reason, does not require long training.

The Dutch Partridge Dog it is also a very good companion dog because it is faithful, friendly, attentive. Your education should be done smoothly, without aggressiveness or too much firmness.
This dog requires regular maintenance. It will be an accomplice of the children and it is possible to leave them together. under surveillance, of course. Apartment living will get you down, he needs to have at least one garden for him. to let off steam and also for daily walks.

Health

The Dutch Partridge Dog he is a robust dog, but can be injured while hunting (fracture, sprain, tendinitis, wound…). His ears are drooping, poorly ventilated, prone to ear infections. Some dogs may be affected by hip-femoral dysplasia, a malformation of the hips that causes lameness and pain.

Grooming

The Dutch Partridge Dog should be brushed once a week to remove dead hairs and dirt. You can bathe once a month with a suitable shampoo.

Inspect and clean floppy ears once a week. When we come back from the hunt, we will check that he is not injured. Good antiparasitic and vacation coverage will be launched.

Characteristics "Dutch Partridge Dog"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Dutch Partridge Dog" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “"Dutch Partridge Dog"“

Dutch Partridge Dog
Drentsche Patrijshond Bowi the Gloucester during upland game hunt in Idaho by DutchID, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
Dutch Partridge Dog
Dutch Partridge Dog by mjk23, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Videos “"Dutch Partridge Dog"“

Spyker – Partridge Dog (Spaniel) – 4 Week Residential Dog Training at Adolescent Dogs
Drentsche patrijshond Indy: avonturen deel 27

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 224
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type
  • UKCGun Dog

FCI breed standard "Dutch Partridge Dog"

FCIFCI – "Dutch Partridge Dog"
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Alternative names:

    1. Drentse Patrijshond, Drent (English).
    2. (en néerlandais : Drentse Patrijshond), épagneul à perdrix de Drente, épagneul hollandais de Drente (French).
    3. Drentscher Hühnerhund (German).
    4. (em neerlandês: Drentsche patrijshond) (Portuguese).
    5. Drentsche Patrijshond, Drent (Spanish).

Pont-Audemer Spaniel
Francia FCI 114 . Spaniel type

Pont-Audemer Spaniel

The Pont-Audemer Spaniel he is a gentle dog, very balanced and obedient. Energetic, smart and loyal, they are easy to train.

Content

History

The Pont-Audemer Spaniel is originally from the Pont-Audemer region, looking for the Marais Vernier, in normandy, where it is traditionally used for hunting waterfowl. In 1886, the Kennel Club of Le Havre began to select him. After World War II, only a few copies of this small brown spaniel remained and crosses were made with the Irish Water Spaniel to save the race.

The Pont-Audemer Spaniel It's very weird. The total population of the breed is about three hundred individuals in France. Some breeders perpetuate the breed, mainly in Normandy and Picardy.

Photo: Riga, Baltic Winner 2013, 9-10 Nov by Tomasyna, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Pont-Audemer Spaniel he is a stocky and vigorous Spaniel, whose body is almost square. Placed almost level with the line of the loins, the tail is carried quite straight. It is usually cut in the third; when the tail is not cut, It should be of medium length, a little curved. Dark amber or hazelnut, the eyes are rather small. The upper part of the skull and the long ears are well provided with curlers that frame the head, giving the impression of wearing a wig.

Hair is slightly rough on the body, wavy, neither flat nor curly. The fur is brown, preferably brown and speckled gray, with reflections of dead leaves.

Height and weight

  • Male size: Of 52 - 58 cm.
  • Female size: Of 52 - 58 cm.
  • Male weight: Of 19 - 20 kg
  • Female weight: Of 17 - 19 kg

Character and skills

The Pont-Audemer Spaniel is loving and displays unwavering loyalty to his masters. However, if they don't get their regular dose of care, these dogs can often get anxious, which is an important trait of his personality.

These dogs are especially good with children and are very sociable. They are also great playmates and family companions.. However, if you are looking for a good watchdog, it may not be the best option, as they are too friendly and quiet to keep an eye on something or someone.

This breed gets along very well with other dogs, but does not get along with dogs of the same breed that do not belong to the same pack or group. It is also not very friendly with other pets.. However, puppies of this breed are easily mixed with other pets and are known to have a friendly demeanor towards them.

Training and education

The training of the Pont-Audemer Spaniel It is easy. This dog is very obedient and loyal to the orders of the master. However, training sessions should be short, since the dog hates any long and repetitive task.

Exercise of Pont-Audemer Spaniel

This dog has aggressive exercise needs, which means that even long walks don't usually satisfy you. The greatest satisfaction you would get would be from any long hunting session. However, if hunting is not a reality, this dog should be allowed to frolic in controlled areas so that he burns enough calories and meets his exercise requirements.

Health

Like the rest of the animals, this breed has health conditions to watch out for. Canine hip dysplasia, a condition related to the hip cavities, can cause arthritis in dogs. These dogs are also prone to Von Willebrand's disease (a bleeding disease related to clotting), and hyperthyroidism (overproduction of hormones in the thyroid).

Apart from these problems, patella luxation and dental problems are the most common in this breed. Alopecia, a skin disease caused by ringworm or other parasites, can also affect these dogs.

In summary, the following health problems are not uncommon in the breed Pont-Audemer Spaniel:

  • Canine hip dysplasia
  • Von Willebrand disease
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Dental disease
  • Patella dislocation
  • Alopecia

Grooming

These dogs' fur and fur might look like they need a lot of grooming, but in reality, this breed needs little to no maintenance. A regular brushing once or twice a week is all you need.

However, the dog's ears need to be cleaned whenever necessary and are at risk of infection if not kept clean.

Characteristics "Pont-Audemer Spaniel"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Pont-Audemer Spaniel" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

How much does it cost to have a Pont-Audemer Spaniel?

Cubs Pont-Audemer Spaniel usually cost between 1000 and 1300 EUR.

Images “"Pont-Audemer Spaniel"“

Photos

1 – “Pont-Audemer Spaniel” at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
2 – The Epagneul Pont Audemer is a french pointing dog by Alephalpha, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – Head profile of a Pont-Audemer Spaniel male by Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – A Pont-Audemer Spaniel male by Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
5 – Pont-Audemer Spaniel male by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
6 – “Pont-Audemer Spaniel” by https://worlddogfinder.com/es/razas/spaniel-de-pont-audemer

Videos “"Pont-Audemer Spaniel"“

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 114
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type
  • Central Canine SocietyGun Dog

FCI breed standard "Pont-Audemer Spaniel"

FCIFCI – "Pont-Audemer Spaniel"
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Alternative names:

    1. Epagneul Pont-Audemer, Setter of Pont-Audemer (English).
    2. Épagneul de Pont-Audemer (French).
    3. Epagneul de Pont-Audemer (German).
    4. (em francês: epagneul de Pont-Audemer) (Portuguese).
    5. Epagneul du Pont-Audemère (Spanish).

Saint Germain Pointer
Francia FCI 115 . Braque Type

Saint Germain Pointer

The Saint Germain Pointer it is little known outside the French borders.

Content

History

A versatile hunting dog that has been used not only for aiming, but also to throw and recover, the Saint Germain Pointer can work with a variety of hunting, including rabbits and pheasants. Unlike most hunting dogs, traditionally, this breed has been popular at shows and has been bred to have a very uniform and specific appearance.

Originally bred in France mixing English Pointer with the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size, This breed is believed to have developed in the early 1830 and claims to have a very elegant heritage. King Charles X of France was given two dogs English Pointer who were very talented hunters. The female, call miss, she was raised with a dog Braque Francais local, and the legacy of Saint Germain Pointer started. Initially, the breed was called Compiegne Pointers due to the location of the kennels in which they were raised, but this name was later altered when the kennels were moved to the region of Saint Germain. Many of the dogs produced were shown at dog shows throughout France and, at that time, they were the race of Pointer most displayed in her native country.

The race Saint Germain Pointer was initially very popular and in 1913 a club was formed that aimed to increase its prevalence in France, as well as improve the breed. Unfortunately, the size of the breed's population Saint Germain Pointer was greatly reduced in every world war. They have never fully recovered from the drastic decline in population size that occurred in the first half of the 20th century., but they are still a breed that has a loyal follower and are not in danger of extinction today.

En los últimos años, the English Pointer enter the genetic pool of Saint Germain Pointer to increase their numbers and add some genetic diversity. Even though few, if there is any, of the breed members have been exported internationally, the UKC granted full recognition to the breed in 2006 within your group of hunting dogs.

Photo: Braque_saint-germain at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

Braco Saint Germain
Braque saint-germain at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

The appearance of Saint Germain Pointer is particularly important for breeders, although it is mainly a hunting dog. Historically, have participated in a large number of French dog shows. Breed members must be of medium build, with good muscles and heavy bones. The dog's skull should be round and the same length as its muzzle.

Your pink nose should have wide open nostrils, while your big golden eyes should show a placid and relaxed expression. Their ears are curved at the tip and should not reach beyond eye level. The shoulders of the Saint Germain Pointer they are impressively long and their limbs must be robust and heavy. They have a broad chest and a straight back, although your rump will bow slightly. The dog's sharp tail is carried at a distinctive horizontal angle when in motion.

The short coat of the Saint Germain Pointer should be faded white with orange markings, and the ears are preferred to be orange everywhere. Unlike in the English Pointer, black hair is not tolerated. The males measure between 56 and 62 height cm, while the smaller females reach heights between 53 and 60 cm.. Most members of the breed will weigh between 18 and 27 kg.

Character and skills

While it is true that Saint Germain Pointer has traditionally excelled on the show floor, is primarily a hunting dog and, as such, has the character expected of a working animal. This breed is easy to train and loves to be kept active and given a task to do. They must have a “soft mouth”, meaning they do not hurt or harm the prey they retrieve. They also tend to work in packs, which means that they normally get along with other dogs. Although it is undeniable that they have a natural instinct to chase small animals, anecdotally they get along well with the small pets in their house that they have been introduced to since childhood.

The Saint Germain Pointer he is truly a family dog ​​and does best when kept indoors with human company. He is particularly affectionate towards those he trusts and will bond closely with each member of his family. They are not typically a breed that displays any aggression, which means they are adapted to children, though they wouldn't be good watchdogs. While it is true that this breed will be willing to befriend any child it meets, Caution is advised with very young children who may not be able to resist brisk greetings and rowdy play!

Education

More than many other dog breeds, the Saint Germain Pointer can be a real treat to train. He is a dog willing to please his master and has the intelligence to complete most of the tasks entrusted to him with relative ease.. Trainers will be most successful when they focus on the breed's most natural behaviors, like recovery.

It is often said that the Saint Germain Pointer it is a hardy dog ​​that is much less sensitive than other closely related breeds. Trainers have the option of using firmer methods than they might expect, However, will continue to achieve the best results with the use of positive reinforcement techniques (instead of negatives).

Exercise

Not far behind when it comes to exercise, the Saint Germain Pointer is a dog that loves to be out of the house. Has great endurance when working and is able to travel long distances for long periods of time without seeming to tire. If kept solely as a companion animal, owners should be able to provide an hour or two of solid exercise each day and should also keep the dog stimulated with various games and training sessions.

Any attempt to keep this breed in a small apartment or house or to exercise it for less time than recommended, will likely lead to a frustrated dog that will become a difficult pet. Anxiety is likely to develop in these situations, hyperactivity and destructive behaviors.

Health

Unfortunately, there is no specific information on the health of the Saint Germain Pointer, and to date there have been no studies on the breed. A working dog, it is generally accepted as a hardy breed. The prudent owner would be aware of these possible health conditions:

Hip Dysplasia

    Hip scoring should be performed by responsible breeders to ensure that the small population of the Saint Germain Pointer stay healthy. A simple x-ray of the hips will allow a vet to assess the quality of the hip joints and inform the breeder if they are good enough to allow breeding.

Ear infections

    When the ear canal becomes clogged with a buildup of smelly debris, an infection is likely present. Ears may also be red, hot and sensitive. Affected dogs tend to shake their heads and rub their faces against the ground. Infections occur mainly due to the proliferation of bacteria and yeast, although they can also be due to a foreign body, like a grass seed inside the ear canal or ear mites.

Grooming

The short coat of the Saint Germain Pointer does not need to be brushed more than once or twice a week. Toenails may need to be trimmed every few months, particularly if you don't walk on hard surfaces. The breed's clear claws make claw clipping easy, since the cut is visible, making it more avoidable than in dogs with dark pigmented claws.

The Most Important Grooming Duty An Owner Should Not Neglect, is the maintenance of good ear hygiene. The ears should be cleaned every one to two weeks with a dog ear cleaner. Owners should also ensure that the ears are dry inside and out after being exposed to water..

Characteristics "Saint Germain Pointer"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Saint Germain Pointer" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 1 out of 5
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “"Saint Germain Pointer"“

Saint Germain Pointer

Saint Germain Pointer Dog Breed – Braque Saint Germain

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 115
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • UKCGundog

FCI breed standard "Saint Germain Pointer"

FCIFCI – "Saint Germain Pointer"
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Alternative names:

    1. St. Germain Pointing Dog (English).
    2. Braque Saint-Germain (French).
    3. Braque Charles bzw. Braque Compiegne (German).
    4. (em francês: Braque Saint-Germain) (Portuguese).
    5. Braco de Saint Germain (Spanish).

French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size
Francia FCI 133 . Braque Type

French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size

Some even say that the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size it is a dog that was born trained.

Content

History

The type French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size grew up in the region of Gascony which bears his name. He is a direct descendant of the oldest known race of pointing dogs already described by Gaston PHEBUS, Count of Foix. This excellent pointing dog has managed to preserve its stamina. In the same way, It has maintained the efficiency of the days when dogs were raised only for the services they provided.

Photo: Pyrenean Pointer at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

Nose and muzzle
Has a big brown nose. Has a wide muzzle, rectangular, sometimes slightly convex.

Eyes
Has a frank look. Your brown or dark yellow eyes are wide.

Ears
The ears of the brave French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size they go well up to the tip of your nose. Slightly bent, turn round at the tip.

Hair
His hair French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size it is very thick. Their head and ears have finer hair.

Their fur can be brown, Brown and white, mottled or spotted brown and white or brown with tawny markings above the eyes, lips and limbs.

Tail
The French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size has a generally docked tail, follows well the prolongation of the convex line of the croup. A long tail is not considered a defect, as long as it is well managed; neither the short tail of
birth

Character and skills

Smart, obedient and very attached to their master, the kind dogs French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size they are soft and calm. Some even say it is a dog that was born trained.

Your training will be smooth and early, since it is a very sensitive dog, even shy, and you have to get used to city noises very quickly. Let's not forget that you are an athlete and that you need “Unburden” regularly. Soft and calm, adapts very well to the city, as long as you get used to it at a young age. The French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size must live with his caregiver and is very affectionate with children.

Education

The reputation of French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size is well established. Like his cousin, the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) , “born trained”, say his followers. Intelligent and very attached to his teacher, he will know how to learn all the tricks of a good education.

It is a sensitive dog with which you must use gentleness. This dog must understand the commandments to assimilate them. One of the reasons why coercive methods should be banned. This is also true for all dog breeds.

The French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size can be perfectly adapted to living in the city. However, will have to be introduced to noise and crowds at a very young age.

Characteristics "French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 1 out of 5
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “"French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size"“

Braque Francais-type Gascogne
Braque Francais-type Gascogne

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 133
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type

FCI breed standard "French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size"

FCIFCI – "French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size"
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Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size)
Francia FCI 134 . Braque Type

Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size)

The Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) he is sensitive and loving, he likes children and feels comfortable both in the city and in the country.

Content

History

The origins of the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) are the same as the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size. They are the best representatives of the old lines of Brachets and “Braques” southerners.

Already in the fifteenth century, the “Braque Francais” can be found on canvases depicting venus scenes. It is scattered throughout French territory during the French Revolution, and the regionalization of breeding allows the appearance of races such as the Ariège Pointer or the Auvergne Pointer.

A breed that was abandoned in favor of British dogs, the breeding of the Braque Francais was revived between the two wars, when the two guys became different. Developed in the Pyrenees, the race descends from the old Spanish Braque and of the now extinct Southern Hound.

A more elegant version than the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size, the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) has legs about 12,5 cm shorter than Gascony.

Photo: Un braque francais, type pyrénées by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) presents the same proportions and gender characteristics of the type French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size, only that its dimensions are smaller and its body structure is lighter. The differences are as follows:

  • It is a rustic dog, not heavy, but muscular enough. His skin is more stretched than the "Gascony" type.
  • The lips are less drooping than those of the "Gascony" type or less convex.
  • The forelimbs are lighter than those of the “French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size”
  • Finer and shorter hair than the Gascony type.
  • Character and skills

    Sensitive and affectionate, He is affectionate with children and feels comfortable both in the city and in the country.

    Your education should be smooth and early, because the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) he is a very sensitive dog, even shy. Therefore, must get used to city noises very quickly.

    Has a natural gift for hunting and very good stamina.

    He cohabits easily with his companions and can stay alone for a day. Fits well with apartment living, as long as you get used to it from a young age. However, you need to exercise very regularly.

    Some say he was born trained.

    Low maintenance required.

    Characteristics "Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) "

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) " you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos “"Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) "“

    Braque Francais Type Pyrenees NAIBE MIRA MAYA
    Vidéo Braques Francais Du Milobre de Bouisse

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 134
    • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
    • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type

    FCI breed standard "Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) "

    FCIFCI – "Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) "
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    Bourbonnais Pointing Dog
    Francia FCI 179 . Braque Type

    Bourbonnais Pointing Dog

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog at birth it is frequently tailless, it is also called “Glue cutter”.

    Content

    History

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog it was already known in 1598 like an expert quail hunting dog. The authors of the time described him as a pleasant companion for the hunter, rustic and healthy looking, born with a short tail, with a white fur, whole and finely speckled with light brown or fawn trout.

    After the first world war, a group of dedicated breeders formed the first Club du Braque du Bourbonnais in 1925 with the goal of reviving the race and restoring its pre-war prominence. The first breed standard was published in the first club newsletter in 1930. Although the organization and these breeders made considerable progress, his efforts were again almost wiped out by World War II. In addition, strict adherence to a natural tailless dog and strict color requirements resulted in a dog based on appearance rather than performance.

    The result of this selection in reverse leads to a total disaffection of the breeders. Of 1963 - 1973, there were no registrations in the L.O.F. (Book of French Origins) . In 1970, under the impulse of Michel Comte, a team of breeders set themselves the mission of ensuring the survival of the Bourbonnais Pointing Dog.

    Today, French breeders strive to produce a Bourbonnais Pointing Dog that conforms to the breed standard, but of equal importance, the Bourbonnais Pointing Dog should now be proficient in the field as pointers, retrievers and trackers. Since the beginning of the 1970, the breeders of Bourbonnais Pointing Dog have substantially and rapidly improved the conformation of the breed and its performance in the field.

    One second Club du Braque du Bourbonnais it was created in 1982 by Michel Comte, with the official recognition of the Central Canine Society (SCC), French affiliate of the FCI, in 1985. The goal of reviving the race had been achieved, the breed standard relaxed, spotting and docked tails were found acceptable and the breed's remarkable hunting instincts were restored. The new breed standard was fully recognized by the SCC and the FCI in 1991. The standard was translated and published on the FCI website at 1998.

    Photo: Braque_du_bourbonnais at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Physical characteristics

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog is a robust, compact and muscular mid-size braque. Gives an impression of robustness and strength. The female has a slimmer and more elegant silhouette. Some dogs are born without a tail (anurus) or with a naturally short tail (brachyura). Tail docking is practiced in countries where it is allowed.

    The head is pear-shaped, namely, rounded in all directions, with rounded side walls, well developed parietals and zygomatic arches. The pear-shaped head is typical of the breed. The axes of the skull and muzzle are parallel or slightly divergent. Neither too light nor too heavy, the head is in proportion to the body. The eyes are large, rather rounded, hazelnut or dark amber, according to coat color. Medium-length drop ears are located at or just above the eye line.

    The coat is fine, dense and short. It is finer on the head and ears, a little thicker and sometimes a little longer on the back. White spots are very invasive, finely speckled with brown (known as “wine lees” or “withered lilac”) the leonado (known as “peach blossom”) in all its variants. White and colored hairs can blend into a roan pattern. The ear generally wears the basic color more or less mottled. Color patches should be few in number and small in size: must not exceed the size of the palm of the hand on the body and must never encompass both eyes at the same time on the face.

    Character and skills

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog is described in the breed standard as gentle and affectionate, but also passionate and intelligent when hunting. Easily adapts to the most varied terrain and games. Naturally seeks high emanation and shows useful and accurate stopping ability.

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog they are mostly a Pointing Dogs versatile.

    Exercise and training

    Options for exercise could include backyard playtime, preferably fenced, or be taken for walks several times a day. Exercise can also be done in the form of indoor activities, like the hideout, chase a ball rolling on the ground or learn new tricks. Certain outdoor activities such as swimming, hiking and retrieving balls or flying discs can provide a good outlet for expending energy. Training for dog sports such as agility, obedience and rallying can also be a great way to give your dog some exercise.

    Health

    The majority of the Bourbonnais Pointing Dog they are healthy dogs. Working with a responsible breeder, those who wish to own a Bourbonnais Pointing Dog they can get the education they need to know about specific health concerns within the breed. Good breeders use health exams and genetic testing of their breeders to reduce the likelihood of disease in their puppies.

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog requires relatively gentle handling. Has the ability to perceive the mood of the manipulator, seeking eye contact at all times.

    Grooming

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog has a fine, dense and short coat. It's a little thicker, and sometimes longer, in the back. On the head and ears, the hair is thinner and shorter.

    Beyond periodic brushing, the occasional bath will keep your Bourbonnais Pointing Dog clean and looking its best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog.. The breed's strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or nail polish to prevent overgrowth, breakage and cracking. The ears should be checked regularly to avoid accumulation of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

    Characteristics "Bourbonnais Pointing Dog"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Bourbonnais Pointing Dog" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

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    Dog friendly ⓘ

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    Hair loss ⓘ

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    Affection Level ⓘ

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    Need to exercise ⓘ

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    Social Needs ⓘ

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    Apartment ⓘ

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    Grooming ⓘ

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    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

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    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

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    Health Issues ⓘ

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    Territorial ⓘ

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    Cat Friendly ⓘ

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    intelligence ⓘ

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    versatility ⓘ

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    Child Friendly ⓘ

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    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

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    Playfulness ⓘ

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    Images “"Bourbonnais Pointing Dog"“

    Photos:

    1 – Braque_du_bourbonnais at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – Braque_du_bourbonnais at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – Braque du Bourbonnais sur fond blanc by Desaix83, from the work of Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – Braque du Bourbonnais – world dog show 2010 by mjk23, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    5 – Braque du Bourbonnais – world dog show 2010 by mjk23, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons
    6 – Braque_du_bourbonnais by The original uploader was Michael Comte at French Wikipedia., CC BY-SA 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons

    Videos “"Bourbonnais Pointing Dog"“

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 179
    • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
    • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type

    FCI breed standard "Bourbonnais Pointing Dog"

    FCIFCI – "Bourbonnais Pointing Dog"
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    Alternative names:

      1. Bourbonnais Pointer, Braque du Bourbonnais (English).
      2. Braque du Bourbonnais (French).
      3. Braque du Bourbonnais (German).
      4. (em francês: Braque du Bourbonnais) (Portuguese).
      5. Braco de Borbón, Braco de Bourbonnais (Spanish).
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