Irish Red and White Setter
Irlanda FCI 330 . Setter

Setter Irlandés Rojo y Blanco

Irish hunters consider the Irish Red and White Setter higher than Irish Red Setter because of its calmer temperament and because it is less visible in the autumn landscape.

Content

History

The Irish Setter it was probably well known in the late 17th century. Outside of ireland, little is known about the existence of two varieties of Irish Setter: the Irish Red and White Setter and the Irish Red Setter. It is the red and white variety that preceded the other, and it is a judicious selection that developed the uniform red color.

When the Irish setters were first exhibited shortly after the middle of the 19th century, there was great confusion about its color. At the end of the 19th century, the red variety had eclipsed the red and white, which became so rare that the breed was thought to be extinct.

In the Decade of 1920, the breeders tried to revive the breed and in 1944 the breed was sufficiently recovered to form a club. In the news, the breed is enjoying a slight revival, and you can find many Irish Red and White Setter in exhibitions and fields.

The current club, the Labor and Exhibition Society of the Irish Red and White Setter, was founded in 1981. Thanks to your efforts and your line of action, the breed is now well established nationally and internationally.

The Irish Red and White Setter, in competition with other breeds of Pointing Dogs, has been successful in field trials, and there are currently a good number of working and exhibition champions.

Originally all Irish Setter were, in its most, red, or red and white, but around 1880 breeders began to prefer the variety of solid red color and as a result, the race was on verge of extinction.

Photo: irwskingspeaks.nl

Physical characteristics

Exist 2 varieties of Irish Setter, that differ both by their morphology and by their behavior in the field.

The Irish Red Setter can be compared to the thoroughbred horse, all steel and tension, no superfluous meat or thick muscles. It must give the impression of extreme speed and everything about it contributes to this: dry fabrics (light but strong skeleton), long, dense muscles, thin and tight skin, without jowl.

The Irish Red and White Setter is similar to the Hunter: very resistant, powerful and robust. The chest is more rounded than the red one and its skin is thicker.

The coat is white with solid red spots.

Height and weight

    ▷ Male size: Of 62 - 66 cm.

    ▷ Female size: Of 57 - 61 cm.

    ▷ Male weight: Of 20 - 25 kg

    ▷ Female weight: Of 18 - 23 kg

Character and skills

The kind and caring Irish Red and White Setter not only is it a popular hunting dog. Thanks to its excellent ability to smell and its strong natural instincts to point and recover, does double duty as a friend of the family. He likes children and can fit in well in a family with children, with the caveat that he's quite rambunctious, especially when it's a puppy, and should always be supervised when there are young children.

The Irish Red and White Setter is always alert, so it is a good watchdog, but does not have the protective nature of a guard dog. In general, gets along well with other dogs and is friendly with cats when raised with them. But keep in mind that it only has a score of 3 in “kindness to cats” on a scale of 1 - 5.

This is an active sporty dog ​​that needs to exercise daily. Take it for a run, to take a long walk, walking him for half an hour twice a day or playing ball until his arms hurt. All of these activities will help you satisfy your need to be outside doing something.. If you are interested in dog sports, is an excellent candidate for agility, the flyball, obedience, the rally and the crawl. It is nice, friendly and mild-mannered once he's past the puppy stage, and it also has wood to be a good therapy dog ​​to visit facilities such as nursing homes and children's hospitals.

In the countryside, the Irish Red and White Setter work at a moderate pace, without ever straying too far from the hunter. He is full of curiosity and seeks hunting in the field. Choose it if your hunting ground is wooded or near a river or lake (better suited to large open spaces).

With regard to training, the Irish Red and White Setter may be a contradiction. He's kind but headstrong, smart but slow to mature. Train him with a light touch so as not to distort his determination, his courage and his high spirit.

Health

All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, like all people have the potential to inherit diseases. Run away from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee for the puppies, to tell you that the breed has no known problems or to keep puppies isolated from the main part of the house for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about the breed's health problems and the incidence with which they occur.

The Irish Red and White Setter have health problems that may be cause for concern, especially if the breeder is not carefully examined. Among them are hip dysplasia, eye problems such as cataracts and progressive retinal atrophy, hypothyroidism and an immune disorder called canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD). A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in their lines..

Do not buy a puppy from a breeder who cannot provide you with written documentation that the parents have been exempted from health issues affecting the breed. Make the dogs are “reviewed by the veterinarian” not a substitute for genetic health testing.

Inform your dog's breeder of any serious illness. If the breeders do not know that a health problem has appeared in their line, cannot take steps to eradicate it.

Grooming

The Irish Red and White Setter has a silky coat that removes dirt easily. Also loose hair, but in a moderate way. The coat should look natural and, except for the bottom of the feet, does not need to be shaved or trimmed.

Brush and comb the coat a couple of times a week - and whenever the dog has been in the field- taking care to gently remove any tangles or kills in the coat. Regular brushing will keep the coat clean, but you will need to bathe the dog from time to time if the white hair starts to get dirty.

The rest are basic care. Trim nails when necessary, usually every one to two weeks. Brush teeth frequently with vet-approved pet toothpaste for overall good health and fresh breath.

Characteristics "Irish Red and White Setter"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Irish Red and White Setter" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “"Irish Red and White Setter"“

Photo:

1 – Irish Red and White Setter during the international dog show in Rzeszów, Poland. by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
2 – Irish Red and White Setter during the international dog show in Rzeszów, Poland. by by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – Irish Red and White Setter by Ordinary Guy, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – Merlin in the kitchen by Dekker70, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
5 – Irish Red and White Setter during the international dog show in Rzeszów, Polonia by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
6 – Irish Red and White Setter during the international dog show in Rzeszów, Polonia by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Videos “"Irish Red and White Setter"“

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 330
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 2: British and Irish Pointers and Setters. 2.2: Setter. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 2: British and Irish Pointers and Setters. 2.2: Setter
  • AKCSporting (FSS)
  • ANKC (Gun dogs)
  • CKCGroup 1 – Sporting dogs
  • ​KC – Gun dog
  • NZKCGundog
  • UKCGun dog breeds

FCI breed standard "Irish Red and White Setter"

FCIFCI – "Irish Red and White Setter"
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Alternative names:

    1. Irish R&W Setter, IRWS/span> (inglés).
    2. Setter irlandais rouge et blanc (francés).
    3. Irischer Rot-Weißer Setter (alemán).
    4. (em inglês: Irish Red and White Setter) (portugués).
    5. IRWS (español).

Lurcher

The Lurcher is a dog Hound of English origin whose name derives from “Lur” that means thief in Gypsy language. Always it has been acknowledged as the dog of the poachers so occasionally is called Poacher ’ s Dog (dog of fugitive).

As a result of its appearance (hairy and scruffy) It is not admitted in competitions but for many it is a dog to enhance. In general, the Lurcher is a cross between a hound and a working dog, What gives rise to many opportunities: Greyhound and Golden Retriever; Whippet and Border Collie.

In the event that you want a Lurcher with more features of hound that of working dog is often cross for the second time with a dog hound type. With this you get a dog faster than a working dog, but with the strength of this. The character of the Lurcher is derived from the best of parents and, some, They define it as quiet and affectionate.

Read more

Longdog

Longdog

Longdog (or Kangaroo Dog) "it is a breed of dog of lebrel type with origin in Ireland whose name literally means"long dog"referring to the shape of its limbs".

Authors such as Colonel Ted Walsh define it as a cross between two hunting dogs, What distinguishes it from the so-called Lurcher, race created from crosses between sighthound dogs and working dogs.

Is not currently distinguish between the Lurcher and the Longdog and encompasses both within the Lurcher.

Because of that are the product of different crosses, the Longdog vary in appearance depending on the races that were used in the cross. They can be so light as a Greyhound or as robust as a Wolf dog. Their coats can also vary depending on the playback. Some have short fur, Some have long fur and some have hard coat.

The common Longdog crosses are usually Saluki with Greyhound, Deerhound with Greyhound, and Whippet with Greyhound. These dogs tend to be raised to (some of the) same purpose as the Lurcher, but they generally have a higher speed compared to the overall resistance and greater training than the Lurcher.

Each of these crossing carries features distintivas…

  • Saluki crossed with Greyhound: It is especially appreciated as a Hunter dog of hares in the United Kingdom and, for short time, in United States. The best copies shared resistance to high temperatures which possesses the Saluki and the capacity for acceleration and strength of the Greyhound.
  • Deerhound crossed with Greyhound: specialist in hunting foxes and deer in United Kingdom, It has a great body resistance and ability to adapt smoothly to the different climatic characteristics, You can live outdoors. In United States, the blood of this can, He has contributed to the development of the American Hound (specialists in the pursuit of coyotes).
  • Whippet crossed with Greyhound: highly appreciated by its balance is, Acceleration, agility, tenacity, heat resistance and, especially, by his rapid recovery. Depending on each dog, It can be used successfully in all kinds of hunting, but in the United Kingdom, stand out, especially in hunting rabbits.

The Lurcher (the Longdog cousins) they were initially raised to catch rabbits when they were expelled from their burrows, but in the Decade of 1950, the myxomatosis ended with most of the rabbits. The myxomatosis, It is an infectious disease of rabbits, swellings on the skin and membranes of these animals, particularly in head and genitals. It is then often evolve into acute conjunctivitis, and sometimes blindness. The rabbit becomes listless, lost appetite and develops fever. In typical cases where the animal has no resistance, death happens on average in 13 days.

It was discovered in Uruguay at the end of the 19th century, in rabbits imported from the genus Sylvilagus. It was subsequently extended by the South American populations of wild rabbits. This was however a less virulent strain than introduced in Australia in 1950, that he slashed the population (of 600 - 100 million in two years).

Scientists decades of Great Britain, Germany and France sought a remedy for the plague that had become the rabbits, but it was the French physician Armand Delille which believed the solution. It was introduced artificially in France in 1952 a few rabbits inoculated with the virus producer the myxomatosis and quickly spread to the European continent in a natural way, through arthropod blood sucking and decimated the French population in 2 years (90% mortality). The myxomatosis, together with hemorragicovírica pneumonia, It is the cause of the decline of the rabbit in the Iberian Peninsula, What has caused the decline of the iconic animals to the point that in the Spanish imperial Eagle were lost the 70 % nests and the Iberian lynx is found without their basic livelihood.

The mode of transmission is the flea and other sucking arthropods of blood in Europe, Although for example, in Australia is transmitted through mosquito.

There is a vaccine for viral vector for domestic rabbits, While in wild specimens Europe have developed immunity and gradually extend.

As mentioned above, in the Decade of 1950, the myxomatosis ended with most of the rabbits, but the disease did not affect the hares.

Y, This led to the need to develop the race to achieve faster dogs to be able to catch hares. A Hare can run at speeds of up 72 km/h.

The need for, the Longdog is born, developed to get a dog proper to the preferred style of hunting and the need of the moment.

Y, Although they are not a pure breed, the crossing with dogs pure Greyhound race, He has carried that are highly valued within the “elite” canine sports.

Because the Longdog is not a pure breed they are not recognized by any canine club. However, North America has recently created the "Lurcher and Longdog Association" to serve as a registering body for dogs Lurcher and Longdog in the United States and Canada.

Like the Lurcher, beyond the different objectives of the crossing, What is certain is that the Longdog is an excellent companion dog that adapts very well to home life, and it is very grateful to received love, She loves to be with people but it needs vigorous walks outdoors, like all dog. Y, above all, very large spaces to savor the aftertaste of freedom.

Dogs breeds: Longdog

Irish Water Spaniel
Irlanda FCI 124 . Water Dogs

Perro de Agua Irlandés

Today, despite relative popularity with some hunters, the Irish Water Spaniel it is still not very widespread outside its country of origin.

Content

History

The origin of the Irish Water Spaniel, but several texts mention that their ancestors would have accompanied the Celts some 1000 years. More concretely, These 11th century texts mention a race similar to the Irish Water Spaniel, described simply as a dog used south of the River Shannon, In Ireland. However, although the characteristics of this ancestor are not documented in detail, experts agree that it was probably not a member of the family of the Spaniel. In fact, This mysterious ancestor is believed to be an ancient race of irish dog that contributed to the development of Irish Water Spaniel. This hypothesis is based on the fact that the Irish Water Spaniel has a very different tail than other breeds of Spaniels. In fact, unlike other representatives of the Spaniels family that have a rather bushy tail, the Irish Water Spaniel has a whip-shaped tail, also known as rat tail.

The other races of Spaniels descended from Persian dogs imported to the Iberian Peninsula. They did not appear in France - where they were then called “espaigneuls“- until the twelfth century. However, only later did mentions of specific breeds appear in the literature, which explains the dog's somewhat hazy past.

The most popular theory about the origin of Irish Water Spaniel is that the Spaniels were imported to Ireland and mixed with other irish dogs, possibly even with the Portuguese Water Dog, the Poodle and the now extinct English water spaniel. Although this theory can be supported by the great resemblance between the Poodle and the Irish Water Spaniel, the origins of the latter remain unclear, and we must be content with speculation, as there are no documents describing how the breed was created.

However, what is true is that the Irish Water Spaniel It was developed mainly for duck hunting and is very happy bringing the game to its master, both on land and in the water: in this way, looks more like a Retriever that a Spaniel. They can even be used to replace certain hunting dogs in a pack, since they are able to point and take the game to its owner when necessary. It is these characteristics and flexibility that make them so popular with hunters..

In the first half of the 19th century, a Dublin breeder named Justin McCarthy played an essential role in the development of the breed. Until then there were at least two different varieties of the breed, and he was able to combine them to create the Irish Water Spaniel as we know it today. It is known that one of his dogs, Boatswain (1834-1852), contributed greatly to the development of the breed by giving birth to a large number of young, and that several dogs of this line were champions in several dog shows.

The Irish Water Spaniel first appeared at dog shows in 1862 in Birmingham, England. For a long time, they were represented mainly by the descendants of the boatswains in these events. However, was not up 1899 when he entered the dog shows, still in england. The first breed club was founded in Ireland in 1890.

The Irish Water Spaniel was introduced in the United States in the decade of 1870. In 1877, in the first Westminster Kennel Club, the most famous dog show in the country, four representatives of the breed were presented to the public. The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognized the breed in 1884, but the United Kennel Club, the other American reference organization, waited until 1948 to do the same.

The Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) took even longer to recognize the Irish Water Spaniel until 1954.

Today, despite relative popularity with some hunters, the Irish Water Spaniel it is still not very widespread outside its country of origin, where it also remains quite marginal. For example, ranks 150 of 190 in the AKC's ranking of America's most popular dog breeds, according to the number of records. In France, it's even weirder, Since the SCC (Société Centrale Canine) received less than 10 registration requests between 2010 and 2016. In Great Britain, the Kennel Club receives an average of one hundred a year: although it is much more consistent than in France, this figure is still quite modest.

Physical characteristics

The appearance of the Irish Water Spaniel it's quite unique. Although at first glance it may be mistaken for a Poodle Grand, its appearance is more robust than this, although it maintains an elegant silhouette. Its coat is also denser than that of the poodle and is made up of long, soft curls.; this is what protects them from water and helps them float. Its waterproof coat also allows it to face harsh climates and bad weather without flinching..

His head is rather broad and round, and ends with a rather square muzzle, strong looking, covered in short hairs. The ears are large, are set high on the skull and fall back on the head with abundant curls. The eyes are small, brown and almond-shaped.

The neck is strong and wide, though it's hidden under a thick layer of hair. The chest is also wide and deep, followed by a slimmer waist, characteristic of active breeds. His well-developed musculature and strong bones make him a fairly robust looking dog..

Its feet are webbed, which gives them a natural facility to swim, which makes the Irish Water Spaniel in one of the best races for swimming.

The tail is also unique and clearly distinguishes the Irish Water Spaniel other Water Dogs. It's shorter, straighter and has a very short coat (or is he almost naked), unlike other breeds of Water Dogs, they all have bushy tails. This explains why the Irish Water Spaniel is sometimes known as “Duck tail spaniel” or “Whip-tailed spaniel”. Although this anatomical feature sometimes makes you smile, makes the Irish Water Spaniel be a better swimmer than others Water Dogs.

Last but not least, the fur of the Irish Water Spaniel is lustrous and is made up of dense curls, with a lot of plumage. They are often called “the clown of the family of the Water Dogs“, not only for his playful personality, but also because of the longer curly hair they have on their heads, which often gives them the appearance of having a tuft on the top of the head, much like a clown wig. The coat is always reddish brown with chocolate tones.

Size and weight

▷ Male size: 55 – 61 cm.
▷ Female size: 53 – 59 cm..
▷ Male weight: 25 – 31 kg
▷ Female weight: 20 – 27 kg

Character and skills

The Irish Water Spaniel is sometimes described as a difficult-tempered dog, and that's probably why it has never been especially sought after as a companion dog, despite its qualities. In fact, it is a dog developed for hunting: It, Therefore, decided to, Intelligent, Active, playful and energetic. This mix can sometimes lead to stubborn or mischievous behavior.. Even when they compete, their playful personality is often imposed and leads them to turn any activity into a game, causing some headaches for your coach. In general, not a breed of dog suitable for a beginner: on the contrary, needs an experienced master, able to give you a constant and structured education.

However, the Irish Water Spaniel it is a perfect companion dog if it is well socialized and trained, and can get enough exercise. Devoted to his master and his family, will do anything to please them, although sometimes this can lead to unwanted mischievous behavior or wanting to play when it's not the time. By the way, although he is devoted to his whole family, it's not uncommon for him to show a preference for a particular member, with whom you have a special affinity.

Able to easily adapt to all situations and conditions, the Irish Water Spaniel he is delighted to accompany his master in many activities, and can excel not only in hunting, but also in water activities or dog competitions, like the exhibitions. In effect, is agile, hardworking and has a good nose. In addition, is naturally happy and balanced, as well as loyal and obedient. With a real propensity to turn any activity into a game, they usually feel great pleasure when doing them, whatever they are.

The Irish Water Spaniel he is one of the best swimmers and loves the water. You have to watch them when they are in the water, since they jump at the first opportunity and enjoy swimming so much that it can be difficult to get them out. Having said that, swimming is a good way to satisfy your need for energy. However, even if you are familiar with the water and swim very well, it is important to keep an eye on him to ensure his safety, as with a child.

The Irish Water Spaniel does not bark much, and generally reserves its impressive barks for situations where you need to warn your family of immediate danger. Therefore, he is quite calm and makes an excellent watchdog, as he is naturally suspicious of strangers. Having said that, his lack of trust with strangers should not be confused with shyness, although he is rarely aggressive towards them: is content to advise. Even when hunting, just bark a little, having the peculiarity of being speechless about hunting, which makes him a good pointer.

The Irish Water Spaniel they tend to get along very well with other dogs and pets. The same goes for children. Whoever your partner is, can spend hours playing with it without getting tired, especially when it comes to looking for the ball.

It must be said that it is a very resistant and lively breed of dog, making it unsuitable for apartment living. You need at least one garden where you can stretch your legs, and it is even better if the garden has a pool. However, a small garden is not enough to satisfy your need for exercise and balance: needs at least an hour of daily running and some walks, as well as swimming regularly.

In fact, it is essential that you can expend your energy to be a calm and obedient dog once at home. Otherwise, the owner should expect destructive behavior from the dog. In fact, it is a recommended breed of dog for an athletic master, not a dog recommended for an elderly or sedentary person.

Starting at 9 or 10 weeks of age, it is recommended to give them 15 - 20 minutes of play in the morning and in the evening, in addition to socializing and doing other exercises. As is still the case for an adult, loves to play fetch or chase a frisbee. However, while waiting for your body to develop and gain muscle, it is better to prevent him from running with his master and, on the other hand, be content with training him to walk a distance of less than one kilometer. You can gradually increase the intensity of your dog's activities and the distances traveled, but you should not rush: too much exercise at a young age can affect your bones and joints, with repercussions for the rest of his life. Once adult, it is possible to run with your dog, but it is advisable to stick to reasonable distances and durations: due to risk of dysplasia, not a dog made to run marathons.

Education

The Irish Water Spaniel it is not a recommended dog for a first adoption. In fact, although it is quite easy to train because he likes to please his master, sometimes has an independent character that pushes you to want to act according to your own will. This is especially true of young males., who are very prone to testing their master's limits. Therefore, it is necessary to know how to show your dog who the master is, establish firm limits and a structured discipline framework with clear and consistent rules. In effect, This dog is known to take advantage of his master at the slightest inconsistency., or if you lack confidence. The fact that they are energetic and need a good amount of daily exercise also contributes to their being a demanding breed..

However, although sometimes they can be stubborn and independent, the Irish Water Spaniel it is usually easy to train. Being one of the most intelligent dog breeds, learn many commands with ease and excel at dog sports. When properly trained, are perfectly capable of performing very specific tasks, both in leisure and in obedience, agility and even dog shows. However, you need to deal with his mischievous nature: the more he learns, Plus you can turn your new abilities into games or mischief of any kind. In fact, it is clear that he has an overflowing imagination.

The Irish Water Spaniel responds better to dog training techniques based on positive reinforcement and rewards. They benefit from being coached by a patient teacher who does not raise his voice, at the risk of awakening their stubborn side and encouraging them to decide to do things their own way. That is why it is important to vary the activities during the educational sessions., to keep your interest and prevent you from starting to do things your way.

Last but not least, the socialization of Irish Water Spaniel is an important aspect of your education. He is extremely suspicious of strangers, although this should not be confused with shyness. The younger you are exposed to a variety of situations, the more comfortable you will be with strangers and will be able to recognize real danger, how not to confuse the postman's visit with a possible intruder. Schools for puppies (puppy socialization classes) they are an interesting option, but it can also be as simple as taking the puppy out in public and visiting the neighborhood. Whatever happens, will always be attentive, so it is the various socialization activities in your training that should help you differentiate between what is a normal part of your life and what is abnormal and should alert your family.

Health

The Irish Water Spaniel they are generally in good health and their fur makes them particularly resistant to bad weather.

However, are prone to various diseases:

waterfalls: unlike other dog breeds, in which they are generally due to aging, cataracts are most often hereditary in theIrish Water Spaniel, and they can appear from the age of five.
follicular dysplasia ;

Hip Dysplasia: it is very common in this breed, and appears to be genetic rather than due to joint wear and tear.

Dental malocclusion: this deformation makes the lower jaw more pronounced, which often causes the lower teeth to pop out of the mouth. Although this can be treated with plastic surgery, it is usually recommended to simply remove the teeth that prevent the mouth from closing normally.
Progressive retinal atrophy (ARP);

Von Willebrand disease;

Hypothyroidism in dogs.

In addition, it is known that the Irish Water Spaniel have allergic reactions to vaccines given to dogs. Therefore, it is important to monitor him during the hours following the vaccination, to react as quickly as possible in case of swelling of the face, lethargy, sharp pain around the injection site, etc. This risk should not be taken lightly, because very serious reactions can lead to the death of the dog.

In addition to this risk linked to vaccines, the Irish Water Spaniel may be sensitive to dewormers and certain dog antibiotics. Therefore, it is necessary to choose a veterinarian who knows well the specificities of this breed, starting with drugs that can cause an allergic reaction in the dog.

Last but not least, like any breed of dog with hanging ears, are at increased risk of ear infections.

Since many of these diseases are genetic and, Therefore, hereditary, it is important to check, when adopting an Irish spaniel, that comes from a line in which these health problems are rare.

Life expectancy

12 - 13 years

Grooming

The dense fur of the Irish Water Spaniel requires regular care to avoid hair build-up. In particular, dead hair must be removed with a natural hair comb two or three times a week, which also helps distribute natural oils and prevent dirt build-up, that the density of its coat makes it retain especially quickly.

It is important to get your dog used to brushing relatively early, why start brushing your dog as an adult, when it is fully active and its coat is a little longer, it can be a real challenge if it is a new experience for him.

In addition, Your dog's coat should generally be trimmed every two months to maintain a healthy appearance.

It is also important to regularly bathe your dog or allow him to expose his coat to water.. The Water Dogs secrete large amounts of natural oils that help protect their coat from water, and regular bathing keeps their coat healthy by preventing too much oil and dirt from accumulating.

By the way, the Irish Water Spaniel is considered a breed of dog hypoallergenic, since it changes very little. However, it is important to remember that no race is 100% hypoallergenic: if you are allergic to dogs, it is better that you do some tests before adopting your new partner.

Last but not least, like any breed of dog with hanging ears, the Irish Water Spaniel are at increased risk of ear infections, since their ears are poorly ventilated and tend to accumulate a lot of wax. For this reason, it is important to examine your dog's ears weekly and clean the accumulated wax with a product designed for it. This weekly exam is also a good opportunity to examine the dog's nails to make sure they are not too long.; if they are, must be trimmed.

Food

They are recommended between 180 and 310 grams of quality active dry food per day for the Irish Water Spaniel, and should be divided into two meals (one in the morning and one at night).

However, as it is a breed of dog that gets fat quickly, but also has a great need for quality power sources, the vet can give good advice to help you choose the right type of food for your dog, and adjust the amount according to your activity level.

Utility

The Irish Water Spaniel traditionally used as a hunting dog for waterfowl. They have an excellent sense of smell. Therefore, he is an experienced hunter who feels very comfortable in the water, but can easily be adapted to most shooting disciplines. When looking for the hunt, often stands still, but it can also bring her back. It is even capable of pulling its prey out and chasing it through thick and tight bushes..

Due to its natural ease in the water, the Irish Water Spaniel also used as a rescue dog at sea.

Last but not least, although they are not well known for this feature and are not commonly used in this context, the Irish Water Spaniel has all the qualities of an ideal companion dog.

Price

The Irish Water Spaniel it is a very rare breed in France, Belgium and Switzerland, so it is difficult to determine the market price of a puppy of this breed.

In other places, either in the United States or in England, for example, the average price of a puppy of Irish Water Spaniel varies between the 700 and 800 EUR, without great differences between males and females.

Characteristics "Irish Water Spaniel"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Irish Water Spaniel" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “"Irish Water Spaniel"“

Photos:

1 – “Irish Water Spaniel” by And IggersFlickr
2 – “Irish Water Spaniel” by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – “Irish Water Spaniel” by anatamanFlickr
4 – “Irish Water Spaniel” “Duke” by DianeFlickr
5 – “8 Week old Irish Water Spaniel puppy, Fergus” by Tom StrattonFlickr
6 – “Irish Water Spaniel” by cchoFlickr

Videos “"Irish Water Spaniel"“

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
  • Group 8: Retrievers - Flushing Dogs - Water Dogs
  • Section 3: Water Dogs. .

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 8: Retrievers - Flushing Dogs - Water Dogs – Section 3: Water Dogs
  • AKCSporting
  • ANKC Group 3 (Gundogs)
  • CKCSporting Dogs
  • ​KC – Gundog
  • NZKCGundog
  • UKCGun Dogs


FCI breed standard "Irish Water Spaniel"

FCIFCI - "Irish Water Spaniel"
Dog

Alternative names:

    1. Whiptail, Shannon Spaniel, Rat Tail Spaniel, Bog Dog, (Irish: An Spáinnéar Uisce) (English).
    2. Chien d’eau irlandais (French).
    3. Irish Water Spaniel (German).
    4. (em inglês: Irish water spaniel) (Portuguese).
    5. Spaniel de Agua Irlandés, Irish Water Spaniel (Spanish).

Irish Water Spaniel

Irish Water Spaniel

The Irish Water Spaniel (Irish Water Spaniel) It is a water dog and one of the oldest breeds of Spaniel dog. Also, is one of the rarest, being known, times, as the “clown” of the Spaniel.

While all the theories of origin of race point to Ireland, the origin of the breed remains unknown. It is possible that more than one of the oldest breeds of Spaniel are involved in its origin, but it is something that is not known for sure.

There is no knowledge of the ancestors of the Irish Water Spaniel, as the father of the breed, Justin McCarthy of Dublin, left no records of this.

Read more

Irish Red Setter
Irlanda FCI 120 . Setter

Setter Irlandés

The Irish Red Setter is spread throughout Europe

Content

History

The origin of dogs Setter dates back to at least the second half of the 16th century: John Caius mentions them in 1570 The British book cart Canibus, What, as its name suggests, is dedicated to the dogs of Great Britain.

It is believed that the Irish Setter came up much later, in the XVIII century, as a result of a crossing. His ancestry is not known for sure, but it is believed to have developed from Irish Water Spaniel, with possible contributions from Irish Terrier, the English Pointer and the Gordon Setter. However, in the early days it didn't have the smooth mahogany red coat we know today, but a red and white fur, especially appreciated for hunting, since it was easy to spot in the bush. This Irish Red and White Setter -that still exists today, although it is more rare- would have gradually resulted, in the course of the 18th century, to the Irish Red Setter. The Irish Red Setter stabilized as a distinct breed in the early 19th century, differing in particular by having longer legs than its bicolor ancestor.

Although its exact origins are unclear, the geographical origin of Irish Setter is well identified. Your story begins, of course, In Ireland, where hunters tried to develop a successful breed of dog for tracking, monitoring and recovery of game birds. They used it as a pointing dog that locates game by freezing in sample position, allowing the hunter to know where the bird is. The term “Setter” comes from this use for which the animal was developed. He was very appreciated from the beginning for his excellent nose, that allows you to detect odors in the air, while most hunting dogs track game on the ground. This feature made him very popular from the beginning..

In addition to his hunting skills, the Irish Red Setter it was also quickly distinguished by its elegant appearance and beautiful mahogany color. Since the early years of the 19th century, some breeders specialized in the production of specimens of this color. Jason Hazzard, of Timaskea, in County Fermanagh, Sir Saint George Gore and the Earl of Enniskillen they were some of the first breeders of the breed. For example, the conde the Enniskillen He decided, already in 1812, he only wanted to have red-haired dogs in his kennels.

In 1862, a specimen called Palmerston stood out for the especially elongated shape of his head and the slenderness of his silhouette. These differences almost cost him his life, since its owner considered that these characteristics made it unsuitable for hunting and decided to drown it. A fan of the breed stepped in and saved him, then made him famous by presenting him in many dog ​​shows. Palmerston gave birth to a large number of descendants, and it is accepted that it appears in the genealogical tree of most dogs Irish Red Setter that exist today. The success of Palmerston in the beauty contests in which he was exposed he was emulated, since without ceasing to be a recognized hunting dog, the Setter Irish Red later became a popular show dog.

The international spread of the Irish Setter

The Irish Setter was imported to the United States already in 1875 and quickly became a star. In fact, the first representative of the race that set foot in America, Elcho, became a star both for his presentations at dog shows and for his effectiveness in the field. It is not strange that the race is one of those recognized since its creation by the American Kennel Club (AKC). The first representative of the breed thus registered in 1878 it was called Admiral. With regard to the United Kennel Club (UKC), the other reference canine organization in the country, recognized the breed in 1914.

Shortly after arrival in the country, the race that is sometimes called Red Setter to distinguish it from its white and red cousin it quickly became one of the most popular breeds at American dog shows. Between 1874 and 1948, nothing less than 760 of their representatives were rewarded in the rings. He was much less noticed for his field skills, since during the same period only 5 specimens were awarded for their hunting skills. This alerted some breed enthusiasts, that in 1940 published in the magazine Field and Stream a call for its rebirth as a hunting dog, its original function. His initiative was quite successful: Like this, although a lot of effort was put into its aesthetic characteristics, the Irish Setter was able to retain both of its functions and remains a highly prized hunting dog for tracking game birds, like the teal, the duck, partridge and quail. It is also common to distinguish between exposure and working bloodlines, that differ in size and robustness.

Of course, not only the United States adopted the Irish Setter. Your appreciation for the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) in 1954 contributed a lot to its spread throughout the world.

Recognitions “Irish Red Setter”

The Irish Setter is now recognized by the world's leading organizations, that distinguish it from Irish Red and White Setter. Many did not recognize the latter until much later.. In fact, the Irish Setter enjoys much greater popularity than its ancestor, although the latter is a bit at half mast…

This is the case, in particular, of United States, where he continues to be present both in the field with the hunters and in the exhibition rings. However, It is far from the heights it reached in the years 60 and 70, thanks mostly to Disney's production of 1962 in which a Irish Setter call Big Red, as well as Rey Timahoe, the famous White House dog during the presidency of Richard Nixon (1969 - 1974). Mid-years 70, It was ranked third in number of annual registrations in the AKC, going from about 4.000 puppies per year to more than 60.000. However, this fashion was ephemeral, and the popularity of Setter gradually declined from the second half of the decade of 1970. Today, is more likely to find the Setter around the post 75 (of something less than 200) regarding the number of annual registrations with the AKC. Keep descending, since at the dawn of the XXI century it was around the position 60.

Also in France, the Irish Setter became incredibly popular over the years 70. If at the beginning of the decade there were already more than 600 annual inscriptions in the French Book of Origins (LOF), this number soared incessantly until approaching 2.400 (four times more) in 1978. The reverse movement occurred in the following ten years, to the point of ending the decade of 1980 at around 700 u 800 annual births. Below, the number stabilized around 600 per year throughout the decades of 1990 and 2000, and then began to decline again in the decade of 2010, at around 500 births per year.

The recent decline in interest in breed is also seen in other countries, like Britain. For example, the number of annual registrations in the Kennel Club is around 700, while in early 2010 approached the 1.000.

Physical characteristics

The Puts irelandes is an active hunting dog, spirited and noble-looking, with a balanced and elegant constitution. These medium-sized dogs are distinguished by their rich mahogany red coat and fine, silky fur that extends over the ears, tail and chest. In general, it's a beautiful blend of refinement and robustness.

It is built around a deep chest that drops almost to elbow level and has a long, flat back., slightly sloping from withers to hindquarters, without an exaggerated drop. It is prolonged with a long, tapered tail, usually worn straight or even slightly curved up. Its hind legs are powerful and well developed, although its lower part is finer from the hock to the sole. They give him a good stride. The front legs are thinner, with straight and nervous forearms. The front joints are well bent, but not twisted in or out.

The head rests on a strong neck, although not very thick and slightly arched, that fits harmoniously between the shoulders. The skull is oval seen from above. The muzzle is moderately long and square, with the lower and upper jaws of almost equal length. The nose is always dark, black or chocolate, and the nostrils are wide open. The ears are placed behind the skull, slightly below eye level. They are thin and long, almost enough to touch the front of the muzzle when held taut. They hang with a sharp crease across the head. The eyes are almendrados, medium in size and quite distant from each other. They are hazelnut to dark brown in color and have a soft but alert expression.

The coat of the Irish Setter it is composed of an undercoat and a short topcoat on the top of the head and front legs, as well as the tips of the ears. It is moderately long on the rest of the body and has long fringes on the ears., on the back of the legs and thighs and on the belly. Their feet have a good density of hair between the toes, like feathers. In addition, despite its length, the coat is smooth and soft, with a shiny appearance.

Its color is one of the distinctive features of the breed. They are mahogany or dark brown, no trace of black. Some individuals have a touch of white on the chest or a thin white line on the top of the skull, but this is not particularly desirable.

Last but not least, sexual dimorphism is only moderately pronounced in this breed: males are generally of 3 - 5 taller centimeters, but they are not, for example, significantly more massive. On the other hand, there may be actual physical differences depending on the purpose for which the animal is raised. For example, the individuals in the show lines are usually more robust and larger than those intended for hunting or company, and their fur is also thicker and denser.

Size and weight

    ▷ Male size: Of 58 - 67 cm.

    ▷ Female size: Of 55 - 62 cm.

    ▷ Male weight: Of 20 - 25 kg

    ▷ Female weight: Of 18 - 23 kg

Character and skills

He gets along wonderfully with children, whose energy and enthusiasm perfectly match his own character. He especially enjoys play sessions with his humans and finds them ideal companions. However, be careful when in the company of very young children, as it can be jerky in its movements and can involuntarily push or even knock them down. In any case, a dog should never be left alone with a young child without adult supervision, and this applies to all races.

The Irish Red Setter generally not lacking in enthusiasm or curiosity. This curiosity - sometimes combined with his hunting instincts- means, However, who is easily distracted and can be difficult to keep your attention. If we add to this that he is sometimes stubborn, it's easy to understand that your education can be a bit complicated at times. And the combination of these two traits can make learning a bit tricky at times!! It also has a great ability to nibble everything in its reach.. Dog training and chew toys should satisfy this urge, but at the beginning of learning, some objects can be destroyed.

In any case, the dog's drive is a characteristic that is preserved for a long time, since it takes much longer than other races to reach a certain psychological maturity. For some people, Living with a puppy-minded dog at five can be challenging, but others love it. In any case, maintains a strong love for life into old age, and some dogs never settle.

In fact, the Irish Setter has a lot of energy to spare: originally bred for hunting, he is still very active and needs to expend his energy on daily walks and be able to run without obstacles. Between an hour and an hour and a half of exercise a day is the minimum to keep you in good physical and mental health, and simple walks on a leash in the neighborhood are not enough for it to develop: you need a place away from traffic where you can run freely and safely. It is an excellent companion for those who want to go running with their pet, and is also happy to accompany bike rides.

Outings may also include time to swim, since the Irish Red Setter it is a water-loving breed. Swimming is also a good way for me to exercise.

The same goes for dog sports, that allow you to mobilize both your physical and mental capacities. The agility, obedience, crawling and rallying are disciplines that are perfectly suited to him and that he does not stop approaching with his usual enthusiasm.

In any case, an active master is necessary to keep you in good physical and mental shape: given your daily need for exercise, the lifestyle of elderly or sedentary people is not at all suitable for him.

As long as you have enough company and opportunities to exercise, he is very nice to live with and deserves his reputation in this regard.

No wonder, given your level of activity, the Irish Setter not suitable for apartment living. A house with a large fenced garden is a much more ideal living environment, but a fence is essential to prevent it from taking off. Like any self-respecting hunting dog, has a hard time restraining himself if he picks up interesting smells. In any case, Even though the garden is big enough for me to run around, it's not a question of leaving it alone for a long time, because he needs to integrate into his family and interact with humans. Loneliness is hard to tolerate and soon suffers from separation anxiety. The combination of lack of company and too much energy can take its toll, since it can lead to damage, plus other possible behavior problems (excessive barking to get attention, etc.).

Sharing a home with another species or with a representative of another species can be a smart way to avoid loneliness. Is able to get along with a cat or rodent once it has been raised and, Therefore, considers you a full member of your family. On the other hand, it is better to avoid living with birds, who are your favorite prey: his hunting instinct would have every chance of waking up at some point and abruptly ending the experience. Obviously, the problem is especially pronounced in the case of individuals from hunting lines, whose instinct is the most advanced.

His sociability is not limited to family members, both animals and humans. In fact, loves the company of the latter, and often welcomes strangers with enthusiasm: therefore, it would be quite illusory to hope to use it as a guardian. Having said that, Although it is not aggressive, can be protective if the situation calls for it. Will bark loudly when a stranger points their nose at him, which makes him at least a good watchdog.

His closeness to the human being, his gentle nature and intelligence make him a very good therapy dog, whether it is made permanently available to a person or used by an association that regularly intervenes in different institutions. In effect, can do wonders in accompanying patients who need emotional support.

Education

The Irish Red Setter not only is he smart and lively, He is also very cooperative in his education because he likes to work and make his masters happy.. However, keep in mind that it retains an exuberant personality for a long time, as if he were still a young cub, including a healthy dose of curiosity. This makes them easily distracted during sessions., and sometimes it can be hard to get their attention, or keep it for more than a few minutes. Therefore, patience and a sense of humor are the keywords in the training of a Irish Setter, since he deserves his reputation for stubbornness, even stubborn at times. It is important to stay calm whatever happens, and act positive and kind.

In any case, things are easier because you really want to learn and you love challenges. So the challenge is essentially to keep it centered.. The best way to do it is through play, with rewards and accolades. His very playful temperament means that he can resist if what is offered does not seem fun to him. Changing activities and rewards regularly can keep your interest and stimulate you more effectively.

Since he loves to run and has a strong hunting instinct, teaching your dog to hunt should be a high priority in your training program, What, as with any race, should start immediately. In more general terms, although in general it is full of good intentions, must learn as soon as possible to be obedient, at the risk of unleashing their tendency to be independent and stubborn.

Begin education of Irish Red Setter at a young age also helps to avoid boredom, since it needs many stimuli to be happy. At eight weeks, is already capable of assimilating many things.

Regarding home training, not usually a source of major problems, although even 4 months the puppy may have difficulty controlling his bladder: if you live inside, it is therefore essential to take it outside regularly.

Like any dog, your socialization also benefits from being started without delay, and it goes much better since it is sociable by nature. Offer you many opportunities to meet all kinds of humans, companions and other animals, but also to face different environments and stimuli (noises, sounds, smells…) it is the best way to make him a perfectly balanced and very pleasant companion.

In addition, especially likes to chew and nibble what is within reach. Therefore, it is necessary not only to keep your precious belongings away, but above all to teach him to vent in a way acceptable to both him and his master: diverting their attention every time they start to chew or nibble on inappropriate things is a good way to gradually target this character trait.

Health

The Irish Setter it is a generally robust and healthy breed, and their representatives rarely have major health problems.

They are also relatively heat tolerant and, by its origin, they also acclimate well to reasonable cold and humidity. However, extreme temperatures are not really for him. Of course, must be able to take shelter in case of heat wave, but you should also be able to sleep in a heated place if the temperatures are below freezing.

The main diseases to which the breed is exposed are :

  • The dilation-torsion stomach, which mainly affects large breeds of dogs and is fatal if the vet does not intervene quickly;
  • The Hip Dysplasia, which is also common in large dogs and can be inherited. It occurs when the thigh bone does not fit well in the hip joint and can cause difficulties in walking or running. Severe cases are usually corrected by surgery;
  • Osteocondrosis (in osteochondritis), ossification disorder that affects the cartilage of the joints and causes lameness. This disease is still little known, but it is suspected of having hereditary causes. It usually manifests itself in the animal's growth period and affects males more frequently than females.;
  • The osteosarcoma, a bone cancer that mainly affects older animals and causes an increasingly pronounced and painful limp;
  • Epilepsy, which is similar to what is also seen in humans and leads to often impressive seizures. However, there are various treatments that allow people with epilepsy to lead almost perfectly normal lives;
  • The Hypothyroidism, a hormonal disorder that can present many different symptoms (weight gain, Dry Skin, hair loss…). It is usually treated with medications;
  • The von Willebrand disease, a hereditary bleeding disorder that can cause blood in the stool or bleeding from the gums or nose. There is no known cure for this disease, but care can be provided to relieve symptoms;
  • Insufficient adhesion of the leukocyte, a serious hereditary disease peculiar to the breed. It leads from a very young age to various and serious bacterial and viral infections because the white blood cells are unable to attack them. It is linked to a recessive gene, which means that an individual can be a carrier of it (and pass it on to their descendants) unaffected;
  • The progressive retinal atrophy, an incurable hereditary disease that corresponds to a slow deterioration of the retina. Produces progressive loss of vision, first at night and then during the day;
  • The entropion, a sometimes inherited eye disorder in which the eyelid rolls inward, irritating the eyeball. The problem can be treated with surgery;
  • The otitis, an ear infection favored by the drooping shape of the ears.

Although the list of diseases the breed is predisposed to can be terrifying, do not forget that their representatives usually spend most of their lives in good health. A study conducted in 2004 by the British Kennel Club and the British Small Animal Veterinary Association revealed that cancer was responsible for the 27% of deaths and that old age was the second leading cause of death, with a 22% of the cases. In other words, these two causes alone represent one in every two deaths, well ahead of cardiac problems (10% of the cases) and gastrointestinal disorders (8% of the cases).

However, since many of the conditions to which the breed is predisposed are or may be inherited, adopting a serious breeder of the Setters irlandes it is crucial to obtain an animal that is not only correctly socialized, but also and above all healthy, and that it probably still is. Therefore, must be able to present the results of genetic tests performed to parents or offspring to rule out any transmission of inherited diseases. You must also present a certificate from a veterinarian attesting that the dog is in good health, as well as the dog's health or vaccination card, in particular to confirm that you have received all necessary vaccinations.

Once the puppy has moved to its new home, care must be taken to respect his growth and not force him to do too many things too soon. Therefore, any particularly strenuous or prolonged activity should be avoided until the puppy's skeleton has reached full maturity, what occurs in this breed at approximately two years of age. Otherwise, you run the risk not only of injury, but also to suffer consequences for life, that may be related to malformations, for example. The risk is all the greater as the Irish Setter is predisposed to various joint problems.

In addition, the adoption of a healthy dog ​​should not do without regular visits to the vet, At least once a year, to allow early detection of a potential problem, before it ends up acquiring very serious proportions. It is also an opportunity to carry out any necessary vaccine recalls..

Always in the field of prevention, it is the owner's responsibility to ensure that their animal's parasitic protection remains active at all times and, for it, renew treatments whenever necessary.

Life expectancy

13 years

Grooming

Caring for the Irish Red Setter takes time and effort. In fact, its beautiful long, silky coat needs to be brushed once or twice a week to stay shiny and knot-free. This regular brushing also stimulates the follicles that cause hair growth., making the coat healthier. During the molting period, in spring and autumn, hair loss is much greater, so daily brushing is recommended to help remove dead hairs.

Unless, Of course, that the Irish Setter don't need more than two baths a year, unless, Of course, that has gotten especially dirty. Be careful to always use a shampoo specifically designed for canines, as there is a risk that the skin will dry out due to a product that is too aggressive. In fact, the pH of dog's skin is not the same as that of human skin.

Their floppy ears also require regular maintenance, as they are a breeding ground for infections. Therefore, should be checked weekly and cleaned with a slightly damp cloth to avoid accumulation of dirt and moisture. The same should be done after every prolonged time outdoors, for example if it is used to hunt. After bathing or soaking outdoors, it is also useful to dry them, again to prevent moisture build-up.

Your eyes should also be carefully examined and cleaned every week., again to prevent dirt from getting into them.

Coat grooming sessions also offer the opportunity to care for your dog's teeth by brushing them with dog toothpaste.. This helps prevent tartar buildup and, Therefore, reduce the risk of bad breath and, above all, of oral diseases. It is best to avoid doing it less than once a week, and the ideal is to take care of it regularly.

Given your level of activity, this dog's claws tend to wear out naturally, so no need to cut them manually. However, it is better to check it every month to make sure it is like this. In any case, if you hear them rubbing against the ground when walking on smooth ground, means that they have become too long. Beyond being then prevented from walking, they can break and potentially injure you.

Whether the fur, the ears, the eyes, teeth or claws, maintaining a Irish Red Setter should not be done randomly, at the risk of hurting or even injuring you. The first time, a visit to a professional dog groomer or vet can be a great way to learn the correct gestures from a professional.

In any case, no reason to wait to start: Familiarizing your dog with these sessions from a young age is the best way for him to cooperate when he needs to be handled, and you can even make maintenance sessions moments of shared complicity.

Manipulations are also useful when returning from a long period in the wild, since then it is necessary to carefully examine their fur, legs and ears to detect the possible presence of infections or small wounds, but also parasites, thorns, skewers, etc.

Utility

The Irish Setter was originally designed and developed to accompany hunters in the search for game birds. It was - and still is- especially appreciated for its qualities as a showing dog: It is excellent for locating game and positioning itself in a sample position so that the hunter knows where the bird is.

His grace, the beauty of his bearing and his reddish-cashew coat also made him popular in dog shows as early as the second half of the 19th century.

They are still recognized and appreciated today for these two uses, but they have also won hearts as affectionate companion dogs, smart and endearing. They are wonderfully suited to family life so owners can give them all the exercise they need, a task that can be delegated, at least in part, In the kids, with those who love to play.

Dog sports are another great way for him to exercise: excels in agility competitions, obedience and tracking, for example.

Last but not least, its closeness to humans, his sensitivity and sweetness explain why he is also found as a therapy dog, for example in schools, hospitals and nursing homes.

On the other hand, the fact that it lacks all aggressiveness, enjoys the company of humans so much and is generally very welcoming to strangers implies that you cannot assume the role of guardian. On the other hand, it is an excellent warning dog, since it does not stop warning the arrival of a stranger.

Price

The popularity of the Irish Red Setter makes it not hard to find, as many breeders can be found both on European and North American soil.

The price of a puppy usually ranges from 500 and 1000 EUR. The average is slightly less than 800 EUR, no significant differences between males and females.

Whatever the country, the price necessarily varies depending on the reputation and prestige of the kennel from which it comes, of his lineage, as well as its intrinsic characteristics, and in particular of its greater or lesser conformity with the standard. This explains why there can be significant price differences between individuals of the same litter.

Characteristics "Irish Red Setter"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Irish Red Setter" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “"Irish Red Setter"“

Photos:

1 – Irish Red Setter Vigo – Galicia – Spain – 06-10-2006 by Luis Miguel Bugallo Sánchez (Lmbuga Commons)(Lmbuga Galipedia)Published by / Publish by: Luis Miguel Bugallo Sánchez, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
2 – Irish Red Setter by Adam Ziaja, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – Irish Setter head by Ehog.hu, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – Irish Setter of 9 years. by Can Nefesoglu, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
5 – Irish Setter by Philipp Schiffmann, CC BY-SA 2.0 OF, via Wikimedia Commons
6 – Irish Red Setter by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Irish_setter_(dog).jpg

Videos “"Irish Red Setter"“

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 120
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 2: British and Irish Pointers and Setters. 2.2: Setter. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 2: British and Irish Pointers and Setters. 2.2: Setter
  • AKCSporting
  • ANKC Group 3 (Gundogs)
  • CKCSporting Dogs
  • ​KC – Gundog
  • NZKCGundog
  • UKCGun Dogs

FCI breed standard "Irish Red Setter"

FCIFCI – "Irish Red Setter"
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Alternative names:

    1. Red Setter, Irish Setter (English).
    2. Setter irlandais (French).
    3. Irischer Roter Setter (German).
    4. (em inglês: Irish Red Setter) (Portuguese).
    5. Setter irlandés (Spanish).

Irish Terrier
Irlanda FCI 139 . Large and medium sized Terriers

Terrier Irlandés

The Irish Terrier it is a dog of pleasant appearance and endowed with an exceptional character.

Content

History

Where does he come from “Irish Terrier” originally?

The Irish Terrier, he is a high-ranking terrier. It is often called the “Irish Red” for its distinctive reddish fur. Its roots are, as in all terriers, a little on the ground. The name Terrier is derived from the Latin “Terra” for the earth. So they were dogs for movement on land and underground.

High-ranking terriers were supposed to run with the herd on fox hunting. When a fox took refuge in its burrow, terriers had to chase him underground and get him out of the burrow, as it is called in the language of the hunters. One can imagine that the fox, after all a well fortified predator, does not voluntarily abandon its burrow. So a Irish Terrier I had to be very brave, fearless and defensive. Even today “Irish Reds” they are hunting dogs in their hearts. They are not afraid and with every fiber they strive to do their job as well as possible. We can still experience all these qualities in the Irish Terrier as a companion dog.

They have a special charm but also the challenge of these their ancestors. But red Irish was also used in many different ways at home and on the farm.. Must keep the yard free of mice and rats, protect chickens, pigeons and rabbits for the night of the martens and foxes. At last, had to watch over the farm and its inhabitants and, if necessary, protect them.

Ludwig Beckmann reported in 1895, in his two-volume work on “Dog breeds”, that already in 1847 in Ireland they had started to breed an independent terrier, the ancestor of the current Irish Terrier. At least that's what the Irish claimed, while the English for a long time dismissed this dog as a variety.

Until 1880 the color of the Irish Terrier was, in fact, still quite uneven. Only little by little did Irish breeders mark their dog with the red coat color as something special. But then it became very popular, even in England and especially in the US, where many Irish had migrated. The first special breed club for Irish Terriers was founded very soon, the 31 in March of 1879 in Dublin. It was then the first race of Irish Terrier in being officially recognized by the British Kennel Club with Ireland as the country of origin.

Physical characteristics

How is a “Irish Terrier”?

The Irish Terrier it's a medium sized terrier, high-ranking and distinctive in appearance. This starts with their reddish fur. It is built almost square. The legs lower vertically, the long tail stands tall, the neck stretches up. The head, eyes and ears underline their alert appearance. You can feel that every fiber of his muscular body is under tension. The standard tells us…

…seem active, lively, agile and energetic and have a lot of substance without showing any clumsiness, because speed and endurance as well as strength are essential for the breed. The Irish Terrier should not appear clumsy or amorphous; the contour of his body and figure must demonstrate speed, grace and fleetingness.

Their coat should be thick and lean in texture. Must be, according to technical jargon, broken or broken, namely, it should look tough and tough and, However, be extended. The head is also hairy, giving the impression of a beard. The “irish red” should be evenly red, wheat-red or yellow-red. Apart from color, the Irish Terrier reminds a bit of a small and elegant Airedale Terrier, which is also quite similar to him in character.

How tall is a “Irish Terrier”?

A Irish Terrier It has a height at the withers of about 45 centimeters weighing about 12 kg. Males are slightly larger and heavier than females.

What is the longevity of a “Irish Terrier”?

As a rule, the Irish Terriers they enjoy a long canine life of more than 12 years in top physical condition.

Character and skills

The Irish Terrier it's a power pack. It is lively, alert, concise. Always attentive, vigilant, non-aggressive, but without fear and in an emergency you are also ready to fight. It is said that the Irish Terrier he is very hard on himself and would face dangers and even his own wounds with extreme contempt. It is still used as a working dog in its home country. There he does a good job as a backyard dog, guard and hunting. In today's hunting it is mainly used for post-shooting work. The official standard describes its character very accurately:

The Irish Terrier, although determined and able to face other dogs, is remarkably loyal, kind and affectionate with people; However, when he is attacked, show the courage of a lion and fight to the bitter end. It is wrongly said that the Irish Terrier he gets into fights with other dogs easily, sometimes even in the exhibition ring. Although it does not avoid any dispute when circumstances require it, the Irish Terrier it is easy to train and it is a sociable domestic dog; still embodies the qualities that, according to previous descriptions, they had made him the “guardian of the poor, friend of farmers and beloved of distinguished gentlemen”.

The Irish Terrier he is essentially a reckless and not a lapdog. However, today it is doing very well as a pet and family dog. He is a faithful companion, vigilant, warm and loving for young and old, as long as you allow yourself and him to move. It has a big character, self-assured and never submissive, that one should respect and appreciate. In his book on Irish “Jerry the Islander”, the great writer Jack London expresses his respect for this great character in the following words: “Jerry, you are gold, pure gold, inside and outside, and no dog in the whole world can compete with you. You have a heart of gold, golden dog; be good to me and love me, and i will be good to you and i will love you now and always”.

Care and health “Irish Terrier”

The Irish Terriers they are very easy to care for. However, your coat should be professionally trimmed and should never be sheared. During clipping, three to four times a year, dead hair is professionally plucked.

Most Irish Terriers have robust health. Here and there skin diseases occur (hiperqueratosis) or metabolic diseases (cistinuria). Sometimes inbreeding is a problem.

What food is best for a “Irish Terrier”?

The Irish Terrier has no special dietary needs. High quality food is of course good for your health. Like most dogs, sometimes he likes a meaty beef bone.

Where can you buy a “irish errier”?

The best way to buy your puppy Irish Terrier is to buy it locally from a breeder registered with the FCI. You must have tested your dogs for the special risks of inherited diseases. There should also be no inbreeding, that can be estimated from the pedigree, if no name appears there twice. The breeder must have his litter well documented by photo. You should be able to see the litter together with the mother bitch, after the fix, in the place. Please, don't buy one Irish Terrier by Internet, because there is a high risk that the puppy will come from a dog vendor or breeder, normally well camouflaged.

Education and maintenance “Irish Terrier”

Keep a Irish Terrier It is not a problem. It has no demands regarding the size of the apartment. The biggest challenge is his temperament. The Irish Terriers they need challenges of a physical and mental nature.

As a companion dog they are suitable for a wide range of tasks. They are very suitable for various dog sports. The Irish Terriers are well positioned as joggers or in moderation, companions of a cyclist. Their aptitude and willingness to work represents both a challenge and an obligation for their masters, and that in any weather.

They must be used to other pets from birth, otherwise they will be seen as prey. The Irish Terriers they are very suitable as playmates for children, since they are prepared for any adventure and are robust enough to play with children. However, the house rules must be correct and the terrier must know his role in the family. On the street he tends to fight with other dogs. Due to its moderate size, his low weight and his good obedience – properly trained – is a companion without problems in all life situations.

Can be carried very well in the transport box, if you've gotten used to it from a young age. The typical Irish Terrier can be trained and educated very well. The clear announcement and the consequence are the magic words here based on a respectful and loving relationship with the master. Its undoubted leadership role must always be present, otherwise the Irishman thinks he has to handle things for himself.

Characteristics "Irish Terrier"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Irish Terrier" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “"Irish Terrier"“

Photos:

1 – Irish Red Terrier during dog’s show in Racibórz, Poland by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Pleple2000
2 – Irish Terrier by Batman1000 / CC BY-SA
3 – Irish Terrier by Anne Sollerud / CC BY
4 – Irish Terrier puppy by https://www.flickr.com/people/[email protected]
5 – Irish Red Terrier during dog’s show in Racibórz, Poland by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Pleple2000
6 – Irish Red Terrier during dog’s show in Racibórz, Poland by Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA

Videos “"Irish Terrier"“

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
  • Group 3: Terriers.
  • Section 1: Large and medium-sized Terriers. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Terriers 1 Large and medium-sized terriers.
    • AKC – Terrier
    • ANKC – Terrier
    • CKC – Terrier
    • ​KC – Terrier
    • NZKC – Terrier
    • UKC – Terrier

    FCI breed standard "Irish Terrier"

    IRISH TERRIER FCI IRISH TERRIER FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Irish Red Terrier (English).
      2. Irish Terrier (French).
      3. Irischer Terrier (German).
      4. Brocaire rua, rish red terrier, Irish terrier (Portuguese).
      5. Irish Red Terrier, Irish terrier (Spanish).
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