Miniature American Shepherd
Estados Unidos FCI 270 . Sheepdogs

Miniature American Shepherd

With his alert expression, attentive and intelligent, the Miniature American Shepherd has all the qualities of Sheepdogs

Content

History

In forty years, Americans have managed to fix the characteristics of this new breed, from the strains of small Australian Shepherds. Recently, the American Kennel Club (AKC) agreed to integrate and, therefore, recognize the Miniature American Shepherd as a race in its own right, integrating it into the Pastoral Group “Sheepdogs” … next to his ancestor, the Australian Shepherd.

In the decade of 1960, the little ones Australian Shepherd that worked on the rodeo circuit in the United States were selectively bred to further reduce their size. The new breed was originally called the “Australian Shepherd” in miniature. “They became especially popular with riders who traveled to horse shows, since his intelligence, loyalty and size made them an excellent travel companion”, say the experts of the Club del Miniature American Shepherd from the USA. “In this way its popularity spread throughout the country.”

Currently, the breed is recognized by the FCI (Fédération Cynologique Internationale), in view of the number of breeders that are embarking on the selection of this breed of dog in Europe.

Photo: Buddy” Miniature American Shepherd – Lost Island’s Roy ‘Arsenal’ Harper – bred by: Julia Bettendorf, Lost River Miniature American ShepherdsJugabe3b, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Miniature American Shepherd shares many physical traits with its predecessor the Australian Shepherd, only on a smaller scale. The females measure between 33 – 43 cm at shoulder; the males between 35,5 – 46 cm.. Despite its size, they are every inch a real herding dog: energetic, versatile, robust and extremely bright. Striking fur comes in black, blue merle, red and red merle. (Merle exhibits any amount of marbling, spots or mottling.) The Miniature American Shepherd they move with the smooth, agile gait of a dog built for tough work on rough terrain.

Character and skills

With his alert expression, attentive and intelligent, dogs Miniature American Shepherd they have all the qualities of a little Shepherd dog, with a pronounced instinct to lead and watch over the herds. Easy to train, able to respond to a variety of demands that allow them to evolve in different sports disciplines. the Miniature American Shepherd However, they are reserved for people who are not familiar to them.. But once the “known”, becomes a wild playmate, and capable of real feats, thanks to its agility and small size.
Like all working dogs, especially those able to work in their original profession, when in a situation with a herd of animals, their behavior changes and they become attentive and tireless helpers.

Its small size, your toilet reduced to a minimum, their adaptability and listening skills, greatly facilitate your life and your education in the city. But, like all shepherds, need to spend and “empty” his overflowing energy. Beautiful walks and runs in the forest are essential to maintain your tone, his physical form and his playful character.

Health and nutrition

This solid and sturdy dog, just like their ancestors, does not pose any particular problem in feeding. His health is that of a dog from generations of working dogs, although many buyers take the step of having a companion dog that is easy to live with. Never forget where it comes from, as you deserve regular physical activity to maintain your figure and strength.

The Miniature American Shepherd is generally a healthy dog, and responsible breeders test their breed for health conditions, communicating with other breeders dedicated to working together for the health of the breed and the preservation of its unique qualities.

Although the Miniature American Shepherd it is a relatively healthy breed, the following complications have been observed:

  • Juvenile cataracts
  • PRA (progressive retinal atrophy)
  • Iris Colobomas
  • PPM (persistent pupillary membrane)
  • Regular visits to the vet for checkups and parasite control help ensure a long and healthy life for the dog.

    Grooming

    The Miniature American Shepherd has a double coat, with a longer outer coat and a wool underlayer. The breed shows a good amount, even more so during shedding season, which can happen once or twice a year. Weekly brushing, daily during molting season, will help remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking its best. Balls or tangles can be resolved with a finer brush or metal comb. As in all races, nails must be trimmed regularly, too long nails can cause discomfort to the dog.

    Training

    As in all races, early socialization and training classes for puppies are recommended, which help to ensure that the dog becomes a well-adjusted and well-behaved companion. Smart and willing to please, the Miniature American Shepherd is highly trainable and will reach its best potential as a partner when taught at least basic obedience.

    Physical exercises

    The Miniature American Shepherd he is active and athletic, and requires a moderate amount of exercise but is also very adaptable to your family's way of life. They do well as city dogs as long as their owners provide them with enough exercise.. They enjoy outings with their people that will occupy both their mind and their body. They enjoy and excel at many dog ​​events, including obedience, agility and tracking.

    Characteristics “Miniature American Shepherd”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Miniature American Shepherd” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images “Miniature American Shepherd”

    Photos:

    1 – Blue Merle Miniature American Shepherd by Lextergrace, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – Miniature American Shepherd with Frisbee by Mullinspw, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – Miniature american shepherd puppy by TanSinVic, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – Miniature american shepherd by TanSinVic, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    5 – Miniature American Shepherd, blue merle, female by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    6 – American miniature shepherd by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/1029669

    Videos “Miniature American Shepherd”

    Type and recognitions:

    • classification FCI:

    • Group 1 –> Herding dogs (except Swiss Cattle Dogs ) / Section 1 –> Sheepdogs. With working trial. –> FCI 367

    • Federations:

    • FCI
    • AKC

    FCI breed standard “Miniature American Shepherd”

    FCIFCI – “Miniature American Shepherd”
    American Miniature Shepherd FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Miniature Australian Shepherd, MAS (English).
      2. Miniature Australian Shepherd (French).
      3. Miniature Australian Shepherd, Mini-Aussie (German).
      4. Miniature Australian Shepherd (Portuguese).
      5. Miniature Australian Shepherd (Spanish).

    Romanian Bucovina Shepherd
    Rumanía FCI 357 - Sheepdogs

    Romanian Bucovina Shepherd

    The Romanian Bucovina Shepherd is a quiet dog, balanced, devoted and who loves children

    Content

    History

    Natural breed known for centuries in the Bucovina region, in northeastern Romania, the Romanian Bucovina Shepherd was brought to light for the first time in 1934 by G. Radulescu Calafat, publisher of the first Carpathian Sheepdog standard, who mentioned in an article published in the journal Vet Sciences another molosser type sheepdog named “Dulau” or “Capau”. Until then, the Romanian Bucovina Shepherd had been compared to him Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog, smaller.

    While the Romanian Bucovina Shepherd has long been used as a guard dog for flocks of sheep against large predators in the Carpathians, like bears, wolves and lynx, it has also been used for many years by Romanian farmers as a guard dog.

    In 1982 the Romanian Cynological Association, the reference canine organization in the country, developed a first standard that described the Romanian Bucovina Shepherd. It was updated in 2001 and 2002 in accordance with the FCI requests (Fédération Cynologique Internationale) with a view to their recognition of the breed, what actually happened provisionally in 2009.

    In 2019, the Romanian Bucovina Shepherd obtained the definitive recognition of the FCI. On the other hand, not yet recognized by the British reference organization, The Kennel Club, nor by the American Kennel Club (AKC) and the United Kennel Club (UKC).

    In fact, it is still very rare outside its country of origin and some neighboring countries, like Ukraine or Serbia. In Romania there have been 6.000 copies in the Romanian Origin Book, but only the breeding of 300 females and 200 males, as Romanian law imposes many restrictions on the breeding of dogs.

    Photo: Ciobanesc de Bucovina – Romania 2018 by 1jagdterrier – YouTube

    Physical characteristics

    The Romanian Bucovina Shepherd they are huge dogs with a body slightly longer than the tall, powerful lower limbs and a horizontal, muscular back. Placed high on the body, its long tail is carried hanging at rest and rises in the back in a slightly upward curve when in the gazebo.

    Romanian Bucovina Shepherd

    The head, which is wide and carried slightly higher than the body, blends in with the voluminous and moderately long neck, which forms an angle of 100 a 110 degrees with the rest of the body.

    The muzzle is black, the eyes are relatively small in relation to the head, the powerful jaw is chisel-shaped and the V-shaped ears with a rounded tip fall along the cheeks.

    While the head and the front of the legs are covered with short hair, the rest of the body is covered with dense hair, long (6 a 10 cm.) and quite stiff. The coat is predominantly white, marked with black spots, gray or leonadas well defined. However, the standard of Romanian Bucovina Shepherd it also recognizes unbleached, uncoloured specimens that are completely white, white as snow, gray like ash or black.

    Sexual dimorphism is well marked in the Romanian Bucovina Shepherd, being the male larger than the female.

    Character and skills

    The Romanian Bucovina Shepherd is a quiet dog, balanced, devoted and who loves children, what can make it an ideal dog for a family. On the other hand, especially distrust strangers, so it is important to socialize him from an early age with the people with whom he can come into contact: friends, neighbors, postmen…

    Used to guarding herds in the company of other dogs, coexists perfectly with its congeners and other pets that share its territory.

    It is not aggressive at all, the Romanian Bucovina Shepherd they are not prone to attack without reason. On the other hand, their very protective character makes them react in a very intimidating way if they perceive an intrusion into their territory. However, his growls and especially his serious and powerful barks are just a way to scare “invaders” and they are rarely precursors of offensive action. However, if you feel that your “family” (which is simply the herd that is in charge, if he has always lived like a sheepdog) is threatened, this extremely brave and protective dog risks going on the attack, without even backing down in front of a bear or a pack of wolves.

    Independent and used to wandering alone in the wild mountains of Romania, the Romanian Bucovina Shepherd tolerates loneliness quite well and can be left alone for a few days without too much trouble, although he obviously prefers the company of his family. However, your ability to keep busy depends on having enough space to walk freely.

    Due to its size, his resonant voice and his need for great spaces, the Romanian Bucovina Shepherd They are not dogs that can live comfortably in apartments and are not recommended for urban areas. They greatly prefer sparsely populated areas, where they can patrol their territory in peace and quiet without risk of unwanted encounters.

    A very active and resistant dog, needs daily physical activity and is happy to accompany his master on long walks in the countryside.

    Education “Romanian Bucovina Shepherd”

    Romanian Bucovina Shepherd
    Dog of the months

    The puppy's socialization phase is of primary importance for the puppy. Romanian Bucovina Shepherd, and it is very important that you meet your family very soon, to possible other household pets, as well as the other people and animals that you will meet regularly during your life. In effect, once adult, find it difficult to accept a new person in your environment (including for example a prospective dog handler or dog behaviorist), although this is not impossible.

    As an intelligent and obedient dog, can be easily trained and trained for his future role as a sheepdog or watchdog from his first birthday. Despite its independent nature, responds very well to positive reinforcement methods, but the teacher must ensure that he always maintains a strong and authoritative demeanor.

    In addition, instead of a long daily training session, it is advisable to opt for several short sessions spread throughout the day.

    Health “Romanian Bucovina Shepherd”

    The Romanian Bucovina Shepherd it is a particularly healthy and resistant breed.

    However, like most large breeds of dogs, are prone to hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia. To reduce risks, make sure they don't overdo physical activity during their growing season.

    Gastric dilation of the dog is another problem that can affect this breed. Due to ingestion of food too fast, especially if they are dry, can be life-threatening and requires urgent intervention by a veterinarian. To minimize this risk, it is recommended to leave large amounts of water available when the dog eats, divide his daily ration into at least two meals and let him rest after these meals.

    Grooming “Romanian Bucovina Shepherd”

    The Romanian Bucovina Shepherd they are long-haired dogs that need to be brushed once a week, and even more often during the shedding period. Losing her hair galore, not recommended for people who do not like to find dog hair all over the house and always have a perfectly clean interior.

    In addition, at the end of winter, it is advisable to cut the hair between its pads to protect your dog from heat.

    It is not necessary to bathe your dog unless, of course, is particularly dirty. In any case, no more than 2 or 3 times a year, as this can damage the natural protective layer of the skin.

    On the other hand, the inside of the ears needs to be checked regularly, since it is common for external parasites to hide there, and clean them well to avoid any risk of infection.

    The dog's claws should be checked monthly and trimmed if natural wear and tear is not enough.

    Food “Romanian Bucovina Shepherd”

    If he Romanian Bucovina Shepherd he has always been fed what his pastor used to prepare for him, good quality commercial kibbles are an ideal solution today, If and when, of course, the manufacturer's recommendations are followed.

    Bones are important in this dog's diet, so it may be helpful to give him a bone to gnaw once in a while. However, chicken bones and other poultry should be banned as they can cause serious damage to the digestive system.

    In addition, as with any dog ​​at high risk of bloating-twisting stomach, the daily ration should be divided into 2 or 3 meals and ensuring that the dog remains calm during and after these meals. This means, for example, make sure he sees his food coming instead of discovering it in front of him when he wakes up, avoid having another animal around you when you eat, and do not stimulate him during his meal or in the following hour.

    In addition, is essential for Romanian Bucovina Shepherd have large amounts of fresh water available at all times.

    Price “Romanian Bucovina Shepherd”

    A puppy Romanian Bucovina Shepherd usually sold between 500 and 1000 EUR, but prices have tended to rise as the breed has been the subject of some interest after its recognition by the FCI. Males tend to be more expensive than females, and the price is higher when the animal has a smooth coat.

    It is necessary to be well informed about the origin of the puppy and check the documents with the Romanian Canine Association. From 2015, the breeding of dogs without pedigree or not registered in the Romanian Origin Book is prohibited in Romania, and the marketing of these puppies is illegal.

    Characteristics “Romanian Bucovina Shepherd”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Romanian Bucovina Shepherd” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos “Romanian Bucovina Shepherd”

    Ciobanesc de Bucovina – Romania 2018 by 1jagdterrier
    Shepherd of Bucovina – Ilie Forest 2018

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 357
    • Group 1: Sheepdog and Cattle Dogs (except Swiss Cattle Dogs)
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1: Sheepdogs. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs

    FCI breed standard “Romanian Bucovina Shepherd”

    FCIFCI – “Romanian Bucovina Shepherd”
    Romanian Shepherd from Bucovina FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Bucovina Sheepdog, Bucovina Shepherd, Southeastern European Shepherd (English).
      2. Berger roumain de Bucovine, Berger de l’Europe du Sud-Est (French).
      3. Ciobănesc Românesc de Bucovina (German).
      4. (em romeno: Ciobanesc Romanesc de Bucovina) (Portuguese).
      5. (en rumano: Ciobănesc de Bucovina) (Spanish).

    Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog
    Rumanía FCI 349 - Sheepdogs

    Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog

    The Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog it is a calm and balanced dog that has an extraordinarily strong bond with its caregiver.

    Content

    History

    The Romanian Shepherd of Mioritza, or Ciobanesc Romanesc Mioritic in romanian, it is a natural breed that has been present for centuries in the Carpathians, especially in southern Transylvania, in the mountainous regions near Sibiu and Brasov. Its exact origins are unknown, but it seems that their ancestors came to Romania around the 13th century with the Tatars who came to settle in the Danube Delta region and along the Black Sea coast.

    In the middle ages, some local rulers used these powerful dogs to accompany their armies. This fueled the legend that the dogs often seen in ancient engravings depicting the battles between the Roman Empire and the Dacians, a native people of the Carpathians, they are the shepherds of Mioritza. However, since these battles took place over 1000 years before the arrival of the dog's ancestors to the region, it is in fact unlikely that he can claim to have any connection to these feats of arms.

    In fact, the Mioritza Shepherd Dog he was above all the faithful companion of the illiterate peasants and shepherds isolated in the mountains. Stunning, mighty and brave, protected, and still protects today, herds against the many predators that live in the Carpathians: line, Wolf, bear…

    His name is also a reference to his qualities as a pastor, Since the word “mioara” means “sheep” in romanian, precisely the animal that it has been protecting for several centuries.

    Even today, many shepherds claim that only one of these dogs can scare away a bear, and popular belief says that it is the only race in the world capable of facing a bear and getting out alive.

    The first written references to Mioritic go back to 1930, when Professor Gheorghe Moldoveanu, studying the Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog, made a first distinction between the different romanian sheepdogs. In 1934, the National Zootechnical Institute published a description of the dog Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog, but it wasn't until 1981 that a first breed standard was defined, prepared by the Romanian Cynological Association (ACR).

    This standard was revised in 2002 to meet the requirements of the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI), who accepted the dog Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog provisionally in 2005, before finally recognizing it in 2015. In the meantime, had taken off across the Atlantic, as recognized by the American United Kennel Club (UKC) in 2006. The other reference body in the country, the American Kennel Club (AKC), did the same in 2018. However, neither the British nor the Canadian Kennel Club have followed suit.

    It is estimated that the population of Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog is of 10.000 individuals in Romania, but the vast majority are pedigree and unregistered dogs. In fact, Although the breeding of non-pedigree dogs is prohibited in the country since 2015, ancient habits are slowly changing. Thus, there is often a dog left “field” from which a puppy is delivered to the neighbor of the village when a litter is born, rather than a pedigree dog that is purchased from a professional breeder.

    On the other hand, although they are still relatively popular in the Romanian mountains, the Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog remain largely unknown outside of their home country, despite the efforts of Barbara Fallent, an Austrian-based breeder dedicated to popularizing them in Europe.

    Photo: Ciobanesc Mioritic by DorinRodina, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Physical characteristics

    Sometimes nicknamed “wool bear”, the Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog is tall, powerful and furry. It is often confused with the Old English Sheepdog (or Bobtail), with which it has many physical similarities.

    They are big and massive, but harmonious and very agile for a dog of this size, while its legs are muscular and erect. The tail stands tall and falls when at rest, but it rises horizontally when in the gazebo.

    The neck is of medium length but broad and powerful, and bears a massive head of large size in relation to the rest of the body. The skull is slightly domed and ends in a rather short muzzle, tapering towards the nose. The latter should be black and well developed. The powerful jaws are scissor bite. The triangular ears with rounded tips fall along the cheeks and “disappear” in the fur.

    The eyes are medium in size, often hazel or dark brown in color, but they can also be lighter in color, except yellow, which is not accepted by the standard of Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog. They express calm and intelligence.

    The coat of the mioritic it is very long, measure at least 10 cm.. Covers the whole body, from head to tip of tail, going through the legs, where however it is a little shorter. The top coat is rough, while the lower layer is more flexible and dense, which makes the coat perfectly adapted to harsh weather conditions.

    The coat can be uniform, white or gray, but most often it is variegated, with distinctive black or gray spots protruding from the white fur.

    Sexual dimorphism is moderately marked, the female being only slightly smaller than the male.

    Character and skills

    The Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog he is a calm and balanced dog that has an extraordinarily strong bond with his master and his family, bond that forms naturally during the growth period. We know that it is “a master's dog” – the person who adopted and raised him – making it very difficult to adopt an adult dog from Mioritic Shepherd Dog.

    He is incredibly devoted and loyal to his family, at least the family he grew up with. Adults, children, pets or farm animals…: everyone he lives with is part of his family, and once he is an adult he will stop at nothing to protect them. Quiet and affectionate, gets along very well with children, without being an ideal playmate, especially for the little ones and / or restless, since he prefers quieter activities. In addition, given its size, could unintentionally push a small one.

    A typical sheepdog, who distrusts strangers. Although tolerate close friends who come often, barks vigorously when a stranger approaches, and only allows him to enter his territory with the agreement of his master. Therefore, a lot of work on socialization and obedience is necessary from an early age to prevent this dog's power from, able to scare away wolves and bears, be misdirected, with dramatic consequences.

    The Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog need space, and it is not at all a breed of dog adapted to apartment living. Its territorial and protective character makes it not an ideal option for people who live in a residential area., even with a large garden. Rather, they adapt better to the field or the mountains, where they have space and where they find less “threats” potentials, especially since they can easily spend their days and nights outdoors.

    Having said that, if you need space, the mioritic neither is it a dog that needs a lot of exercise, at least not as an adult. It is true that the puppies of this breed are hyperactive and need to exercise daily, either in the form of games or walks. But the adult is much calmer, as are most sheepdogs, who prefer to stay close to their herd and not stray too far from it: patrolling the garden and taking an occasional walk with his master is more than enough for him.

    However, it is important to know that the “territory” that defends the Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog it is not limited to your garden: protect the place where your family is, establishing a kind of security perimeter around it in all circumstances. Like this, if your flock grazes in the mountains, don't let anyone get close, and if your family walks in a park, does the same.

    However, the Mioritic Shepherd Dog not spontaneously aggressive, and never attacks for no reason. Barks to warn the intruder that they are not welcome, and leave the one who understands the message alone. On the other hand, anyone who risks ignoring the warning without his master's consent risks finding out why this dog has been the best friend of Romanian shepherds and protector of their flocks for centuries.

    At last, used to accompany them alone, have learned to make decisions on their own. Although loyal and obedient, his independent character and power make him a dog that is not suitable as a first dog.

    Education “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog”

    If socializing the puppy from an early age is necessary for all breeds, is even more indispensable in the case of Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog. You must meet the people you may meet as an adult as soon as possible and get used to the situations that will be part of your life: walks in a crowded place, visits to the vet, sessions at the hairdresser… The latter should also allow you to get used to being handled without hesitation, which is absolutely essential to avoid any problems once adult, given its size and power.

    In the same way, learning obedience should begin as soon as the dog is adopted. Smart and devoted, the Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog it is relatively easy to train if your master has the necessary experience and knows how to remind your dog who the master is if necessary. On the other hand, Inconsistent or hesitant orders can lead you to take matters into your own hands and choose the attitude that seems most appropriate. Unfortunately, in such cases, unlikely to make the desired decision.

    In any case, although professional help can be useful as support, education must be provided by the teacher himself. You are the only person whose authority you recognize and trust.

    In addition, traditional training methods should be banned, as they run the risk of damaging the strong bond between student and teacher. Positive reinforcement-based dog training is a much better option.

    Regarding your role as guardian, does not require any special training. In fact, their instinct for protection is innate, so you don't need any specific training to become an excellent watchdog. In the same way, learn to become a good herding watchdog by observing adults, and just reproduce this behavior when it grows. Once again, no specific training is required.

    Health “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog”

    The Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog he is a very healthy dog: is not subject to hereditary diseases, it is only slightly sensitive to common diseases and is resistant to harsh weather conditions. In fact, many individuals reach the age of 14 years or more, which is unusual for a dog of this size.

    However, like all large dog breeds, may suffer from ..:

    ▷ Hip Dysplasia;
    ▷ elbow dysplasia;
    ▷ gastric dilation-torsion.

    In addition, its long and dense coat can become a refuge for many parasites, especially if you spend most of your time outdoors. Therefore, it is essential to regularly ensure that all your deworming treatments are up to date.

    Grooming “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog”

    The Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog It is an easy-care breed of dog: a weekly brushing of his coat is enough to get rid of his dead hairs and ensure that he has no injuries that can be hidden by his long hair.

    However, during the move, the dog should be brushed more frequently to avoid accumulation of dead hair, that could create knots and become true “parasite nests”.

    Bathing the dog is unnecessary, since the Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog has a self-cleaning coat. Even if he rolled in the mud before he came home, leaving it outside in a dry place should be enough to get rid of dirt. “A Mioritic dry is a Mioritic clean”, as the shepherds say.

    On the other hand, it is essential to check every 2 or 3 days that your eyes and ears are not dirty and do not show any signs of infection. Their teeth and claws may be checked less regularly, but special attention should be paid to the dog's paw pads to make sure there is no accumulated dirt.

    It is a good idea to get used to Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog to these grooming sessions from an early age, to avoid any problems later, given its size and power. If the teacher knows how to do it, they can become beautiful moments of complicity between him and his partner.

    On the other hand, if it has to be prepared by a professional, the presence of your caregiver is necessary to calm you down and ensure that you do not have any aggressive reaction towards the stranger who is manipulating you.

    Price “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog”

    A puppy Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog costs between 1000 and 1200 EUR. A male is more expensive than a female, because males are more sought after by shepherds.

    In any case, It is necessary to be well informed about the origin of the puppy and to check its documents with the Romanian Canine Association (ACR). In fact, from 2015, the breeding of dogs without pedigree or not registered in the Romanian Origin Book is prohibited in Romania, and the marketing of these puppies is illegal.

    Characteristics “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    1.0 rating
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog”

    Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog
    Beautiful Romanian Shepherd Dogs, the one on the left is the “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog” and the one on the right is the “Romanian Bucovina Shepherd” by Remus Pereni, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog
    “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog” by akc

    Videos “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog”

    Romanian Mioritic Shepherd – Facts and Information
    The Miracle of Life – Romanian Mioritic shepherd dog babies

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 349
    • Group 1: Sheepdog and Cattle Dogs (except Swiss Cattle Dogs)
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1: Sheepdogs. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs
    • AKCFoundation Stock Service
    • UKC – Herding dogs

    FCI breed standard “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog”

    FCIFCI – “Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog”
    Romanian Shepherd from Mioritza FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Romanian Mioritic, Mioritic Shepherd Dog, Ciobănesc Românesc Mioritic (English).
      2. Mioritic (French).
      3. Mioritic, Mocano, Barac (German).
      4. (em romeno: Ciobănesc românesc mioritic) ciobanesc romanesc mioritic (Portuguese).
      5. Mioritic (Spanish).

    Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog
    Rumanía FCI 350 - Sheepdogs

    Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog

    The Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog is slightly more sensitive and less independent than other guard dog breeds

    Content

    History

    The Romanian Carpathian Sheepdog, also known as Carpatin (of his original name Ciobanesc Romanesc Carpatin), He is native to Romania, more precisely from the Danube Delta.

    It is said to be descended from the Lupo races – molosoides, comparable in size to ancient mastiffs, but with a morphology closer to that of the wolf, and that has been used to protect herds for more than 9.000 years, namely, since the beginning of the domestication of cattle in this region.

    Legend has it that their ancestors, to whom he is physically very close, they interbred naturally with wolves, resulting in a powerful and fearsome race. Although there is no irrefutable evidence, such hybridizations between dog and wolf are known to have in fact occurred in various regions of the world, what makes this theory plausible.

    Often hunting in packs, nothing stops this dog with his courage and unerring protective instinct. There have even been cases where a herd of Carpathian shepherds has been seen repelled by an adult bear. The Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog has been selected over the centuries with the main criterion of utility, which explains why it has kept its herding dog qualities intact to this day, especially since Romania still has many predators on its territory, including wolves and bears. Over the years, they have also become increasingly integrated into the family as guard dogs; very protective of their master, it's a role they play wonderfully.

    The first breed standard was developed in Romania in 1934. After the fall of communism in 1989, a few passionate breeders of the Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog developed the breed so that its standard could meet the criteria of the Fédération Cynologique Internationale. Their efforts paid off, since the latter finally recognized it provisionally in 2005, and then definitely ten years later, in 2015. Among the other large canine organisms, the Société Centrale Canine and the United Kennel Club also recognize the Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog, what is not the case with the American Kennel Club, the Canadian Kennel Club or the Kennel Club, the leading organization in Great Britain.

    Although they are increasingly known and appreciated in the rest of the world, the Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog still quite rare outside of their home country. On the other hand, still very popular in Romania, where it is used as a herding dog and as a guard and companion dog.

    Photo: Possibly Carpathian sheepdog or Bucovina sheepdog by Alex Zelenko, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Physical characteristics

    The Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog he is a large dog with an impressive physique.

    The body is rectangular, vigorous and well developed, without heaviness. Its length is greater than the height at the withers, and the lumbar region may be slightly longer in females than in males.

    The tail is held high, reaching or slightly exceeding the point of the hock. With abundant hair, hangs at rest but is carried high and slightly curved in action. It is neither flat nor rolled in the back.

    The head is strong but not heavy, of type lupoid, with a stop moderately marked. The nose is always black, big and wide. The scissor bite is powerful. The eyes are medium in size, almendrada form, dark brown. The ears, slightly above the eye line, they are triangular in shape, a little rounded at the tip, and fall close to the cheeks.

    The inner layer is dense and flexible, color clear, but the hair is rough, smooth and dense. It is shorter and flatter on the head and front of the legs, longer in the neck, the back of the legs and tail. It is abundant and of medium length in the rest of the body. The fur is sable (Wolf) with white markings, and the skin is ash colored.

    Character and skills

    The Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog is balanced, calm and brave. They are innate herding dogs with a very strong protective instinct, with an unconditional attachment to his flock and a closeness to his master and family that is far greater than that of most other guard dog breeds.

    This protective instinct makes them mistrust strangers. In the presence of a stranger, will come between him and his family and bark as a warning, until his master makes him understand that there is no danger.

    However, due to its friendlier temperament than the average of other guard dog breeds, it is also an excellent companion dog. As a breed of dog adapted to children, he is very gentle with them and is a great playmate for them. Regarding the cohabitation of the dog with the cat, generally goes well. Last but not least, the fact that they have long gotten used to defending themselves and working in packs also explains why they generally manage to get along with their peers, although they can be dominant with them.

    Although it suits all families quite well, this large and energetic dog needs a lot of exercise and play to maintain his mental balance and physical health. Therefore, better suited to a family that likes to move, and thus you can enjoy hiking with your dog (dogs-rando), from running with your dog (canicross) or cycling with your dog (cani-mountain biking). To feel completely fine, need at least an hour of daily exercise.

    Therefore, not at all suitable for use in an apartment: too small a space and insufficient physical exercise could cause behavioral disorders in the dog, including uncontrolled aggression (even towards their owners) and / or destructive behavior on the part of the dog. This is all the more true since the Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog is slightly more sensitive and less independent than other guard dog breeds; therefore shows more anxiety in case of prolonged loneliness, especially if you are indoors with nothing to do to keep busy. Therefore, the ideal home for him is one with a large enclosed garden where he can run, and a master who is available to play with his dog and walk him for long hours.

    Education “Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog”

    Although the Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog it is a calm and balanced dog that is easier to train than other guard dog breeds, needs a strong education to start at an early age, since it has a strong character. It is imperative that the owner immediately show his dog who the master is and impose his authority, at the risk of seeing his partner with his impressive physique take control.

    Of course, firm does not mean brutal. Positive dog training, with incentives and rewards, is always the best way to earn respect and obedience. Purely authoritarian training would only lead to confrontation with this voluntarily dominant dog.

    Health “Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog”

    Although there have been cases of hip dysplasia or eye problems in some individuals, the Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog it is a robust breed of dog, able to stay outdoors in inclement weather without being unduly hindered and, In addition, does not have a congenital predisposition to certain pathologies.

    Therefore, daily exercise and a balanced diet are enough to keep the dog healthy, vigorous and toned.

    However, be careful not to give too large a portion of food before physical exertion: like all big breeds, is particularly exposed to the risk of stomach dilation-torsion.

    Grooming “Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog”

    Although the Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog has a long fur, rarely needs professional grooming. However, it is recommended to brush the dog's hair daily with a wire brush or detangler, especially during the shedding period.

    If you spend most of your time outdoors, it is recommended to wash your dog once a month. However, if you stay inside, a dog bath every three to four months is sufficient.

    On the other hand, it is important to regularly examine and clean the dog's ears, as for all dogs with lop ears. A buildup of ear wax or bacteria could lead to infections, like ear infections.

    In addition, as in all races, brushing your dog's teeth at regular intervals is essential to avoid tartar problems. Ideally, you could do this two or three times a week.

    At last, how often a dog's claws are trimmed depends on its level of activity. It is best to inspect them from time to time and trim them if necessary.

    Characteristics “Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images “Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog”

    Carpathian Shepherd

    Carpathian Shepherd

    Photos:

    1 – “Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog” by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1434185
    2 – “Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog” by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1625909

    Videos “Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog”

    Jeff the Carpathian Shepherd – 4 Weeks Residential Dog Training
    Sanziana, a Carpathian Shepherd Dog baby girl

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 350
    • Group 1: Sheepdog and Cattle Dogs (except Swiss Cattle Dogs)
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1: Sheepdogs. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs
    • UKC – Herding dogs

    FCI breed standard “Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog”

    FCIFCI – “Romanian Carpathian Shepherd Dog”
    Romanian Carpathian Sheepdog FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Romanian Shepherd, Romanian Carpathian Shepherd, Carpathian Sheepdog (English).
      2. Chien de berger des Carpathes (French).
      3. Carpatin, Zavod (German).
      4. (em romeno: Ciobănesc românesc carpatin) (Portuguese).
      5. Carpatin, Pastor de los Cárpatos, Perro pastor de los Cárpatos (Spanish).

    Shetland Sheepdog
    Escocia FCI 88 . Sheepdogs.

    Shetland Sheepdog

    The Shetland Sheepdog it's really friendly, lovely with children, intelligent and loyal.

    Content

    History

    In the 19th century, in the North Shetland Islands of Scotland, the ancestors of Shetland Sheepdog, often called Sheltie, they helped flocks of sheep and sounded the alarm when strangers approached their farm.

    However, the exact origins of this dog are as dark as the mist that covers his homeland. Its resemblance to him Rough Collie supports the theory that it is descended from these dogs, believed to have been imported from Scotland. However, Colleys breeders and various specialists refute this claim.

    For them, the Sheltie would have developed in isolation on these islands, and they would be the result of different crosses. The races most frequently cited as contributors to its creation are the Icelandic Sheepdog, the Yakki de Groenlandia (an extinct race), the Cavalier King Charles spaniel, the Pomeranian and the Border Collie.

    In any case, at the beginning of the 20th century it was often crossed Rough Collie, which reinforced the resemblance between the two races.

    What is certain is that its small size was the result of the most rational selection work. Similar to the “Pony of Shetland”, known for its miniature size, locals gave preference to animals that needed little food, a rare commodity in this difficult region.

    Although the Shetland Sheepdog it was especially appreciated in its native islands for its qualities of a sheepdog and alert, it was mainly his appearance that allowed him to get out of there. Visitors to England in the late 19th century were delighted with the small size and texture of the dog's coat. Shetland Sheepdog, and soon they wanted to take something home, which they did. Soon, some locals decided to start breeding for export, selecting breeders for height and coat. More and more individuals set out to conquer Britain and then the rest of the world. However, there were neither breed standards nor consultations between the different breeders, so the race developed in directions sometimes very distant from each other.

    Things changed after the official recognition in 1909 by the Kennel Club, the leading organization in Great Britain. The name chosen was simply the name by which the dog had been known until then, the Shetland Sheepdog. This recognition helped to stabilize the breed by establishing a well-defined framework in which the different breeders had to work..

    However, the chosen name was not to the liking of the colleys breeders, who pressured them and won their case in 1914: then it was officially renamed as Shetland Sheepdog.

    In the meantime, the first specimens had arrived in the United States and, already in 1911, the American Kennel Club (AKC) also accepted it. Was not up 1948 that the United Kennel Club (UKC), the other reference organization in the United States, he did the same. It was followed by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) in 1954, as well as by all other important institutions, including the Canadian Kennel Club (CCC).

    Although the Shetland Sheepdog is now common all over the world, paradoxically it has become rare on its home island, where it has been replaced by the Border Collie for grazing.

    This decline can also be seen in the rest of Britain. For example, Annual Kennel Club enrollments have dropped from more than 1300 less than 800 in less than a decade.

    The phenomenon is also occurring in the United States, where he now occupies the position 25 (of a little less than 200) on the AKC popularity rankings, based on the annual number of people registered in the organization. In other words, has lost a lot of ground compared to the decades of 1980 and 1990, in which he was almost constantly among the 10 first, reaching a maximum of 40.000 records in 1993. The fall is slow but steady, since at the beginning of 2010, I was still in the 20 first positions.

    The race “Father” of the Shetland Sheepdog "o"Sheltie"how often nickname", they are the Border Collie.

    Physical characteristics

    The Sheltie they have a double mantle, What makes this breed peleche much more than other dogs. Long hair covering the thick and soft layer base, is repellent to water, While the layer base provides relief to heat and cold.

    There are three main colors: Sable, It ranges from the Golden to mahogany; Tri-color, formed by the black, White and Tan, and blue mirlo, composite grayscale, white, black and Tan.

    Black and white: is less common but still acceptable.

    Sand: the best-known color, dominates over other colors. The shadow Sabre, or mahogany can sometimes be confused with the Sheltie tricolor because of the large amount of dark shading in their coats. Another name for him Sheltie “shading”, is trifactorado sable and white. This name comes from the mixture of a tricolor and a sable and white. Other acceptable but less common color is Sable Merle, which sometimes can be difficult to distinguish between the regular sable after the time of puppy. The saber mirlo has patches of dark brown on a light brown background compared to the black and grey blue Merle.

    There are other two colors that are a bit rare, which are unacceptable in the ring. The White Color-headed (most of white head “normally” marked), It is the product of two dogs crossed white facotrados. Double Merle, the product of the crossing of two Sheltie bluebird, they can be crossed but have a high incidence of deafness or blindness than other colors.

    The ideal height at the cross, in males 37,5 cm.. The females. 35,5 cm.. One greater diversion of 2,5 cm above or below these measures is regarded as highly undesirable.

    Character and skills

    It is an excellent companion dog, highly loyal. It is joyful, intelligent and always ready to obey. The Sheltie is love, loyal and affectionate with the family and of course, on the sidelines, with strangers; for this reason the Sheltie must be socialized. Some may be very reserved. This breed is very well with children if they raise with them from an early age; However, its small size makes it easy for a child to accidentally harm them, This monitoring is necessary. Well consider bringing an adult Sheltie for a House with young children, they may not be compatible.

    Some Sheltie tend to show a similar to a Terrier personality that tends to be hyperactive, and always ready, However this temperament is not sanctioned in the breed standard. Some may be shy, but this temperament is specifically discouraged by the standard. The trend towards shyness, It can be reduced with proper socialization. The average Sheltie is an excellent watch dog, giving alarm barks when a person is at the door or pass a car on the street.

    The herding instinct is strong in many Sheltie. Love to chase and pasture including, squirrels, ducks, pigeons and children. The Sheltie love run in large open areas.

    They normally love to play. They are better with a sensitive owner, but firm. The Sheltie is, first and foremost, a smart pastor and love to keep them busy, Although his level of activity, usually, It coincides with the level of its owner. As they are very intelligent, they are highly trainable. Lack of exercise and intellectual stimulation, It can lead to undesirable behaviors, including excessive barking, phobias and nervousness. Fortunately the annoying behaviors may decrease largely by an hour of exercise to make the dog with its owner.

    In its category, the breed dominates Dog Agility competition. They also look at obedience competition, Flyball, Grazing, Tracking and proof of talent.

    It is a very intelligent dog, According to Dr. Stanley city, expert on animal intelligence. The Sheltie It is one of the dogs brightest occupying the position number 6 in the Ranking of 132 evaluated races. His research found that an average Sheltie could understand a new command in less of 5 repetitions and yields to the command for the first time the 95% of the times or more.

    Health

    Similar to the Rough Collie, There is a tendency to inherit malformations and diseases in the eye. Each puppy should have his eyes examined by a qualified eye veterinarian. Some lines may be susceptible to hypothyroidism, Epilepsy, Hip Dysplasia, or skin allergies. The life expectancy of the Sheltie is between 10 and 15 years, Although some in some it may be more, and in others may be less.

    Von Willebrand disease is an inherited bleeding disorder. The Sheltie breed, affected dogs, as a general rule, they do not live long. The Sheltie carry type III Von Willebrand, which, It is the most severe of the three levels. There are DNA tests that were developed to find the disease in dogs Sheltie. It can be done at any age and will showcase one of the following results: affected, carrier or affected not. The Sheltie may also suffer from hypothyroidism, It is the low functioning of the thyroid gland. Clinical symptoms include, loss of hair, on low weight and faintness.

    Although small breed dogs are unlikely to be affected by hip dysplasia, It has been identified in some specimens of Sheltie. Occurs when the head of the femur and the acetabulum do not fit correctly, This causes pain and/or lameness. Hip Dysplasia is thought to be genetic; Many breeders sent to test their dogs to certify that they are free from this.

    Characteristics “Shetland Sheepdog”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Shetland Sheepdog” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 88
    • Group 1: Sheepdogs and Cattledogs (except Swiss Cattledogs).
    • Section 1: Sheepdogs. With working trial.
    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs
    • AKC – PASTORAGE
    • ANKC – Group 5 (Working dogs)
    • CKC – Group 5 (Pastoral)
    • ​KC – Pastoral
    • NZKC – Work
    • UKCScenthounds

    FCI breed standard “Shetland Sheepdog”

    FCIFCI – “Shetland Sheepdog”
    Shetland Sheepdog FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Shetland Collie, Dwarf Scotch Shepherd, Sheltie (English).
      2. Shetland, Sheltie (French).
      3. Sheltie (German).
      4. Sheltie (Portuguese).
      5. Miniature Collie, Sheltie (Spanish).

    South Russian Ovcharka
    Rusia FCI 326 . Sheepdogs

    South Russian Ovcharka

    It is a dog that reacts fast, is strong, balanced and lively, with a tendency to be dominant and very active in defense.

    Content

    History

    The ancestry of the South Russian Ovcharka It comes from the thick-haired bearded dogs that were brought along with fine wool sheep to the steppe regions of the South from Spain. This fact is mentioned in volume XXVI (1830 and., St. Petersburg) from the complete collection of the laws of the Russian Empire. These agile medium-sized dogs, modern-like Catalan Sheepdog, they were able to corner the flocks of sheep and protect them. These dogs brought from Spain spontaneously mated with local shepherds and hunting dogs, who had been raised there as sheep since ancient times. Later, these crossbreeds spread throughout the southern regions of Russia and they were even known abroad, in western countries or in Europe as “the russian shepherd”. In 1867, a gold medal was awarded to Russian Shepherd Dog at the World's Fair in Paris for its beauty. However, the real selection started in 1898, in Crimea, en Askania – Nova, the demesne of the Russian baron of German origin Mr. Friedrich von Falz-Fein. He was the person who gave the breed modern typical traits and called it “South Russian Ovcharka“.

    Numerous offspring with local hounds had led to increased height and white color dominance, added a certain lightness of confirmation and a few chest flattening typical of fast-running dogs, as well as tucked-in belly and more pronounced angles of the hindquarters. The last typical characteristics of the conformation and the name “South Russian Ovcharka” they were finally assigned to the breed in the period of the USSR, in the early decade of 1930, when the first official breed standard was approved. The dogs of South Russian Ovcharka they are easy to maintain and can easily adapt to various weather conditions due to their resistance, and they are always ready to protect their owners and their properties. These dogs are exceptionally loyal and dedicated to their owners., but at the same time it should not be expected that the South Russian Ovcharka be friendly to strangers.

    Physical characteristics

    The South Russian Ovcharka it is a medium to large size dog, medium-bodied, not robust, with strong bones and powerful dry muscles. Sexual dimorphism is well defined, males are more bulky compared to females and have larger heads. The top line is a characteristic feature of the breed; forms a slight curve over the spine. The body, the head, the limbs and tail are covered in thick fur, long and disheveled that gives a deceptive impression of clumsiness and heaviness, but actually the South Russian Ovcharka he is a fast and agile dog. The eyes, slightly almond-shaped, must be dark and horizontally arranged. The ears are relatively small, triangular and hanging.

    • Hair: the cloak is made up of long hair (10-15 cm.), often dense and slightly wavy, hard with abundant undercoat.
    • Color: uniform white allowed, White grey (Ash), white with gray traces, stained gray; fawn white robes are rarer, straw and completely gray.
    • Size: males, minimum 65 cm.; females, minimum 62 cm.. Individuals of 75 cm or more.

    Observations and tips

    Puppies are sometimes born light gray in color and turn white with the first shedding.

    Character and skills

    It is a dog that reacts fast, is strong, balanced and lively, with a tendency to be dominant and very active in defense. Very smart and responsive, is very balanced but easily takes action if your family's safety is threatened. It is very good with the owners, children included.

    South Russian Ovcharka Pictures

    South Russian Ovcharka videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:Group 1 –> Herding dogs (except Swiss Cattle Dogs). / Section 1 –> Sheepdogs. Without working trial.
    • FCI 326
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs
    • UKC – Herding dogs

  • FCI Standard of the South Russian Ovcharka breed
  • SOUTH RUSSIAN SHEPHERD DOG FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Yuzhnorússkaya Ovcharka, Ukrainian Ovcharka, Ukrainian Shepherd Dog, Yuzhak, South Ukrainian Ovcharka, South Russian Shepherd Dog, South Russian Sheepdog (English).
      2. berger de l’Ukraine (French).
      3. Juschnorusskaja Owtscharka, Südrussischer Schäferhund, Ioujnorousskaïa Ovtcharka (German).
      4. pastor-da-ucrânia (Portuguese).
      5. Pastor Ucraniano, Pastor del sur de Rusia (Spanish).

    Photos:

    1 – Southern Russian Shepherd by https://www.pexels.com/es-es/foto/perro-2042862/
    2 – South Russian Ovcharka during dog’s show in Racibórz, Poland by user:chained / CC BY-SA
    3 – South Russian Ovcharka during dog’s show in Racibórz, Poland by user:chained / CC BY-SA
    4 – South Russian Ovcharka during dog’s show in Racibórz, Poland by user:chained / CC BY-SA
    5 – Wikimania Images by Sailesh by Sailesh Patnaik / CC BY-SA

    Slovak Cuvac
    Eslovaquia FCI 142 - Sheepdogs.

    Slovak Cuvac

    The Slovak Cuvac is a good watchdog, faithful and very brave, always ready to fight intruders, even if it's bears or wolves.

    Content

    History

    The white mountain dog breed group is derived from arctic-type wolves, whose survivors remained from the pre-glacial era in the mountainous areas of Europe, as far as freezing limits reached. These areas are the mountainous slopes of the North Caucasus, the balkans, especially the Rodope mountains, the Carpathians, especially the Tatra, the slopes to the north of Abruzzo and finally the Pyrenees. In these cold and humid regions the mountain dog was introduced, also accompanied by ancient flora and fauna, which were still discovered by the Swedish researcher Wahlenberg in Scandinavia.. We can find a similar relationship with Nordic pets, for example, in Tatra regions in the Carpathians where the Huzul horse has as its predecessor the Gudbrandstal horse; in the same way, the Slovak Cuvac has an analogy with the pomeranian sheepdog. Slovak alpine cowboy activity has a very old tradition.

    The Slovak Cuvac along with the mountain sheep, the Huzul horse and the typical mountain inhabitants constitute the basic economic conditions to take advantage of the pastures in cattle breeding. The Slovak mountains mostly belonged to the free people who were not subject to the servitudes of the Middle Ages; the people protected the country's borders and their task was only to make sheep cheeses. His institution was called ″ Wallach Alliance ″ (Vallasky belt), based in Kaschau until the abolition of easements. The members of this military and pastoral group carried out their services in the pastures, always accompanied by the typical surveillance dog. Tatra that also appear in many images. The Slovak Cuvac has shown his skills as a good caregiver, guardian and companion, as well as guide the flocks of sheep, to the care of the cattle and also in the pastures of turkeys and other domestic animals, as well as guarding various objects. Also the clients of the thermal stations who visited the alpine cowboys and who came to buy cheeses and other products, they looked with pleasure at these puppies covered in dense hair and bought them, taking this breed to lower places where it was often considered a luxury breed for its unique appearance.

    In the Polish Tatra region, where there is a similar breed of mountain dog called goral dog, exceptionally strong specimens were commonly called "Liptauer", indicating its Slovak origin. In this way, It is also limited from the topographical point of view the region of the breeding of the Slovak Cuvac white. The genealogical record of the Slovak Cuvac was started in Czechoslovakia more than 30 years by Professor Anton Hruza of the Veterinary Faculty of Brünn. The initial material came from the Liptovska Luzna region, kokava, Vychodna from Tatrach and the surrounding area of ​​Rachovo in the Carpathians. The first hatchery was named ″ Ze zlaté studny ″ (from the golden well) and it was founded in Svitavy u Brna.

    The calf in the Carpathians was called ″ z Hoverly ″ (the Hoverla). Since then, the Breeders Club of Slovak Cuvac is based in Bratislava where exact registrations are made and exhibitions are organized, judgments and powers that extend throughout the country. Other original bloodlines come from the Liptovské Hole regions, Velky Choc, buried, Martin, Jedlova and Jeseniky. The lines that have been extended further are Topas, career, Simba, Hrdos, Ibro, Cuvo, Ass, Dinar, Samko, Bojar, Olaf and others. Genetically the Slovak Cuvac can be characterized as a leuzistic mountain dog with a black muzzle, and to a lesser extent as a flavistico white dog with brown snout and lighter eyes. From the combination of the mentioned genetic types, in which the first is dominant, some variations in color tonality originate, pigmentation of the eyes, of the eyelids, of the muzzle, lips and mucosa. By means of a strict selection in the direction of the first type, judges and breeders achieved the rate required for the current standard and its stabilization within the hatchery area. The number of club members with bred and kennel dogs has reached as many as 200 in the last times. Since then, we have 800 live and registered dogs throughout the Republic. The quality of our upbringing of Slovak Cuvac it reflects, among other things, in the favorable judgment made in international exhibitions (Prague, Brno, Liberec, Bratislava, Leipzig among others) with intense foreign competition.

    Physical characteristics

    Shows the typical solid and solid appearance of mountain dogs. The bone is solid, the lively and vigilant temperament, fearless and attentive. The eyes are dark brown and oval. Ears are high and very mobile, of moderate length, hanging and almost attached to the head. The tail has a low implant and at rest descends to the hock. When the dog moves, he wears it curled on his back.

    • Hair: except for the head and limbs, where is shorter, the mantle constitutes a dense continuous covering without tufts in the tail and the haunches. The Mache have a marked mane. The subpelo, fine thick, it is completely covered by the hair and is less dense in summer.
    • Color: white. A yellowish blur at the end of the ears is supported but not desirable.
    • Size: males, of 62 a 70 cm.; females, of 59 a 65 cm..

    Observations and tips

    According to the tradition, only white individuals are selected to distinguish them at night from wild animals.

    Character and skills

    He is extremely faithful and brave and is always ready to face any harmful animal, still to wolves and bears. In order to differentiate it during the night from the wild beasts of the field, it is only bred in white color, this being an ancient tradition.

    He is very affectionate with his owner.

    Images of the Slovak Cuvac

    Videos of the Slovak Cuvac

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:Group 1 –> Herding dogs (except Swiss Cattle Dogs). / Section 1 –> Sheepdogs. Without working trial.
    • FCI 142
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs
    • AKC – PASTORAGE
    • UKC – Herding dogs
  • Slovak Cuvac breed FCI standard
  • SLOVAKIAN CHUVACH FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Slovak Cuvac, Slovak Chuvach, Tatransky Cuvac, Slovak tschuvatsch (English).
      2. Slovenský čuvač, cuvac (French).
      3. Slovenský Cuvac (German).
      4. Cuvac (Portuguese).
      5. Cuvac eslovaco (Spanish).

    Source:

    1 – fci

    Photos:

    1 – Cuvac eslovaco by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1323780
    2 – Cuvac eslovaco by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1323780
    3 – Cuvac eslovaco by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1424979
    4 – Cuvac eslovaco by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/898976
    5 – Cuvac eslovaco by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1233682

    Schapendoes
    Holanda FCI 313 - Sheepdogs.

    Schapendoes

    It is also used as a companion dog, but it is little known outside the Netherlands.

    Content

    History

    At the end of the last century and the beginning of the present, appeared the Dutch schapendoes in most places in the Netherlands where there were flocks and flocks of sheep. The shepherds esteemed him for his tireless spirit of work and for his intelligence.. It belongs to the versatile group of long-haired herding dogs that have a densely covered head. It is related to the Bearded collie, the Puli, the Polish Lowland Sheepdog, the Bobtail, the Berger de Brie, the Bergamasco and the German sheep pudding in the variety presented in Hessen, Odenwald and the lower Rhine regions. All these dogs similar to each other, are small mutations of mountain dogs.

    The Schapendoes It was not recognized as a distinct breed until World War I and was close to extinction in the 1990s. 1940 due to the competition of the Border Collies imported. In 1947 a breed club was formed, el Dutch Schapendoes.

    The race began its march towards a formal identity in 1954, when a breed standard and a breeding book were established. However, it was not until 1971 that the Schapendoes gained full recognition as a Dutch race. The FCI (Federation Cynologique Internationale) recognized the breed in 1989.

    Recognized by the United Kennel Club in 2006, the Schapendoes has been registered with the Foundation Stock Service of the American Kennel Club since 2005, but it doesn't have full recognition.

    Physical characteristics

    It is a long-haired and light-built dog. The eyes are quite big, rounded and brown, the expression must be frank, loyal and alive. The ears are inserted quite high, they are not thick or fleshy and hang freely by the head, the tail is long and covered with streaked hair, at rest hangs vertically, at a trot he carries it very high and curved, waving sensibly to the right and left; at gallop it remains straight and horizontal.

    Its movements are elastic and agile; he is an exceptional jumper.

    • Hair: the cloak is very dense, with abundant subpelo. The hair is long and more than 7 cm.. in the hind limbs. It should not be completely smooth, but slightly wavy.
    • Color: all colors are allowed; preferably bluish gray with a tendency to black.
    • Size: males, of 43 a 50 cm.; females, of 40 a 47 cm..

    Character and skills

    The typical Schapendoes friendly and adaptable it is generally easy to get along with, as long as you get plenty of exercise and play. Although he is an independent thinker, is usually cooperative and wants to please. He tends to enjoy being with his people, so hope she stays close to you, inside or outside.

    The Schapendoes works the sheep by elbowing their nose and shoulders, and you can try to do this with people too, especially with the children. Do not allow. On the positive side, He is generally a playful and energetic friend for children who are old enough to throw a ball for him, run with him and teach him tricks.

    This is typically a smart breed that is quick to learn.. But it is important to be clear with the rules or he will try to avoid them if you are not consistent.

    Its generally alert nature can make this breed a good watchdog.. Although grazing breeds have a tendency to be vocal, the Schapendoes not usually a great barker. However, can become an annoying barker if left to himself and bored.

    Like most herding dogs, the Schapendoes requires a lot of socializing to make sure you don't get too cautious or suspicious. Socialize puppies at a young age with many people, different environments and circumstances so they can learn to adapt.

    Start training a Schapendoes the day I bring him home or, before you know it, he will train him. (If these dogs were lawyers, they would know all the loopholes.) It is capable of absorbing everything you can teach it. Do not wait until you have 6 months to start training or you will have a more stubborn dog in your hands.

    If possible, take it to a trainer when you have 10 a 12 weeks and socialize, socialice, socialice. However, Note that many kinds of training puppies require certain vaccinations (such as kennel cough) are a day, and many vets recommend limited exposure to other dogs and public places until puppy vaccinations (including rabies, distemper and parvovirus) They are completed. Instead of formal training, You can start training your puppy to socialize at home and among family and friends until immunizations are completed in the puppy.

    Talk to the breeder, Describe exactly what you want in a dog and ask for help choosing a puppy. Breeders see their pups daily and can make incredibly accurate recommendations once they know something about their lifestyle and personality..

    The puppy Schapendoes Perfect not fully formed out of the whelping box. It is a product of his background and upbringing. Look for a puppy whose parents have good personalities and who has been well socialized from an early age.

    Schapendoes Health

    The Schapendoes is a generally healthy breed with a life expectancy of 12 a 15 years. All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, do not walk, from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee for their puppies, that affirms that the race is 100 percent healthy and have no known problems or that your puppies are isolated from the main part of the home for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about the health problems of race and the incidence with which occur in their lines.

    The Schapendoes they are generally healthy, but there is some incidence of progressive retinal atrophy (ARP), an eye disease that can cause blindness. Responsible breeders do DNA testing of their dogs for PRA and have them examined by a certified ophthalmologist before breeding.. They also examine their dogs for hip dysplasia.

    If a breeder tells you they don't need to do those tests because they've never had a problem with their lines or their dogs have been vet checked or they give any other excuse to skimp on the genetic testing of the dogs, leave immediately.

    Careful breeders examine their breeding dogs for genetic diseases and raise healthier copies only and best looking, but sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas and a puppy develops one of these diseases despite good breeding practices. Advances in veterinary medicine mean that in many cases dogs can still live a good life. If you are going to have a puppy, ask the breeder about the ages of the dogs in their lines and the typical causes of death.

    Remember that after you have welcomed a new puppy into your home, has the power to protect you from one of the most common canine health problems: the obesity. Keep a Schapendoes being the right weight is one of the easiest ways to promote better overall health.

    Schapendoes grooming

    The Schapendoes has a dense double coat with fine fur that is slightly wavy. In its longest part, in the hindquarters, the hair is about 7 cm long. The head and face of the breed are characterized by a pompadour, a mustache and beard.

    Considering how much hair you have, the Schapendoes is quite easy to style, does not require any trimming or trimming. It is normal for it to look a bit messy.

    Even so, it is better to check it a few times a week so that it does not get tangled and brush it accordingly. To help prevent tangles, puppies may need to be groomed two to three times a week as their adult coat appears. Bathe the dog as needed.

    You will not find the coat of your Schapendoes or the hair on your hand after stroking it, because the breed normally loses very little.

    The rest are basic care. Trim nails every three to four weeks or as needed. Brush your teeth often – with a vet-approved pet toothpaste – for good general health and fresh breath.

    Schapendoes ratings

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Schapendoes” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Schapendoes images

    Schapendoes videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:Group 1 –> Herding dogs (except Swiss Cattle Dogs ). / Section 1 –> Sheepdogs. Without working trial.
    • FCI 313
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs
    • AKC – PASTORAGE
    • CKC – Group 7 – Herding dogs
    • UKC – Herding dogs
  • Schapendoes breed FCI standard
  • DUTCH SCHAPENDOES FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Dutch Schapendoes, Nederlandse Schapendoes (English).
      2. Nederlandse Schapendoes (French).
      3. Niederländischer Schapendoes (German).
      4. skapendus (Portuguese).
      5. Nederlandse Schapendoes (Spanish).

    Photos:

    1- Schapendoes by Wikipedia
    2 – Schapendoes by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1414360
    3 – Schapendoes by Swedish Fair from Sweden / CC BY
    4 – Schapendoes by publicdomainpictures