Blue Lorikeet
Vini peruviana


Blue Lorikeet

Description

The Blue Lorikeet (Vini peruviana) has an approximate length of 18 cm.. and a weight ranging between 31 and 34 g..

Dark blue bright in the crown with paler veins; The feathers of the back of the crown, elongated as in other members of the genus; Lords and ear-coverts white. Upperparts dark blue bright with Plumas-bases blackish. Upper wing bright blue with the internals of the flight feather brownish colour. Underwing coverts dark blue, the rest of Underwing Black.

Throat and upper breast white; bright dark blue rest, underparts on the basis of blackish feathers. The tail dark blue, with the slightly elongated Central feathers typical of the genus; undertail blackish.

The bill orange; Iris yellowish brown; Legs orange color.

Male slightly larger, particularly the head and the bill, with the chin pure white. Legs they can also be a bit darker.

The immature differs from the adult as having the underparts uniform greyish-black, with the exception of some small white spots on the chin. Black the bill. Dark brown the irises and legs dark brown.

  • Sound of the Blue Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori Monjita.mp3]

Habitat:

It depends largely on coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) for food and nesting, Although other species such as the banana and Hibiscus they are also frequented by the Blue Lorikeet.

Sometimes they look around the villages and in the gardens. The Blue Lorikeet they are very active, rarely remain long in one place. They are usually seen in small groups of a maximum of seven birds that fly between the coconut trees in flower.

Reproduction:

The breeding It is estimated that it is from May to July. Nests in the coconut trees, whether in a hollow log or a coconut tree rotten still attached to the tree, also have seen them are nesting in a stump of Pandanus fallen. The laying is two eggs that incubate for 25 days and budding young leave the nest in 6-8 weeks.

Food:

Feed of nectar, but has also been recorded feeding on the ground and the search for small insects on the underside of leaves.

Distribution:

The Blue Lorikeet It was formerly widespread in the The Society Islands and the Tuatnotu archipelago, but at present is absent from 15 of the 23 Islands where dwelt in the past (some of which can be to come back to enter), including Tahiti, Bora-Bora and Moorea, the largest group of the Society Islands (c expiry date. 1900 of Tahiti and Moorea; Decade of 1920 for Bora-Bora).

Although the population decline has been linked to a series of threats, including the introduction of the the swamp Harrier (Cirrus approximans) and introduction of a malaria avian provoked by the Culicoides mosquito; predation by rats and cats is the most serious problem facing the species. The distribution currently in the different islands, including population estimated with the dates when they know, shown below (but there are several islands that they have never been visited and that even ideal might be to sustain the species).

The Society Islands: Motu One 250 couples; Manuae 300-400 couples in 1974 but in apparent decline following the introduction of cats in 1975.

Tuamotu archipelago: Tikehau 30 couples in 1984; Rangiroa 100-200 birds before 1972, were kept in 1991 but the numbers are not quantified; Arutua, apparently still present in 1975 but there are no current statistics; Manihi a bird in 1991; Kaukura last sighting in 1923; No estimate of population; Apataki 1989 survey gave a minimum of 300 birds.

Cook Islands: Aitutaki probably introduced; until 500 couples present in 1991; Island Hervey possibly introduced in the past, but there is no recent information.

– The population in Aitutaki seems stable and as the Black Rat (Ratuus ruttus) is not present, This island is thought to be the hope for the survival of the species.

Conservation:

– Current IUCN Red list category: Vulnerable

– The population trend: Decreasing

There are few data on population trends; However, the species has declined gradually in each island, where cats, the black rats of Marsh Harriers have colonized the coast. Therefore, a slow to moderate fall in the population is suspicious.

The threat of extinction of this species in the Islands, It is more than likely due to their predation by black rats (Rattus rattus) and to a lesser extent, by the Feral cats (Felis catus). Their extinction since Makatea in the Tuamotu archipelago It could have been accelerated by a particularly violent hurricane. Its reduction in the scope of the Society Islands correlated with the spread of the marsh harriers (Circus approximans) introduced. The accidental introduction of black rats on islands where the Blue Lorikeet It is a continuous threat to the species.

Lori Monjita in captivity:

There are more than 20 males in captivity, but only about ten females. The species was first raised in captivity in 1937 by Lord Tavistock, but until 1977, When a group of birds seized in the U.S.. He was sent to the poultry farmer Rosemary Low en el Reino Unido, These birds were practically unknown in poultry.

Also have grown up in the San Diego Zoo, whose success with two females breeding in 1979 He had much international publicity when parents, that it had been confiscated from smugglers, they escaped the destruction by Customs officers after a public protest.

Alternative names:

Blue Lorikeet, Pacific Lorikeet, Tahiti Lorikeet, Tahiti Lory, Tahitian Lorikeet, Tahitian Lory, Thaitian lory, Violet Lorikeet (English).
Lori nonnette, Lori de Tahiti, Perruche nonnette (French).
Saphirlori (German).
Loris Vini Peruviana (Portuguese).
Lori Monjita, Lorito Zafiro (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Vini
Scientific name: Vini peruviana
Citation: (Statius Müller, 1776)
Protonimo: Psittacus peruvianus

Lori Monjita images:

————————————————————————————————

Blue Lorikeet (Vini peruviana)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

1 – free-pet-wallpapers
2 – Two adults (left) close to a three immature birds perched in a palm tree. – Author Josep del Hoyo – lynxeds
3 – Miles to the wild – Enlace
4 -Miles to the wild – Enlace
5 – Adult bird preening. Author Tomasz Doroń – lynxeds

Sounds: Matthias Feuersenger (Xeno-canto)

Ultramarine Lorikeet
Vini ultramarina

Ultramarine Lorikeet

Description

The Ultramarine Lorikeet (Vini ultramarina) has a length of 18 cm.. and an approximate weight of 35 g..

Front bright navy blue iridescent; crown and nape Mallow dark blue with streaks of light blue; lores and spots on ear-coverts, white (bases of ear-coverts, Purple and blue). Mantle and covert wing, Navy blue; rump and tail coverts, dark blue light. The flight feather, light blue, Blackish internal. Blue off the Underwing coverts. Throat dark blue with white speckles; in the band chest mauve blue with área subterminal pale blue feathers. Belly blank slate bases in feathers, giving a mottled appearance; the thighs dark blue malva; coverts, Turquoise.

The uppertail-coverts, whitish blue with navy blue light diffuse in the outer margins;
undertail coverts whitish merged with navy and some irregular gray markings.

Bill yellow orange, upper mandible, blackish brown at the base; irises brownish yellow; the orange legs.

Both sexes are equal but the female It is slightly smaller.

The immature adult differ by the absence of white on underparts, they are uniformly blackish. Also by bill black, irises Dark Brown and legs orange-brown.

  • Sound of the Ultramarine Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori Ultramar.mp3]

Habitat:

In the Decade of 1970 in Nuku Hiva, These parrots were found only in pristine forests (that they have not been touched and that it is in its original condition) on the 700 m.

There is a similar habitat preferences in UA Pu, where are located mainly in montane forests between 700 and 1.000 m. Populations have also been of Ultramarine Lorikeet in banana plantations, coconut and mango (Mangifera indica), in coastal areas.

The species seems to have a wider range of habitat preferences in UA Pu., being found at altitudes ranging from the coast to wooded crests.

They feed in trees with flowers, especially coconut trees and Erythrina.

Loud and lively; the birds move freely between the canopy and lower floors, allowing the human approach. They usually travel in pairs or groups of up to a dozen of individuals. The majority of flights performed below the level of the trees, but for longer distances they rise spiral up to considerable heights.

Extremely Active, rarely long they stay in a tree and feeds using the peak acrobaticamente support.

Reproduction:

The nesting of these birds is from June to August.

It nests in hollow trees, preferring Artocarpus altilis, Pometia, Pandanus tectorius and Hibiscus tileacus. Sometimes they use the old nest of another species. They lay two white eggs.

A record of breeding in captivity gives chick a period of eight weeks to become independent.

Food:

It feeds on a great variety of trees in flower, nectar and pollen. Within your preferences are the flowers of the coconut palm, the native tree and banana Hibiscus tileaceus.

It also feeds on fruits, especially mango and insects.

Distribution:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 100 km2

The Ultramarine Lorikeet is endemic of the Marquesas Islands, of Nuku Hiva, UA Pu and UA Huka, Although fossil remains show that previously most widely spread.

In UA Pu the population was estimated at 250-300 couples in 1975. But in 1988 had been reduced on the 60%, probably due to the spread of rats Rattus rattus, and a hurricane in 1988, Although its effects on the population of birds are uncertain.

In Nuku Hiva the small population of around of 70 birds that inhabited the high valleys and ridges in the northwestern part of the island, between 700 and 1.000 d., You can that they are now extinct.

The majority of the population, the day today, remains in UA Huka, where the species was introduced in 1940. This population would have grown from 200 to 250 couples in the late 1970s and was considered abundant in 1990 at altitudes environment to the 500 d., with a population estimated between 1.000 and 1.500 birds. The main threat to the species, here, is the potential arrival of rats, and between 1993 and 1994, 14 Ultramarine Lorikeet they were moved to Fatu Hiva in an attempt to keep them safe from rats; However, the deterioration of habitat by grazing and malaria mammals avian, also they have been and are still potential factors to increase the vulnerability of this species.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Danger.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

CITES Appendix I. in danger of extinction.

The entire population is located on an island where the species is stable, in other islands recently has been extinguished. The general trend is suspected to be a slow and continuous decrease. If the black rats come to UA Huka the decrease will be quick and severe.

Other threats included are logging in some sectors of the habitat of the Ultramarine Lorikeet to plant crops, fruit trees, and use the trunks for woodcarvings for tourism.

Lori Ultramar in captivity:

Extremely rare.

Alternative names:

Ultramarine Lorikeet, Marquesas Lorikeet, Ultramarine Lory (English).
Lori ultramarin, Lori de Goupil, Lori des Marquises (French).
Ultramarinlori (German).
Loris Vini Ultramarine (Portuguese).
Lori Ultramar, Lori Ultramarino (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Vini ultramarina
Citation: (Kuhl, 1820)
Protonimo: Psittacus ultramarinus

Ultramarine Lorikeet images:

————————————————————————————————

Ultramarine Lorikeet (Vini ultramarina)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

1 – Miles to the wild – link
2 – Miles to the wild – link
3 – Miles to the wild – link
4 – An adult bird perched on a palm tree – Author Josep del Hoyo – IBC.lynxeds.com
5- A juvenile bird feeding in a tree. – Author Josep del Hoyo – IBC.lynxeds.com

Sounds: Mark Todd (Xeno-canto)

Stephen's Lorikeet
Vini stepheni

Stephen's Lorikeet

Description

19 cm.. length and a weight between 42 and 55 g..

The plumage of the Stephen's Lorikeet (Vini stepheni), in general is green.

The upper part of the head is light green. The region of the windows of the nose, the cheeks, the ear-coverts, the neck, the chest and the abdomen They are red. It has a belt Variable greenish purple size chest. Thighs and bottom of the abdomen They are purple. The Hip is yellowish-green. The feathers wing-coverts They are red and green; the primaries, longer, are black. The upper part of the tail It is yellowish green and the bottom darker yellow with green.

The irises It is reddish brown, the legs and the bill are orange.

The immature they have the underparts green with purple and red marks on the throat and the abdomen. Tail dark green. The bill and eyes Brown.

  • Sound of the Stephen's Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori of Stephen.mp3]

Habitat:

Its usual habitat are dense shrubs and trees, Palm trees, handles, coconut and banana plantations.

They make daily trips from the forest into the coastal strips to feed in coconut palms.

They live in pairs or in small groups outside the breeding season. They are very active and difficult to see in dense vegetation; the easiest way to see them is in flight, they are easy to distinguish by their bright red plumage. Their flight is fast with a characteristic wings hum. They are not shy and view them up close, are especially when eating.

Reproduction:

There are no data about its reproduction in the wild.

Food:

The Stephen's Lorikeet is omnivore, consumes nectar, pollen and fruits of a wide variety of plants. The flowers of the plants Scaevola sericea and Timonius polygamus They provide the main sources of nectar. Arthropods are part of the diet, including lepidopteran larvae found in the sporangia fern Phymatosorus

Distribution:

Stephen distribution of Lori

The Stephen's Lorikeet is limited to Henderson island in the Pitcairn Islands, a small island uninhabited and surrounded of coral limestone cliffs, in the South-Central area of the Pacific Ocean.

The Pitcairn Islands, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno There are four volcanic islands in the South Pacific Ocean. These islands are a British overseas territory (formerly a British colony), the last one left in the Pacific.

In 1987, the total population It was estimated between 720 and 1.820 specimens.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Vulnerable

• Population trend: Stable

This species may prove to be the only member of its genus whose habitat and population size have been little affected by adverse changes in their environment. However, is qualified as vulnerable, Since it is only on a small island.

He seems to have adapted to the presence of the single introduced predator, Pacific rat (Rattus exulans). In August of 2011, a rat eradication operation was carried out in the Henderson island to eradicate R. exulans of the island. However, the accidental introduction of a more aggressive predator, as other species Rattus, It could be devastating. Diseases such as malaria avian and smallpox are another potential threat. The introduction of exotic species of plants could have serious consequences for native vegetation and, Therefore, for this species.

Rat eradication could save seabirds on Henderson Island

Averted a potentially serious threat in 1983 When an American millionaire sought to make a home in the Henderson island. The request was rejected by the Government of the United Kingdom. Henderson is now a world heritage site.

Stephen Lori captive:

Currently there are no known to any Stephen's Lorikeet in captivity. VULNERABLE.

Due to its endangered status, any specimen that can not be returned to their natural habitat (natural range) It should be placed preferably in a breeding program well managed to ensure the survival of the species.

Alternative names:

Stephen’s Lorikeet, Henderson Island Lorikeet, Henderson Island Lory, Henderson Lorikeet, Henderson Lory, Stephen’s Lory, Stephens’s Lory (English).
Lori de Stephen (French).
Hendersonlori, Henderson Lori (German).
Stephen Lori (Portuguese).
Lori de Stephen (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Vini
Scientific name: Vini stepheni
Citation: (North, 1908)
Protonimo: Calliptilus ? stepheni

Images Stephen's Lorikeet:

————————————————————————————————

Stephen's Lorikeet (Vini stepheni)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

1 – by © Pawl Warren – UK OVERSEAS TERRITORIES CONSERVATION FORUM
2 – By Peter Fitzgerald, Andrew J.Kurbiko, Hansbaer, Openstreetmap (File:Pitcairn Islands map.svg) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Mark Todd (Xeno-canto)

Kuhl's Lorikeet
Vini kuhlii


Kuhl's Lorikeet

Description

18 cm.. long and an approximate weight of 55 g..

Males and females of the Kuhl's Lorikeet (Vini kuhlii) they are identical in appearance. Adults have the cheeks, the chest and the part forward of the belly bright red.

The upperparts the body has different shades of green with the exception of a few Feather erection of color blue dark in the neck.

Its tail is multicolored, the Central feathers are red and purple sides, with the Green terminal part.
A zone blue-violet in the belly around the the thighs. The bill and legs are orange, the tail is short.

The birds youth they have the underparts opaque red.

  • Sound of the Kuhl's Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori of Rimatara.mp3]

Habitat:

The natural habitat of the Kuhl's Lorikeet they are tropical rainforests. On the Islands desforestadas also is in coconut plantations. It is a nectarivore that feeds sucking nectar with his rough tongue.

Reproduction:

Observed in the month of March, April and August.
Nest in the trunks of coconut trees or FARA (Pandanus tectorius) dead or in cavities of hotu. Sometimes one or two rectangular holes mark the entrance of these nests. Only a litter has been found with two chicks.

Food:

Nectar and pollen from the banana flowers (Musa sp.), Kapok (Ceiba pentandra), pacayers (Inga edulis), Mango (Mangifera indica), avocado (It persea americana), the coconut (Cocos nucifera), the Cordyline (fructicosa Cordyline) , the NASE (Barringtonia asiatica), the tafano (Guettarda speciosa), the Pomeroy (Syzygium jambos) and ATAE (Erythrina variegata).

The small seeds of purau (Hibiscus tiliaceus) and AITO (Casuarina equisetifolia). Axillary buds and young shoots of hotu, purau and falcata (Paraserianthes falcataria).

They lick the surface of the leaves of banana. Make sudden movements in the leaves of certain trees without flowers or fruit (including dead Palm trees), also tends to dig small holes – clearly too superficial to serve as a nest -, This we do think that also can be insectivorous.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident) 510 km2

Endemic of Rimatara in the Tubuai Islands, Center-South Pacific (France), where the population is estimated at 905 birds. It has also been introduced in Kiribati including Teraina (Washington Island) and Tabueran (Fanning island), both before 1798, and Kiritimati (Christmas Island), where six specimens were transferred in 1957.

Occasional appearances in the Thbuai island about Rimatara they are probably elopements pets.

Although the species is relatively common in Rimatara. the recent introduction of rats is cause for concern.
The population of Tabueran (c. 200 birds) It is also vulnerable because of predation of nests by rats.

In Teraina There are a few 1.000 birds and with no confirmed threat. It is possible that one or two individuals can still survive in Kiritimati. IN DANGER OF EXTINCTION.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Danger

• Population trend Decreasing

Although populations are believed to be stable in Rimatara and Teraina and grow in Atiu where it was recently introduced, invading predators are probably causing a decrease in Tabuaeran and Kiritimati, Therefore, the general trend is suspected to be a moderate and continuous descent is its population.

Excessive exploitation of its red feathers is the most likely reason for the extinction of the Kuhl's Lorikeet in the Cook Islands.

A serious threat to all Broods in the Pacific Islands, It is the depredation caused by rats in the nests, especially on the part of the Black Rat (Rattus rattus). In Rimatara, There was a wide shot of black rats (Rattus rattus), to leave the island away from them in the year 2000. However the Pacific rats (R. exulans) they remained very abundant.

In Teraina, There is no evidence of the presence of the (R. Rattus), Although the Pacific rat (R. exulans) is abundant, While in Tabuaeran and Mitiaro, still having black rats (R. Rattus). Cats can be a threat in Kiritimati. The Common mine (Acridotheres tristis) It is a threat to the introduced population in Atiu, Since it competes for nesting sites and usually attacking young people Kuhl's Lorikeet.

Ongoing conservation actions:

Appendix II of CITES.
– In Kiribati, the species is fully protected.
– In the French Polynesia the species is protected by national laws and regulations from 1996.
– In Rimatara It has been protected by a traditional tapu (taboo) from 1900.

– 27 birds were reintroduced in Atiu from Rimatara in May of the 2007, after which organized a community contest to find the first young birds, with a reward given to the winner.
– Monthly count of birds in Atiu carried out to evaluate the success of the effort of introduction.
– A control program of the Common mine started in Atiu in May of 2009, including harassment and capture, with a bounty for each dead bird.
– For October of the 2009, the population of the birds Mine had been reduced in a 60% and this program is permanent.
– In Rimatara, 21 bait stations were established in the main Pier in September of 2009 to prevent black rats invade the island and awareness is being carried out among children about the importance of protecting the birdlife of the island.

Lori Rimatara in captivity:

It is not in captivity.

Due to its State, in danger of extinction, any specimen that can not be returned to their natural habitat (natural range) It should be placed preferably in a breeding program well managed to ensure the survival of the species.

Alternative names:

Kuhl’s Lorikeet, Kuhl’s Lory, Kühl’s lory, Rimatara Lorikeet, Rimitara Lorikeet, Ruby Lorikeet, Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (English).
Lori de Kuhl (French).
Rubinlori (German).
Lóris-de-kuhl (Portuguese).
Lori de Rimatara (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Vini
Scientific name: Vini kuhlii
Citation: (Vigors, 1824)
Protonimo: Psittacula kuhlii

Kuhl's Lorikeet images:

————————————————————————————————

Kuhl's Lorikeet (Vini kuhlii)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – Miles to the wild – link
2 – Miles to the wild – link
3 – Miles to the wild – link
4 -Miles to the wild – link
5 – Duncan WrightTo feltoltő sajat munkaja: „Vini australis”. Engedely: GFDL, Forrás: Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Matthias Feuersenger (Xeno-canto)

Blue-crowned Lorikeet
Vini australis


Blue-crowned Lorikeet

Description

19 cm.. of length and a weight of 40 to 55 g..

Samoa distribution of Lori

The Blue-crowned Lorikeet (Vini australis) has a plumage in their great majority color green. The upper part of the head is dark blue with light blue streaks. The region of the windows of the nose, the cheeks, the ear-coverts, the neck and the abdomen They are red. the lower part of abdomen and the thighs they are purple blue. The back is green, the interior of the tail is yellowish-green. The irises is reddish brown. The legs are of color red and the bill is orange.

The youth are equal to adults, but with less red in the face and throat, little or no abdominal patch, stripes blue shorter in the crown, no purple in the thighs, Brown the eyes.

  • Sound of the Blue-crowned Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori of Samoa.mp3]

Habitat:

It is found in forests, coconut palms or any habitat where flowering trees; coastal mountains, gardens and agricultural areas. Nomad, sometimes traveling between the Islands.

Daily movements in search of food. Aggressive but gregarious, they often move in flocks of up to 12 individuals, except during the breeding season living with their partners.

In Samoa It is common around villages and plantations and less common in moist forests, higher elevations in the rain forest and secondary growth.

Reproduction:

Nests in holes or hollows of trees, It has also been reported that they dig burrows in the banks of Earth, Although it has not confirmed. The laying is one or two white eggs. Breeding registered in June and August. In captivity the incubation It has been calculated in 23 days.

Food:

It feeds on nectar, pollen and red fruits. It particularly prefers Erythrina, Wild hibiscus and coconut.

Distribution:

Extends over the archipelagos of Samoa, Tonga and LAU, distributed by Islands: ʻAlofi, Fotuhaʻa, Fulago, Futuna, Haʻafeva, Niuafoʻou, Moce, Niuē, Ofu, Olosega, Sāmoa, Savaiʻi, Tafahi, Taʻu, Tofua, Tungua, ʻUiha, ʻUpolu, Varoa, Vavaʻu and Voleva. In the past was also in ‘USA, Tongatapu and Mata-Utu but there has been extinguished.

Conservation:

– Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern.

– The population trend: Decreasing.

The world population It has not been quantified, but the species is informed that it is common in much of its restricted area of distribution.

The population is suspected to be in decline due to the predation by species invasive.

It is still fairly common throughout its range, but it has become extinct on many islands and it is decreasing in Tonga (probably because of the rats).

Lori Samoa in captivity:

Like the others Vini lories, the Blue-crowned Lorikeet It is still quite rare in poultry, probablemente como resultado de la protección que reciben en see you soon países nativos del Pacífico Sur.

Alternative names:

Blue-crowned Lorikeet, Blue crowned Lorikeet, Blue-crowned Lory (English).
Lori fringillaire (French).
Blaukäppchen (German).
Loris Vini Australis (Portuguese).
Lori de Samoa (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Vini
Scientific name: Vini australis
Citation: (Gmelin, 1788)
Protonimo: Psittacus australis

Blue-crowned Lorikeet pictures:

————————————————————————————————

Blue-crowned Lorikeet (Vini australis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – “Vini australis-London Zoo, England-8a” by William Warby from London, England – Unknown-Tropical BirdUploaded by Snowmanradio. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
2 – “Vini australis-two on a perch-8a-4c” by Vini_australis_-two_on_a_perch-8a.jpg: TJ Lin – originally posted to Flickr as Dscn6140 and uploaded to commons at Vini_australis_-two_on_a_perch-8a.jpg. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
3 – By Duncan Wright (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
4 – By Steven G. Johnson on commons (same as unnormalized on flickr) (Dsc_0014uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
5- by Zambar – zoochat.com

Sounds: Samuel Jones (Xeno-canto)

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