Red-collared Lorikee
Trichoglossus rubritorquis

Red-collared Lorikee

Description Red-collared Lorikeet:

26 cm. long and 103-140 grams.

Red-collared Lorikee

The Red-collared Lorikee (Trichoglossus rubritorquis) they have the head violet / blue with purple / blue streaks on face; throat and sides of the nape blackish; neck orange / red; chest yellow / orange without sweeping; abdomen dark green; the thighs green / yellow until undertail-coverts; upperparts and tail green; underwing-coverts orange; yellow and broadband under the wing . Bill orange / red. Eyes dark orange.
The youth they are similar to adults.

    taxonomy:

Occasionally he treated in Australian literature as a separate species of Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), but this is only appropriate review, as here, the whole complex of Rainbow Lorikeet: differs from Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus moluccanus) in his collar Orange Fire vs. pale green; Blue neck vs. green; vs belly black. blue; and of the Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus forsteni) in his collar Orange Fire vs. yellowish green; nape blue vs. red crab; nape blue vs. dark blue or green; larger size.

Species Monotypic.

  • Sound of the Red-collared Lorikee.

Habitat:

There have been no large-scale seasonal movements are common throughout the year in some places.

It's more common in the lowlands, but it is up 2400 meters above sea level. They can be observed in a wide variety of areas including settlements, forests, coconut plantations, Savanna, eucalyptus forests and mangroves. They are in mixed flocks with other parrots; small and noisy groups. Nomads, since they depend on flowering trees. It perches communally in groups of hundreds of birds.

Reproduction:

very similar reproductive biology to the Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus). May-January season in Northern Territory. The laying Typically two or three eggs.

Food:

Diet very similar to the Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) which feeds on nectar, fruit, flowers and insects, including Pandanus spiralis. It can also be found around artificial feeding stations.

I necked Lori distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 1.100.000 km2

North Autóctono Australia, which they inhabit the lowlands. Integrated or hybridized with Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) on Queensland Peninsula, Australia, in southwest Cape York.

Red-collared Lorikeet Conservation:

    Justification of the red list category

1. Current category Red List UICN: Least Concern..

2. The population trend: Decreasing.

3. Population size : It is unknown.

This species has a extremely large distribution area, and therefore does not approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criterion of size range (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a decreasing area size or fluctuating distribution, extension / habitat quality, or size of the population and a small number of places or severe fragmentation).

While the trend of the population seems to be decreasing, It not believed to be declining fast enough to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion population trend (decrease of more than 30% in ten years or three generations).

The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 mature individuals with an estimated> 10% continuous decline in ten years or three generations, or a specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

    Justification of the population

Global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as abundant (pit et to the. 1997).

    Justification trend

It is suspected that the population is declining due to unsustainable levels of exploitation.

    Threats

The species has been the subject of a intense trade: from 1981, When it was included in the Appendix II of the CITES, they have been 100.388 individuals caught in international trade (UNEP-WCMC CITES Trade Database, January 2005).

In captivity:

In Europe, this species of lori has been largely imported from early last century, and in 1910 it managed to raise in the zoo London (four years later, the first breeding France). Currently it is rare outside Australia. Life expectancy: 20 years in nature, 15-25 years in captivity.

Alternative names

Australian rainbow lory, Rainbow Lorikeet (Red-collared), Red collared Lorikeet, Red-collared Lorikeet (English).
Loriquet à col rouge, Loriquet à collier rouge, Loriquet à tête bleue (à col rouge), Loriquet à tête bleue (rubritorquis) (French).
Australischer Blauwangenallfarblori, Darwin-Allfarblori, Rotnackenlori (German).
Periquito-arco-íris (rubritorquis), Lóris-de-colar-rojo (Portuguese).
Lori cuellirrojo, Lori Arcoiris (rubritorquis) (Spanish).

Thomas Horsfield
Thomas Horsfield

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus rubritorquis
Citation: Vigors & Horsfield, 1827
Protonimo: Trichoglossus Rubritorquis

Lori I necked images:


Red-collared Lorikee (Trichoglossus rubritorquis)

    Sources:

    1. Avibase
    2. Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    3. Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    4. Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – A Red-collared Lorikeet at Cincinnati Zoo, Ohio, USA by Fr. Ted Bobosh [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (2) – A Red-collared Lorikeet at Cincinnati Zoo, Ohio, USA by Ted [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Red-collared Lorikeet standing on a man’s cap at Lion Country Safari, Florida, USA by derivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)Trichoglossus_haematodus_rubritorquis_-Lion_Country_Safari-6.jpg: Duncan Rawlinson from Vancouver, BC [CC BY 2.0 or CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus rubritorquis) in the Walsrode Bird Park, Germany by Quartl [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons
    (5) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (6) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (7) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus rubritorquis) by Graham WinterfloodFlickr
    (8) – Trichoglossus haematodus rubritorquis Location taken: Lion Country Safari, Loxahatchee, Florida Photo by David J. pole [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (9) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (10) – A painting of a Red-collared Lorikeet (originally captioned “Trichoglossus rubritorquis. Scarlet-collared Parrakeet by Edward Lear [Public domain]

    Sounds: Phil Gregory, XC287820. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/287820

Rainbow Lorikeet
Trichoglossus moluccanus

Rainbow Lorikeet


Rainbow Lorikeet

Content

Description Rainbow Lorikeet:

Of 25-30 cm. length; 70-169 grams and a wingspan of 46 cm..

Rainbow Lorikeet

The plumage of the Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus moluccanus) is very bright. The head is deep blue with a neck greenish-yellow and the rest of the upperparts (wings, back and tail) are deep green. The chest is red with blue-black barring.. The belly is deep green, and the thighs and rump are yellow with deep green barring.. In flight, a yellow wing-bar contrasts clearly with the red underwing-coverts.

There is little to visually distinguish between the sexes; However, for an acute observer, their dimorphism is readily apparent.

The youth has bill black, which gradually brightens to orange in the adults..

The markings of Trichoglossus moluccanus resemble of the Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), but with a belly blue and breast with little or no blue-black barring..

Rainbow Lorikeet Taxonomy

With one exception, the species have been treated so far as a group of subspecies within the extended group Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), but they differ from the Trichoglossus haematodus her pale red breast without bars ; its blue belly against green or blackish; its pale blue hood without black edge and its larger size.

The subspecies Trichoglossus moluccanus eyrei (South of Australia) It is included within the species nominal. Small hybrid population of species paired with Musk Lorikeet (Glossopsitta concinna) in SE Southern Australia (Yorke Peninsula).

  • Sound of the Rainbow Lorikeet. (1)

(1) Some species are under extreme pressure because of traps and harassment. Therefore, open availability of high-quality recordings of these species may further worsen problems, this being the reason why downloading these recordings is off. In conclusion, recorders themselves are free to share these files on xeno-canto, but they will have to approve access to these recordings.

We do not take this action lightly, and we wish it were not necessary, but we are convinced that the negative impacts of offering easy access to these recordings outweigh the benefits. To access these recordings, You can contact directly with the recorder.

Subspecies description:

  • Trichoglossus moluccanus moluccanus

    (Gmelin, 1788) – Nominal.

  • Trichoglossus moluccanus septentrionalis

    (Robinson, 1900) – As the species nominal but with brighter stripes purple / blue in the head and tail shorter.

Habitat:

The Rainbow Lorikeet often they travel together in pairs and occasionally respond to calls to fly like a flock, then they disperse again in pairs. Couples aggressively defend their feeding and nesting against other lstallion arcoiris and other bird species. Not only they scare off smaller birds, as the Noisy Miner (Manorina melanocephala) and the Brush Wattlebird (Anthochaera chrysoptera), but also to larger, as the Australian Magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen).

Reproduction:

In Australia, Reproduction usually takes place during spring (from September to December), but it may vary from one region to another with changes in food availability and climate. Sites nesting They are variable and may include gaps as tall trees eucalyptus, trunks of palm trees or overhanging rocks.

Couples sometimes nest in the same tree with other couples Rainbow Lorikeet or other species of birds. The clutch size is between one and three eggs, which are incubated for about 25 days. Incubation tasks are performed by the female alone.

The Rainbow Lorikeet they are mostly monogamous They matched and remain for long periods, if not for life.

Food:

Nectar and pollen of native trees and shrubs, especially eucalyptus (for example, Eucalyptus gummifera, Eucalyptus maculata).

Rainbow Lorikeet distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 3,810,000 km2

Endemic East and Southeast Australia (of Cape York to the Eyre Peninsula, South of Australia)

They were recorded for the first time in Perth in 1968 and it is believed that the population came from less than ten birds were deliberately released or had escaped from aviaries.

Since the beginning of the decade 1960, the population has grown exponentially and has spread rapidly throughout 174 km2 metropolitan area. The current population is estimated at 8.400 birds and their range is expanding at a rate of 0,7 km per year.

wanderer Tasmania.

Distribution of subspecies:

  • Trichoglossus moluccanus moluccanus

    (Gmelin, 1788) – Nominal.

  • Trichoglossus moluccanus septentrionalis

    (Robinson, 1900) – North of Queensland (Cape York Peninsula), in northwestern Australia; also the Torres Strait Islands (Boigu and Saibai except, at the north end) and it was introduced in the district of Perth, in southwest Australia..

Rainbow Lorikeet conservation:

1. Current category Red List UICN: Least concern.

2. The population trend: Decreasing.

3. Population size : Unknown.

Justification of the red list category

This species has a extremely large distribution area, and therefore does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criteria of size range (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a decreasing area size or fluctuating distribution, extension / habitat quality, or size of the population and a small number of places or severe fragmentation). While the trend of the population seems to be decreasing, It not believed to be declining fast enough to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion population trend (decrease of more than 30% in ten years or three generations).

The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 mature individuals with an estimated> 10% continuous decline in ten years or three generations, or a specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification of the population

Global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as abundant in northern Australia and rare Tasmania (pit et to the. 1997).

Justification trend

They suspected that the population is declining due to unsustainable levels of exploitation.

Rainbow Lori Threats

The species has been the subject of a intense trade: from 1981, When it was included in the Appendix II of the CITES, they have been 100.388 individuals caught in international trade (UNEP-WCMC CITES Trade Database, January 2005).

In captivity:

It is not very common. Its longevity It 20 years en libertad, 15-25 years in captivity and its market price is around wild birds 250 EUR.

Alternative names:

Rainbow Lorikeet, Rainbow Lorikeet (Rainbow) (English).
Loriquet à tête bleue (de Swainson), Loriquet à tête bleue (moluccanus), Loriquet arc-en-ciel, Loriquet de Swainson (French).
Regenbogenlori (German).
Lóris-molucano, Periquito-arco-íris (moluccanus) (Portuguese).
Lori arcoiris, Lori de Arco Iris (Spanish).

Gmelin Johann Friedrich
Gmelin Johann Friedrich

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus moluccanus
Citation: (Gmelin, JF, 1788)
Protonimo: Psittacus moluccanus

Rainbow Lorikeet images:


Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus moluccanus)

Marigold Lorikeet
Trichoglossus capistratus

Marigold Lorikeet

Description Marigold Lorikeet:

26 cm.. length and a weight between 100-157 g..

The Marigold Lorikeet (Trichoglossus capistratus) has the forecrown, the cheeks and chin, dark blue; and the rest of the head It is green with a broadband yellow-green in nape (part posterior of the neck). The upper breast is yellow with green narrow edges feathers. Underwing-coverts are yellow with scattered orange marks. Males may have some red on their edges. The abdomen is dark green. Their peaks They are hooked.

The males and females and players seem to depend on DNA or endoscopic sexing to determine gender.

Taxonomic status:

This taxon is considered a subspecies of Trichoglossus [haematodus, rosenbergii, moluccana, forsteni, capistratus, weberi] (sensu lato) by some authors.

  • Sound of the Marigold Lorikeet (1).

(1) Some species are under extreme pressure because of traps and harassment. Therefore, open availability of high-quality recordings of these species may further worsen problems, this being the reason why downloading these recordings is off. In conclusion, recorders themselves are free to share these files on xeno-canto, but they will have to approve access to these recordings.

We do not take this action lightly, and we wish it were not necessary, but we are convinced that the negative impacts of offering easy access to these recordings outweigh the benefits. To access these recordings, You can contact directly with the recorder.

Description 3 subspecies:

  • Trichoglossus capistratus capistratus

    (Bechstein, 1811) – Nominal.

  • Trichoglossus capistratus flavotectus

    (Hellmayr, 1914) – Head green with purple / blue streaks on forecrown up to the cheeks; variability of yellow to deep orange in chest; neck wide and yellow; abdomen dark green to green / black; underwing-coverts yellow with orange markings variables.

  • Trichoglossus capistratus fortis

    (Hartert, 1898) – Head black / brown with purple / blue streaks on forecrown up to the cheeks; lores , throat, line up back of the eyes and occiput, green; chest bright yellow with orange but not barred / red marks; abdomen dark green, with occasional shades blue / black; underwing-coverts yellow.

Habitat Lori flanged:

The Marigold Lorikeet They are in mixed flocks with other parrots; small and noisy groups. Nomads, since they depend on flowering trees. It perches communally in groups of hundreds of birds.

It is more common in lowlands, but it is up to altitudes of 2400 m. Wide variety of areas including settlements, forests, coconut plantations, Savanna, eucalyptus forests and mangroves, including dry forest Roti.

Reproduction Lori flanged:

Total of 21 nests found in Sumba between late August and early October 1992, all cavities in large trees (principalmente deciduous).

Food Lori flanged:

Few specific dietary data, but presumably similar to Trichoglossus haematodus and it is known to take nectar and pollen from native trees, as well as insects and figs.

Distribution Lori flanged:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 171.000 km2

The Marigold Lorikeet It is a species of parrot endemic to the islands of Southeast Asia Sumba, Roti, Wetar and Blend (Indonesia) and Timor (Indonesia and East Timor).

Distribution 3 subspecies:

Conservation Lori flanged:

1. Current category Red List UICN: Least concern.

2. The population trend: Decreasing.

3. Population size : —.

Justification of the red list category

Although this species may have a restricted range, It not believed to approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criterion of size range (Scope of the presence <20.000 km2 combined with a decreasing area size or fluctuating distribution, extension / habitat quality, or size of the population and a small number of places or severe fragmentation).

While the trend of the population seems to be decreasing, It not believed to be declining fast enough to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion population trend (decrease of more than 30% in ten years or three generations).
The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 mature individuals with an estimated> 10% continuous decline in ten years or three generations, or a specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification of the population

Global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as common in Timor (pit et to the. 1997).

Justification trend

They suspected that the population is declining due to unsustainable levels of exploitation.

Threats

The species has been the subject of a intense trade: from 1981, When it was included in the Appendix II of the CITES, they have been 100.388 individuals captured in international trade (UNEP-WCMC CITES Trade Database, January 2005).

In captivity:

It's one of the lori rainbow less noisy but rare in captivity except Dili (Capital of Timor Oriental), where it is quite common. Its longevity It 20 years en libertad, 15-25 years in captivity.

Alternative names

Marigold Lorikeet, Rainbow Lorikeet (Marigold) (English).
Loriquet à tête bleue (harnaché), Loriquet à tête bleue [capistratus], Loriquet d’Edward, Loriquet harnaché (French).
Blauwangenlori, Timor-Allfarblori (German).
Periquito-arco-íris-de-timor, Lóris-de-timor (Portuguese).
Lori de Caléndula, Lori embridado, Lori Arcoiris [capistratus Group] (Spanish).

Johann Matthäus Bechstein
Johann Matthäus Bechstein

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus capistratus
Citation: (Bechstein, 1811)
Protonimo: Psittacus capistratus

Marigold Lorikeet images:


Marigold Lorikeet (Trichoglossus capistratus)

Flores Lorikeet
Trichoglossus weberi

Flores Lorikeet

Description Lori Flores:

25 cm. length and 100-150 g. of weight.

 Flores Lorikeet

The Flores Lorikeet (Trichoglossus weberi) is generally Green; light green / blue stripes on the forecrown and lores, the rest of the head with brighter green stripes; underwing-coverts yellow / green. The chest and the thighs are yellowish or reddish. The bill It is orange-red and irises orange-red. The legs son grises. Smaller size than other species Trichoglossus.

The youth they are similar to adults.

    taxonomy:

Sometimes you think you're closer Olive headed Lorikeet (Trichoglossus euteles). With one exception, so far it has been treated as a subspecies within the complex Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), but differs in its chest rather pale green; abdominal patch medium green; head dark green with streaks of bright green; small size (less than a Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus forsteni) relatively small). Monotypic.

  • Sound of the Flores Lorikeet. (1)

(1) Some species are under extreme pressure because of traps and harassment. The open availability of high-quality recordings of these species may further worsen problems. For this reason, transmission and download of these recordings is off. Recorders are free to share in xeno-edge, but they will have to approve access to these recordings.

Habitat:

It's more common in the lowlands, but it is up 2400 meters above sea level. Wide variety of areas including settlements, forests, coconut plantations, Savanna, eucalyptus forests and mangroves.

It is found in mixed flocks with other parrots; small and noisy groups. Nomads, since they depend on flowering trees. It perches communally in groups of hundreds of birds.

Reproduction:

Birds have been recorded in conditions reproduction in June and is reported reproduction between February and August (White and Bruce 1986, Reeve y Rabenak 2016).

It will nest on the ground in some of the predator-free islands.

Food:

It feeds mainly from nectar, but also feeds on figs, insects and can be found around artificial feeding stations.

Distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 25.500 km2

The Lori Flores are endemic to the Flores Island, Indonesia, where it is described as common (pit et to the. 1997).

Conservation Lori Flores:

1. Current category Red List UICN: Near-threatened.

2. The population trend: Decreasing.

3. Population size : 10000-19999 individuals.

    Justification of the red list category

It is believed that this species has recently split a moderately small population (approaching 10.000 mature individuals), forming one subpopulation, inferring that is suffering moderately rapid decreases due to the pressure of capture and loss of habitat. Therefore, It has been classified as Near threatened, but more information on population size, trends and threats can lead to a reassessment of their status.

    Justification of the population

It is believed that the population of Flores Lorikeet It is moderately small (namely, approaching 10.000 mature individuals).

    Justification trend

They suspected that the population is declining due to loss of habitat and unsustainable levels of exploitation.

    Threats

The habitat destruction through the combined impacts of firewood collection, commercial logging, timber extraction for construction materials and clearance for agriculture may represent the most relevant threat.

The loss and fragmentation of forests It is already extensive in Flowers, where no semi-permanent forest below 1.000 meters is included within protected areas published in the Official Gazette. These threats are exacerbated by the expansion of human population, with large volumes of timber needed for housing construction, and the fact that the application of the laws by the government is little or no.

Deciduous rain forest is being cut extensively through land grabbing and the establishment of agricultural areas, a factor that is inevitably reducing the range and population of this species. Logging continues in the coastal belt to make way for crops, illegal logging continues in the protected areas.

It is presumed that the capture for trade in wild birds It represents an additional threat, as for other subspecies of the complex (Trichoglossus haemotodus).

Conservation actions and research in progress

Appendix II of the CITES. CMS Appendix II. It has been recorded in the Mbeliling Forest Reserve (Reeve y Rabenak 2016).

Conservation actions and research proposals

1 – Estimate the population and assess population trends and scale of the pressure catch.

2- Conduct a specific study of the species to identify important sites, in order to provide protection.

3- Carry out research on their status and habitat use (with special attention to feeding ecology and fragmentation of forests) so that long-term management of the species facilitate.

4- Monitor trade to investigate whether this represents a significant threat.

5- Initiate campaigns sensitization to get the support of local people in forest protection.

In captivity:

In captivity it is kind enough rare de lori. He was raised for the first time Great Britain, in 1969, in Germany in 1984.

Because of its endangered status, Any suitable specimen can not be released back into their natural habitat (native range) It should preferably be placed in a breeding program well managed to ensure the continued survival of this species.

Alternative names

Flores Island rainbow lory, Flores Lorikeet, Leaf Lorikeet, Rainbow Lorikeet (Leaf) (English).
Loriquet à tête bleue (Weber), Loriquet à tête bleue (weberi), Loriquet de Flores, Loriquet de Weber (French).
Flores Blauwangenallfarblori, Flores-Allfarblori, Webers Lori (German).
Periquito-arco-íris (weberi) (Portuguese).
Lori de Flores, Lori Arcoiris (weberi) (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus weberi
Citation: (Büttikofer, 1894)
Protonimo: Psitteuteles weber

Flores Lorikeet images:


Flores Lorikeet (Trichoglossus weberi)

    Sources:

    1. Avibase
    2. Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    3. Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    4. Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – Flores Lorikeet, Trichoglossus (haematodus) weberi, at New Port Aquarium, Cincinnati, USA by derivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)Trichoglossus_haematodus_weberi_-New_Port_Aquarium-8.jpg: Serge Melki [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (2) – Weber’s Lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus weberi) at Newport Aquarium by Ltshears [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], from Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Fig. 1: Flores Lorikeet (Trichoglossus = Psitteuteles Weber Weber)
    Fig. 2: Olive-headed Lorikeet (Trichoglossus euteles = Psitteuteles euteles) by A Weber’s lorikeet (Trichoglossus weberi) at the Jerusalem Biblical Zoo by SuperJew [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – Trichoglossus haematodus weberi Buttikofer, 1894 bt Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis Biodiversity Center [CC BY-SA 3.0]

    (5) – Weber’s lorikeet, Picture taken at Loro Parque in Puerto de la Cruz / Tenerife by Dominik DeobaldFlickr
    (6) – Johann Büttikofer [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

    Sounds: Raf Floats, XC350575. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/350575

Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet
Trichoglossus forsteni

Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet


Description:

25 a 30 centimeters length and 100-157 g. of weight.

The distinctive and colorful Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus forsteni) has the head dark blue, neck pale green, chest smooth red, and belly dark blue. The remaining plumage It is a bright pale green, and the bill typically red.

In flight the species shows a flash of bright yellow on the inside of all flight feather, and coverts bright red at the bottom of the wings.

  • Sound of the Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet.

taxonomy:

This taxon is considered a subspecies of Trichoglossus [haematodus, rosenbergii, moluccana, forsteni, capistratus, weberi] (sensu lato) by some authors.

The specific epithet forsteni commemorates the Dutch naturalist Eltio Alegondas Forestry.

Subspecies description
  • Trichoglossus forsteni djampeanus

    (Hartert 1897) – They differ from the species nominal by the fact that their head It is darker and more evidently streaked with bright purple / blue.

  • Trichoglossus forsteni forsteni

    (Bonaparte 1850) – Nominal.

  • Trichoglossus forsteni mitchellii

    (Gray,GR 1859) – Both adults have head black / brown with gray / green streaks in crown up to the cheeks; red / brown in occiput; chest Red with minimal or no Barred; neck yellow green; purple / black belly; smaller.

  • Trichoglossus forsteni stresemanni

    (Meise 1929) – As the species nominal but with paler chest orange / red; green washing occiput; feathers the mantle yellow / orange basis.

Habitat:

The Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet is located in lowlands and lower montane forests, including secondary growth and plantations, tending to be observed at the edges and around perturbed vegetation instead of inside the closed canopy forest (pit et to the. 1997). In Sumbawa the Trichoglossus forsteni It ranges from sea level to 800-1200 meters and up 2150 metres in Lombok (pit et to the. 1997); at least in Sumbawa, the variation in altitudinal range is attributed to the movements in monitoring trees in bloom in a large area (White y Bruce 1986).

Reproduction:

Birds have been reported in breeding conditions in May Sumbawa (White y Bruce 1986). It nests in a deep hole in a large tree (pit et to the. 1997).

Food:

No specific data, but presumably similar to Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)

Distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 101.000 km2

The Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (incorporating subspecies mitchelli, djampeanus and stresemanni) It is located on the islands of Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa, Tanahjampea and Kalaotowa, Indonesia.

An assessment of the state of the taxa that make up the species indicates that the species may no longer be present in Bali, It is extinct in Tanahjampea after capture, mainly before 1990, and it is not clear if he persists in kalatom (Eaton et al. 2015). In Lombok the species is still present, with a recent observation of a flock of 18 individuals above 1.500 metres in 2015 (F. Rheindt per Eaton et al. 2015), although given the lack of other records for many decades, it can be assumed that the population is likely to be small. Sumbawa now it may be the stronghold of the species, and it was suggested that the species is “secure(Eaton et al. 2015), and there is a large area of ​​potentially suitable habitat remaining on the island.

Distribution of subspecies

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Vulnerable.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

• Population size : 1600-7000 individuals.

Justification of the red list category

It is estimated that this newly divided species has a small population that is experiencing suspected moderately rapid population decline due to the pressure of the traps for wild bird trade. Therefore, is classified as Vulnerable.

Justification of the population

It is estimated that the population size is lower to 10.000 mature individuals, on the basis of an interim evaluation of the places where it is likely that any number is retained species. In addition, it is considered possible that the population supposedly higher in Sumbawa does not exceed 1.000 mature individuals.

Justification trend

It is suspected that the population is experiencing descent moderately fast because of unsustainable levels of exploitation.

Conservation actions and research in progress

Appendix II of the CITES, where they include species that are not necessarily threatened with extinction, but in which trade must be controlled in order to avoid utilization incompatible with their survival. CMS Appendix II (Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals).

Conservation actions and research proposals

– Estimate the population and assess population trends and scale of capture pressure.
– Carry out a specific study of the species to identify important sites, in order to provide protection.
– Conduct research on their status and habitat use (with special attention to food ecology and forest fragmentation).
– Initiate awareness campaigns to enlist the support of local people in protecting forests and preventing illegal trade.

Lori pechiescarlata in captivity:

Rare in captivity. Each captive specimen of this species which is capable of reproducing, It is placed in a well-run program of captive breeding and not be sold as a pet, in order to ensure its long-term survival. However it copies sold from the Loroparque Foundation at a price of around 400 EUR.

In captivity, It appeared in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, for example, in 1896 It was imported by the London Zoo. The first offspring of the world recorded in 1990 on India.

The Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet It has a longevity 20 years in nature, 15-25 years in captivity.

Alternative names:

Rainbow Lorikeet (Sunset), Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet, Scarley-breasted Lorikeet, Sunset Lorikeet (English).
Loriquet à face bleue, Loriquet à tête bleue (de Forsten), Loriquet à tête bleue [forsteni], Loriquet de Forsten (French).
Bali-Allfarblori, Forstenlori (German).
Lóris-de-forstein (Portuguese).
Lori de Puesta del Sol, Lori pechiescarlata (Spanish).

Charles Lucien Bonaparte
Charles Lucien Bonaparte

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus forsteni
Citation: Bonaparte, 1850
Protonimo: Psittacus forsteni

Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet images:


Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus forsteni)

    Sources:

    Avibase
    • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – Sunset Lorikeet (also known as the Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet and Forsten’s Lorikeet) at Cincinnati Zoo, USA by Ted [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (2) – A Sunset Lorikeet (also known as the Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet and Forsten’s Lorikeet) at Cincinnati Zoo, Ohio, USA by Ted [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Two Rainbow Lorikeets at Newport Aquarium. This subspecies of the Rainbow Lorikeet is also called Forsten’s Lorikeet by Trichoglossus_haematodus_-Newport_Aquarium-8a.jpg: Jeff Kubinaderivative work: Snowmanradio [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – Two Rainbow Lorikeets at Newport Aquarium. This subspecies of the Rainbow Lorikeet is also called Forsten’s Lorikeet
    Date 22 April 2009, 15:31 (UTC)_haematodus_-Newport_Aquarium-8a.jpg: Jeff Kubinaderivative work: Snowmanradio [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (5) – Lories at the Jurong BirdPark, Singapore. Taken by Terence Ong in November 2006. Trichoglossus haematodus forsteni by rk, Singapore. Taken by Terence Ong in November 2006. Trichoglossus haematodus forsteniNo machine-readable author provided. Terence assumed (based on copyright claims). [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons

    Sounds: Patrik Aberg, XC40063. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/40063

Coconut Lorikeet
Trichoglossus haematodus

Coconut Lorikeet

Description:

26 cm.. of length and weight 100-157 g.

The Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) are colourful birds that find us almost all the colours of the Rainbow in their plumage.

Have the front of the crown, face and throat Dark bluish mauve, with violet stripes on the front of the crown, ear-coverts and part low of them cheeks; the rest of the head is dark blue with the bases of feathers brown-black color, especially around the rear of the crown and throat, and with greenish stripes at the rear of the crown.

The upperparts are of color green brilliant with specks of color reddish in the center of the the mantle (bases of feathers), and collar back brighter yellowish green.

The primaries with the tips blackish; a patch bright yellow in the innerwebs of the flight feather, that tends to orange in the secondaries; outerweb of the primaries and under wing-coverts, green. Underwing-coverts orange-red; the flight feather dark gray in tips.

The Breast , the upper part of the abdomen and flanks bright reddish orange top, barred dark blue, tending to green at the bottom of the chest; abdomen with brands of color green in the Center, sometimes forming a discrete patch or interspersed with reddish orange; abdomen and the thighs with a beaming green and yellow with bases of color yellow; undertail-coverts of color yellow with tips of color green glossy. Upper, the tail of color green with them innerwebs of the lateral feathers yellowish: undertail, the tail greyish green in the outerweb, yellow in the innerwebs.

The bill orange red: the irises orange-red; legs gray or greenish gray.

Both sexes are very similar.

The immature they are more muted than adults, with the bill and the irises Dark Brown and the tail more pointed.

  • Sound of the Coconut Lorikeet.

Description of subspecies of Trichoglossus haematodus
  • Trichoglossus haematodus caeruleiceps

    (Albertis & Salvadori, 1879) – The blue of the head is more pale, Red is orange-red with the lined in very narrow and dark blue. Abdomen Blackish and band of the neck yellow.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus deplanchii

    (Verreaux,J & Des Murs, 1860) – 26 cm.. of length and a weight of 140 gr.

    The Coconut Lorikeet (deplanchii) (Trichoglossus haematodus deplanchii) is a variation of the nominal (Trichoglossus Haematodus)

    Similar to the nominal Haematodus, but plumage slightly paler. The head has a very bright blue. Reddish orange on the chest, similar to the Trichoglossus haematodus massena, only that more alive. The abdomen is of color green beige and is extends to the part back from the neck. The the thighs and the feathers under the tail yellow and the upper part of the tail olive green.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus flavicans

    (Cabanis & Reichenow, 1876) – Something bigger, 27 cm approximately in length. Its plumage varies from green to olive green and yellow opaque. Breast and neck reddish colour with fine dark edges. Front and contour of eyes violet blue.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus haematodus

    (Linnaeus, 1771) – The nominal

  • Trichoglossus haematodus intermedius

    (Rothschild & Hartert, 1901) – 26 cm approximately in length. The blue of the head extends slightly less. The neck is yellow and the abdomen dark green.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus massena

    (Bonaparte, 1854) – 25 cm.. length.

    The Coconut Lorikeet (massena) (Trichoglossus haematodus massena) is a variation of the nominal (Trichoglossus Haematodus).

    The plumage is similar to the of the Ornate Lory except that it is usually paler. The head is blue, ending at the nape with dark brown feathers interspersed with more Brown clear. The chest is of color reddish with a narrow edging blue dark. In some cases, You can see some areas yellow in the plumage of the chest. The abdomen is green; but can have some type of mark in the part inferior of the abdomen blue-violet.

    The eyes are of color orange in the adult and Brown in the youth. The bill is red orange.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus micropteryx

    (Stresemann, 1922) – Somewhat smaller, 25 cm approximately in length. The plumage is something more pale, the chest reddish orange with narrow edging of dark blue. Abdomen dark green. Band of the neck greenish yellow.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus nesophilus

    (Neumann, 1929) – 26 cm approximately. Very similar to the Trichoglossus Haematodus Flavicans but with feathers underneath of the tail are green.

  • Trichoglossus haematodus nigrogularis

    (Gray,GR, 1858) – Something bigger, 28 cm., approximately, length. Is similar to the Trichoglossus Haematodus Caeruliceps, but the blue of the head It is more dark and often have more red feathers on the neck.

Habitat:

The Coconut Lorikeet they are parrots of the Plains and Highlands. They are distributed by a wide variety of habitats such as mangrove forests, Moors and heathland near the coast, wooded meadows, galleries of trees, reforestation during regeneration and rainforests.
In all cases, they need places with abundant flowers.

The Coconut Lorikeet they have also colonized habitats formed by man: coconut plantations, orchards and gardens on the outskirts of cities. They mark a greater preference for edges and clearings inside the dense jungles. Gladly tolerate the areas with degraded vegetation and plantations of small size in the small atolls.

They are birds sedentary, that does not prevent to do short trips looking for trees in flower. Because of these movements, populations appear to vary locally. Very gregarious, they live in pairs or in bands that can vary from a few birds to several hundred, Depending on the availability of food resources.

These birds are very active and noisy, flying a bit randomly above the tops of the trees or climbing up the branches in search of flowers or fruits.

During his search for food, the Coconut Lorikeet they often share space with other species of frugivorous.
When they are hidden among the leaves, their cries of call reveal their presence.

They adopt a flight very quick and direct.
Are monogamous. During courtship, the couple is side-by-side, swaying, the neck forward and the pupil dilated. They wave irregularly wings to reveal the clear band that crosses its sub-wing.

Reproduction:

The breeding season carried out at different times according to the area of distribution.
The species nominal eat your laying between September and December. Both members of the couple set up their nests in a tree cavity, usually a eucalyptus. Several nests, two or three may be in the same tree, but the entrance of the nest will fiercely defend against any intrusion.

In the the Admiralty Islands, the Coconut Lorikeet Sometimes they nest in the ground. The female normally lays 2 eggs on a bed of wood rotting chips. She incubated alone for a few 25 days.

The young chicks are altricial and need to 8 weeks to fend for if same. As soon as they are autonomous, they bind to the bedrooms and common bands.

Food:

The Coconut Lorikeet they have a bill acute equipped with a language composed of some structures similar to hairs tiny called papilla it help excavate the pollen and the nectar from the flowers.
Also eat fruits, berries, seeds, outbreaks and insect larvae.

In Australia, they forage primarily in eucalyptus trees and trees of the genus Banksia, in particular, coastal Banksia (Banksia integrifolia) and River Banksia (seminuda), trees that often exceed the 15 metres in height.
They are also found in farmland, since they are particularly cultivated fruits and seeds Milky enthusiasts.
Easily entering gardens to steal fruit and not disdain approaching feeders

Distribution:

Size of its range (breeding/resident ): 5,310,000km 2

Endemics Oceania, at the edge of the Asian continent.
Can be found in Australia, in the East of Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, New Caledonia, the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu.

In Australia, they are mostly on the coast, to the North of Queensland in the South of Australia and Tasmania.

Distribution of subspecies Trichoglossus haematodus

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

The species has undergone intense trade: from 1981 When it began trading in CITES Appendix II and through the year 2005, 100.388 individuals were captured in the wild and reported in the international trade.

In some places of Australia, It is hunted for food and feathers are later used in ritual ceremonies

Lori coconut in captivity:

I recommend to read first hand information:

KNOWING THE Coconut Lorikeet

Alternative names:

Coconut Lorikeet, Rainbow Lorikeet (Coconut) (English).
Loriquet à tête bleue (French).
Allfarblori (German).
Lóris-arco-íris (Portuguese).
Lori Arcoiris, Lori de cocotero, Tricogloso de Pecho Rojo (Spanish).

Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Trichoglossus haematodus
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1771)
Protonimo: Psittacus haematod . [sic]

Coconut Lorikeet images:


Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)

    Sources:

    Avibase
    – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    – Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    Birdlife
    Oiseaux.NET

    Photos:

    (1) – Rainbow Lorikeet perching on a wooden post at Tanganyika Wildlife Park, Kansas, USA. by Snowmanradio- Wikipedia
    (2) -To Green-naped Lorikeet, T. h. haematodus, a sub-species of Rainbow Lorikeet, Trichoglossus haematodus at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore. by Benjamint444- Wikipedia
    (3) -A Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus moluccanus) in Melbourne, Australia. by Alfred- Wikimedia
    (4) -Lorikeets feeding on the flowering tree, Corymbia ' Summer Beauty ' (cultivar). Photographed in suburban Brisbane, Australia. by Tatiana Gerus- Wikimedia
    (5) -Two birds preening each other. Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Australia by Arnie Hollyman- IBC.lynxeds.com

    Sounds: Patrik Aberg, XC215305. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/215305

Mindanao Lorikeet
Trichoglossus johnstoniae

Mindanao Lorikeet

Description

20 cm.. length and a weight between 48 and 62 gr.

The plumage of the Mindanao Lorikeet (Trichoglossus johnstoniae) is usually Green. The facial area It is red with a tendency to pink. The band that goes from the eye until the part back from the neck is dark purple.

The underparts are yellow, scalloped with green resembling scales. They have the Underwing coverts and subcaudales yellowish green. The band less of them wings is yellow. Its bill is reddish orange, the legs grayscale and the eye ring dark gray. The eyes orange-red.

The birds immatures have less red on the face. Instead of the band of color purple dark of the adults, young birds have an off color lilac and a Brown stain behind the eye. The rings of the eyes are of color grey white. The eyes Brown.

There are no significant differences between males and females.

  • Sound of the Mindanao Lorikeet.

Habitat:

Found of 1.000 a 2.500 m in the Mount Apo and 1.000 1,700 m in the Mount Malindang.

The Mindanao Lorikeet they prefer mossy forests, but also you can see them along the edge of the forest and in degraded areas.

Generally noisy during the flight, but when they feed on, remain calm. They migrate daily between different altitudes in the morning looking for food in the Highlands and in the evening return to their resting places in the lower areas.

Move higher during the day, in flocks of up to 50 birds, to feed on trees with flowers and shrubs. At sunset, they return to the lower slopes to rest.

Reproduction:

Little is known of the ecology of replica. Probably it breeding is performed between months of March and may.

Captive breeding records indicate that the laying tends to be of two eggs, the incubation of some three weeks and that the young leave the nest between three weeks and a month more afternoon.

Food:

With feeds nectar, flowers, fruits, pollen and insects.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 8.700 km2

Endemic to the mountains of Mindanao (Philippines)

Conservation:

[stextbox id=”alert” float=”true” align =”right” width =”270″]

• Current IUCN Red list category: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

Its Habitat favorite is relatively unlikely that is affected by human activities in the medium term, but logging and capture should remain concerns.

The world population apparently not been quantified formally, but the species is described as very rare and there are those who think that there are less than 10.000 individuals.

Lori Mindanao in captivity:

Very rare in captivity.

Due to its decreasing trend in terms of its population, any specimen that can not be returned to their natural habitat (natural range) It should be placed preferably in a breeding program well managed to ensure the survival of the species.

Alternative names:

Mindanao Lorikeet, Apo Lorikeet, Johnstone’s Lorikeet (English).
Loriquet de Johnstone (French).
Mindanaolori, Mindanao-Lori (German).
Loris johnstoniae (Portuguese).
Lori de Mindanao, Tricogloso de Mindano (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus johnstoniae
Citation: Hartert, 1903
Protonimo: Trichoglossus johnstoniae

Mindanao Lorikeet images:

————————————————————————————————

Mindanao Lorikeet (Trichoglossus johnstoniae)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – “Trichoglossus johnstoniae - London Zoo, England-8a” by William Warby from London, England – Unknown-Tropical BirdUploaded by Snowmanradio. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
2 – “Mindanao Lorikeet (Trichoglossus johnstoniae)-3c” by Mindanao_Lorikeet_(Trichoglossus_johnstoniae).jpg: Elizabeth Ellisderivative work: Snowmanradio (talk) – originally posted to Flickr as Lovebird and uploaded to commons at Mindanao_Lorikeet_(Trichoglossus_johnstoniae).jpg. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
3 – by Jonathan Beilby – IBC.lynxeds.co
4 – zoochat.com
5 – papageien.org

Sounds: Kennedy, Robert S. – © 2014 Cornell University

Yellow-and-green Lorikeet
Trichoglossus flavoviridis

Yellow-and-green Lorikeet

Description

20 cm.. length and a weight between 80 and 95 gr.

Yellow-and-green Lorikeet

Very similar to the Scaly breasted Lorikeet by appearance scaly on underparts, but differs from it by color low wing and brands that adorn their head.

Adults of the Yellow-and-green Lorikeet (Trichoglossus flavoviridis) they have the upperparts plumage of a beautiful green.

The forecrown and top They are are greenish brown. The throat and the chest to abdomen It is yellow with dark green flakes. Area of sides up to the coverts and the bottom of the wings It shows a beautiful yellow-green.

The bill is orange. The irises is orange-yellow, the legs grey.

It has no sexual dimorphism.

In the youth, all the yellow markings are derived more green. The bill is brown, while the bare parts of the face are white. The irises is brown.

  • Sound of the Yellow-and-green Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori Verdigualdo.mp3]

Description 2 subspecies

  • Trichoglossus flavoviridis flavoviridis

    (Wallace, 1863) – Nominal. Overall plumage It is olive green. The forecrown and crown yellow. The back of the neck brown. the yellow throat and the chest to abdomen, with the scalloped dark green.

  • Trichoglossus flavoviridis meyeri

    (Walden, 1871) – Shown in upperparts a darker shade of green; the underparts They are less scaly. The back of the top, the occiput and nape are greenish-Brown. The cheeks and throat They are yellow with dark green stripes. This subspecies is much smaller, between 40 and 50 gr.

Habitat:

The Yellow-and-green Lorikeet they are distributed with greater diligence between primary forest and mature secondary forest than their close relatives, the Ornate Lory. However, This does not prevent them from entering the open lands to feed from the ceibos in flower (coral trees).

Throughout its area, these birds are considered fairly common. In Celebes, are common in the mountainous areas where have been supplanted to a large extent to the Ornate Lory. In the Sula Islands, they are common in almost all altitudes.

They live in small flocks of noisy and sometimes mingle with the Ornate Lory When looking for food in the trees in flower at the edge of forests.

These birds are relatively timid and they tend to stay inside the dense forest foliage, where their cryptic plumage makes them practically invisible. When they feel threatened, leave the foliage uttering cries penetrating and powerful. They are easier to fly above the treetops on quick flights or the circulating a flight above the trees, just before landing in the branches more high.

Reproduction:

There is little information reproduction in the natural environment. The only nest we have discovered so far was in a mossy forest, about 2.400 meters above the sea level. It was located high above the ground in a dead tree.

In captivity, the implementation is, usually, two white eggs that incubate for a few parents will be 23 days. As with all the Lori, the reproductive cycle It is particularly long and hard about 65 days.

Food:

The Yellow-and-green Lorikeet is above all vegetarian. Their language is particularly suitable for crop pollen and the nectar from the flowers. It is equipped with long buds that allows you to easily reach their favorite food. They have a predilection for the trees of the genus Euphorbia and Erythrina.

Distribution:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 6.300 km2

The Yellow-and-green Lorikeet They are endemic to the islands east of Indonesia. They are exclusively on the Sula Islands (Taliabu, Mangole, Sanana) and especially in the area of Celebes island.

Description 2 subspecies

Conservation:

• IUCN Classification: Least concern.

• No threats today.

The species is not threatened. In Taliabu, It is very common in altitude areas, but it is also quite common in degraded areas bordering the coast. It is estimated one world population above the 100.000 specimens.

Justification of trend

They suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

Lori Verdigualdo in captivity:

Pretty common in captivity.

Take it easy, Nice trill. Sensitive to cold temperatures and somewhat susceptible to disease. He will join his caregiver over time although initially shy.

Alternative names:

Yellow-and-green Lorikeet, Citrine Lorikeet, Yellow & Green Lorikeet, Yellow and Green Lorikeet, Yellow&green lorikeet, Yellow-and- Green Lorikeet, Yellow-green Lorikeet (English).
Loriquet jaune et vert (French).
Celebeslori (German).
Lori flavoviridis (Portuguese).
Lori Verdigualdo, Tricogloso Verde y Amarillo (Spanish).

Alfred Russel Wallace
Alfred Russel Wallace

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus flavoviridis
Citation: Wallace, 1863
Protonimo: Trichoglossus flavoviridis

Yellow-and-green Lorikeet images:

————————————————————————————————

Yellow-and-green Lorikeet (Trichoglossus flavoviridis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Joseph Forshaw M
– Parrots-A Guide to the Parrots of the World by Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Yellow and Green Lorikeet (Trichoglossus flavoviridis) in the Walsrode Bird Park, Germany By Quartl (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Trichoglossus flavoviridis Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1862 by Joseph Wolf [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Frank Lambert (Xeno-canto)

Use of cookies

This web site uses cookies so that you have the best user experience. If you continue browsing you are giving your consent for the acceptance of the aforementioned cookies and the acceptance of our cookies policy, Click the link for more information.plugin cookies

TO ACCEPT
Notice of cookies