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Red Lory
Eos bornea

Red Lory

Content

Description

31 cm.. length and an approximate weight of 170 gr.

The head and the neck of the Red Lory (Eos bornea) are entirely of a deep red color.

In the adult the primary feathers are black with a large red mirror. The feathers tertiary and the coverts are of color blue. The joint of the feathers of the helmsman they are reddish-brown. The irises they are red, legs grayscale and the bill dark orange.

The immature they tend to be more off than their parents coloring. They show the feathers tertiary grey, lightly stained blue. The ear-coverts Sometimes it tinges of blue. Times, the area of the vent and the thighs it infiltrates with small stains blue. The feathers of the abdomen often carry some edges blue dark. They have the irises brown.

Not exists no sexual dimorphism visible although the males tend to be more corpulent that the females.

Description 2 subspecies

  • Eos bornea bornea

    (Linnaeus, 1758) – Nominal.


  • Eos bornea cyanonotha

    (Vieillot, 1818) – The Red of his plumage is much more dark almost brown.

Habitat:

They are mostly primary forests, in the wooded areas during regeneration, Forest Hills, coconut plantations, in abandoned gardens and mangroves.

They are mainly in coastal areas, What does not climb up to 900 m in the island of Ceram and up 1.800 m in the of Buru.

Throughout its area, the Red Lory are fairly common, However, some populations are more dispersed around the villages, since they are very cautious towards humans.

Behavior:

The Red Lory they live in pairs or in small groups, but sometimes you can observe large flocks of 50 individuals.

They are birds noisy and quite easy to observe, as they often fly above the canopy attracted by the red flowers of the tree of coral (Erythrina).

They have a fast and direct flight and when moving, make your buzz due to its quick flapping.

In the Kai Islands, their movements are common: all days, they cross the arm of sea that separates the different islands flying rapidly and at high altitude.

During the rest hours that occur at noon, the Red Lory they spend most of their time smoothing their feathers in the shade of a tree. Probably, This practice is designed to strengthen marital ties. Parties that enjoy priority are the head and neck; as you can not reach these areas with its beak, you will always need your partner collaboration. The “patient” that is subject to this preferential treatment seems to express a deep sense of satisfaction.

Reproduction:

The couples begin to look for the location of the nest between the months of August and September. It is located high in a big tree.
In mid-December some young leaving the nest have observed.

As in all loris, the nesting period is very long and hard 7 to 9 weeks.

In captivity, the Red Lory puts 1 or 2 litters per year. Each spawning has usually 2 white eggs that are incubated for a period ranging from 24 to 26 days.

Food:

In their natural habitats, the Red Lory feed of nectar, pollen, fruits and insects of fashion casual.
Your food › seem to be them flowers of the trees of the species Eugenia and Erythrina.

All the Loris they have a language that is especially suited, with a brush tip made up of elongated papillae. This characteristic allows birds to collect pollen from flowers and compress it in a suitable way for swallowing.. They play an important role in the pollination of flowering plants and trees.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 57.900 km2

The Red Lory they have a very restricted distribution area. They live South of the Moluccan Islands, halfway between Sulawesi and the western end of New Guinea.

Distribution 2 subspecies:

Conservation:


Status


• Current IUCN Red List category: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

This species has a very large range, and therefore not approaching the thresholds for Vulnerable according to the range size criterion.

The population is suspected of being in decline due to unsustainable levels of exploitation.

The species has undergone intense trade from 1981, When it began trading in Appendix II. 99.834 wild-caught specimens have been recorded in international trade, Although none from 2000 (UNEP-WCMC trade database, January 2005 CITES).

"Red Lory" in captivity:

This lori is considered one of the most widespread within poultry. It's an interesting bird, robust and easy of play, ideal for a start in the world of the loris. It also has a very attractive red color; It playful and is easy for tame.

It is a great conversationalist. Some have entire sentences in their vocabulary. Unfortunately, his voice is sometimes very strong, with a high sharp squeal. Most are docile, even at maturity. They can be prolific breeders and are fairly easy to find as hand-raised pets..

Too much protein in the diet can lead to gout., a type of arthritis that crystals are deposited in the joints. May be a bit uncomfortable due to liquid diet.

Alternative names:


Red Lory, Buru Red Lory (ingles).
Lori écarlate, Lori rouge (French).
Rotlori (German).
Lóris-vermelho (Portuguese).
Lori Rojo (español).

Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus

scientific classification:


Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Eos
Scientific name: Eos bornea
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Protonimo: Psittacus borneus


Images “Red Lory”:

Videos "Red Lory"

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“Red Lory” (Eos bornea)


Sources:

Avibase
– BirdLife.org
– mundoexotics
Oiseaux.NET

Photos:

* A Red Lorry at Taronga Zoo, Sydney, Australia by Navin – wikimdia
* Red Lory (Eos bornea) looking upwards by shahram sharif – Wikimedia
* Red Lory (Eos bornea) at Singapore Zoo by Joost Rooijmans – Wikimedia
* Red Lory – KL Bird Park – Malaysia by diego_cue – Panoramio
* Moluccan Red Lory – Parrots Australia

Sounds: BAS van Balen (Xeno-canto)

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Blue-crowned Lorikeet
Vini australis


Blue-crowned Lorikeet

Content

Description

19 cm.. of length and a weight of 40 to 55 g..

The Blue-crowned Lorikeet (Vini australis) has a plumage mostly green. The upper part of the head is dark blue with light blue streaks. The region of the windows of the nose, the cheeks, the ear-coverts, the neck and the abdomen They are red. the lower part of abdomen and the thighs they are purple blue. The back is green, the interior of the tail is yellowish-green. The irises is reddish brown. The legs are of color red and the bill is orange.

The youth are equal to adults, but with less red in the face and throat, little or none abdominal patch, stripes blue shorter in the crown, no purpura on the thighs, brown the eyes.

Habitat:

It is found in forests, coconut palms or any habitat where flowering trees; coastal mountains, gardens and agricultural areas. Nomad, sometimes traveling between the Islands.

Daily movements in search of food. Aggressive but gregarious, they often move in flocks of up to 12 individuals, except during the breeding season they live with their partners.

In Samoa it is common around villages and plantations and less common in moist forests, higher elevations in the rain forest and secondary growth.

Reproduction:

Nests in holes or hollows of trees, It has also been reported that they dig burrows in the banks of Earth, Although it has not confirmed. The laying is one or two white eggs. Breeding registered in June and August. In captivity the incubation It has been calculated in 23 days.

Food:

It feeds on nectar, pollen and red fruits. It particularly prefers Erythrina, Wild hibiscus and coconut.

Distribution:

Samoa distribution of Lori
Extends over the archipelagos of Samoa, Tonga and LAU, distributed by Islands: Love, Futuha'a, Fulago, Futuna, Ha'afeva, You're young, Moce, Niue, Ofu, Olosega, Samoa, Salt, Tafahi, Say, Tofua, Tungua, Fire, It's cool, Varoa, I'm sorry and Voleva. In the past was also in ‘USA, Tongatapu and Mata-Utu but there it is extinct.

Conservation:


Status

– Current IUCN Red List category: Least concern.

– The population trend: Decreasing.

The world population It has not been quantified, but the species is informed that it is common in much of its restricted area of distribution.

The population is suspected to be in decline due to the predation by species invasive.

Still fairly common throughout its range, but it has become extinct on many islands and it is decreasing in Tonga (probably because of the rats).

"Blue-crowned Lorikeet" in captivity:

Like the others Vini lories, the Blue-crowned Lorikeet still quite rare in poultry farming, probably as a result of the protection they receive in their native South Pacific countries.

Alternative names:

Blue-crowned Lorikeet, Blue crowned Lorikeet, Blue-crowned Lory (ingles).
Lori fringillaire (French).
Blaukäppchen (German).
Loris Vini Australis (Portuguese).
Lori de Samoa (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Vini
Scientific name: Vini australis
Citation: (Gmelin, 1788)
Protonimo: Psittacus australis

Images “Blue-crowned Lorikeet”:

Videos "Blue-crowned Lorikeet"

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“Blue-crowned Lorikeet” (Vini australis)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – “Vini australis-London Zoo, England-8a” by William Warby from London, England – Unknown-Tropical BirdUploaded by Snowmanradio. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
2 – “Vini australis-two on a perch-8a-4c” by Vini_australis_-two_on_a_perch-8a.jpg: TJ Lin – originally posted to Flickr as Dscn6140 and uploaded to commons at Vini_australis_-two_on_a_perch-8a.jpg. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
3 – By Duncan Wright (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
4 – By Steven G. Johnson on commons (same as unnormalized on flickr) (Dsc_0014uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
5- by Zambar – zoochat.com

Sounds: Samuel Jones (Xeno-canto)

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Pygmy Lorikeet
Charmosyna wilhelminae

Pygmy Lorikeet

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

The Pygmy Lorikeet (Charmosyna wilhelminae) has an approximate length of 13 cm.. and a weight of 20 g..

The head is green; the forecrown brighter yellowish green; crown dark purple, with broadcast Blue in them tips and color turquoise bright in the feathers of the nape; rear of the nape with wash of olive. Mantle green; low back and tail reddish color; at the top, the tail purple blue. The wings, by up green with parts internal of the flight feather Blackish and blackish the primary coverts. The wings below rosa-salmon; Tips from the flight feather blackish. The underparts Green yellowish with prominent veins on the chest. Upper, the tail green, Red at the base (normally hidden in the field); olive brown below with red and yellow tips on the base. The bill reddish orange-tipped yellow; cere color red pink; Grey the ring perioftalmico; irises yellow to orange-red; legs light grey.

Female lack of red on it rump and in the wings view in flight.
Immature generally more muted and upperparts slightly more Brown. Lacks blue at the tips of the feathers of the nape. Yellow stripes on the top of the chest less distinct or absent. The bill and the irises brown.

Habitat:

Mainly inhabits in humid forests and on the edge of forests, but also by forest savanna and established secondary vegetation. It is usually between the 1.000 meters of altitude and the 2.200 m, but in the South and around Port Moresby It is occasionally much closer to sea level, in the forests of lowlands. It forages in couples and small flocks of up to 20 birds in the trees in flower, often in the company of Goldie's Lorikeet and Fairy Lorikeet. Very Active When it feeds and, often difficult to identify due to its size and predominantly green plumage. It is not uncommon, but easily overlooked. and has been found in groups of up to 200 individuals. It has often been seen flying in mixed flocks above the canopy, where they can hardly be identified due to their small size.

Reproduction:

Breeding and nesting habits unknown.

Food:

Feeds of nectar and pollen.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 290.000 km2

North of New Guinea in Irian Java (Indonesian) and Papua New Guinea. The range of the Mountains Parotia on doberai peninsula, in the West of the island of New Guinea, through the cordillera central, the Huon Peninsula, and South-East of the mountain range of Owen Stanley. In the immediate vicinity of Port Moresby (for example, area Sogeri) There is little (but possibly regular between May and November).

The population world will think that is of less than 50.000 specimens and is considered to be stable. There are few in captivity.

Conservation:


Status


• Current IUCN Red List category: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.


The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but the species according to sources is generally very rare.

The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.


"Pygmy Lorikeet" in captivity:

Rare.

Alternative names:

Pygmy Lorikeet, Pygmy Streaked Lorikeet, Pygmy Streaked Lory, Wilhelmina’s Lorikeet, Wilhemina’s Lorikeet (ingles).
Lori de Wilhelmina (French).
Elfenlori (German).
Lori Pigmeo (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Charmosyna
Scientific name: Charmosyna wilhelminae
Citation: (Meyer,AB, 1874)
Protonimo: Trichoglossus Wilhelminae

Images "Pygmy Lorikeet"

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“Pygmy Lorikeet” (Charmosyna wilhelminae)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

1 – loromania

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Colasisi
Loriculus philippensis


Loriculo Filipino

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

14 cm.. length and a weight between 31 and 40 g..

The head of the Colasisi (Loriculus philippensis) is bright green with a patch of narrow Scarlet color on the front of the Crown, bordered orange-red color on the back edge; yellowish-green Chin: narrow collar on the back of the Orange and red neck, with a wash light yellowish in the neck.

Bright green upperparts with dark crimson rump and uppertail coverts (lower sides of light blue). Bright green wings with vane internal to the darker flight feathers. Under, the wings of turquoise-blue with the exception of the outermost coverts which are green. Bright red throat Center, merging to red-orange in the center of the chest (yellow on the bases of feathers); rest of the lower region of bright green, lighter and more yellow than the upper region. Upper, the green tail; Blue below.

Coral red beak; dark brown irises; dark orange legs.

The female has a face marked in blue and does not have the Red bib, that is replaced by a greenish yellow colour wash. The female Crown is washed in yellow-orange (stronger than in the male).

Young birds have a more off Crown and paler beak.

Subspecies description
Subspecies
  • Loriculus philippensis apicalis

    (Souance 1856): Two aberrant samples previously attributed to theLoriculus salvadorii. They are larger, with less red on the Crown, more blue on the tail, and darker green colour. All the Crown of this subspecies is Scarlet, merging in Orange on the back of the neck and orange on the mantle in both sexes (duller in females). Bright red in the hip and more orange on the top.

  • Loriculus (philippensis) bonapartei

    (Souance 18563): You have the back of the head with pronunciation orange hue, Pico black and grey legs.

  • Loriculus philippensis bournsi

    (McGregor 1905): The male with red only in the front and light yellow area in the center of the Crown (female much less yellow on the Crown), upper part of the Crown of the male less yellow shows that the L. p. Regulus. Orange line on the nape of the male is less clear in the female. Female with less blue in the face that the nominal species.

  • Loriculus philippensis chrysonotus

    (Sclater, PL 1872): Frontal area and rest of the crown bright red that extends in golden yellow color on the mantle, and showing a fine reddish collar on the back of the neck. Male with more orange in the lower part of the throat patch. The female Crown similar but less marked.

  • Loriculus philippensis dohertyi

    (Hartert 1906): Maybe more orange in the mantle, but hardly different to the L. p. apicalis.

  • Loriculus philippensis mindorensis

    (Steere 1890): Orange-yellow on the neck line. Crown Green. More extensive turquoise patch on both sides of the rump.

  • Loriculus philippensis philippensis

    (Statius Müller 1776): Nominal

  • Loriculus philippensis regulus

    (Souance 1856): Similar to the L. p. bournsi but male with much more yellow on the Crown (female shows a more subdued yellow broadcast, but more than in the previous race). Nape line weaker than in the bournsi. Male with more Scarlet patch.

  • Loriculus philippensis siquijorensis

    (Steere 1890): Male with less red bib and the red spot of the largest Crown than in the nominal species. Back of the Green Crown. Falata neck mark. Female with more blue in the face.

  • Loriculus philippensis worcesteri

    (Steere 1890): Male Scarlet throat patch smaller than that in the L. p. chrysonotus. Both sexes show a more extensive Crown of orange-red in the rear margin. There is a small patch on the back of the neck of orange color and a light reddish color in the mantle of diffusion.

  • Loriculus (philippensis) camiguinensis

    (Tello, JG 2006): has mainly green plumage, with throat, front side of the face and thighs of azure-blue; the front, the pileus, the obispillo and the top of the red tail, While the rest of the tail is blue. Males and females are identical in appearance, What is unusual in others Philippine parrots, Since only males of other species have red forehead.

Habitat:

The species is found along the edges of the forest, secondary growth, Bamboo forests, areas cultivated near villages, orchards and plantations of coconut. The birds are alone, in pairs or in family groups, sometimes in small flocks, sometimes with other birds.

Reproduction:

The breeding season has been recorded from April to August.. Three eggs are deposited and incubated by the female during 20 days, the young leave the nest in five weeks.

Food:

They feed in the upper levels of flowering plants or fruit trees, sometimes at lower levels, flower, nectar, fruit (including figs) and seeds, sometimes intoxicated by consumption of fermented coconut nectar (coconuts).

Distribution:

Limited to the Philippines (less the Sulu archipelago), where are widespread and resident except in Palawan. Its abundance varies according to the subspecies.. In general, the species is locally common up to 1000 meters above sea level, but have been recorded at altitudes of up to 2.500 m (Mount Apo, Mindanao).

Subspecies distribution
Subspecies

Conservation:


Status


– Current IUCN Red List category: Least concern

– The population trend: Decreasing

The world population is considered to be above the 20,000 exemplary but decreasing due to loss of habitat. The subspecies Mindoro is considered as threatened, and both subspecies of Cebu as Siquijor, are nearly extinct the loss of habitat (as these birds are commonly caged and traded between islands, contemporary records of birds from Siquijor they require confirmation to determine whether they refer to the breeds).

The combined population of Mindoro, Sibuyan, Blacks, Surigao del Sur, Tables, Romblon, Masbate, Ticao, Cuimaras and Basilan (subspecies L. p. mindorensis, L. p. bournsi, L. p. Regulus and L. p. dohertyi) probably add in total not more than 5.000 birds.

"Colasisi" in captivity:

Very rare.

Alternative names:

Colasisi, Philippine Hanging-parrot (ingles).
Coryllis des Philippines (French).
Philippinenpapageichen (German).
Loriculus philippensis (Portuguese).
Lorículo Filipino (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Loriculus philippensis
Genus: Loriculus
Citation: (Statius Müller, 1776)
Protonimo: Psittacus philippensis

Images “Colasisi”:

Videos "Colasisi"

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“Colasisi” (Loriculus philippensis)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – a female perched. by iggino – lynx
(2) – Birds-pet-wallpapers – link
(3) – Loriculus philippensis camiguinensis (Author AlexKant) – Crocolandia Foundation – ZooChat
(4) – Loriculus p. apicalis, male, By iggino – lynx
(5) – tapety-papousci

Sounds: David Edwards (Xeno-canto)

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Norfolk Island Kaka
Nestor productus †

Norfolk Island Kaka

Content

Description:

The Norfolk Island Kaka (Nestor productus) was their large with a bill, wings short and wide, and with legs and feet large.

Norfolk Island Kaka

I had 38 centimeters long. The top of his head era gris pardusca, while its face varied from yellow to orange, sometimes with a reddish tint. It was said that his Hip It was greenish yellow, and upperparts, including the wings, they were mostly greyish-brown in color, slightly darker than the top of the head, with the bottom of the back and rump orange or dark red and the tail brown. Upper chest It was brown and gray bottom bright yellow, with the belly and sides reddish orange (Forshaw & Cooper 1981, 2002; Greenway 1958).

Its social structure and dispersion are not registered, but the Norfolk Island Kaka of New Zealand, he watched alone or in small groups of up 10 individuals (Higgins 1999).

Habitat:

Habit in the native forest in the Norfolk Island and about Phillip Island (Greenway 1958). The species could be observed both in the canopy of tall trees, and soil, the rocks (Gould, 1865, Greenway 1958).

Given its endemism in the Norfolk Island, the Norfolk Island Kaka It was presumably sedentary.

Reproduction:

Little is known of reproductive cycle of the Norfolk Island Kaka; just put on record of four eggs in tree holes (Gould 1865).

Food:

It is known that he fed on nectar Flowers tree white wood (Lagunaria) (Gould 1865). Definitely should be more varied. The captive birds they ate lettuce and the leaves of other vegetables, as well as dairy meals and fruit juice (Gould 1865). Presumably he foraged in both the soil and the canopy (Gould, 1865).

Distribution:

Its range was about 15,5 hectares.

It was endemic to the Norfolk island (in Australia) and nearby Phillip Island, Australia. It became extinct in the wild in mid-century 19 on Norfolk Island, and possibly a little later Phillip Island.

The species is believed to have had a very limited ability to move between islands., and probably he spent his whole life on the island of his birth (Gould, 1865).
In the Norfolk Island Kaka occasionally kept in captivity, as the birds were gentle and easy to capture alive (Gould 1865). The species He survived in captivity until after it had become extinct in the wild (Greenway 1958). There are no known captive populations and none has been reintroduced into the wild. The last known living bird was in captivity in London in 1851 (Garnett et to the., 2011).

No made extensive studies for this species. But, there have been a series of ornithological studies in the Norfolk Island since the species disappeared from the island (p.ej. Bell 1990, Robinson 1988, Schodde et al., 1983, Smithers y Disney 1969), no signs have been found of the species.

Conservation:

• Current category of the Red List of the UICN: extinct.

Rationale for the Red List category

This species was known in the Norfolk Island, but it was Extinguished to mid 1800. It is believed that the elimination of habitat and hunting have been the main drivers.

According to reports, was tame and, Therefore, hunted strongly convicts and early settlers and easily trapped as a pet.

No information is available on the population size before its decline.

"Norfolk Island Kaka" in captivity:

They were captured by his meekness and they were common in the Norfolk Island

Alternative names:

Norfolk Island Kaka, Norfolk Island Kea, Norfolk Island Parrot, Norfolk Kaka (English).
Nestor de Norfolk (French).
Dünnschnabelnestor, Norfolkkaka, Norfolk-Kaka (German).
Kākā-de-norfolk (Portuguese).
Kaka de Norfolk (español).

John Gould
John Gould

scientific classification:


Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Strigopidae
Genus: Nestor
Scientific name: Nestor productus
Citation: (Gould, 1836)
Protonimo: produced Plyctolophus


Images “Norfolk Island Kaka”:

————————————————————————————————

Norfolk Island Kaka (Nestor productus)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Australian Government – Department of the Environment and Energy (Nest produced - Norfolk Island Kaka)

Photos:

(1) – Natural Science Curatorial Trainee – Birmingham’s Norfolk kaka
(2) – Nestor productus Gould, 1836 by Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Nestor productus By Gould, 1836 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Norfolk Island in Kaka (Nestor productus). The last bird in captivity died in London in 1851. Specimen from the Zoological Museum in Firenze, Italy by Thomas WesenerFlickr
(5) – Nestor productus By Gould, 1836 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – The Norfolk Island in Kaka (Nestor productus) from the plate in the Bulletin of the Liverpool Museum. From the specimen in the Tring Museum by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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Blue-eared Lory
Eos semilarvata


Lori de Seram

Content

Description

Is the more small of the gender Eos, with only 24 cm.. length and an approximate weight of 170 gr.

The plumage of the Blue-eared Lory x(Psittacus erithacus) is bright red.

The upperparts of the cheeks and ear-coverts form a band blue violet.

The feathers of abdomen and under the tail are blue, the primaries are black and red color on the inside, the secondaries has black spots, the feathers largest of the shoulder are blue, the back is red-brown, the underparts bright red, their irises are reddish brown, the legs grey and orange red the bill.

The plumage of the youth usually appears paler and duller Red. The mask boils down to a simple pale blue dot under the eye and the mumps. The scapulars are brownish grey with light blue striped uniform. The feathers of abdomen are red with some blue touches. The irises reddish color.

The Blue-eared Lory EOS can be mistaken for other species of the genus, but in its area of distribution, only the Red Lory (Eos Bornea) shows similarity of characters. But, does not display a blue stain in the face or at the bottom of the abdomen.

Habitat:

Frequently not only in primary forests, but also in the Highlands bordering the bare mountain peaks.

This bird usually lives above the 1.200 meters above sea level, area to which the Red Lory (Eos Bornea) fails. But, from time to time is reduced to 800 m, so sometimes they interfere in the same area two species.

The Blue-eared Lory they live alone, in pairs or small family groups.

They feed in the foreign branches of trees in flower.

They are noisy birds in flight, but they are relatively quiet and discrete When feed. When they move they tend to fly at low altitude.

Reproduction:

There is not much information of their reproduction habits in the natural environment. But, It can be assumed that the Red Lory It takes a form of very similar to that of other nesting Loris. These are cavemen, that is to say, you install their nests in tree cavities.

The season of spawning It estimated that the months of September to March.
Usually, they lay two eggs per clutch and its incubation lasts a few 26 days.

Young people are often taken up to 10 weeks before you fly.

Food:

They feed mainly on nectar in the trees in flower in lower altitudes and Heath (Heather, gorse, broom) at higher altitudes.

Distribution:

Lori distribution of Seram
The Blue-eared Lory is endemic of the Seram island in the Moluccas (Indonesian).

Conservation:


Status

– Current IUCN Red List category: Least concern

– The population trend: Decreasing

The world population It has not been quantified, but the species is estimated that it can range from common to abundant at the local level (pit et to the. 1997). However, justified the population trend, It is suspected to be in decline due to unsustainable levels of exploitation.
The population range is between 5,000 and 50,000 birds released.

Probably the Blue-eared Lory It will always remain a rare specimen in the world of birds.

In March of 1995 the Government of Indonesian stopped the export of these birds.

Its hunting for local trade has become especially intense.. Fortunately, There is no reason to keep to the Blue-eared Lory as a pet on the part of the indigenous population.

"Blue-eared Lory" in captivity:

Since its population is decreasing, any specimen that can not be returned to their natural habitat (natural range) should preferably be placed in a well-managed breeding program to ensure the survival of the species.

Alternative names:

Blue-eared Lory, Ceram Lory, Blue eared Lory, Seram Lory (ingles).
Lori masqué, Lori à oreilles bleues (French).
Halbmaskenlori (German).
Loris Semilarvata (Portuguese).
Lori de Orejas Azul, Lori de Seram (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Eos
Scientific name: Eos semilarvata
Citation: Bonaparte, 1850
Protonimo: Eos semilarvata

Images “Blue-eared Lory”:

Videos "Blue-eared Lory"

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“Blue-eared Lory” – (Eos semilarvata)


Sources:

Avibase
– BirdLife.org
Oiseaux.NET

Photos:

– Blue-eared Lory in the Walsrode Bird Park, Germany by Quartl – Wikimedia
papageien.org
– Blue-eared Lory (Eos semilarvata) at the San Diego Zoo by Leon Mitchell – Wikipedia
– free-pet-wallpapers.com
kanaria1898tuttlingen.de

Sounds: Mark Todd (Xeno-canto)

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Kuhl's Lorikeet
Vini kuhlii


Kuhl's Lorikeet

Content

Description

18 cm.. long and an approximate weight of 55 g..

Males and females of the Kuhl's Lorikeet (Vini kuhlii) they are identical in appearance. Adult birds have cheeks, the chest and the part forward of the belly bright red.

The upperparts the body has different shades of green with the exception of a few Feather erection of color blue dark in the neck.

Its tail is multicolored, the Central feathers are red and purple sides, with the Green terminal part.
A zone blue-violet in the belly around the the thighs. The bill and legs are orange, the tail is short.

The birds youth they have the underparts opaque red.

Habitat:

The natural habitat of the Kuhl's Lorikeet are the tropical humid forests. On the Islands desforestadas also is in coconut plantations. It is a nectarivorous that feeds sucking nectar with his rough tongue.

Reproduction:

Observed in the month of March, April and August.
Nest in the trunks of coconut trees or FARA (Pandanus tectorius) dead or in cavities of hotu. Sometimes one or two rectangular holes mark the entrance of these nests. Only a litter has been found with two chicks.

Food:

Nectar and pollen from banana flowers (Musa sp.), Kapok (Ceiba pentandra), pacayers (Inga edulis), Mango (Mangifera indica), avocado (It persea americana), the coconut (Cocoa nuts), the Cordyline (fructicosa Cordyline) , the NASE (Barringtonia asiatica), the tafano (Guettarda speciosa), the Pomeroy (Syzygium jambos) and ATAE (Erythrina variegata).

The small seeds of purau (Hibiscus tiliaceus) and Aito (Casuarina equisetifolia). Axillary buds and young shoots of hotu, purau and falcata (Paraserianthes falcataria).

They lick the surface of the leaves of banana. Make sudden movements in the leaves of certain trees without flowers or fruit (including dead Palm trees), also tends to dig small holes – clearly too superficial to serve as a nest -, This we do think that also can be insectivores.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident) 510 km2

endemic to Rimatara in the Tubuai Islands, south-central Pacific (France), where the population is estimated at 905 birds. It has also been introduced in Kiribati including Teraina (Washington Island) and Tabueran (Fanning island), both before 1798, and Kiritimati (Isla Christmas), where six specimens were transferred in 1957.

Occasional appearances in the Thbuai island about Rimatara they are probably elopements pets.

Although the species is relatively common in Rimatara. the recent introduction of rats is cause for concern.
The population of Tabueran (c. 200 birds) It is also vulnerable because of predation of nests by rats.

In Teraina There are a few 1.000 birds and with no confirmed threat. It is possible that one or two individuals may still survive in Kiritimati. IN DANGER OF EXTINCTION.

Conservation:


Endangered

• Current IUCN Red List category: Danger

• Population trend Decreasing

Although populations are believed to be stable in Rimatara and Teraina and grow in Atiu where it was recently introduced, invading predators are probably causing a decrease in Tabuaeran and Kiritimati, Therefore, the general trend is suspected to be a moderate and continuous descent is its population.

Excessive exploitation of its red feathers is the most likely reason for the extinction of the Kuhl's Lorikeet in the Islas Cook.

A serious threat to all hatchlings in the Pacific islands, It is the depredation caused by rats in the nests, especially on the part of the Black Rat (Rattus rattus). In Rimatara, There was a wide shot of black rats (Rattus rattus), to leave the island away from them in the year 2000. However the rats of the Pacific (R. exulans) they were still very abundant.

In Teraina, There is no evidence of the presence of the (R. Rattus), although the Pacific rat (R. exulans) is abundant, While in Tabuaeran and Mitiaro, still having black rats (R. Rattus). Cats can be a threat in Kiritimati. The common mine (Acridotheres tristis) It is a threat to the introduced population in Atiu, Since it competes for nesting sites and usually attacking young people Kuhl's Lorikeet.

Ongoing conservation actions:

Appendix II of CITES.
– In Kiribati, the species is fully protected.
– In the french polynesia the species is protected by national laws and regulations from 1996.
– In Rimatara It has been protected by a traditional tapu (taboo) from 1900.

– 27 birds were reintroduced in Atiu from Rimatara in May of the 2007, after which organized a community contest to find the first young birds, with a reward given to the winner.
– Monthly count of birds in Atiu carried out to evaluate the success of the effort of introduction.
– A control program of the common mine started in Atiu in May of 2009, including harassment and capture, with a bounty for each dead bird.
– For October of the 2009, the population of the birds Mine had been reduced by 60% and this program is permanent.
– In Rimatara, 21 bait stations were established in the main Pier in September of 2009 to prevent black rats invading the island and raising awareness is taking place among children about the importance of protecting the avifauna of the island.

"Kuhl's Lorikeet" in captivity:

It is not in captivity.

Due to its State, in danger of extinction, any specimen that can not be returned to their natural habitat (natural range) should preferably be placed in a well-managed breeding program to ensure the survival of the species.

Alternative names:

Kuhl’s Lorikeet, Kuhl’s Lory, Kühl’s lory, Rimatara Lorikeet, Rimitara Lorikeet, Ruby Lorikeet, Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (ingles).
Lori de Kuhl (French).
Rubinlori (German).
Lóris-de-kuhl (Portuguese).
Lori de Rimatara (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Vini
Scientific name: Vini kuhlii
Citation: (Vigors, 1824)
Protonimo: Psittacula kuhlii

Images “Kuhl's Lorikeet”:

Videos "Kuhl's Lorikeet"

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“Kuhl's Lorikeet” (Vini kuhlii)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – Miles to the wild – link
2 – Miles to the wild – link
3 – Miles to the wild – link
4 – Miles to the wild – link
5 – Duncan WrightThe uploader's own work: "Vini australis”. Engedely: GFDL, Forrás: Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Matthias Feuersenger (Xeno-canto)

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Striated Lorikeet
Charmosyna multistriata

Striated Lorikeet

Content

Description

They weigh around 40 to 50 g. and length of 18 cm..

The plumage of the Striated Lorikeet (Charmosyna multistriata) It is predominantly green with yellow stripes on the belly and in the chest.

The throat, the forecrown and sides of the head They are slightly more yellow. The neck and the back of the head They are brown with some orange yellow stripes. The tail is olive green on top and having a tip dark yellow. The bottom of the tail It is greenish yellow with some red feathers around the vent. The most characteristic feature of Striated Lorikeet is the bill two colors. Upper bill is blue-gray with a touch of red orange, While the bottom is completely reddish-orange. Only one other Lori with a peak of two colors and that is the Musk Lorikeet. The irises It is red and legs They are gray with black nails.

Both sexes are the same color, the male is slightly larger and has a bill longer. They are also a little colored in the head.
The immature They have the same colors as adults, only the bill it is more black and darker stripes.

Habitat:

It inhabits in the mountains and hills and forest edges. Mainly found between 180 and 1.800 m, but they have been at much lower altitude, about 80 m. Found in pairs or in small groups of up 20 birds, sometimes fellowship with the Red-flanked Lorikeet and the Fairy Lorikeet (observed in mid-February in mixed flocks with these species). similar to the behavior Red-flanked Lorikeet, the consorts, but although they have observed flocks Striated Lorikeet fly with the Red-flanked Lorikeet, they usually form discrete individual groups.

Reproduction:

Habits of nesting and breeding unknown.

Food:

Prefer treetops in bloom where it feeds on pollen and nectar, but they may also feed on epiphytes.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident) 170,000 km2

Endemic to the montane forests of the center of West Papua New and Papua New Guinea, South of the cordillera central. The world population It is believed to be of less than 10.000 specimens, but it is probably stable. A small number in captivity.

Conservation:


Status


• Current IUCN Red List category: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

Its habitat is locally threatened by logging and clearing for agriculture. Reports of the species in Ok Tedi They show that the population of the Striated Lorikeet has fallen dramatically after the severe drought in 1997-1998 (P. Gregory in litt., 2010).

The species may be threatened by the presence of a large copper and gold open pit mine in Ok Tedi, but the impacts of this mine are currently unknown. It is likely to be tolerant of uneven and degraded forests and although it may have a small population in general, do not believe that it is declining very rapidly.

"Striated Lorikeet" in captivity:

In aviculture the Striated Lorikeet It has become one of the rarest species. These birds have not been imported in large quantities, and many of the birds that survived the journey later died due to infections by fungi and other diseases. Few breeders were able to raise them on a regular basis.

Alternative names:

Striated Lorikeet, Streaked Lorikeet, Yellow Streaked Lory, Yellow-streaked Lorikeet (ingles).
Lori strié (French).
Streifenlori (German).
Lori Estriado (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Charmosyna
Scientific name: Charmosyna multistriata
Citation: (Rothschild, 1911)
Protonimo: Charmosynopsis multistriata

Images “Striated Lorikeet”:

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“Striated Lorikeet” (Charmosyna multistriata)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife
– loryclub

Photos:

1 – Author: Jaroslav Chloupekbiolib.cz
2 – by DavyVanthuyne’s Bucket
3 – Birds-pet-wallpapers – link
4 – Author iggino – lynx
5 – tierportraet.ch – link