Paradise Parrot †
Psephotellus pulcherrimus

Paradise Parrot

Content

Description:

Paradise Parrot

The extinct Paradise Parrot (Psephotus pulcherrimus) was a small parrot (27-30 cm long) and rather distinctive, with scapulars red and long tail.

The male had forecrown of bright red and a crown black; eye rings yellowish; ear-coverts and throat emerald green. The nape black merged with the dark brown on the neck and then into paler, earthy brown the mantle and back. The scapulars were bright red; the rump was turquoise; and tail top green-bronze and blue, merging into bluish-black. The under body comprised an chest and upper abdomen emerald green, merging into turquoise on the sides of neck and in the part inferior of the abdomen; the belly, the vent and flanks were bright red; and the under tail was bluish white. The upperwing was earthy brown, concolorous with the mantle and back; and the underwing was deep blue.

The female was less colorful, differing from the male by forecrown and face yellowish; a crown duller blackish-brown; throat and chest with brownish-orange suffusion; belly pale blue and coverts the lower abdomen, vent and under tail red on the fringes of some feathers. In both sexes bill was grayish; the eyes brown; and legs and feet were grayish brown.

The juveniles resembled females.

taxonomy:

This taxon is considered a subspecies of Psephotellus [pulcherrimus or dissimilis] (sensu lato) by some authors

Habitat:

The Paradise Parrot lived mainly in rolling river valleys were lightly wooded with eucalyptus forests, or open forests often dominated by ironbarks and bloodwoods, with an understory of annual and perennial native grasses; These areas often were dotted with termite mounds.

Reproduction:

the details of the distribution areas or territories unknown Paradise Parrot, although it is believed that adults have remained in the same places nesting for many years.

Little is known of sexual maturity or life expectancy of this species. The reproduction It was recorded between September and March. Sunsets are placed three to five white eggs, with a pink tinge, a camera nest at the end of a tunnel excavated in termite mounds.

Food:

There is little information on diet Paradise Parrot, however it was known that fed on seeds of native grasses.

Distribution:

The Paradise Parrot He was present in eastern Australia, only he reported with certainty from southeast Queensland. Is likely to records in upstate been wrong. It is also often said that the species had been found in New South Wales, but there has been no confirmed records (Olsen 2007). Era locally common although generally scarce in the nineteenth century (Forshaw and Cooper 1989), but then he declined rapidly and was thought to be extinct as a result of drought 1902 until it was rediscovered in 1918 (Chisholm 1922). The last observation was confirmed in 1928. Some credible reports continued in the years 30 and 40 (Olsen 2007), but although Kiernan (1993) He claims to have seen five birds 1990, the species is now considered extinct (Necklace et to the. 1994).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Extinct.

Its extinction It was probably marked by a reduction in food supply due to drought and overgrazing (Olsen 2007). Also contributed frequency altered fires and propagation tunas (Joseph 1988), the disease, the trampeo and harvest of eggs (Garnett 1992), the predation of nests by introduced and native species (Chisholm 1922) and removal of eucalyptus by ringbarking (Kiernan 1993). After a significant reduction in the size of the population of the species, It seems that endogamia inhibited fertility of birds (Gerrard 2008).

Alternative names:


Anthill Parrot, Beautiful Parakeet, Beautiful Parrot, Elegant Parrot, Grass Parrot, Ground Parrot, Ground Rosella, paradise parakeet, Paradise Parrot, Red-shouldered Parakeet, Red-shouldered Parrot, Red-winged Parrot, Scarlet-shouldered Parakeet, Scarlet-shouldered Parrot, Soldier Grass-Parrot, Soldier Parrot (English).
Perruche de paradis (French).
Paradiessittich (German).
Periquito-do-paraíso (Portuguese).
Perico del Paraíso (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Psephotellus
Scientific name: Psephotellus pulcherrimus
Citation: (Gould, 1845)
Protonimo: platycercus beautiful


Sources:

Avibase
• Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
• Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Preserved specimen by Naturalis [CC BY-SA 3.0]

(2) – Parrots in captivity /. London :George Bell and Sons in Biodiversity Heritage Library by Flickr

Hooded Parrot
Psephotellus dissimilis

Hooded Parrot

Description

25,5 - 28 cm.. length and a weight between 50 and 60 g..

The Hooded Parrot (Psephotellus dissimilis) is a very striking species, restricted to the dry forests of the North of Australia. The male has a pileum black, their underparts are Turquoise with a patch in the shoulders golden yellow.

The females are pale green with a pale turquoise diffusion in the cheeks, abdomen and cadwas.

The Golden-shouldered Parrot, with which it is closely linked, is very similar in appearance, but they are only observed in the Cape York Peninsula, in the North of Queensland, and males differ in their tones slightly. The Hooded Parrot does the yellow colour in the forecrown or in the lores and the yellow markings of the shoulders and reddish of the belly, they are smaller than. The females they are very similar, but the Golden-shouldered Parrot It shows a faint red marks on the area, white, Bass belly, has the undertail- coverts Blue, bluish color of the belly is absent and the undertail- coverts They have a pinkish tone; also has a Brown Suffusion in the crown, a forecrown yellowish and the cheeks they are greener.

The Northern Rosella shares territory with the Hooded Parrot and also has a pileum black, but it lacks of the underparts Turquoise and yellow markings on the wings.

The Hooded Parrot they have an elegant flight, and males they are very bright with a Flash of bright yellow showing in the wings. The flight fast and slightly wavy. Bird perch, times, phone cables, and can make long flights at high altitude.

Providing more detail to its description, the Hooded Parrot has the pileum, lores and the area below and in front of the eyes, black, merging into grey-brown colour in the the mantle (darker uppers than the Golden-shouldered Parrot). The rump is turquoise blue and the uppertail-coverts green. Wing coverts golden yellow (grey dark in vane inner).

Flight feather Blackish with difusion-verde turquoise at the edge of the vane outer (thin yellow color at the outer edge). Feathers of the wings and bend of wing bluish green; underside of flight feather blackish brown. The cheeks, the neck and the chest Turquoise, lightly coated with emerald green; rest of the underparts Turquoise with the exception of undertail- coverts they are orange-red with yellow tips. Uppertail dark bars.

Central feathers of the tail Green bronze with black tips, side green blue with white tips, with a blackish central bar; undertail, the tail apparently light blue with black tips when it is closed. Bill pale grey; irises dark brown; legs light brown.

The female is usually pale, a light yellowish green, with wing-coverts a bright yellowish-green, flight feather blackish, and a turquoise color broadcasting in the rump, from the top of the breast to belly, and vaguely in the cheeks. Subcaudales coverts bathed in Pink salmon; pale marks in the wings.

The immature they are like the females, but males have the head darker and the cheeks bright. Adult plumage they would earn in the second annual moult.

The very young birds they have the peaks yellow.

Habitat:

Sedentary, Although some early records of the Melville Island they probably relate to the post breeding dispersal. Scattered sparsely through the open dry forests, flooded Plains, especially grasslands of Malaleuca-dominated and Spinifex Triodia, meadows with termite mounds, also in rows of eucalyptus trees along watercourses and the rocky ridges.

Usually, they are in pairs or in small groups, but after the breeding season, from September (end of the dry season) onwards, they may gather in groups of up to 100 birds feeding.

Reproduction:

Egg-laying range from late January until mid-April, at the end of the rainy season, the nest is a tunnel in a Termite Mound. The direction and height of the entrance of the nest is variable, but the temperatures in nest Chambers are more stable within the larger mounds. A recent study of the ecology of nesting in the Northern Territory showed a density of 0,45 - 0,70 nests per square kilometer, with a 50% the egg producing offspring. Between two and six eggs make up the implementation, and are incubated for around 20 days by the female. Within five weeks the hatchlings leave the nest. The females., sometimes, they sit away from their nests during the heat of the day.

Food:

The diet is composed, mainly, of pasture seeds seasonal during the dry season and perennial plants during the wet season. The variation in the ability to master the techniques of power for different types of seeds can explain the apparent early dispersal of immatures in the wet season. Birds feed on quietly on the floor, resting in the foliage near the water during the heat of the day. When drinking, they often walk into the water along banks of sand. They are sometimes seen feeding on road verges, often in association with the Black-faced Woodswallow (Artamus cinereus).

Distribution:

Endemic to North of Australia where is located in the western part of Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, from the South of the Alligator River, to the southwest of Pine Creek and the South-East of Include. Birds also are scattered over East and West until the rivers Roper and upper area of the Daly.

The Hooded Parrot formerly extended eastward to the MacArthur River, but its territory, covering the Kakadu National Park, It has contrataido in recent times.

In general, It rare. Although it is now fully protected. Capture is believed to it has been a problem in the past. Burning and grazing may limit the availability of herbs seeds during the dry season.

Mining also threatens the habitat of the species. There is a moderate number of birds in captivity.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The world population is estimated at 20.000 specimens (Garnett and Crowley 2000).

Population trends have not been quantified, but populations seem to be stable, without descents recent (Garnett and Crowley 2000).

The species is still common in areas under the administration of the Park Aboriginal and National, where the grazing is minimal and where there are programs that ensure its survival, or around the Rocky slopes, where is the availability of food in the rainy season relatively assured.

Perico Capirotado in captivity:

Although the popularity of the Hooded Parrot has increased considerably in the last decade, This species is still quite unknown in poultry. The main reason is, probably, that they are not easy to care for and reproduce in captivity, due to its high demands care and difficulty it in terms of its food supply. The Hooded Parrot they are not recommended for a beginner breeder birds.

No one knows exactly when these birds were imported for the first time to Europe, but it was probably at the beginning of the last century. In the autumn of 1912 English Hubert Astley It was who got the first satisfactory result of breeding with the Hooded Parrot, got 4 young people from a litter of 5. In the Netherlands, the Dr. Polak It also had results before the second world war. Once born the offspring, they were taken along with a couple of Red-rumped Parrot (Psephotus haematonotus) they grew up without any problem.

There is a variety of the Hooded Parrot because different crosses with other species such as Mulga Parrot (Psephotellus varius) and the the Golden-shouldered Parrot (Psephotellus chrysopterygius). Therefore, We must pay attention to the features when we are going to buy a couple of future players of this species. If you have doubts about the purity of certain birds, consult with a person who is familiar with this type of parrots.

In terms of the behavior, the Hooded Parrot adapt to the European climate relatively well, Although they are sensitive to the cold and damp climate. They are quiet birds, enable, not shy and that adapt quickly to their caregiver. His voice is not worrying. Love these birds being on the ground, where spend much time. They love to swim and are not rodents of wood. During the breeding season they are aggressive with other birds. Even outside the breeding season, It is not advisable to fit them with their peers or keep them with other bird species. Young birds together may stay in a birdhouse. As a basic rule, Ave predict an area of one square meter.

It is not known exactly how these birds can live, According to sources, a specimen was still alive after 18 years in captivity

Alternative names:

Hooded Parrot, Antbed Parrot, Anthill Parrot, Black-hooded Parakeet, Black-hooded Parrot, Golden-shouldered Parrot, Hooded Parakeet (English).
Perruche à capuchon noir (French).
Collettsittich, Hooded Sittich (German).
Periquito-encapuzado (Portuguese).
Perico Capirotado, Periquito encapuchado (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Psephotellus
Scientific name: Psephotellus dissimilis
Citation: Collett, 1898
Protonimo: Psephotus dissimilis

Hooded Parrot images :

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Hooded Parrot (Psephotellus dissimilis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A male Hooded Parrot, about 30 km south of Pine Creek, Northern Territory, Australia By birdphotosneill (Hooded ParrotUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – A pair of Hooded Parrots, about 30 km south of Pine Creek, Northern Territory, Australia By birdphotosneill (Hooded ParrotsUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – A pair of Hooded Parrots about 30 Km south of Pine Creek, Northern Territory, Australia. The male is in the foreground By birdphotosneill (Hooded ParrotsUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – By originally posted to Flickr as parkiet xxx and uploaded to commons at Psephotus_dissimilis_(female)_-Burgers_Zoo-8a.jpg: frank woutersderivative work: Snowmanradio (Psephotus_dissimilis_(female)_-Burgers_Zoo-8a.jpg) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Male Hooded Parrot (Psephotus dissimilis) – Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Park in Scotland Neck, North Carolina By SandyCole (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Golden-shouldered Parrot
Psephotellus chrysopterygius


Golden-shouldered Parrot

Description

26 cm. length between 54 and 56 g. of weight.

Golden-shouldered Parrot

The Golden-shouldered Parrot (Psephotellus chrysopterygius) males have a pileum black, the forecrown, the lores and orbital area yellow, slightly with blue-green tones. The black of the pileum merges gradually with the greyish Brown of the the mantle, with some blue on the back neck pink. The rump shows a beautiful turquesa color that contrasts slightly with the green color of the tail view from above.

The median bright yellow, they form a visible band in the wings. The greater coverts they have a dominant brown-black color with some small patches of Turquoise Blue clear.

The flight feather they are blackish with a turquoise-colored border around the vane outer. The underparts is blue. The lower parts are turquoise blue, except the lower abdomen and the lower part of the tail, that are red with bases and white finishes. The Central tail feathers they usually have a bluish-black-tipped bronze color. The lateral tail feathers they are blue-green with white tips. The underside of tail is white with a dark blue finish. The bill is pale-grey. The irises are dark brown, the legs brownish grey.

The females they have a yellowish-grey colour, along with opaque Brown wash on the top. In addition, they have the forecrown yellowish. The flanks, bottom of the chest and Hip they are shaded light blue. The belly is whitish grey with red spots. You can see a pale bars on the wings.

The immature are similar to the females, Although the young male they have a dark CAP and the cheeks more blue. Young people acquire their adult plumage final at the age of 16 months.

  • Sound of the Golden-shouldered Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Perico Aligualdo.mp3]

Habitat:

The Golden-shouldered Parrot they are birds sedentary. However, just after the nesting season, they can make short trips that lead to mangroves. At the time of playback, mainly frequent open forests of eucalyptus and logging and whose undergrowth is covered with a thick layer of grass. Within these areas, the Golden-shouldered Parrot nest, mainly, along with small partially invaded by water bowls. In the territory should, mandatory, Haber mounds of Earth made by termites, which are essential for the nesting of this species.

The Perico Aligualdor, usually, they live alone, in pairs or small family groups, but also sometimes gather in flocks of up to 30 individuals. These birds feed and quench your thirst first thing in the morning or in the evening. They rest in the foliage during the hottest times of the day. The Golden-shouldered Parrot they tend to feed on the ground, where venture with confidence. They find refuge in trees if bother them. They walk up to small pools of water where bathing and quench your thirst.

Reproduction:

The time of reproduction extends from April to August. During courtship, the male makes short flights around the female, rising from the front a short feather Crest and waving his chest feathers.

The Golden-shouldered Parrot they dig their nests in a termite still damp from recent rain.

There are two types of termite mounds that are usually used by this species:

– built by termites type conical termite mounds Scopulus

– semicircular termite mounds built by termites of the type laurensis.

The first are usually their favorite because the temperature is most constant, While in semicircular termite mounds, they often have the entrance North, which sometimes causes large thermal contrasts. The mound may contain several nesting rooms. The nest entrance is located between 45 and 125 cm above the ground. A long tunnel of 15 - 60 cm ends into a round hole in one 25 cm long.

The Golden-shouldered Parrot It lives in symbiosis with a moth:
The Trisyntopa Scatophaga that at the same time it lays its eggs in the nest of the parakeet. The larvae feed on feces and feathers of the juveniles, helping to keep the nest clean waste.

The female lays of 4 - 7 eggs who is responsible for incubating single for almost 20 days. The young man takes around 5 weeks to acquire all their feathers and leaving the nest. A week after hatching, the male joins the female to feed the offspring. He stands guard at the top of the nest for long periods of the day. When he brings the food, notifies the female's arrival, emitting loud cries. When it is time to leave the nest the young are able to fly inside the tunnel without landing. After the flight, they continue to be fed by adults during at least 2 weeks. They remain in the family group for quite some time. To the dispersal of family groups, young males are away more of their places of birth than young females.

Food:

Outside the breeding season, the Golden-shouldered Parrot they have a diet almost exclusively vegetarian. They remain of the seeds of grasses Panicum or Eragostris. They often feed on seeds falls of different plants. During the rainy season, When these resources become scarcer, It is likely that it depends on the species of plants that can be found throughout the year.

Distribution:

Endemic to the northeast of Australia, where is distributed only in a small area north of the River Morehead and South of Musgrave, to the North of Queensland. There are currently at least four populations, each with between 30 and 100 birds, so the world's population can be of no more than 500 individuals, or 150 breeding pairs. Other more recent sources estimate the spawning in around 2.500 individuals mature (Garnett et to the., 2011).

A record of 1980 It extended its known range North to the Pascoe River, but in general it has contracted significantly in recent 100 years, prior records were situated towards the South, until around Normanton.

They were largely trapped in the past, especially since the mid of 1960 until the beginning of 1970. However, grazing and burning of crop residues, the spread of tea trees Leptospermum, predation by cats and the disruption of nests by tourists, It may have played one major role in the decline of the species.

Despite the fact that is protected, probably continue some screenshots.
Some individuals in captive.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Danger

• Population trend: Decreasing

The breeding population has been estimated at around 2.500 individuals mature (Garnett et to the., 2011)

Historically, There were three confirmed breeding populations: from Coen - Port Stewart, According to sources in the Decade of 1920, River Musgrave-Moorhead where the population has shrunk significantly and continues to decline, and to the West of Chillagoe where the population persists, with a stable trend. In general, the population is suspected that it may now be decreasing (Garnett and Crowley 2000), Although the likely rate of decline has not been estimated.

The species has suffered terribly from poaching in the Decade of 1960 and the early 70 Although this bird is protected, There are still such practices.
Today, the Golden-shouldered Parrot faced with new threats: the development of new agricultural lands and the destruction of the traditional habitats where distributed.

Perico Aligualdo in captivity:

The Golden-shouldered Parrot It has always been a rare guest of aviaries in the world. However, Currently, there are more birds in captivity of those existing in freedom, which demonstrates the difficulties encountered by these birds in their natural habitat.

This species is not recommended for beginners; prices already are high enough to discourage potential buyers, only the true fans virtually “Professional”.

A small group composed of one male and seven females of Golden-shouldered Parrot they came to Britain in 1897. These birds were forerunners, but the first known result of successful reproduction dates of 1961. Is inscribed with the name of Alan Lendon an Australian.
The second reproductive success corresponds to a German W. Etterich, This was in 1966. R. Burkard Zurich succeeded in 1968. In addition, in 1954, a so-called Australian breeder Edward Hallstrom He got sixteen hybrids after the mating of two males of Golden-shouldered Parrot with females of Hooded Parrot.
Currently there are many impure birds in the aviaries of fans and thats a shame. These are mostly young females hybrid. These birds do not have the opaque yellow band on the front and, Therefore, one can easily recognize, female purebred if they have the yellow tape and a bronze-colored Crown clear.

The Golden-shouldered Parrot a temperate maritime climate does not resist; they are very sensitive to the cold moisture. Apart from that, It's a peaceful and active bird, She is not shy and quickly forged a friendship with your caregiver. His voice is melodious, with what does not bother the neighbors. You spend much time on the ground and like, often, bathing. They are aggressive during breeding with other birds and it is not appropriate to keep abroad with other species; interactions with other birds are often problematic.

Alternative names:

Golden-shouldered Parrot, Antbed Parrot, Anthill Parrot, Chestnut-crowned Parakeet, Chestnut-crowned Parrot, Golden shouldered Parrot, golden-shouldered parakeet, Golden-shouldered Parrot (chrysopterygius), Golden-winged Parakeet, Golden-winged Parrot (ingles).
Perruche à ailes d’or, Perruche à ailes d’or (chrysopterygius) (francés).
Goldschultersittich (alemán).
Periquito-de-asas-douradas (portugués).
Perico Aligualdo, Perico de Alas Amarillas, Loro Hombroamarillo, Periquito de Espalda Dorada (español).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Psephotellus
Scientific name: Psephotellus chrysopterygius
Citation: Gould, 1857
Protonimo: Psephotus chrysopterygius

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Golden-shouldered Parrot (Psephotellus chrysopterygius)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Male Golden-shouldered Parrot at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia By TheGirlsNY (originally posted to Flickr as Pretty bird) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Golden-shouldered Parakeet (Psephotus chrysopterygius) – watercolor, Romain Risso By Gossipguy (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Phil Gregory (Xeno-canto)

Mulga Parrot
Psephotellus varius

Mulga Parrot

Description

27 - 28 cm. length between 53 and 70 g. of weight.

Mulga Parrot

The plumage of the Mulga Parrot (Psephotellus varius) It, in general, color bright green. A yellow band on the front and a variable red spot adorns the back of the crown. The abdomen and the thighs are yellow, more or less stained Red. The uppertail-coverts are bright green, with a reddish blotch at the base of the tail. The lower area of the back It has a greenish-blue band bordered above and below with a dark bluish green line;. The curvature of the wings are turquoise and the blankets they have a yellow-orange tone forming a patch on the wing. The central feathers of the tail are green bronze, changing to greenish-blue. The outer feathers of the tail are green-blue on the bottom and white on the tip. The bottom of the tail It has a pale blue base and a finish in black. The bill is dark gray. The irises Brown, legs grey.

In the female, the head, the back and top of the chest a color is brownish olive. The feathers of the lower parts are light green. The headband orange-yellow is barely noticeable and, often dyed red bermejo. The place that adorns the back of the crown is opaque reddish. The patch of the wing is red, not yellow as in the male.

The youth they are much more muted than their parents. Young females have small blankets Green bordered of Red, giving a scaly appearance to the latter. Among young males, the red in the abdomen and the thighs is practically missing.

Habitat:

The Mulga Parrot generally prefers dry open habitats and lightly wooded Plains, where can find a great variety of vegetation. Found in scrubland Mallee and, in plots of Acacia, Casuarina, and also in the regions where small trees of eucalyptus They punctuate the stretches of sand. They are also present in the rocky hills or rocky cliffs.

They survive in dry areas, but in these cases, often sit near sources or temporary streams. The Mulga Parrot they owe their English name (Mulga Parrot) the fact that his rank often coincides with areas of Mulga, It is the vernacular name of Aboriginal origin, It is used to describe the semi-arid vegetation that covers the largest part the Australian continent. Mulga It appoints to the extension of the ecosystem or landscape in which Acacia are the dominant vegetation type. This does not mean that this species is strictly dependent on this habitat type.

Unlike in the Red-rumped Parrot, the Mulga Parrot is a quiet and reserved bird. This species usually lives in pairs or small family groups, rarely in large flocks. Most of the time, looking for food on the ground, in the shade of the trees at the edge of a road.

They show a great familiarity and usually allow to photograph them at close range. When it manifests some distrust, They walk away a short distance, to a tree and then return to Earth as soon as the intruder has moved away. On the other hand, When it comes to drinking, they are very cautious, as well as when they rest in the treetops, where are trying to keep hidden.

Reproduction:

They hold the nesting period between the months of July and December, but also at other times of the year, provided that is a rainy month. The processions are very similar to the of the Red-rumped Parrot (Psephotus haematonotus) and includes mutual grooming.

The nest It is often found in a cavity in a tree, However, They also use nests of others parakeets or other openings such as tunnels dug on the banks.

The nests of the Mulga Parrot they are often found in small stunted trees, at low altitude above the ground. However, places near the rivers provide locations that are to a greater height.

The female incubated during 19 days, While the male mounts guard close to stock up your food partner and warn of possible dangers.

The chicks, they leave the nest four weeks after hatching. Immediately after take-off, they join adults to form family groups.

Food:

The Mulga Parrot they feed on grass seeds, acacia seeds, berries, mistletoe and fruits. They complement your menu with different varieties of insects.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 3.330.000 km2

Endemic to the southern part of the Australian continent. Its range covers the entire southern part of Western Australia, except the forest area of ​​south west. It continues along the Great Australian Bight, Southern Australia and reaching the state of Victoria. Ends in southeast New South Wales, but does not cross the Great dividing range and it kept at great distance from the coast. Despite the large size of its territory (more than 3 million square kilometers), the species is considered monotypic (no subspecies).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

The Mulga Parrot they are widespread and relatively common in appropriate habitats.

Since the European colonization, the species seems to have significantly changed their habitat and is now more common in the grain belt in the desert.

The population, currently estimated at around 100.000 birds, It is slightly decreasing in the South due to the thinning areas of Mallee. In general, is not endangered. Classified by the IUCN as it does not present major problems.

Perico Variado in captivity:

It is in 1861 that the Mulga Parrot they arrived in Europe. The first issue was exposed to the public at the Zoo in London. The first case of reproduction of this species dates back in the year 1876 in charge of the SR. Verviers in France. For a long time, These birds were known for being unreliable. That may be true, but the Mulga Parrot who are captives now in Europe support good climate, Although they seem a little less solid than the Red-rumped Parrot (Psephotus haematonotus). It is possible that this is one of reasons why have been much less popular in aviaries that the Red-rumped Parrot.
Despite this, It is a parakeet can be advised to novice fans. The varied Perico often show minor differences in color and design. This is not anything unusual, This phenomenon is also known among the birds living in the wild. It is even possible to see the small differences in the same nest, If you look well.
These birds always in motion they are not suitable to be captive as company bird in a small cage.

These are relatively strong birds, they withstand the cold relatively well, Although they are sensitive to very low temperatures. They are birds peaceful and assets. Quickly show confidence to their caregiver. The sound of his voice is melodious. It is a bird that likes to raise. Like to be on the ground and, often spend their time grooming are. They also love to bathe. On the other hand, they are large rodents.
They are aggressive during the breeding season when they are in the company of other birds, even if it can be accommodated with conspecifics and other species of large birds, that will have no trouble, If the space in which birds are kept is large enough.

With regard to its longevity, a sample lived 11,8 years in captivity. In captivity, estas aves se han conocido casos de reproducción con 1 año de edad.

Alternative names:

Mulga Parrot, Many-colored Parakeet, Many-colored Parrot, Many-coloured Parakeet, Many-coloured Parrot, Varied Parrot (English).
Perruche multicolore (French).
Vielfarbensittich (German).
Periquito-de-mulga (Portuguese).
Perico Variado, Periquito multicolor (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Psephotellus
Scientific name: Psephotellus varius
Citation: Clark, AH, 1910
Protonimo: Psephotus varius

Mulga Parrot images :


Mulga Parrot (Psephotellus varius)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife
  • Anage: El Animal Envejecimiento y Longevidad de base de datos – AnAge entry for Psephotus varius

  • Photos:

(1) – Mulga Parrot (Psephotus varius), Northern Territory, Australia By Christopher Watson (http://www.comebirdwatching.blogspot.com/) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – A male Mulga Parrot at Gluepot Reserve, South Australia, Australia. Male By David Cook Wildlife Photography from Wamboin, NSW, Australia [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Mulga Parrot (Psephotus varius) Currawinya NP, SW Queensland, Australia By Aviceda (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Mulga Parrot (Psephotus varius), Northern Territory, Australia By Christopher Watson (http://www.comebirdwatching.blogspot.com/) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A male Mulga Parrot (also known as the Many-coloured Parrot at Wyperfeld National Park, Victoria, Australia By David Cook Wildlife Photography [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Parrots in captivity /. London :George Bell and Sons,1884-1887 [i.e. 1883-1888] – Flickr

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