Sulfur-breasted Parakeet
Aratinga maculata

Sulfur-breasted Parakeet


Description:

30 cm. length and 110 g. of weight.

The Sulfur-breasted Parakeet (Aratinga maculata) is pale orange, with the head and rear of the neck pale yellow

. The throat and the chest are pale yellow, the the thighs are greenish; flanks pale orange, undertail-coverts greenish, the mantle pale greenish yellow; rump pale yellow orange, tail blue-green, wings green-yellow, underwing-coverts pale yellow. Close orange stripe on the front of the crown, in the lores and around eyes. Orbital ring pale grey. Iris dark gray / brown. Bill almost black.

The immature presumably as of adults, but with cheeks and top of the chest Yellow olive. (Observed one specimen).

  • Sound of the Sulfur-breasted Parakeet.

taxonomy:

described in 2005 under the name of Aratinga pintoi, but later it was shown that the current name, It considered invalid for a long time, indeed it applies to this form, and therefore takes precedence; of holotype of Aratinga pintoi It has now been designated as neotype of Psittacus maculatus, which formally stabilizes synonymity. The species was misidentified as a juvenile of the Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) or a hybrid between the latter and Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya); now generally recognized as a separate taxon, differing greatly reduced due to the orange-red in the face (where it forms an irregular mask), Breast and belly.

Habitat and behavior:

The species inhabits areas with large tracts of forest and Savannah adjacent (O’ Shea 2005, Mittermeier et to the. 2010). performs movements nomads.

It is similar in behavior and general ecology of the species group Aratinga solstitialis. Are in groups of 2-10 birds and they are relatively Meek, feeding along roads and orchards.

Reproduction:

Not much is known about their breeding habits. A nest observed with an egg of unknown size.

Breeding season: August October

Food:

Feeds of fruit and seeds of Guateria sp., Dalechampia sp., Byrsonima sp. and Myrcia sp.

Distribution:

Extending its range (breeding / resident): 159.000 km2

The Sulfur-breasted Parakeet (Aratinga maculata) (formerly pintoi; see Nemésio y Rasmussen 2009) It has a fragmented range in For and Amapá in Brazil, and at the southern end of Suriname (p. e.g.. Silveira et al. 2005, Mittermeier et to the. 2010, Vieira da Costa et al. 2011). After a three-day survey conducted in 2003, Silveira et al. (2005) They claim that Sulfur-breasted Parakeet It was quite common in Monte Alegre, For. Also, in Suriname species has been characterized as uncommon to fairly common (O’ Shea 2005, Mittermeier et to the. 2010).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Growing.

• Population size : unknown.

Justification of the red list category

The trend of the population It seems to be increase, and therefore the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criteria of population trend (> 30% decrease in ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un descenso continuo estimado en >10% in ten years or three generations, or specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern

Threats

The distribution area this species is affected by the deforestation, mainly driven by the expansion of agriculture as they build new roads; However, deforestation Brazil You may be benefiting this species and facilitating their spread to new areas (Vieira da Costa et al. 2011). Long-term, deforestation can become so rapid and extensive that the balance of extensive forest tracts and sheets required by the species will be overcome and the species could begin to decline. Silveira et al. (2005) They claim that Monte Alegre, For, no obvious signs of a strong pressure entrapment. Also, Mittermeier et to the. (2010) They say no reports of any hunting or capture of the species by Amerindians in Savannah Sipaliwini of Suriname meridional.

Aratinga Pechisulfúrea in captivity:

virtually unknown; maintained by local people and zoos Brazil. It can live up 30 years in captivity.

Alternative names:

Sulfur-breasted Parakeet, Sulphur-breasted Parakeet (English).
Conure de Pinto, Conure à poitrine soufrée (French).
Schwefelbrustsittich (German).
cacaué (Portuguese).
Aratinga Pechisulfúrea (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Aratinga
Scientific name: Aratinga maculata
Citation: (Statius Müller, 1776)

Sulfur-breasted Parakeet images:

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Sulfur-breasted Parakeet (Aratinga maculata)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
World Parrot Trust

Photos:

(1) – Aratinga maculata by Sidnei DantasFlickr
(2) – alexanderlees, IBC1058449. Accessible at hbw.com/ibc/1058449

Sounds: Thiago V. V. Costa, XC57522. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/57522

Sun Parakeet
Aratinga solstitialis

Aratinga Sol

Description:

Ilustración Aratinga-Sol

Of 30 cm.. length and a weight between 120 and 130 g.

Of great beauty, the Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) has the lores, ocular region and ear-coverts golden yellow, changing to shades red orange glossy; the forecrown, crown and nape are of a rich color yellow brilliant with color orange.

Bright yellow in the the mantle, the back and rump; uppertail-coverts of color yellow with exotic feathers of color blue. Scapulars Green Tips and the vane inner blue; the coverts smaller and medium, of color yellow with variable staining Green; greater coverts with tips of color green beige, primary coverts, blue. Flight feather, green above, primaries with tips and vane inner blue; grayish brown then. Undertail-coverts yellow (or orange / yellow). The throat Orange with yellow shading at the top of the chest; lower chest and the belly orange; Flanks and area of the vent yellow.

Upper, the tail mainly of color green yellowish with tips of color blue; undertail, of color grey with dye beige.

The bill of color Brown dark to black; the irises dark brown; legs distant.

Both sexes similar.

Immature usually with more muted than adults with the yellow colors of the head and the body replaced by an orange-Green. Lesser and medium uppertail-coverts green.

  • Sound of the Sun Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Sun Conure.mp3]

Habitat:

In general, live in Savanna, in dry forests with Palm trees and some times in flooded areas, until 1200 m. Cross the habitats more open only when traveling between the patches of forest. Are Bird social, usually observed in flocks of 30 or more individuals, with aggregations over large in tree fruit.

Reproduction:

It nests in hollow of trees or palms (for example, Mauritia).
Nest with a chick only in the month of February in Suriname. The size medium of laying is of 3 a 4 eggs. These eggs are hatch during 23 a 27 days, that is almost the forty percent more that it from other birds, in comparison with the mass of egg.

Food:

Their diet is poorly documented, Although it probably consists of locally available food, such as different fruits, berries, nuts, sprouts and flowers. Some foods known including pods of legumes, small fruits of the family Melastomataceae, fruits Red's Cactus and possibly berries of the genus Malpighia.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 96.600 km2

The Sun Parakeet are distributed in the northeast of South America, from the Monte Roraima in the extreme north of Brazil (a single record in 1848 previously attributed to Venezuela), areas adjacent of it Pacaraima mountains in Venezuela and North of Guyana, to Pomeroon River, eastward through Suriname (apparently unknown in the North) and French Guayana until Brazil in Amapá.

Observed also in For and Eastern Amazonas (with boundary to the West around Rio Branco and locally to the South of the Amazon, from Santarém to the region of the River Canumã).

Although in general can be considered is usual, records sporadic suggest appearances local of the Sun Parakeet in an extended range of its distribution area.

Maintained locally as domestic fowl and trapped for the bird trade Vivas.

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: In danger of extinction

• Population trend: Decreasing

A well known in the South flock of Guyana has registered with a maximum number of 200 individuals (Bergman 2009), with other recent records in Roraima (Laranjeiras et to the. 2011). The population is estimated therefore between 1,000-2,499 mature individuals, based on recent records. This is equivalent to 1,500-3,749 birds in total, rounded in 1.500-4.000 individuals.

The population of the Sun Parakeet It is thought that can be in continuous descent, because, probably, continuous pressure which is subjected due to hunting.

THREATS:

Due to the high demand for this species in the pet market, its population has declined drastically over the past twenty years (J. Gilardi in litt., 2007).

Have been exported largely from Guyana during this time, What has led her to virtual extinction in that country. Trappers of Guyana and French Guiana have traveled to the border with Brazil to buy these birds for export (T. Arndt in litt. 2007, L. Silveira in litt., 2007).

A fit annual of export of 600 bird was established in Guyana in the years 1980 and it is believed that more than 2.200 they were imported into the United States between 1981 and 1985 (J. Gilardi in litt., 2007).

Its trade is in course, and because of the ease with which these birds may be attracted by bait (for example corn) and the long distances that will be traveling, It is easy to catch all individuals in a given area(J. Gilardi in litt., 2007).

Conservation Actions Underway:

    • It is very common in captivity, but it is not known what percentage of this population are hybrids between the Aratinga solstitialis and the parakeet maculata (Silveira et to the., 2005, LF Silveira in litt. 2012).

Conservation Actions Proposed:

    • Consider the inclusion of species in Appendix I.

    • Prevent the trade cross-border immediately CITES.

    • Work with them inhabitants indigenous of the land indigenous Raposa Serra do Sol and it community Amerindian in Karasabai for avoid its entrapment and protect the habitat right.

    • Survey to locate other important additional subpopulations.

    • Establish lines of breeding in captivity of birds of pure race.

Aratinga Sol in captivity:

The Sun Parakeet is known for its quacking very strong in comparison with its size relatively small. It is capable of imitating human beings, but not as well as some larger parrots.
Are popular as pets, due to their bright coloration while they have a very limited ability to speak.

Due to its inquisitive temperament, demand much attention from their owners, and sometimes they can be very noisy.

Alternative names:


Sun Parakeet, Sun Conure, Yellow Conure (English).
Conure soleil, Perriche soleil, Perruche soleil (French).
Sonnensittich (German).
Jandaia-sol, cacaoé, guaruba, Jandaia, jandaia-amarela, quijuba (Portuguese).
Aratinga Sol, Periquito Dorado (Spanish).
Perico Dorado (Venezuela).

Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Aratinga
Scientific name: Aratinga solstitialis
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Protonimo: Psittacus solstitialis

Images Sun Parakeet:

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Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Cover photo:

(1) – Sun Conure or Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) at a bird park in Singapore By Michael Gwyther-Jones (originally posted to Flickr as Singapore) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Image Gallery:

(2) – Three Sun Parakeets (also known as Sun Conure) at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore. The bird in the middle of the photograph has been wing clipped By Michael Gwyther-Jones from UK (FlickrUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Sun Parakeets (also known as Sun Conures) at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore By Michael Spencer (originally posted to Flickr as Jurong Bird Park) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Sun Parakeet (also known as Sun Conure) at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore By Michael Spencer (originally posted to Flickr as Jurong Bird Park) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Sun Conures at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore. Wing clipped By Doug Janson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

(6) – Sun Parakeet (also known as Sun Conure) perching on a branch and eating white flowers at Hamilton Zoo, New Zealand By Brian Gratwicke [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(7) – Sun Conures, at Pairi Daiza, Brugelette, Belgium © Hans Hillewaert /, via Wikimedia Commons
(8) – A pet Sun Parakeet (also known as Sun Conure) perching on a shoulder. It has been wingclipped By turtlemom4bacon from Orlando, FL, USA [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(9) – A Aratinga solstitialis at Baltimore Aquarium, USA By Chris Williamson [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(10) – Feeding a Sun Conure, also known as a Sun Parakeet at Discovery Cove, Orlando, Florida, USA By eric from USA (IMG_4596) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(11) – He loves it when you blow on his face and it makes him puff! By Sarah G from Tulsa, USA (Sherbie Sherbie Puffs-Alot) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(12) – Wing clipped Sun Parakeets (also known as Sun Conures) at Kobe Kachoen, a bird and flower park located on Port Island in Kobe, Japan By merec0 (originally posted to Flickr as niji) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(13) – Sun Conure, at Pairi Daiza, Brugelette, Belgium © Hans Hillewaert /, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo illustration:

(14) – An adult Sun Parakeet or Sun Conure (Aratinga solstitialis) . Jacques Barraband [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Jandaya Parakeet
Aratinga jandaya

Aratinga Jandaya

Description:

30 cm.. length.

The Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya) they have both sides of the neck, cheeks, lores, ear-coverts and forecrown orange, deeper in the ear-coverts, around the eyes and in the lores; the crown and nape are yellowish-Orange (Some birds with paler yellow tones in the head).

Mantle and scapulars olive green; back and top of the rump, Green with orange-red horizontal bars; lower rump and uppertail-coverts olive green. Main feathers of the wings blue, the others feathers, green (brightest that in the the mantle). The flight feather blue color above, on the vane outer, Blackish towards the tip and grey below. Underwing-coverts orange-red. The underparts orange-red, slightly paler in the upper part of the chest and in the throat; undertail-coverts green.

Upper, the tail of olive with blue tips; undertail, charcoal grey.

Bill grey-black; bare periophthalmic pale grey; irises brown; legs grey.

Both sexes similar.

The immature has the head yellow and the neck with green markings; Dim Orange below.

  • Sound of the Jandaya Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Aratinga jandaya.mp3]

Habitat:

The Jandaya Parakeet move between deciduous woodlands, closed, bushes and cleared areas of rainforest. Sporadically at the edge of the rainforest and the caatinga. In palm groves of coconut on the coast of Pernambuco. Also frequent croplands and pastures. (Usually in flocks of approximately 12 birds, but sometimes in pairs or individually.

Reproduction:

Nests in tree cavities, at least a 15 metres in height. Observed offspring in the nest of December in Maranhão; eggs hatch between August-December, in the area of Belém. Clutch, probably composed of three eggs.

Food:

Food reported include seeds, berries and fruits of certain Melastomataceae, Mangifera, Palms Mauritia and Cecropia. They can sometimes damage the crops of corn.

Distribution:

Distributed by northeast of Brazil. The species extends from the vicinity of Belém, Northeast of For, and São Luís, Maranhão, from South to North and East of Goiás and more eastward through Piauí, Ceará, Rio Grande do Norte, Paraíba, Pernambuco, Alagoas and probably the north end of Bay.

Locally common, While perhaps decreasing in some areas. It is possible that usually it is to expand its range through colonization of the cleared areas of rainforest high, especially in For and Maranhão.

Their status in the East its area of distribution is unknown.

Maintained in captivity with consequences serious, Perhaps derived from the illegal trade internal in Brazil and, possibly, by smuggling towards Asia South-East.

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

This species has a range very large, and therefore not approaching the thresholds for vulnerable under the criterion of size range

The size of the world population of Jandaya Parakeet It has not been quantified, but this species has been described as “rare” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Its population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

Jandaya parakeet in captivity:

Pretty common in captivity and easy to raise.

Like all the Aratinga, This species is not characterized by their ability to speak, Even so, can get to say some words with crystal clarity.

Its food is made up of different fruits, vegetables, Soak vegetables and specific feed for parrots. There are species Meek and intelligent to which are the trains very well and are playful, What makes them good pet to maintain in a House. Being aves gregarias, is convenient to provide them a companion, Since solo can be quite noisy.

Enjoy the baths, and is advisable to keep them in an Aviary or in cage of good proportions; It is also convenient to let the small flights out of its enclosure.

Its longevity often haunt them 20 years in captivity, being able to get to the 30 years, Depending on your care.

Alternative names:

Jandaya Parakeet, Flaming Conure, Flaming Parakeet, Jandaya Conure (English).
Conure jandaya, Conure à tête jaune, Perriche jandaya, Perruche à tête jaune, Perruche jandaya (French).
Jandayasittich, Jendajasittich, Jendayasittich (German).
Jandaia, jandaia-verdadeira (Portuguese).
Aratinga Jandaya, Periquito Rojo (Spanish).

Gmelin Johann Friedrich
Gmelin Johann Friedrich

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Aratinga
Scientific name: Aratinga jandaya
Citation: (Gmelin, JF, 1788)
Protonimo: Psittacus Jandaya

Jandaya Parakeet Images:

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Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya) aka Janday Conure. Photographed in Puerto Rico at the Mayaquez Zoo By Dick Daniels (http://carolinabirds.org /) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

(2) – Jandaya Parakeet (also known as Jenday Conure) in Beale Park, Reading, Berkshire, England By David Long from London, United Kingdom (IMG_4798Uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(3) – Jenday Conure or Jandaya Parakeet in a tree. By GIANNIZZZERO at English Wikipedia [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

(4) – Jenday Conure or Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya) at Iguaçu Bird Park, Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil. Photographed on 23 April 2003 By Arthur Chapman [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(5) – Jenday Conure (Aratinga jandaya) at the Las Vegas Zoo By ZooFari (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(6) – Aratinga jandaya and Aratinga solstitialis at Kobe Kachoen (Kobe Flowers and Birds Garden) in Kobe, Hyogo prefecture, Japan By Chris Gladis from Kyoto, Japan (Jandaya Parakeet) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(7) – Jendayasittiche (Aratinga jandaya) im Karl-Foerster-Garten des Tierparks Berlin-Friedrichsfelde By Lotse (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(8) – A Jandaya Parakeet (also known as Jenday Conure) at Beale Park, Lower Basildon, Reading, Berkshire, England By David Long (originally posted to Flickr as IMG_4800) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(9) – Jandaya Parakeet (also known as Jenday Conure) in Beale Park, Reading, Berkshire, England By David Long from London, United Kingdom (IMG_4802Uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: GABRIEL MILK (Xeno-canto)

Golden-capped Parakeet
Aratinga auricapillus

Aratinga Testadorada

Description:

Of 30 cm.. of length and a weight of 130 g..

The Golden-capped Parakeet (Aratinga auricapillus) It is often treated as the same species as the Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) and Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya).

The lores, frontal band and ocular region of this kind are of color red glossy; the crown is bright golden yellow; ear-coverts, cheeks and both sides of the neck, green. The area of the nape and the the mantle are pale green: the back and the top of the rump with different hues of green and tips of red or orange; floor area of the rump and uppertail-coverts, green; the small and medium-sized upperwing-coverts, green; the large coverts and primaries, secondaries, vane outer and tips from them primaries, blue.

Underwing-coverts, orange-red; underside of flight feather grey. The chin and throat yellowish green with orange discoloration on the top of the chest and deep color red pale in the belly; vent, the thighs and undertail-coverts, green. Upper, the tail, of colour brownish with them tips blue, sometimes with the vane external foreign blue feathers; undertail, the tail, grey.

The bill, grey-black; grey, the bare skin of the bare periophthalmic; irises yellowish; legs grey.

Both sexes similar.

Immature It has little or nothing red in the rump, more off the yellow colour of the crown; the top of the chest is greener and less extensive red on the belly.

  • Sound of the Golden-capped Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Aratinga testadorada.mp3]

Subspecies description:

  • Aratinga auricapillus auricapillus

    (Kuhl, 1820) – The species nominal.

  • Aratinga auricapillus aurifrons

    (Spix, 1824) – The upperparts totally green (without red margins on the feathers of the back and Hip top). More green in the upper zone of the chest, lacking Orange dye of the nominal species.

Habitat:

They live in forests, as well as in the clearings and edges of the same, including coastal forests moist Atlantic of Evergreen and deciduous forests closed type of inside. They prefer primary formations.

Scarce or absent grassland with trees or secondary vegetation, even in the vicinity of the remaining original forests. Observed to 2.180 m (Parque nacional do Caparaó, to the South of Espírito Santo). Gregarious, usually observed in flocks of 12-20 individuals, more rarely in groups of up to 40.

Reproduction:

There are few details about the reproductive ecology of this species, Although probably nest in the months of November-December.

Implementation size in captivity is of 3-5 eggs.

Food:

Diet Golden-capped Parakeet includes various seeds and fruits. Reported foods include the maize, okra and fruits red sweet unspecified.

Considered one pest of crops in some areas before its abrupt population decline.

Distribution:

The Golden-capped Parakeet (Aratinga auricapillus) are distributed in the area South-East of Brazil; from the North of Bay, Eastern part of Goiás and Minas Gerais, Brazil, to the East and South, on the East coast of Brazil (Espírito Santo, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Paraná and possibly, Santa Catarina).

The observations in Rio Grande do Sul, apparently they are wrong, Although the species still can be found at the East end of Mato Grosso from the South.

A single record in 1918 in Paraguay, near the border with Paraná, expected from any exhaust.

Generally rare and irregular distribution, residents, extinct in many places with their current range defined by the remaining forests.

He greater stronghold population of the species is located in Minas Gerais, Brazil, where the species was considered common in 1987 in several areas. They are very rare or they have become extinct in Santa Catarina, Paraná, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Espirito Santo, and scarce in Goiás and Bay.

The decrease in the population is must to the continuous logging of forests and to their captures for the trade of birds.

There are several protected areas with populations of the Golden-capped Parakeet, such as the Monte Pascoal National Park (Bahia) and Parque Estadual do Rio Doce (Minas Gerais, Brazil).

Rare in captivity, mostly out of Brazil.

Distribution of subspecies:

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Near-threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the population of the Golden-capped Parakeet It has not estimated formally and in the absence of sufficient data, it is estimated that you there are more than 10.000 specimens, more or less equivalent to 6.700 mature individuals; However, detailed research is required.

The population the species is suspected that it may be in decline due to the continuous loss of habitat and to his capture to the pet trade.

• There has been a broad and continuous clearing and fragmentation of the suitable habitat for this species, for use as coffee plantations, soy and sugar cane in São Paulo, and livestock in Goiás and Minas Gerais, Brazil (Snyder et to the., 2000).

• The capture for trade, He has probably had a significant impact, Since it was relatively common in illegal Brazilian markets in the middle of the Decade of 1980, importing hundreds of birds to Western Germany in the Decade of 1980. However, the precise effect obfuscates a great number of birds bred in captivity, that presumably see reduced pressure on wild populations remaining (LF Silveira in litt., 1999).

• Despite their tendency to nest, times, near human settlements, It is apparently not the most favoured species for the pet trade (VT Lombardi in litt. 2011).

• There are records of persecution in response to the degradation of crops.

Conservation Actions Underway:

Conservation Actions Proposed:

    • Survey to locate new populations important and define the limits of its current range.

    • Study to determine their population dynamics and dispersal ability, as well as providing a detailed analysis of their requirements of habitats in different sites.

    •Guarantee protection of key reserves.

    • Protect species under Brazilian law.

Aratinga Testadorada in captivity:

Rare in captivity, mostly out of Brazil.

Their life expectancy is about 30 years.

Alternative names:

Golden-capped Parakeet, Flame-capped Conure, Flame-capped Parakeet, Gold-capped Conure, Golden capped Parakeet, Golden-capped Conure (English).
Conure à tête d’or, Conure à tête dorée, Perriche à tête d’or, Perruche à tête d’or (French).
Goldkopfsittich, Goldkappensittich (German).
jandaia-de-testa-vermelha, cara-suja, jandaia, periquito-de-cabeça-vermelha (Portuguese).
Aratinga Testadorada, Maracaná corona dorada, Periquito de Cabeza Dorada (Spanish).
Maracaná corona dorada (Paraguay).

Kuhl, Heinrich
Heinrich Kuhl

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Aratinga
Scientific name: Aratinga auricapillus
Citation: (Kuhl, 1820)
Protonimo: parrot auricapillus

Golden-capped Parakeet images:

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Golden-capped Parakeet (Aratinga auricapillus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A Golden-capped Parakeet at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore By Peter so (Golden-capped ParakeetUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(2) – Picture of a Golden-capped Parakeet in the zoo of Wrocław (Poland) By Nicolas Guérin (messages) (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – A Golden-capped Parakeet (also known as Golden-capped Conure) in Seattle, Washington, USA By Matthew Wilson (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Two Golden-capped Parakeets (also known as Golden-capped Conures) in Seattle, Washington By Matthew Wilson (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A Golden-capped Parakeet (also known as Golden-capped Conure) in captivity By Patrick Hawks from Sint Maarten (Bird is the wordUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Douglas Meyer (Xeno-canto)

Dusky-headed Parakeet
Aratinga weddellii

Aratinga Cabecifusca

Description:

Anatomy-parrots-eng

Of 25-30 cm.. length and a weight between 95-115 g.

The head of the Dusky-headed Parakeet (Aratinga weddellii) is greyish Brown, with off blue stripes that give it a scaly appearance. The upperparts are green, the feathers of the nape they have yellowish margins (some banks in the mantle), the back and Hip with Brown centers, giving an appearance of Brown altogether. The scapulars with varying between Brown and green edges; the minor, large and medium-sized inner coverts green grass with paler green margins; the outer and the primary coverts are dark blue. Primary and secondary most of blue color with vane outer Green or green margins toward the vane external in the primaries; very dark (almost black) the Tips. Underwing-coverts green: underside of the flight feather opaque gray. Top of the chest pale green with turquoise suffusion; belly and undertail-coverts pale yellowish green, greener on the flanks. Upper, the tail green, Blue towards the tip: undertail, opaque gray.

Dusky-headed Parakeet

The bill shiny black; cere pinkish grey; wide area orbital off-white; irises yellowish white; legs dark gray.

Both sexes similar.

The immature are like adults but with the irises darker.

Habitat:

Dusky-headed Parakeet Video

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Aratinga

They inhabit in rainforest, semi-humid, swamps, involved swamp forest and stubble, until 500 metres in Colombia and exceptionally 750 metres in Bolivia. Its preferred habitats are the forests and marshes and flooded forests in swampy areas. Also in the remnants of forest in wet savannahs and cleared with patches of remnant forest areas. Also observed in coffee and sugarcane plantations; apparently rarely fly over the dense forest. Usually, in pairs or in small groups, but flocks of up to 75 individuals reported where food is abundant.

Reproduction:

It nests in trees and palms of marshy or riparian areas, between June and August. They also used the cups of dead Palm trees and termite nests.
Four nests observed in Leticia, Colombia, between 4 and 15 metres in height. Birds incubating in the month of February in Colombia. Bird in reproductive condition in the month of August in Bolivia. Observed breeding of the month from June to September in Loreto, Eastern Peru; from April to July in the Mato Grosso.
A normal start is of 3 a 5 eggs and both parents feed the chicks.

Food:

Its diet consists of seeds, fruit, flowers, berries, as well as insects and their larvae found in the trees decaying and stumps.

Distribution:

Its distribution ranges from the southeast of Colombia, East of Ecuador and Peru to the East of Bolivia and West of Brazil.

Apparently Nomad in some parts of the distribution. In general common, even in partially deforested areas, and perhaps increase due to clearing and fragmentation of dense forest.

Conservation:

Conservation status ⓘ

Status
Least Concern ⓘ (UICN)ⓘ

• Red list category of the UICN current: Least concern

• Population trend: Growing

The size of the world population Dusky-headed Parakeet It has not been quantified, but this species is described as common (Stotz et to the. (1996)).

This species is suspected that it has been lost between the 15 and the 17,7% of its suitable habitat within its range over three generations (21 years) based on a model of deforestation of the Amazon (Soares-Filho et to the., 2006, Bird et to the. 2011). Given the susceptibility of this species to the hunting or trapping, It is suspected that its population may decrease in around the 25% in three generations.

Dusky-headed Parakeet in captivity:

It is not common in captivity, but in the past was part of the international trade. They are common in cultivation areas, for this reason they are common in homes of peasants.

The Dusky-headed Parakeet is not known for its ability to mimic the speak human, but they are nevertheless birds very fun, kind and loving – provided that they have been hand reared and socialized properly. They are not as active and noisy as other species of parrots, they only emit sounds, not too high, when excited.

Wonderful pets. His charming personality makes them good pets for children. They are not demanding, they spend happy hours playing with their favorite toys but still much enjoy human company.

They are relatively easy to raise. They may have several broods per year; However, good breeding practices stipulate that it should not be allowed having more than two or three clutches to allow your rest. The size of Sunset is of 3 a 4 eggs, they are incubated for a few 23 days. Both parents are responsible for rearing the young. The chicks leave the nest After a few 50 days.

In nature, According to sources, females have been estimated can live up to 25 years. Its longevity in captivity It has not been studied in detail. It has been observed a muscle aging in wild animals.

Alternative names:

Dusky-headed Parakeet, Dusky Conure, Dusky headed Parakeet, Dusky Parakeet, Dusky-headed Conure, Weddell’s Conure (English).
Conure de Weddell, Conure à tête sombre, Perriche de Weddell, Perruche de Weddell (French).
Weddellsittich, Weddell-Sittich (German).
Aratinga-de-cabeca-escura, aratinga-de-cabeça-suja, jandaia-de-cabeça-azulada, jandaia-de-cara-suja, periquito-de-cabeça-suja (Portuguese).
Aratinga Cabecifusca, Perico Canoso, Periquito de Cabeza Gris, Perico cabezagris(Spanish).
Loro canoso, Perico Canoso, Cotorra cabecigris, Cotorra cabeciparda (Colombia).
Cotorra de Cabeza Oscura, San Pedrito, Lorito cabeza gris (Peru).
Perico cabecioscuro (Ecuador).
Tarechi (Bolivia).
Ipií (Chimane).
Bambaorito (I ingano).
Sacara (Cofán.).
Butuquiria (Macuna).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Aratinga
Scientific name: Aratinga weddellii
Citation: (Deville, 1851)
Protonimo: Conurus Weddellii

Dusky-headed Parakeet images:

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Dusky-headed Parakeet (Aratinga weddellii)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Dusky-headed Conure or Weddell’s Conure (Aratinga weddellii) in captivity. Kobe Kachoen By merec0 (originally posted to Flickr as 神戸花鳥園 (32)) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – A Dusky-headed Parakeet at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore By Sham Edmond [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Dusky-headed Conure or Weddell’s Conure (Aratinga weddellii) By Steve Beger [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Dusky-headed Conure or Weddell’s Conure (Aratinga weddellii) By en:user:Jhwodchuck (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:DuskyConure.jpg) [GFDL, GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Aratinga weddellii – conură cu cap negricios – Dusky-headed conure – conure à tête sombre by Florin FeneruFlickr
(6) – Ilustración Dusky-headed parakeet by Biodiversity Heritage LibraryFlickr

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Nanday Parakeet
Aratinga nenday


Aratinga Ñanday

Description:

Of a length between 32-37 cm.. and a weight between 120-141 g..

Aratinga Ñanday

The Nanday Parakeet (Aratinga nenday) has the forecrown, crown, lores previous and most of the cheeks tiznadas black: both sides of the neck and ear-coverts pale yellowish green; some feathers Brown or reddish in the margins of the pileum black; the nape grass-green. Mantle and back pale green faded yellowish-green in the rump and uppertail-coverts.

Scapulars mostly green, Although some medium-sized pens are dark blue in the vane inner; under wing-coverts mostly green, with the exception of the primary coverts that are blue. The flight feather dark blue above with vane outer paler in some primaries; then color between Brown and pale black.

Most of the underwing-coverts pale yellowish green. Throat pale yellowish green with shades of pale blue at the top of the chest; underparts remaining of pale yellowish green color, except the the thighs Red and some blue feathers in undertail-coverts.

Upper, the tail reddish brown, distal blue; undertail, dull brown.
The bill black; bare periophthalmic pale grey: the irises reddish brown; legs Pink.

Both sexes similar.

The immature It has less blue on the top of the chest and throat.

  • Sound of the Nanday Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Nanday Conure.mp3]

Habitat:

The Nanday Parakeet they live in open lowland some 800 m, including the Humid Chaco or Eastern (a report on the dry Chaco in Bolivia), wetlands and livestock areas with palms. In the Humid Chaco or Eastern and lower basin of the Río Paraguay they prefer areas with fan palmsCopernicia, growing in the seasonal flood plains with xerophytic vegetation drought-related, and observed in areas of swamps with Palm trees in the Santa Cruz Department, Bolivia.

Gregarious, with flocks of up to a dozen birds during the breeding season; hundreds of birds often gather in the roosts.

Reproduction:

Nest in holes of Palmas, trees or fence posts, for example, of cattle pens.

The breeding season in November in Mato Grosso. The laying is of 3-4 eggs. After breeding their young, all birds build large communal roosts until the next breeding season.

Food:

Diet Nanday Parakeet includes the Palm fruits Copernicia, sometimes taken in the ground.

They can cause damage to the crops, for example, corn.

Often seen in water wells.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 260.000 km2

This species is native from South America from the southeast of Bolivia to the southwest of Brazil, the center of Paraguay and North of Argentina, of the region known as the Pantanal.

The species is found in a band of approximately 200 km from East to West, focusing on the wetlands of the upper basin of the Río Paraguay, in the East of the Santa Cruz Department, Southeast Bolivia, South-West of Mato Grosso and West Mato Grosso from the South in Brazil, to the South, by the middle of Paraguay up to the Chaco province, Formosa province and North of Province of Santa Fe in Argentina (occasional in Province of Misiones and Province of Corrientes). A report of the Province of Santiago del Estero is probably wrong.

There are several wild populations in Buenos Aires and California. You can wander, outside the breeding season, the area inside of Central Chaco.

In general locally abundant and common, especially in areas where their favorite plants concentrate. In Argentina they are more numerous in the Formosa province, and is the most common Parrot in some parts of Mato Grosso.

Trapped for the bird trade, with more than 114.000 indivciduos exported from Argentina in the years between 1985-1990, Although many of these birds is probably came from Paraguay.

Note:

Copies released observed in the Canary Islands (Spain), in particular in the South of Tenerife and Fuerteventura, sometimes confused with the Rose-ringed Parakeet. It transpires that the species has been reproduced, In addition, in Andalusia, Catalonia. It has also been observed in points of Madrid, País Vasco and Valencia (Spain).

You escape to the South of Portugal.

Copies also introduced at different points of North America and in Asia.

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Least concern

• Population trend: Growing

Global population size has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

The species has undergone intense trade: from 1981, When it was included in the Appendix II, 267,246 individuals caught in the wild were recorded in international trade (UNEP-WCMC trade database CITES, January 2005).

Thousands are legally exported from Argentina.

Aratinga Nanday in captivity:

Very common in captivity.

In captivity they are wonderful pets if care and properly socialized. They all have distinct personalities and appreciate the toys that are provided with. They like to be out of his cage at least six hours a day.
These birds are escape artists, extremely intelligent and skilful. Some of them speak, others do not, Depending on your personality. They are characterized by having a very strong call and they are not suitable for apartments.

They are birds they reproduce quite easily in spacious accommodations and Cologne. Are, usually, good parents.

There are places, as Puerto Rico, that its possession is illegal.

They can live between 35 and 45 years.

Alternative names:

Nanday Parakeet, Black-headed Parakeet, Black-hooded Conure, Black-hooded Parakeet, Black-masked Parakeet, Nanday Conure (English).
Conure nanday, Perriche nanday, Perruche à tête noire, Perruche nanday (French).
Nandaysittich, Nanday Sittich (German).
jandaia-de-cabeça-negra, maracanã, nendai, periquito-de-cabeça-preta, Periquito-de-cabeça-preta / Periquito-nandaí, Principe-negro, príncipe-negro (Portuguese).
Aratinga Nanday, Aratinga Ñanday, Cotorra de Cabeza Negra, Loro Cabeza Negra, Nanday, Ñanday, Ñenday (Spanish).
Ñanday, Ñenday (Argentina).
Ñanday (Guaraní).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Aratinga
Scientific name: Aratinga nenday
Citation: (Vieillot, 1823)
Protonimo: Psittacus nenday

Nanday Parakeet pictures:

————————————————————————————————

Nanday Parakeet (Aratinga nenday)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Book parrots, Parrots and macaws

Photos:

(1) – Feral Nanday Parakeet (also known as the Black-hooded Parakeet or Nanday Conure) eating sunflower seeds in a garden in Sarasota, Florida, USA By Apix (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Feral Nanday Parakeets (also known as the Black-hooded Parakeet or Nanday Conure) eating sunflower seeds in a garden in Sarasota, Florida, USA By Apix (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Nanday Parakeet By J. Patrick Fischer (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – A pet Black-hooded Parakeet (also known as the Nanday Parakeet and Nanday Conure) By MAULI (originally posted to Flickr as Little Big Mouth) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A pet Nanday Conure, named Jack By Mceder at English Wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – il·lustració digital /digital illustration – dibuixosnatura

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

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