Red-winged Parrot
Aprosmictus erythropterus

Red-winged Parrot

Description

30 a 33 cm.. length between 120 and 210 g. of weight.

The Red-winged Parrot (Aprosmictus erythropterus) has the head of color green bright with brightness blue green in the crown and nape. Mantle, back and scapulars black. Area low of it back and rump brilliant blue, more clear towards the tail; uppertail-coverts of color green yellowish with broadcasting yellowish at the base. Curve of the wing yellow-green light. Carpal edge blackish. Upper, the wing-coverts, bright Scarlet. Tertiary and primaries marked in black on vane inner, Green on vane outer; secondaries also bathed in black in vane outer; primary coverts of color green dark bathed in black. Under, the wing-coverts green. The underparts bright, pale and slightly yellowish-green. Upper, the tail Green dark with tips of color yellow and lateral feathers Blackish in vane internal with yellow tips; undertail, the tail Blackish with tips pale.

Bill coral red; irises reddish brown; legs grey-black.

Female It is predominantly green with a small red spot in the wings (only a point apical on coverts major interiors, but the increase in the external; restricted to the outer feathers of the median) that of the male, and do not have any black in the the mantle; vane outside of outer secondaries black. The Green is also more off, and a bit more yellowish in them underparts. The rump is of a blue more off, and the glitter blue in it crown and nape of the male, is absent in the female. Under, the tail has tips yellowish and touches of color pink.

The immature they are similar to the females, but with a irises more Brown and bill yellow from the beginning. Young males attain adult plumage in the third annual moult, but black can show the mantle feathers before this.

  • Sound of the Red-winged Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Papagayo Alirrojo.mp3]

Description 3 subspecies

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus coccineopterus

    (Gould) 1865 – Male with more blue in it crown and nape. Both sexes slightly paler, and the female also more off the Green that it nominal species.

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus erythropterus

    (Gmelin) 1788 – The nominal.

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus papua

    (Mayr & Rand) 1936

Habitat:

Resident, Although nomads in the edges of the range. Is semiarid and subtropical forests of eucalyptus and Casuarina, boedes of the Woods, riparian forests, thickets of acacia, mangroves, agricultural fields, scrub Cypress pine (Callitris), and the lowlands of the Savannah.

On the inside of Australia are mainly linked to the extension of wooded of the systems fluvial.

They are usually found in small groups of up to fifteen birds, rarely reach more of 50 individuals in a single flock. The largest groups are likely to form at the end of the breeding season when family groups gather in places of power.

The species is common and visible, but not particularly accessible; When resent, birds can fly some distance, often making strong sounds.

Sometimes associated with the Pale-headed Rosella and Mallee Ringneck, and they feed under the trees, Although it is more usual to see them on Earth to drink.

Reproduction:

The nesting You can start early, in the months of April or may in the North, but the southern main breeding season is from August to February. During the courtship, the male perches near the female, exposing your blue rump, and making sounds.

The nest normally found in a eucalyptus, and the eggs are put into a deep hole covered with scrap wood. Three to six white eggs are They incubated for around 20 days by the female, which is fed by the male until the eggs hatch. The young are cared for by both parents and they leave the nest in a five weeks.

Food:

The diet It includes seeds, fruit, flowers and insects; in the mangroves, the mistletoe (Loranthus) is your favorite diet.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 5.230.000 km2

The Red-winged Parrot (Aprosmictus erythropterus) are confined in Australia, in the coastal districts of the southeast of Irian Jaya (Indonesia) and in the Western Province (Papua New Guinea).

In New Guinea, the species is restricted to the region between the rivers Digul and Fly.

In Australia extends from about Broome, in Western Australia (registered West of Anna Plains, and southwest of the Cordillera de Edgar) through the Kimberley region, including some islands on the coast (Buccaneer and Bonaparte archipelago, Islands Osborne and Sir Graham Moore, and Admiralty Gulf Islands) in the Northern Territory, about Nicholson.

Extends northward up to the Cobourg peninsula and to the South, at the turn of the Cordillera Camfield and Dunmarra Roadhouse, reaching some coastal islands, including Melville and Groote Eylandt.

Extends to the East in Queensland, in the Nicholson River, are distributed in the Cape York Peninsula, with records by the coast, about Rockhampton (occasional southernmost), and reaching inside, about Dajarra, to the South of Mount Isa and Southeast, through the lower part of the Diamantina River, Windorah, Quilpie, Mitchell and San Jorge.

On the inside of New South Wales the end points of the range are in Inverell in the East, Gunnedah, Dubbo and Mudgee in the South and There is a, Menindee and Broken Hill, near the southern border of Australia.

They are also in the North, in the basin of the Darling river, and have been recorded in the South-East of Australia, around the Lake Eyre and North of Cooper Creek.

Wandering individuals have been recorded in Renmark and Victory Downs, in the latter, possibly from some exhaust.

Leaks have also been observed in Sydney and Melbourne.

The species is common in appropriate habitats, except in their range limits.

The world's population is above the 100.000individuals and the species is considered secure.

A moderate number of captivity.

Protected by law.

Distribution 3 subspecies:

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus coccineopterus

    (Gould) 1865 – South of New Guinea and Western Australia, to the East through the northern territory of the Cape York Peninsula, Queensland

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus erythropterus

    (Gmelin) 1788 – The nominal

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus papua

    (Mayr & Rand) 1936 – South of New Guinea

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Growing

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, Although it is estimated very above the 100.000 specimens.

The species, According to sources, is usually common and locally abundant (pit et to the. 1997).

The population is suspected that it may be in decline due to ongoing habitat destruction.

Redwing in captivity Papagayo:

Fairly common in Australia, not so much in other places.

Active, Acrobat; they require a large birdhouse with plenty of hangers. The male can become aggressive with the female.
Fairly quiet and shy.

Una muestra vivió 24,4 years in captivity.

Alternative names:

Red-winged Parrot, Red winged Parrot (English).
Perruche érythroptère, Perruche erythroptère (French).
Rotflügelsittich, Rotflügel-Sittich (German).
Periquito-de-encontro-vermelho (Portuguese).
Papagayo Alirrojo, Papagayo de Alas Rojas (Spanish).

Gmelin Johann Friedrich
Gmelin Johann Friedrich

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Aprosmictus
Scientific name: Aprosmictus erythropterus
Citation: (Gmelin, JF, 1788)
Protonimo: Psittacus erythropterus

Red-winged Parrot images:

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Red-winged Parrot (Aprosmictus erythropterus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– World Parrot Trust – parrots.org
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – By David Cook Wildlife Photography from Wamboin, NSW, Australia [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – By Jan Harenburg (Own work) [CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Aprosmictus erythropterus erythropterus – Orde Psittaciformes – Papegaaiachtigen
(4) – Red-Winged Parrot (Aprosmictus erythropterus) Male – Pine Creek, M. 7. – encimages
(5) – “Aprosmictus erythropterus-Australia-pair-8” di Kitykat79 – originally posted to Flickr as King Parrots!. With license CC BY 2.0 Transact Wikimedia Commons.
(6) – A painting of two Red-winged Parrots (originally captioned “Platycercus erythropterus. Crimson-winged parraket. 1. Male. 2.Female.”) by Edward Lear 1812-1888. The painting shows a female behind young male by Edward Lear [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Peter Woodall (Xeno-canto)

Olive-shouldered Parrot
Aprosmictus jonquillaceus

Olive-shouldered Parrot

Description

35 cm.. length and 130 g. of weight.

The Olive-shouldered Parrot (Aprosmictus jonquillaceus) has the head bright pale green. Mantle and back darker green color that the of the head and underparts, showing a blue diffusion; rump bright teal pale. Uppertail brighter yellowish green.

Upper, the wing feathers with small coverts fused in color yellow-green; Blue dark greenish in the curve of the wings; outer median coverts bright Scarlet, feathers interiors lit of color green yellowish with a bit of red in the tips. Large external coverts scarlet, feathers interiors light green, some showing red ends; some feathers turquoise green on the edge of the Carpus; primary coverts Green with broadcasting blue at the tips of the vane outer; secondary green medium, primaries medium green with blue diffusion in the coats of the feathers outermost. Wing feathers brighter yellowish green; underside of flight feather black. The underparts light green, more yellowish in them the thighs and undertail-coverts. Upper, the tail of color green dark with edges of color yellow, and with vane yellowish external to the lateral feathers; undertail, the tail of color Brown blackish with tips yellow, and with yellowish diffusion in vane outside of lateral feathers.

Bill orange red, with yellow tip; irises orange: legs Blackish grey.

The female lacks of the broadcast Blue in the the mantle, shows less contrast between the head and the the mantle, limb yellowish to them greater coverts red, and have them irises more Brown.

Immature has green, No greenish-yellow, in the wing-coverts and irises of Brown pale.

  • Sound of the Olive-shouldered Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Papagayo of Timor.mp3]

Subspecies description

  • Aprosmictus jonquillaceus wetterensis

    (Salvadori, 1891) – The male as the nominal but the coverts wing lower and Middle are of color green washed with yellow; the mantle and top of the back pale green, with less blue markings; less red on the outer half and the secondary wings covers; smaller.

    The female is like the female of the nominal species, but the uppertail-coverts darker green; slightly smaller in size.

    The youth as the youth of the nominal species, but with the uppertail-coverts darker green; smaller.

  • Aprosmictus jonquillaceus jonquillaceus

    (Vieillot, 1818) – The nominal

Habitat:

In Timor the species is found in forests, acacia savannas, primary and secondary forest, from sea level to the 2.200 m (2.600 meters altitude extreme). In Wetar, observed in 1990 in recently logged forests, near the coast.

The ecology of the species is probably similar to the of the Red-winged Parrot, but it is not well known; observations of birds that fly involve couples and small flocks. A couple allowed a closer approach, observing her in silence to three meters high in a big tree.

Reproduction:

Their reproductive habits are unknown, probably similar to the of the Red-winged Parrot.

Food:

Probably similar to the of the Red-winged Parrot: seeds, fruit, flowers and insects; in the mangroves, the mistletoe is your favorite food.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 28.500 km2

Endemic and fairly common in Timor (for example, about Camplong, Kupang, Lelogama, Mutis and Dili), Wetar and Roti.

The world population is estimated at around 10.000 specimens and it is probably stable, but as the species the majority of parrots from Indonesia is vulnerable to capture and habitat loss. A number of moderate in captivity.

Distribution of subspecies:

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The total population has been estimated at 10,000 individuals (Lambert et to the., 1993), probably including mature individuals 6,700.

The population is suspected that it may be declining due to the continuous destruction of the habitat and unsustainable levels of exploitation.

Ongoing conservation actions

Appendix II of CITES. Quotas were imposed during the Decade zero of 1990 While there was uncertainty about the total size of the population, but these are not met.

Conservation Actions Proposed

• Review estimates of the population of the species and review the impact of the trade in their numbers.
• Determine if the decreases are still evident.
• Protect areas of suitable habitat.

Parrotfish Timor in captivity:

Game, with low noise level, aggressive with other birds. You can require deworming.

Very rare in captivity

Alternative names:

Olive-shouldered Parrot, Jonquil Parrot, Olive shouldered Parrot, Timor Parrot, Timor Red-winged Parrot (English).
Perruche jonquille (French).
Timorsittich, Timor Sittich (German).
Periquito-de-asa-vermelha-de-timor (Portuguese).
Papagayo de Timor (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Aprosmictus
Scientific name: Aprosmictus jonquillaceus
Citation: (Vieillot, 1818)
Protonimo: Psittacus jonquillaceus

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Olive-shouldered Parrot (Aprosmictus jonquillaceus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Aprosmictus Jonquillaceus – LoroMania

Sounds: Mike Nelson (Xeno-canto)

Australian King-Parrot
Alisterus scapularis

Australian King-Parrot

Description

39-43 cm.. length between 195 and 275 g. of weight.

Australian King-Parrot

The Australian King-Parrot (Alisterus scapularis) is very similar to the Moluccan King-Parrot but larger.

It has the head and bright Scarlet underparts, with the exception of the coverts black infracaudales, with large red tips. Narrow rear necklace with mixture of the dark blue to dark green of the mantle (the mantle fringed darker feathers still); lower back and rump, dark blue. Pale necklaces, slightly greenish-blue, forming a distinctive 'taut'; Green wing coverts, and green flight feathers with vane Blackish internal. Under, feathers dark green bathed in blue wing. Upper, Black tail with a light blue bathroom in the vane external side feathers; undertail, Black tail.

Bright coral red beak, with black tips; iris yellow ; grey legs.

Strong dimorphism in female, with the Crown and green upper parts (including supracaudales coverts and tail, but not the Croup which is a lighter blue than in males). The face and the chest are coloured green opaque with a reddish spread warm. Females may occasionally show some pale necklaces. The infracaudales coverts are green, very red-tipped. The Central tail feathers are green, the lateral blackish with narrow pink tips.

The peak is a blackish brown dark.

The immature birds are like females, but with a pale beak and dark iris.

Younger females are less red below. Males get the adult plumage during a slow change that starts around of the 16 months, and continue for others 14 a 15 months.

  • Sound of the Australian King-Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Papagayo Australiano.MP3]

Subspecies Alisterus scapularis:

  • Alisterus scapularis minor Mathews, 1911 – Same as the nominal species, but smaller.
  • Alisterus scapularis scapularis (Lichtenstein, 1816) – The nominal

Habitat:

The Australian King-Parrot disperse, regularly, After the breeding season, in wooded areas, reaching altitudes of 1.625 m, Although rarely seen on top of the 1.200 m, from where come down to more open habitats; they have seen other apparently climate-related movements. They can travel moderate distance; a ringed bird was recovered to 270 kilometers from their place of origin.

During the breeding season, they are often found in dense forests (sclerophyllous forest wet), wooded streams and associated habitats, including more open eucalyptus forests and savannahs bordering riparian forests.

Outside the breeding season, they are in a wider variety of habitats, including the cultivated areas, parks, orchards and occasionally suburban gardens.

They are usually in pairs or small groups, Although the post-breeding immatures can form groups of up to 50 or more birds. The Australian King-Parrot, often, they sit in a visible way on high exposed branches. When feed, However, the birds are still cautious and fairly quiet. They gather to eat early in the morning, sometimes in mixed groups with Rosella parakeets and other parrots. They remain silent during the warmest part of the day, to re-enable the afternoon.

Noisy flocks, often, they might be returning to the roosts at night.

Reproduction:

During courtship, males move head, the wings and inflate their feathers; the female responds with Wiggles head, and asking for food. The breeding season extends from September to February. The nest is a hollow in a tree dead or alive (often a large eucalyptus with hollow tips). The entrance of the nest is usually at a certain height. Between three and six (usually four) eggs are deposited in a deep hollow on a bed of wood dust. The female incubates alone during 20 days, with the male in the vicinity to provide food.

The young remain in the nest during 5 weeks, after which they leave the nest and remain with their parents.

Food:

The diet consists of fruit, berries, nuts, seeds, insect larvae, flowers, outbreaks and other vegetable materials. The species is also fond of mistletoe VISCUM album, eucalyptus and acacia trees. It can cause damage in orchards and fields, usually in search of potato, the maize and other crops.

When feed, They argue the food with their legs, and extract with its beak. If you bother, These parrots flying quickly to hide, but they can become tame in some inhabited areas.

Distribution:

The Australian King-Parrot is distributed along the East coast of Australia, in the interior of the western slopes of the Great dividing range, extending from Cooktown in the North of Queensland, to the South, the District of Atherton, then through Eungella, Blackall, MooNiE and in New South Wales, where it reaches inside approximately in Bingara, Mudgee and Albury. In Victoria is limited to the South-East, being Portland its southwestern boundary.

It is common in Canberra, especially during autumn and winter, and birds Getaways, occasionally seen in Adelaide, along the Murray River and in the West of Victoria.

The species can also be seen in Fraser, Stradbroke and Broughton Islands.

The world's population is considered that it is far superior to 50.000 specimens and stable, While may have been affected by trade and some degree of habitat loss.

Distribution subspecies Alisterus scapularis:

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, Although it is estimated over the 50,000 specimens.

The species, According to sources, It is generally common, but may be declining due to deforestation and the destruction of their habitat in course (pit et to the. 1997).

Australian parrot in captivity:

Fairly common in Australia, not so much in other places.

Sweet disposition, tame; It will tolerate other species outside the breeding season.

Alternative names:

Australian King-Parrot, Australian King Parrot, Blood Rosella, King Lory, King Parakeet, King Parrot, King-Red Lory, Queensland King-Parrot, Scarlet-and-Green Parrot, Southern King-Parrot, Spud Parrot (English).
Perruche royale (French).
Königssittich, Königsittich (German).
Periquito-rei-australiano (Portuguese).
Papagayo Australiano, Papagayo Real Australiano (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Alisterus
Scientific name: Alisterus scapularis
Citation: (Lichtenstein, MHC, 1816)
Protonimo: Psittacus scapularis

Australian King-Parrot images:

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Australian King-Parrot (Alisterus scapularis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – “Alisterus scapularis (male) -Bunya Mountains-8” by Arthur Chapman – originally posted to Flickr as Alisterus scapularis (Australian King Parrot). Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
(2) – By Andy (originally posted to Flickr as King Parrot Couple) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – By Geoff Penaluna from Australia (Female King parrotUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – By Jan from Singapore, Singapore [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – “Alisterus scapularis-Commonwealth Park, Canberra, Australia-male-8” by Duncan McCaskillPicasa Web Albums. Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
(6) – HBW Alive – hbw

Sounds: Diego Caiafa (Xeno-canto)

Papuan King-Parrot
Alisterus chloropterus

Papuan King-Parrot

Description

36 cm.. length between 138 and 190 g. of weight.

The Papuan King-Parrot (Alisterus chloropterus) It has a bright red head, wide rear collar of blue stretching at the nape to the back of the Crown and sides of the upper part of the chest. Blackish green mantle, apparently black in the field; lower part of the back, buttocks and supracaudales coverts Dark Violet.

Dark green wings with large patch of yellowish-green through the lower, internal medium and more large inner coverts; Green flight feathers, with vane Dark internal. Under, the wing coverts blue-violet. Bright red bottoms, with hidden dark bases to the coverts infracaudales. Upper, tail bluish black; Black down.

Black beaks with a red upper mandible base; Orange iris; feet of color grey blackish.

The female of color green for over, devoid of the pale in wings patch, with a dark blue rump and blackish tail. Head and upper part of the chest of green (reddish mottled), and the rest of of the Red bottoms. Under, the Green wing coverts. Coverts with dark centers infracaudales, but this is less evident in the Australian females. That base with more Brown in the upper jaw in males.

Young as females, but with tips to the tail feathers pink, a greener chest, and a peak and iris darker.

  • Sound of the Papuan King-Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Papagayo Papu.mp3]

Subspecies description

  • Alisterus chloropterus chloropterus

    (Ramsay, EP 1879), the nominal subspecies.

  • Alisterus chloropterus callopterus

    (Albertis & Salvadori 1879) – Male with blue band narrow through the mantle, It does not extend to the rear of the Crown. More green in the mantle.

  • Alisterus chloropterus moszkowskii

    (Reichenow 1911) – Sexes generally similar. Male has no or only shows a blue light in the back of the neck band, and it has the mantle and signs on the sides of the chest of green. Male with violet that extends more down in the back that the nominal species. Both sexes can display tips pink tail feathers. Immature with narrower and more off the wings patch. Green marks on the chest.

Habitat:

They are distributed in the dense forests from close to sea level until the 2.800 m. The birds are also sometimes found in cultivated areas, at higher altitudes, in more open habitats with casuarinas, and in areas of secondary growth. To the Papuan Parrot hears them more frequently of what seen, and are more frequently asked vislumbrados flying between the trees through breaks in the forest.

Bird alone, couples or groups of up to ten copies, they feed on silently and discreetly in the lower floors and half-height of the forests, and they can be addressed a short distance when they deliberately leave in search of fruits, seeds, berries and nuts; When resent, they usually only fly within walking distance.

Reproduction:

Little-known cycle of reproduction, but nesting, According to sources, begins in the month of March with two or three eggs in the implementation. The period of incubation is of 21 days, and the incipient takes 35 days. Young people reach the independence in 50 days.

Food:

Fruits, seeds, berries and nuts

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 324.000 km2

The Papuan King-Parrot extends from North of Cenderawasih Bay, to the East, about Aitape on the North Coast. Although locally common, the species is probably suffering due to the trade of birds. The world population is estimated at around 70.000 birds.

Distribution of subspecies:

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, Although it is estimated at around 70,000 specimens.

The species is reported as locally common (pit et to the. 1997).

The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

Papuan parrot in captivity:

Active Parrot; need extra space because of the tendency that has to turn into an apathetic or lethargic in a small cage bird. It is not very loud. The dietary changes must occur slowly. It has a tendency to internal parasites.

Very rare in captivity.

Alternative names:

Papuan King-Parrot, Green-winged King Parrot, Green-winged King-Parrot, Papuan King Parrot (English).
Perruche à ailes vertes, Perruche royale à ailes vertes, Perruche royale de Papouasie (French).
Papuasittich (German).
Periquito-rei-de-asa-verde (Portuguese).
Papagayo Papú, Papagayo Real de Alas Verdes (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Alisterus
Scientific name: Alisterus chloropterus
Citation: (Ramsay, EP, 1879)
Protonimo: Aprosmictus chloropterus

Papuan King-Parrot Images:

————————————————————————————————

Papuan King-Parrot (Alisterus chloropterus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Wikipedia
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – “Alisterus chloropterus-Jurong Bird Park-male-8a” by Peter Tan – originally posted to Flickr as Australian King Parrot. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
(2) – “Alisterus chloropterus-Grant’ s picnic ground-in tree-8” by Jade Craven – originally posted to Flickr as King Parrot at Grants Picnic Ground. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
(3) – Birds and Birds – Parrocchetto reale aliverdi
(4) – Bottom view of a male perched on a branch by Carmelo López – Lynx
(5) – franz.kulman

Sounds: Sam Woods (Xeno-canto)

Moluccan King-Parrot
Alisterus amboinensis

Moluccan King-Parrot

Description

35 a 40 cm.. length between 145 and 163 g. of weight.

Moluccan King-Parrot

The Moluccan King-Parrot (Alisterus amboinensis) has a head, neck, the nape of the neck and the upper mantle of bright red, with strong demarcation to dark blue-violet in the lower mantle, back, buttocks and supracaudales coverts. Green wings with the exception of the blue in the small inner coverts and carpal edge. Under, black wings with blue-violet coverts. Bright red bottoms, with mauve bases to coverts infracaudales, sometimes visible; flanks with a little blue. Upper, the very dark blue colal; below black grey color wide-margin rose to the side feathers.

Peak with a base of orange-red in the upper jaw, Blackish lower; Orange iris; black grey legs.

The two sexes, somatic sexual dimorphism is not presented..

Immature with more green in the back; Brown-Black beaks; pale eye-ring and darker than the adults of iris. Dotted pink on the outer tail feathers. Mature in one year.

  • Sound of the Moluccan King-Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Papagayo Moluqueno.mp3]
List of subspecies Alisterus amboinensis
Subspecies
  • Alisterus amboinensis amboinensis (Linnaeus, 1766) – The nominal
  • Alisterus amboinensis buruensis (Salvadori, 1876) – As the subspecies sulaensis but with more feathers in the tail with pink edges. Blackish grey peak in both sexes
  • Alisterus amboinensis dorsalis (Quoy & Gaimard, 1830) – As the nominal but the rose of the absent tail feathers; Red slightly darker on the head and underparts.
  • Alisterus amboinensis hypophonius (S. Muller, 1843) – As the nominal, but the wings and the deep blue wing coverts; the rose in the absent tail feathers
  • Alisterus amboinensis sulaensis (Reichenow, 1881) – As the nominal, but with a green stripe across the upper mantle; No rim with pink in the tail feathers.
  • Alisterus amboinensis versicolor (Neumann, 1939) – Unlike the subspecies sulaensis by having a uniform blue mantle; smaller in size than the nominal.

Habitat:

The Parrot Moluqueno is distributed through the dense humid primary and secondary forest, and from time to time in the adjacent plantations, farmland and gardens, from the lowlands up to around the 2.100 meters above sea level.

The birds are usually found in pairs or in small groups, and are very quiet while they eat and shy at all times, hiding in the thick foliage and flying in the midst of strident calls at the first sign of the emergence of any intruder.

Reproduction:

Just nothing is known of the cycle of reproduction in the wild, but according to sources, nesting takes place between the months of February and April.

Two young birds nests have been found on two occasions in hollow trees.

An instance of the breeding in captivity gave data for the incubation of 19 days, with the emerging young in nine weeks.
The courtship was observed during feeding, and two eggs were deposited.

Food:

The diet includes acorns Lithocarpus, as well as the hard fruits, outbreaks and other forest tree berries.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 149.000 km2

Is distributed from Peleng and Sula Islands eastward through the Moluccas, including Halmahera, Buru, Ambon and Seram. Also found in the Western Islands of Papua, including Waigeo, Batanta and Salawati.

In New Guinea is from Vogelkop and East of the Bomberai peninsula some 135 ° E.

Generally rare due to habitat loss and trade in birds.

Distribution subspecies Alisterus amboinensis
Subspecies
  • Alisterus amboinensis amboinensis (Linnaeus, 1766) – The nominal
  • Alisterus amboinensis buruensis (Salvadori, 1876) – Is located in Buru in the center of the Moluccas.
  • Alisterus amboinensis dorsalis (Quoy & Gaimard, 1830) – Is located in West Papua.
  • Alisterus amboinensis hypophonius (S. Muller, 1843) – Endemic of Halmahera in the North of the Moluccas.
  • Alisterus amboinensis sulaensis (Reichenow, 1881) – Is located in the Sula Islands
  • Alisterus amboinensis versicolor (Neumann, 1939) – It is endemic in the Peleng island of the Banggai Islands

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, but the species is described as generally common, Although rare in Halmahera.

The nominal subspecies population is estimated at 70.000 specimens (pit et to the. 1997).

The population is suspected to be declining due to the destruction of habitat in course.

Moluccan Papagayo in captivity:

Occasionally available.

Nervous, is a bird a pet bird.

In captivity will have failed to reproduce.

In the Zoological gardens of Loro Parque, Tenerife, on Canary Islands, biologists Dr. Burkard and Dr. Gerlach they have made so large colonies, but since 1972 they have succeeded until now non.

More information on loromania

Alternative names:

Moluccan King-Parrot, Amboina King Parrot, Amboina King-Parrot, Ambon King-Parrot, Moluccan King Parrot (English).
Perruche tricolore, Perruche royale d’Amboine (French).
Amboinasittich (German).
Periquito-rei-amboina (Portuguese).
Papagayo Moluqueño, Papagayo Real de Amboina (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Alisterus
Scientific name: Alisterus amboinensis
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1766)
Protonimo: Psittacus amboinensis

Moluccan King-Parrot images :

————————————————————————————————

Moluccan King-Parrot (Alisterus amboinensis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– World Parrot Trust – parrots.org

Photos:

(1) – “Alisterus amboinensis-Brevard Zoo-8a-ec” by Alisterus_amboinensis_-brevard_zoo-8a.jpg: Malinderivative work: Snowmanradio (talk) – originally posted to Flickr as Purdy Birdy and uploaded to commons at Alisterus_amboinensis_-brevard_zoo-8a.jpg. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
(2) – By richard broderick (T0010716uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Brevard Zoo – Melbourne, FL, USA © 2004 Jeff Whitlock – The Online Zoo
(4) – Brevard Zoo – Melbourne, FL, USA © 2004 Jeff Whitlock – The Online Zoo
(5) – Vogelpark, Alphen Aan Den Rijn – ZOOTOGRAFIANDO
(6) – “Swainson king parakeet” by William John Swainson – Transferred from en.Wikipedia. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Sounds: Frank Lambert (Xeno-canto)

Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot
Micropsitta bruijnii

 Microloro Pechirrojo

Description

9 cm.. length between 12 and 16 g. of weight.

The crown of the tiny Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta bruijnii) various of pink to Brown towards the nape; cheeks, chin and ear-coverts, pale pink; line that goes from the eyes up to the nape, iridescent blue. Band wide in the part back from the nape, iridescent blue, rest of the upper region Green with fine dark margins. The flight feather Black finely lined in green; under wing-coverts Green with centers black. Feathers of the wings grey-black.

The underparts are pink, with collar narrow blue iridescent in the part superior of the chest, merging is in color green in them lower flanks and blue in the part back from the neck; sides chest, blue. Uppertail Pink dark. Central feathers of the tail of color blue opaque, dotted black; Black yellow-orange-tipped outer.

Bill grey, cere pink, irises brown; legs grey.

Female mainly green and devoid of underparts Roses and the neck Blue of the male. The crown Pink is replaced by the blue (with the exception of the front that is pink), and uppertail-coverts are of color green yellow, not pink. The wing feathers show some brands of color green and the throat is grayish white.

Immature are like females, but are orange in the underparts, and they have forecrown and lores White.

Note: The name scientific bruijnii commemorates the Dutch merchant's feathers Antonie Augustus Bruijn.

  • Sound of the Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.ma Vasco care of s.o rg/wp-co Interahamwe nt/the the s/i the ge le ss_gra y_be you ty/so low due s/Mi croloro Pechirrojo.MP3]
Description 5 subspecies
  • Micropsitta bruijnii bruijnii

    (Salvadori, 1875) – Nominal.

  • Micropsitta bruijnii buruensis

    (Arndt, 1999)

  • Micropsitta bruijnii necopinata

    (Hartert, 1925) – Crown the male is brown with a yellowish Center. The cheeks, the throat and the part middle of the chest and abdomen are reddish in colour. The uppertail-coverts are yellow. The female is like the female of the nominal but the crown is more purple-blue.

  • Micropsitta bruijnii pileata

    (Mayr, 1940) – The male has the crown of color red more dark that the nominal, and extends below, to nuchal collar blue.

  • Micropsitta bruijnii rosea

    (Mayr, 1940) – The Red of the underparts is richer, but restricted to the center of the part inferior of the chest and the abdomen. The Red of the cheeks and Arch of crown also is more rich. Female as the female of the nominal.

  • Note: Birds observed recently in OBI, Center-North of Moluccas, possibly belong to a new subspecies. (Mittermeier, J.C., Cottee-Jones, H.E.W., PURBA, E.C., Attack, M.., Hesdianti E. & Supriatna, J. (2013)
    A survey of the avifauna of Obi island, North Moluccas, Indonesia. Forktail 29: 128-137.)

Habitat:

The microloro pechirrojo they can be observed in primary and secondary forests on mountain, along the forest margins, and also have been recorded in the Albizia moluccana, in coffee plantations. They are usually between 500 and 3.000 m, but they can be found at lower altitudes. There is a record of a wandering bird observed at the level of the sea.

The species is usually found in pairs or in groups of up to 20 individuals, quickly moving in small groups through the second half of upper canopy. They are most commonly by their sharp calls.

Birds prefer the dead trees and can “Skip” from one branch to another in search of fungi and lichens for food. They also take fruit and flowers.

Unlike other Pygmy parrots, they build their cavities for nesting on the sides of the dead trees, not in termite mounds. Tunnel entrance leads up into the cavity and enter by the back. One of the reported tunnels had 100 x 55 mm. with a coating of wood inside.

Reproduction:

The breeding season, According to sources, is between the months of December and April. The nest It is a hole in a stump or dead tree to an altitude that ranges between 3 and 4 meters above the ground; apparently one of these nests counted with the presence of one male and two females.

Food:

Fungi and lichens, Sometimes they feed on fruit and flowers.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 269.000 km2

The Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot are distributed by the islands of Buru and Seram, and in the mountain forests along the New Guinea, the Bismarck Archipelago, and three of the Solomon Islands. In New Guinea, are observed in the mountains Tamrau and Parotia of Vogelkop, along the Onin peninsula, and through the central mountain range, including the mountains, Kubor, and coming up to Adelbert, Saruwaged and Owen Stanley ranges in the North and Southeast. There are also in New Britain and New Ireland (Hans Meyer Range) and in Bougainville, Kolombangara and Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands.

Distribution 5 subspecies

    Conservation:

    • Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

    • Population trend: Stable

    The size of the world population It has not been quantified, probably over the 100,000 specimens. The species is released between common and rare due to deforestation and loss of habitat in this limited range.

    The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

    Microloro pechirrojo in captivity:

    It is not in captivity. Difficult to keep alive for more than a few hours or days.

    Alternative names:

    Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot, Mountain Pygmy Parrot, Mountain Pygmy-Parrot, Red breasted Pygmy Parrot, Red-breasted Pygmy Parrot, Rose-breasted Pygmy Parrot (English).
    Micropsitte de Bruijn, Perruche pygmée de Bruijn (French).
    Rotbrust-Spechtpapagei (German).
    Papagaio-pigmeu-de-peito-vermelho (Portuguese).
    Microloro de la Montaña, Microloro Pechirrojo (Spanish).

    Salvadori Tommaso

    Scientific classification:

    Order: Psittaciformes
    Family: Psittaculidae
    Genus: Meeki
    Scientific name: Micropsitta bruijnii
    Citation: (Salvadori, 1875)
    Protonimo: Nasiterna bruijnii

    Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot images:

    Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot
    ————————————————————————————————

    Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta bruijnii)

    Sources:

    Avibase
    – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    – Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – A pair was found foraging on the trunk of a tree By high mehdhalaouate – lynx
    (2) – © Bernard Van Elegem – bernardvanelegem

    Sounds: Hans Matheve (Xeno-canto)

Finsch's Pygmy-Parrot
Micropsitta finschii

Finsch's Pygmy-Parrot

Description

9,5 cm. length between 12 and 18 g. of weight.

Finsch's Pygmy-Parrot

The head of the Finsch's Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta finschii) is bright green, slightly yellowish, dotted with pale blue in the chin and throat. Upperparts bright green, with fine darker stripes. The flight feather they are black with fine green edges; wing feathers greenish yellow. The underparts pale yellowish green with fine darker stripes and feather in the center of the belly orange-red; uppertail-coverts yellow, the longest with bluish-green tips. Upper, the tail is off blue, Black in the Center and sides with blue and yellow tips; below, the tail is black with yellow tips.

Bill blackish; cere Pink ; irises orange red; legs grey.

Cere rose in the male, grey in the female. The females they lack the red marks in the underparts and they have pink feathers, not blue, on chin.

Immature with bill grayish and reddish brown, not orange-red, the irises.

In the juvenile birds the cere is greyish in both sexes. Males immature of the species nominal lack of the chin Blue and red markings in the abdomen.

  • Sound of the Finsch's Pygmy-Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Microloro de Finsch.mp3]

Subspecies description

  • Micropsitta finschii finschii

    (EP Ramsay, 1881) – The nominal.

  • Micropsitta finschii nanina (Tristram, 1891) – The adults have a stain blue in the part superior of the crown.
  • Micropsitta finschii viridifrons

    (Rothschild & ECTION Hartert, 1899) – Adults have a large blue spot at the top of the crown and blue tones to the sides of the face.

  • Micropsitta finschii tristami

    (Rothschild & ECTION Hartert, 1902) – Adults do not have blue spots and orange

  • Micropsitta finschii aolae

    (Ogilvie-Grant, 1888) – Adults have the upperparts darker and have a blue spot on the top of the crown.

Habitat:

Most common in the lowland primary forest at medium altitude, are observed to the 900 meters above sea level (lower limit of cloud forests where they are replaced by the Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot, but they are distributed in a variety of habitats, including weed gardens, casuarinas, secondary growth, areas of open scrubland and occasionally coconut (Cocos nucifera). It's a vociferous and active species, difficult to observe. They are alone, in pairs or in groups of 3 a 6 birds. They feed on acrobatic form, down with your head upside down and using their tails as support on the bark of the trees.

Reproduction:

One or two eggs are deposited by the female in a cavity excavated over a period of several weeks in an active nest of tree termites (that is also used for the rest). Adults were observed with calves in January of 1995 in the South of New Ireland. The period of reproduction It speculates that may be between March and Mayo.

Food:

Peck the trunks and branches of the tree tops and medium height plants to glean Lichens and fungi, also noticed them is feeding of seeds of Casuarina.

Distribution:

Are found in the Bismarck Archipelago including New Hanover, Tabar, Lihir and New Ireland, through Bougainville in the Solomon Islands in Choiseul, Santa Isabel, Malaita, Vella Lavella, Gizo, Kolombangara, New Georgia, Rendova, the Russell Islands, the Islands of Florida, Nggela Sule, Guadalcanal, Uki and San Cristóbal.

Distribution of subspecies:

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, supposedly above 100.000 specimens. The species according to sources, It is abundant within its range (pit et to the. 1997).

The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

In captivity:

Not found in captivity.
This species only has been live for short periods in captivity; new birds may refuse foods completely.

Alternative names:

Finsch’s Pygmy-Parrot, Emerald Pygmy Parrot, Finsch’s Pygmy Parrot, Green Pygmy Parrot, Green Pygmy-Parrot (ingles).
Micropsitte de Finsch (francés).
Salomonenspechtpapagei, Salomonen-Spechtpapagei (alemán).
Micropsitta finschii (portugués).
Microloro de Finsch (español).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Micropsitta finschii
Genus: Meeki
Citation: (Ramsay,EP, 1881)
Protonimo: Nasiterna Finschii

————————————————————————————————

Finsch's Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta finschii)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
Wikipedia

Photos:

(1) – A bird foraging on a trunk by Josep del Hoyo – lynx
(2) – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M

Sounds: Mark Todd (Xeno-canto)

Meek's Pygmy-Parrot
Micropsitta meeki

Meek's Pygmy-Parrot

Description

10 cm. length.

Microloro-of-Meek-(2)

The Meek's Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta meeki) has the feathers of the head dark brown, strongly scalloped in color yellow on them ear-coverts and the sides of the throat, and usually with the eyebrows in a vague color yellow; feathers of the crown with fine greyish yellow tips.

Upperparts dark green, darker on the margins and the Center to the Middle coverts black. Feathers primary Black with green trim; secondaries mainly green. Wing feathers more dark with the tips of color yellow; underside of flight feather blackish. Top of the chest and centre of belly, opaque yellow, with brown spots at the tips of the feathers; flanks color green dark; under the tail, coverts yellow. Tail greenish blue in the Center, feathers laterales blackish with stains yellow on the tips or with pointed blue and yellow.

Bill yellow rose pale; irises yellowish brown; legs Pink.

Similar to males females.

  • Sound of the Meek's Pygmy-Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Microloro the Meek.mp3]

Subspecies

  • Micropsitta meeki meeki

    : (Rothschild and Hartert, 1914) – The nominal.

  • Micropsitta meeki proxima

    : (Rothschild and Hartert, 1924) – The face is more pale and the grey more beige that the of the nominal species; light diffusion of greenish color instead of the yellow markings of the nominal, and a band front yellow with find in them eyebrows.

Habitat:

Not well known. It occurs in forests, high secondary growth, and even in trees around inhabited areas. The birds are found in small groups. Habits are like those of the Buff-faced Pygmy-Parrot.

Reproduction:

The nest It tend to build in a mound of termites tree, Sometimes it can be very close to the ground.

Food:

Feed of lichens and fungi collected from trunks of trees.
They nourish also of seeds, nuts, berries and fallen fruit that can be found, Although they prefer to eat fruits of plants. They also feed on insects and insect larvae.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 2,400 km2

Endemic to the forests of the lowlands, until 700 meters of altitude on the Islands in the Northwest Bismarck Archipelago including Manus, Lou and Rambutyo in the Group of Admiralty and Mussau and Emira in the Group of San Matías.

Of the two subspecies:

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, It is thought that it may be above the 10,000 specimens. The species according to sources is common both in Manus as Lou (pit et to the. 1997).

The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

Microloro Meek captive:

Not found in captivity.

While attempts have been made to keep Pygmy parrots in captivity, These have not been successful. This may be due to the fact that birds suffer from stress or a lack of understanding of their dietary needs.

Alternative names:

Meek’s Pygmy-Parrot, Citrine Pygmy Parrot, Meek’s Pygmy Parrot, Yellow-breasted Pygmy Parrot, Yellow-breasted Pygmy-parrot (English).
Micropsitte de Meek (French).
Meekspechtpapagei, Meek-Papagei (German).
Micropsitta meeki (Portuguese).
Microloro de Meek (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Meeki
Scientific name: Micropsitta meeki
Citation: Rothschild & Hartert, 1914
Protonimo: Micropsitta meeki

————————————————————————————————

Meek's Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta meeki)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
(2) – Meek’ s Pygmy-Parrot on Manus – BIRDING AROUND THE WORLD

Sounds: Frank Lambert (Xeno-canto)

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