Geelvink Pygmy-Parrot
Micropsitta geelvinkiana


Geelvink Pygmy-Parrot

Description

The Geelvink Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta geelvinkiana) has 9 cm.. length between 13 and 17 g. of weight.

Geelvink Pygmy-Parrot

The coverts headphones are of color brown with fusion to blue-green in the part rear; crown purple-blue; Upperparts green, Middle coverts with centers of color blackish. The flight feather Black with narrow green borders in vane outer. The underparts Green Center of chest and belly ocher-yellow, more warm towards the part superior of the chest. Uppertail Yellow. Central feathers of the tail blue, Green Tips with yellow spots and black exterior.

The bill grey; irises of color red or brown orange; legs grey.

Female with less blue of the crown and underparts greenish yellow.

Immature with the bill most of yellow and grey tip.

  • Sound of the Geelvink Pygmy-Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Microloro the Geelvink.mp3]

Subspecies description

  • Micropsitta geelvinkiana geelvinkiana

    : (Schlegel, 1871) – The nominal

  • Micropsitta geelvinkiana misoriensis

    : (Salvadori, 1876) – The male has the head Brown marks on the belly yellow and orange. Female with the crown Blue and underparts greenish.

Habitat:

With distributes in lowland, secondary growth, cultivated areas with isolated trees, and around native gardens, until 300 meters or higher altitudes. The birds are found in groups of 4-5. and is them has seen associate it with other birds in them trees low of berries that accrued in the forest. Very shy.

Reproduction:

They dig caves in termite tree in which to lay their eggs (also used for rest cavities at night), often close to the ground. The nesting It was observed from mid-June to August. Arndt He found two young in a nest which were visited by the female every two hours. The camera was full of dust from the Termite Mound and contained some shell of broken eggs and feathers.

Food:

Probably Lichen and fungi from the bark of the trees. As in other Meeki, crushed seeds were found in the stomach of a bird collected.

Distribution:

Size distribution (reproduction / resident): 2,500 km2

Are observed only in Numfor and Biak Islands, (Indonesia), up to about 300 meters above sea level. In 1991 It was thought that the global population was around of 10.000 and stable, but in 1997 searches for the species over a period of 12 days he suggested either that was rare or that easily overlooked, with observations on a single day, sometimes only with sound contacts.

Distribution of subspecies:

  • Micropsitta geelvinkiana geelvinkiana

    : (Schlegel, 1871) – Nominal

  • Micropsitta geelvinkiana misoriensis

    : (Salvadori, 1876) – Present in Biak island.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the world population It has not been quantified; in 1991 It was estimated in approximately 10,000 specimens. The species is described as well distributed in good numbers in primary and secondary lowland forests (pit et to the. 1997).

There are no data on population trends, but the species is suspected that it is decreasing at a rate of slow to moderate, due to loss of habitat.

Microloro Geelvink in captivity:

Not found in poultry farming.

Alternative names:

Geelvink Pygmy-Parrot, Geelvink Bay Pygmy Parrot, Geelvink Pygmy Parrot (English).
Micropsitte de Geelvink (French).
Geelvinkspechtpapagei, Geelvink-Spechtpapagei (German).
Micropsitta geelvinkiana (Portuguese).
Microloro de Geelvink (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Micropsitta geelvinkiana
Genus: Meeki
Citation: (Schlegel, 1871)
Protonimo: Nasiterna pygmaea Geelvinkiana

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Geelvink Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta geelvinkiana)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A juvenile bird on the termite mount (nest). by mehdhalaouate – lynx
(2) – “Nasiternageelvinkianakeulemans” by John Gerrard KeulemansOrnithological Miscellany. Volume 1. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Sounds: George Wagner (Xeno-canto)

Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot
Micropsitta keiensis

Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot

Description

9,5 cm. length between 11 and 14 g. of weight.

Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot

The crown of the Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta keiensis) is yellow ocher, with a warm brown in forecrown; lores, chin and area under the eyes, brown; coverts outpus, dark green, tending to lighter green on cheeks and throat.

Upperparts, dark green with center at wing-coverts and feathers of black color with a black colored margin extrecho; flight feather black with vane Green external; feathers wings green. The underparts are yellowish-green, with fine dark stripes; undertail-coverts yellow and green. Upper, the tail It is iridescent, slightly greenish blue in the Center, Foreign feathers blackish with yellow spot on the ends. Under, the tail dark blue and yellow.

Bill dark grey; irises brown; legs dark gray.

Both sexes similar.
Immature like females but with bill pale yellow.

  • Sound of the Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Microloro las Kai.MP3]

Description 3 subspecies

  • Micropsitta keiensis keiensis

    (Salvadori, 1876) – the subspecies nominal.

  • Micropsitta keiensis viridipectus

    (Rothschild, 1911) – Similar a nominal, but darker.

  • Micropsitta keiensis chloroxantha

    (Oberholser, 1917) – The mature more muted. The underparts with red markings male, dyed yellowish in female.

Habitat:

It inhabits in the forests of lowlands, in secondary growth and, sometimes around inhabited areas and coconut trees. The ecology species is similar to that of the Buff-faced Pygmy-Parrot. The birds are alone, in pairs or in small groups, and they can be distributed by undergrowth to some 20 meters above the ground. They climb on trunks and branches, and they can go down head, in inverted position, sometimes.

Reproduction:

Nest and roost Termites in tree cavities, the cavity they dig for themselves; the passageways of the tunnel going upwards and can be folded before arriving at the nido-camara. up the laying two white eggs deposited in a cavity unlined (dimensions around 20 cm x 15 cm.), and they can be occupied by other adults roost (up to four) during the breeding season. The exact role of these visiting birds is unknown, It is thought that they can help with the tasks of nest. nesting It has been recorded from October to March

Food:

With feed lichen, fungi, seeds, fruits and insects. Most of the Lichen directly collected it from the surface of the bark of the trees.

Distribution:

Size of its range (breeding/resident): 763.000 km2

The Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot is distributed among the Islands of Papua, in the West area, including Waigeo, Gébé, Kofiau, Salawati and Misool; through Vogelkop and Onin peninsula (West Papua Province); in the Kai and Aru Islands, and in the South of New Guinea between Mimika and the Fly River. The species is common to scale local.

Distribution 3 subspecies:

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, It is estimated over the 100,000 specimens.

The species, According to sources, It is considered very common within its range (pit et to the. 1997).

The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

Kai microloro of captive:

Not usually survive in captivity.

Alternative names:

Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot, Yellow capped Pygmy Parrot, Yellow-capped Pygmy Parrot (English).
Micropsitte pygmée (French).
Gelbkappen-Spechtpapagei (German).
Micropsitta keiensis (Portuguese).
Microloro de Kai, Microloro de las Kai (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Micropsitta keiensis
Citation: (Salvadori, 1876)
Protonimo: Nasiterna keiensis

Images of the Kai Microloro:

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Yellow-capped Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta keiensis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Parrot-birds – link
(2) – «NasiternaPygmaeaFKeulemans» by John Gerrard KeulemansOrnithological Miscellany. Volume 1. Licensed public via domain Wikimedia Commons.

Sounds: Hans Matheve (Xeno-canto)

Buff-faced Pygmy-Parrot
Micropsitta pusio


Buff-faced Pygmy-Parrot

Description

The Buff-faced Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta pusio) has a length 8,4-8,6 cm.. and 11,5 g. of weight, what it becomes in the Parrot more small of the world.

Has the forecrown, face and chin of color Brown mottled dark, eyebrows yellowish; centre of crown blue, merging to green in the area of the nape. Upperparts Greens with wing-coverts Black in the Center. Flight feather Black with green ends; lower coverts greenish yellow; underside of the primaries greyish, lightly bathed in yellow. The underparts brighter yellowish green, more pale in the center of the chest and the belly; uppertail-coverts Yellow. The tail centrally blue, with a black shaft. Outer feathers Black with yellow spots.

Bill dark grey; irises brown; legs of color grey or pink.

Female slightly more off than the male around the face.

Young with crown greenish blue and less brightness in the face.

  • Sound of the Buff-faced Pygmy-Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Microloro Pusio.mp3]

Subspecies description

  • Micropsitta pusio pusio

    (PL Sclater, 1866) – Nominal

  • Micropsitta pusio beccarii

    (Salvadori, 1876) – Usually darker than the nominal race especially on the face, including eyebrows.

  • Micropsitta pusio harterti

    (Mayr, 1940) – Brands that most off the nominal head, Blue throat. Less yellow in the parts below that the subspecies Micropsitta pusio stresemanni.

  • Micropsitta pusio stresemanni

    (ECTION Hartert, 1926) – As the subspecies Micropsitta pusio harterti, but slightly larger and more yellow below.

Habitat:

They are found in lowland forests, wooded hills, Gallery forest and secondary growth, from sea level to the 500 m. It is also locally in the Savannah and areas of coconut trees (Cocos nucifera).

The species is common and committed, but it can be difficult to find due to its small size. Birds can also sometimes be glimpsed by flying in small groups above the canopy. They tend to fraternize in pairs or in groups of up to 30 birds.

They frequently stop while they feed on and turn your head to the right, possibly to find predators.

Reproduction:

Tanysiptera-galatea
Common Paradise-Kingfisher (Tanysiptera galatea)

Nestbox, they dig in tree cavities active termite mounds, for example the (Microcerotermes biroi). A nest was also found in a terrestrial termite, the entry just a meter from the ground. There is a flange on each side of the entry hole and this differentiates their holes of other species that make their nests in termite mounds, such as the Common Paradise-Kingfisher (Tanysiptera galatea).

Until three white eggs are the implementation. The nesting season has been recorded throughout the year. Adults sleep on community and up to eight birds have been recorded from a cavity.

Food:

It moves rapidly along lianas and trunks or branches of trees (in inverted position) using its long claws to grip and digging Lichens and fungi in the barks. Also sometimes feed on seeds, fruits and insects (that it can be accidentally ingested).

Distribution:

Lowlands of North of New Guinea from the West coast of the Cenderawasih Bay, Irian Java, at the Southeast end of Papua New Guinea; absent from the Highlands of the Huon peninsula and Owen Stanley Ranges above each 500 m, but observed in some of the Northern Islands of New Guinea, including Kairiru, the Schouten Islands, Manam, Karkar and Batangas. The species is found in the lowlands of the West to the coastal region of South on the River Puari. Are also in the Bismarck Archipelago, including Umboi, Tolokiwa, Sakai, the Witu Islands, Lolobau, New Britain, Uatom and Duke of York. Also observed in the archipelago D ’ Entrecasteaux in Fergusson and in the Louisiade archipelago in Misima Island and Tagula.

Distribution of subspecies:

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The size of the world's population has not been quantified but he is estimated above the 100 000 specimens.

The species according to sources is very little common in its range distribution.

The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

Microloro pusio in captivity:

They feed on lichens and fungi, therefore its reproduction and maintenance in captivity it is virtually impossible.

Alternative names:

Buff-faced Pygmy-Parrot, Buff faced Pygmy Parrot, Buff-faced Pygmy Parrot (English).
Micropsitte à tête fauve (French).
Braunstirn-Spechtpapagei (German).
Papagaio-pigmeu (Portuguese).
Microloro de Cabeza Azul, Microloro Pusio (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Meeki
Scientific name: Micropsitta pusio
Citation: (Sclater,PL, 1866)
Protonimo: Nasiterna pusio

Images Buff-faced Pygmy-Parrot:

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Buff-faced Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta pusio)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – El loro más pequeño del mundo – medioambiente.net
(2) – Photo of Micropsitta pusio [By Katerina Tvardikova] – New Guinea Birds
(3) – A bird feeding on the bark of a tree. Author Carmelo López – lynx
(4) – Photo of Micropsitta pusio [By Katerina Tvardikova] – New Guinea Birds
(5) – Buff-faced Pygmy-Parrot, Micropsitta pusio at Nimbokrang by jon hornbuckle – BIRDING AROUND THE WORLD
(6) – Tanysiptera galatea By Katerina Tvardikova – New Guinea Birds

Sounds: BAS van Balen (Xeno-canto)

Swift Parrot
Lathamus discolor

Swift Parrot

Description

The Swift Parrot (Lathamus discolor) has a length of 23 to 28 cm.. and weighs approximately 65 g..

It is a slim Parrot, medium sized wings angular and pointed tail sharpened.
The head is bright emerald green. The forecrown, the chin and center of throat, red; lores bright yellow; centre of crown blue.

The upperparts (rump), bright green. The wing-coverts and feathers under wing They are red. The feathers under the tail They are red with green scales effect. The chest and feathers belly are yellowish green.

The bill Horn is color and irises yellow.

The female is paler and extent of mask Red lower than that of males. The color of the bottom of the tail just have red.

  • Sound of the Swift Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Periquito Migrador.mp3]

Habitat and behavior:

To the Swift Parrot It is usually seen in small groups of up 30 birds, sometimes in larger flocks (hundreds of birds) around the abundant food sources. There has also been some extraordinary reports in the enumeration of the flocks of more of 1.000 birds.

Are migratory birds. Are reproduced in Tasmania and then move to Australia continental, in autumn, for the non-reproductive season. Most of the population spends the winter in Victoria and New South Wales, before returning to Tasmania in spring. Usually they are gregarious in raising.

The playback area It is always within the 8 km from the coast, largely restricted to an area of less of 500 km² along the Western seaboard between Santa Helena and the Lune River, including offshore islands, as Mary Island and Bruny island.

The higher densities They occur between the After Bernier and Orford and Wellington Ridge about Hobart. A smaller breeding population is located in the North of Tasmania between Launceston and Smithton.

Reproduction:

Reproductive success is strongly related to the intensity and scope of the flowering of the Eucalyptus globulus (Tasmanian Blue Gum). In years of bad bloom, It seems that there is little breeding.

The breeding season It is mid-September to late January. Birds begin to return to Tasmania from your area of wintering on the continent at the beginning of August. Most of the population comes in mid-September. Unpaired birds upon arrival to Tasmania they can not start breeding until November after finding colleagues.

The De l'Tmño Nidada is three to five eggs. The female makes the incubation. in cautiverior incubation lasts about 25 days. Young people will fly in around 6 weeks. The presence of juveniles, recently fledged at the end of January and early February suggests double broods may occur. Second broods are dependent on the availability of food.

A recent study has shown that the nests of the Swift Parrot they are often found in close proximity together. Nest trees may be to only 10-15 m from, and can support up to four active nests each.

Food:

The Swift Parrot It feeds mainly on nectar, mainly of eucalyptus, but also feeds on insects Psyllids and lerps, seeds and fruits.

It is a tree Harvester, forages mainly in the eucalyptus, but from time to time low to the ground to feed on seeds, fallen flowers, fruit and Lerp. During the breeding season, the nectar from the flowers of the Eucalyptus globulus (Tasmanian Blue Gum) is the main source of food.

Sometimes they voraciously consume nectar in areas very accessible and this makes them reluctant to fly making them vulnerable to attack by cats, especially when forage among low foliage. His agility and alertness in flight can also be affected by the consumption of large quantities of nectar, possibly increasing the risk of collisions with artificial or hard-to-see objects.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 21.500 km2

The Swift Parrot, as its name suggests, migrates through the Bass Strait, between Tasmania and the Australian continent. Comes to Tasmania in September and returned to the southeast of Australia between March and April.

You can get to be as far north as the South-East of Queensland and get up to Adelaide from the West, Although the most recent sightings are restricted to the southeastern part of the State.

Conservation:

They estimated that the current population probably contains about 2.000 mature individuals and is declining.

The population of this species is suspected to be decreasing in line with the loss and degradation of habitat.
The gliding of the sugar they are the main predators of the broods of the Swift Parrot on the island of Tasmania, being the cause of the 85% of deaths, but they are not present on the Islands Bruny and Maria

• Current IUCN Red list category: Danger

• Population trend: Decreasing

The logging of a particular species is also responsible for the decline of population, eucalyptus, which constitute the 90% your diet.

– The Swift Parrot is classified as a species in danger of extinction in the law of conservation of biodiversity and protection of the environment of 1999 of Australia.

– The Migratory Perico It is classified as threatened by law of warranty of the flora and fauna of Victoria (1988). According to this law, a State action for the recovery and future management of this species must be. In addition the Migrator parakeet is classified as endangered on the list of advisory on threatened vertebrate fauna of Victoria of 2007.

Periquito Migrador en cautividad:

There are no populations in captivity, they are being handled or propagated actively by reintroducing. However, the Swift Parrot is easily propagated in captivity, and many of them are housed in private collections.

Alternative names:

Swift Parrot (English).
Perruche de Latham (French).
Schwalbensittich, Schwalbenlori (German).
Periquito-andorinha (Portuguese).
Periquito Migrado (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Lathamus discolor
Citation: (Shaw, 1790)
Protonimo: Psittacus Discolor

Swift Parrot pictures:

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Swift Parrot (Lathamus discolor)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife.org
Wikipedia
mundoexotics.com
environment.gov.au

Photos:

1 – By original photograph by frank woutersderivitive work Snowmanradio (talk) 18:52, 4 October 2008 (UTC) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
2 – “Lathamus discolor-captive-8-ec” by Lathamus_discolor_-captive-8. jpg: Ernst Viknederivative work: Snowmanradio (talk) – originally posted to flickr at Img_4454. JPG and uploaded to commons at Lathamus_discolor_-captive-8. jpg. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
3 – “Lathamus discolor Bruny 1” by JJ Harrison ([email protected]) – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
4 – bonapartemadar.hu
5 – Swift Parrot, Lathamus discolor. Photograph Geoffrey Dabb 27.04.2005 at Mount Majura nature reserve – majura.org

Sounds: Vicki Powys (Xeno-canto)

Cobalt-winged Parakeet
Brotogeris cyanoptera


Periquito Aliazul

Periquito Aliazul

Description:

The Cobalt-winged Parakeet (Brotogeris cyanoptera) measured 15-21 cm.. in height and weighs around 67 g. Distinguishable on the fly by the cobalt blue of the the flight feathers; forecrown yellow and crown with blue dye; chin orange.

Has the tail short and acute. Its bill opaque beige es

  • Sound of the Blue cheeked Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Brotogeris_cyanoptera.mp3]

Subspecies description:

  • Brotogeris cyanoptera beniensis

    (Gyldenstolpe, 1941) – It has lighter green in all the body and yellow plumage edges in the wing .

  • Brotogeris cyanoptera cyanoptera

    (Pelzeln, 1870) – The nominal

  • Brotogeris cyanoptera gustavi

    (Berlepsch, 1889) – Has the forecrown light green, shoulder yellow and only a patch blue in half of the wing .

Habitat:

Very common. It is found in secondary forest, riparian, edges and savanna, until the 600 m (occasional over of 1000 m). Fly in small flocks of 10 to 20 individuals (rare in couples), feed in the canopy.

Reproduction:

It nests in hollow and termite mounds on tree.

Food:

Its diet It is probably the same as that for the majority of the species Brotogeris: fruit nectar, figs, berries and seeds.

Distribution:

Its population is distributed between the East of Colombia, Southwest of Venezuela to the North of Bolivia and Brazilian Amazon.

Distribution of subspecies:

  • Brotogeris cyanoptera beniensis

    (Gyldenstolpe, 1941) – Bolivia.

  • Brotogeris cyanoptera cyanoptera

    (Pelzeln, 1870) – The nominal

  • Brotogeris cyanoptera gustavi

    (Berlepsch, 1889) – Peru.

Conservation:

Its population has been estimated at more of one million copies.

Not considered in any of the categories of threat.

Parakeet Aliazul in captivity:

Rare in captivity, due to the limited success in reproduction.

Alternative names:

Cobalt-winged Parakeet, Blue-winged Parakeet, Cobalt winged Parakeet (English).
Toui de Deville, Perruche à ailes de cobalt (French).
Kobaltflügelsittich (German).
Periquito-de-asa-azul, Periquito-de-asa-azul, tuipara-de-asa-azul (Portuguese).
Catita Aliazul, Periquito Aliazul, Periquito de Alas Azules (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Brotogeris
Scientific name: Brotogeris cyanoptera
Citation: (of Pelzeln, 1870)
Protonimo: Sittace cyanoptera

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Cobalt-winged Parakeet (Brotogeris cyanoptera)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Budgerigar
Melopsittacus undulatus


Common Budgie

Description

18 cm. length and a weight between 22 and 32 g..

Periquito-Comun

In the Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) of adults, the cere Blue contrasts with the frontal zone; the front of the face and throat are pale yellow. The latter is covered by a line of black spots. The area which is located below the cheeks is purple.

The central part of the pileum extending from the rear of the eyes to neck It is covered with alternating thin black bands and bands of pale yellow. These bars are expanded on the the mantle and wing-coverts, forming a scaly effect.

The underparts, the area beneath the wings, the lower part of the back and rump create a beautiful pale green together. The tail is opaque blue tones with a central yellow stripe on the side feathers.

The female has a Brown wax.

The immature they are more turned off with bars on the front. The black spots on the throat they are absent.

  • Sound of the Budgerigar.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Periquito Comun.mp3]

Habitat:

The Budgerigar they are distributed by a wide variety of open habitats, including open forests, lightly wooded grasslands and savannas. Also appreciate the areas of Mallee, farmland, the vegetation that grows along the rivers, bushes adapted to drought and open plains. They come fitted with desert areas of Mulga (Acacia aneura). Although they are able to survive several days without water, These birds are never far from a water source.

In areas where fruit production is steady and in others where it is stable for very long periods, the movements of the Budgerigar they are easily predictable.

In the South end, There are pilgrimages only in cases of prolonged drought and wandering parakeets return to their territory with the first rains and recolonizan when the level of the rivers return to normal.

Reproduction:

The Budgerigar they build their nests of June to September in the North its area of distribution. They reproduce between August and January in the South. Nests can be installed at any time of the year after the rains fall. Establish a second breeding as soon as conditions are favorable.

These parakeets usually nest in colonial way. The nest is located in a natural cavity in a tree, in a strain, an any fence post, or in a large fallen branch.

The female lays from 4 to 6 eggs and incubation lasts a few 18 days. The chicks remain in place of birth during 30 days before flying.

Food:

The Budgerigar It vegetarian, they eat herbs and seeds of quenopodios. Plants vary in categories and proportions, According to which regions and times.

The East inside of Australia, These birds feed exclusively on seeds that are on the ground, While in the middle of the continent, There is more variety of plants to select. In the first case, grain size barely exceeds the 2 mm diameter and the second, more than 40 plant varieties make up the diet of these parakeets.

From time to time, the Budgerigar, they come in growing areas and take advantage of the ripe fruits.

Distribution:

The Budgerigar are distributed widely throughout the Interior of Australia, Although they are rare in the coastal districts of the This and the end South-West (absent of Tasmania, Arnhem Land and Cape York Peninsula).

The species may be of common to very abundant, but they are nomadic, and may change from year to year areas.

These parakeets, frequently, they burst from the arid areas to more humid areas and there are temporary movements towards the South during the summer, but these changes may be affected by annual rainfall patterns.

We have introduced, without success, in a number of places around the world (or they have escaped from captivity and could not be) including South Africa, United Kingdom, Japan, Hong Kong, Puerto Rico, Brazil, Switzerland, Colombia, the Society Islands, New Zealand and Oman.

In the EE.UU. the species has managed to colonize Hawaii and California (leaks also occur regularly in the city of New York City). In Florida a population was originally registered in the area of St. Petersburg, in the Decade of 1950 and now has more of 3.000 individuals; These birds are mobile and have been recorded along the coast This of all the South from Jacksonville to Miami, and in the West everything Hudson to South of Fort Myers, from time to time go towards the North in Gainsville.

Parakeets, occasionally escaped, they may appear in Tasmania.

The world population is estimated at around 5.000,000 copies.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Growing

This species is not threatened at all, even they are abundant, and in some places where resources are good, countless flocks darken the sky, to cause branches to break from 4 centimeters in diameter, When large number of birds used them as support for their breaks.

Populations fluctuate widely depending on weather conditions.

The cattle that live on farms in the Centre of Australia has made to the Budgerigar they will benefit from new water supplies. Like this, the number of parakeets are in constant increase.

These parakeets are the most well known psittacidas in the world.

Periquito Común en cautividad:

This parakeet was discovered in 1805 and since then it has become the most popular captive bird in the world. While it is considered as domestic fowl, However, is a gregarious and instinctive animal, with the same needs that the parrots who freely roam the lands of Australia.

The Budgerigar It dynamic, curious, melodious and because of its small size, the beauty of their plumage and their entertaining behaviour, truly charming. This is what makes it a coveted bird. However, It is still a bird that needs to fly, play and socialize with their peers. Like any bird, It is sensitive to the social and environmental context. In fact, their real needs are too often overlooked, many parakeets suffer neglect or even abuse.

In captivity, the Budgerigar It is larger than its counterpart in nature. Measures of 20 to 25 cm. from head to tail and weighs between 30 and 45 g.. In addition to the colour of your coat, wild type, There are numerous mutations (other coat colors) associated with the increase in crossings and selections in certain genes, that translates into more spontaneous mutations.

The Budgerigar has two silent by year average, and the first moult occurs between the fourth and sixth month. The molt is complete renovation of the plumage of the bird. Pens fall to others push, includes your tube of keratin that parakeets will open with their beaks to release pen and relieve the irritation that engenders the same thrust. It can be more or less painful and intense. Some plucking is so fast that the bird may experience some difficulties during the flight.

Check the intensity of the change of the parakeet through black head tubes, tiredness and especially the number of feathers on the ground.

The food of the Budgerigar is based on the millet and the birdseed, Although it must be complemented with other seeds or vegetables (as the lettuce, Spinach, pepper, carrot, corn on the COB). The fruits are also a good dietary supplement for these birds. Occasionally it can provide a little bread or biscuit, but always with caution that not give them anything very sweet. The avocado, the chocolate and the parsley they are deadly toxic for the Australian parakeets.

The the parakeet cage It must be sheltered from the cold, a temperature between the 20-25 º C. It must be of one sufficient size so you have freedom of movement and can exercise. The balusters must be arranged horizontally so that they can climb up them. Wash the cage at least once a month with a disinfectant, change the water daily and clean the shells of the food. A cat litter tray can be placed to make their needs.
It is also important to let the parakeet out occasionally and fly freely around the room. Windows must be closed and curtains, because you can hit them.
Are very sociable birds and it is better to live with other parakeet. The best couple is formed by a male and a female. This will attempt to kill his companion if it is of the same gender.

With regard to its longevity, According to sources, these animals can come to live until 21 years in captivity. The same sources indicate that these parakeets suffer from a high incidence with respect to ovarian cancer.

Alternative names:

Budgerigar, Budgerygah, Budgie, Canary Parrot, Grass-Parakeet, Lovebird, Scalloped Parrot, Shell Parakeet, Shell Parrot, Undulated Parrot, Warbling Grass-Parrot, Zebra Parrot (English).
Perruche ondulée (French).
Wellensittich (German).
Periquito-australiano (Portuguese).
Periquito Australiano, Periquito Común, Cotorra Australiana, Cata Australiana (Spanish).

George Shaw

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Budgerigar
Scientific name: Melopsittacus undulatus
Citation: (Shaw, 1805)
Protonimo: Psittacus undulatus

Budgerigar pictures:

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Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Budgerigar at Zoo Atlanta, USA By TheSussman (Mike) (originally posted to Flickr as Parakeet) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Two budgerigar at Henry Doorly Zoo, USA By Jeff Coffman (originally posted to Flickr as DSC_1265) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – male budgerigar. taken near Cameron’s Corner, Qld By Benjamint444 (Own work) [GFDL 1.2], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Detail shot of budgerigars head By Kirk (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Melopsittacus undulatus flock, Karratha, Pilbara region, Western Australia By Jim Bendon from Karratha, Australia (budgies_4) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – By User Magnus Manske on en.wikipedia [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
(7) – Exterior diagram of a green budgerigar By ZooFari [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Marc Anderson (Xeno-canto)

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