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Blue-headed Parrot
Pionus menstruus


Blue-headed Parrot

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description “Blue-headed Parrot”:

28 to 30 cm.. height and between 234 and 295g. weight.

The Blue-headed Parrot (Pionus menstruus) is distinguishable by having the head, neck and chest blue; Red in the rump and in the Base ventral of the tail (very visible on the fly), basis of the bill and neck dotted with pink.

Shoulder and end of the wing olive green with yellow border, tail green with blue tip.

Subspecies description:

  • Pionus menstruus menstruus

    (Linnaeus, 1766) – The nominal

  • Pionus menstruus reichenowi

    (Heine, 1884) – Blue head, the neck and darker throat; lower underparts washed with blue green color; coverts red infracaudales with blue ends.

  • Pionus menstruus rubrigularis

    (Cabanis, 1881) – Smaller, head pale blue, neck more extensive and clear Red.

Habitat:

Species very common, lives in humid forests, semi-wet, from gallery, stubble, crop areas until the 1500 m.

Reproduction:

It feeds on various seeds, fruits and flowers.

Food:

It nests in hollows of trees and palms in dry season.

Loro distribution-headed:

They live in freedom from the South of Costa Rica, North of South America to the West of Ecuador. To the East of the Andes, comes to Peru, part of Brazil to the North of Bolivia.

Subspecies description:

  • Pionus menstruus menstruus

    (Linnaeus, 1766) – The nominal

  • Pionus menstruus reichenowi

    (Heine, 1884) – Coastal areas of the northeast of Brazil (Alagoas until Holy Spirit)

  • Pionus menstruus rubrigularis

    (Cabanis, 1881) – Tropical North of Costa Rica to western Colombia and West of Ecuador.

Conservation-headed Parrot:


Status


• Red List category of the UICN current: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the world population of the Blue-headed Parrot It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

This species is suspected that it may lose 18,5-23% of habitat within its distribution over three generations (20 years) based on a deforestation model of the Amazon (Soares-Filho et to the., 2006, Bird et to the. 2011). So, they suspected that can decrease in <25% in three generations.

In captivity:

Pretty common in captivity. Intelligent, inquisitive although sometimes shy. Active by nature, they can become overweight if you don't have a wide space where exercise your flight. Mature birds usually match throughout his life with his partner, you will defend with aggression of any intruder.

Its diet in captivity is wide. fruits such as: Apple, pear, orange, banana, granada, cactus fruits, Kiwi, they form around the 30 percent of the diet; vegetables such as: Carrot, celery, green beans and peas in pods; fresh corn; Greens such as: chard, lettuce, Kale, dandelion, healer, chickweed; mixture of small seeds, such as: millet, birdseed, and small amounts of buckwheat, oats, safflower and hemp; soaked and sprouted sunflower; beans, cooked legumes and boiled corn.

Alternative names

Blue-headed Parrot, Cobalt Parrot (English).
Schwarzohrpapagei, Schwarzohr-Papagei (German).
Cotorra Cabeciazul, Loro Cabeciazul, Loro de Cabeza Azul (español).
Pione à tête bleue, Pionus à tête bleue (French).
baitaca, curica, maitaca, maitaca-de-barriga-azulada, maitaca-de-cabeça-azul, sijá, Sôia, Suia (potugués).
Pappagallo testablu (Italian).


scientific classification:

Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pionus
Scientific name: Pionus menstruus
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1766)
Protonimo: Psittacus menstruus

Images "Blue-headed Parrot"

Videos "Blue-headed Parrot"

“Blue-headed Parrot” (Pionus menstruus)


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Red-and-blue Lory
Eos histrio

Eos histrio

Content

Lori-of-them-sangihe-6

Description

31 cm.. length and a weight between 150 and 185 gr.

The two main colors of the Red-and-blue Lory (Eos histrio) they are the red and blue.

A broad blue-purple line extends from the eyes through the ears and for the sides of the neck. A broad transverse band blue on the chest. The tail coverts they have blue pink. The feathers of the part superior of the tail they are reddish purple.

The irises is red, the legs grey.

Both sexes are very similar.

In immature, the feathers of the head and the chest they have a dark blue edging. The blue of the crown extends up to the neck and below the eyes. Thighs they are dull purple. The irises They are brown.

Description 3 subspecies

  • Eos histrio challengeri

    (Salvadori, 1891) – The band blue of the chest is of smaller size and mixed with red; the blue band of the eyes does not extend to the the mantle; smaller.


  • Eos histrio histrio

    (Statius Müller, 1776) – Nominal.


  • Eos histrio talautensis

    (Meyer,AB & Wiglesworth, 1894) – More black in the corbeteras wing and in the flight feather.

Habitat:

The Red-and-blue Lory they are common in primary forests, and on the hills of the hills. The feed, they made raids in coconut plantations along the coast and in the more open areas.

They make short trips daily. In the Talaud Islands You can see flying from island to island.

Initially, They lived in large flocks and concentrated in large numbers in common dormitories..

Today, in view of its decline, them find in pairs or in small groups. Large gatherings have become extremely rare or virtually non-existent.

In the Karakelong island were seen, However, on two occasions, more groups of 400 birds.

The Red-and-blue Lory they are birds noisy, which makes them quite easy to observe.

Reproduction:

The species nests in holes in tall trees, most belonging to the class canarium family Burseraceae, and the breeding period main seems to be from May to June, Although it is suspected that nesting may include other months.

We find nests, both in the forests and cultivated areas. The spawning usually includes 2 eggs which are incubated for approximately 25 or 26 days. There is no any other information in the natural environment.

Food:

Although they also consume some insect larvae, the Red-and-blue Lory are mostly vegetarian. They feed on coconut plantations, in the fig trees and trees of the genus canarium It produces edible nuts.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 1,000 km2

The Red-and-blue Lory is confined to the Talaud Islands (almost exclusively in Karakelang) front North of Sulawesi, Indonesian

Description 3 subspecies

Conservation:


Endangered

• Current category of the Red List of the UICN: Endangered.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

This species has a very small range (It is known only in some places), and it is declining due to habitat loss. It has been a downhill fast in the population, largely as a result of their capture for trade, and this is expected to increase in the future. So, qualified as In danger.

Although it was previously abundant, the species has decreased and the population in KarakelongIt was estimated in 8,230-21,400 birds in 1999 (Riley 2003). The subspecies of the nominal of the Sangihe Islands, is likely that has been extinguished.

The encroachment and logging are driving the loss of forests, aggravated by the threat of illegal trade in the species, contribute to the acceleration in the decrease of the population.

In 1999, the investigation concluded that you the 1.000 and 2.000 birds were being captured in Karakelang each year, the 80% (illegally) for the markets of birds of the Philippines.

Ongoing conservation actions:

Since 1995, the project “Action Sampiri” He has been working for the conservation of biodiversity in Sangihe and Talaud, in the implementation of awareness-raising programmes of field work and the conservation and development of ideas for the future use of the land.

Efforts have been made to promote the local support of the species at Talaud, his last bastion.

It has been reported that the poaching and the trade of this species have decreased drastically after the confiscation of assets by Ranger of the forest Department in 2005 (RT Prayudhi in litt., 2008).

The bird is part of the European Association of Zoos, the program Aquaria’s European Endangered [species] and Parrot Taxon Advisory Group (Wilkinson 2000), where it is being bred in captivity (Sweeney, 1998).

"Red-and-blue Lory" in captivity:

It is currently very rare in captivity.

Due to its status in danger of extinction, any specimen that can not be returned to their natural habitat (natural range) should preferably be placed in a well-managed breeding program to ensure the survival of the species.

Alternative names:

Red-and-blue Lory, Blue-tailed Lory, Red & Blue Lory, Red and Blue Lory, Red-blue Lory (ingles).
Lori arlequin, Lori histrion (French).
Harlekinlori (German).
Lóris-arlequin (Portuguese).
Lori de las Sangihe, Lori Rojo y Azul (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Eos
Scientific name: Eos histrio
Citation: (Statius Müller, 1776)
Protonimo: A player parrot

Images “Red-and-blue Lory”:

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“Red-and-blue Lory” (Eos histrio)


Sources:

Avibase, BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – En Loro Parque (Spain, Tenerife) by Drägüs – Wikimedia
2 – Lori en Loro Parque, Tenerife, España by Drägüs – Wikimedia
3 – En ZooParc de Beauval, France by User:Edhral – Wikimedia
4 – Red-and-blue lory. two in a cage. by TJ Lin – Wikimedia
5 – A Red-and-blue lory in a zoo by jojo nicdao – Wikimedia
6 – The Red and Blue Lory (Eos histrio now Eos histrio histrio) and The Challenger Lory (EOS challengeri now Eos histrio challengeri) Chromolithograph. Plate VII from A monograph of the lories, or brush-tongued parrots, composing the family Loriidae. By St. George Jackson St. Mivart (1827–1900). Artwork by John Gerard Keulemans (1842-1912). This was published by R. H. Porter (London) in 1896. By John Gerard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Frank Lambert (Xeno-canto)

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Swift Parrot
Lathamus discolor

Swift Parrot

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

The Swift Parrot (Lathamus discolor) has a length of 23 to 28 cm.. and weighs approximately 65 g..

It is a slim Parrot, medium sized wings angular and pointed tail sharpened.
The head is bright emerald green. The forecrown, the chin and center of throat, red; lores bright yellow; centre of crown blue.

The upperparts (rump), bright green. The wing-coverts and feathers under wing They are red. The feathers under the tail They are red with green scales effect. The chest and feathers belly are yellowish green.

The bill Horn is color and irises yellow.

The female is paler and extent of mask Red lower than that of males. The color of the bottom of the tail just have red.

Habitat and behavior:

To the Swift Parrot It is usually seen in small groups of up 30 birds, sometimes in larger flocks (hundreds of birds) around the abundant food sources. There has also been some extraordinary reports in the enumeration of the flocks of more of 1.000 birds.

Son migratory birds. Are reproduced in Tasmania and then move to Australia continental, in autumn, for the non-reproductive season. Most of the population spends the winter in Victoria and New South Wales, before returning to Tasmania in spring. Usually they are gregarious in raising.

The playback area It is always within the 8 km from the coast, largely restricted to an area of less of 500 km² along the eastern coastal strip between Santa Helena and the Lune River, including offshore islands, as Mary Island and Bruny island.

The higher densities They occur between the After Bernier and Orford and Wellington Ridge about Hobart. A smaller breeding population is located in the North of Tasmania between Launceston and Smithton.

Reproduction:

Reproductive success is strongly related to the intensity and scope of the flowering of the Eucalyptus globulus (Tasmanian Blue Gum). In years of bad bloom, it seems that there is little breeding.

The breeding season It is mid-September to late January. Birds begin to return to Tasmania from your area of wintering on the continent at the beginning of August. Most of the population comes in mid-September. Unpaired birds upon arrival to Tasmania they cannot start breeding until November after finding mates.

The De l'Tmño Nidada is three to five eggs. The female makes the incubation. in cautiverior incubation lasts about 25 days. Young people will fly in around 6 weeks. The presence of juveniles, recently fledged at the end of January and early February suggests double broods may occur. Second hatchlings depend on food availability.

A recent study has shown that the nests of the Swift Parrot often found in close proximity to each other. Nest trees may be to only 10-15 m from, and can support up to four active nests each.

Food:

The Swift Parrot It feeds mainly on nectar, mainly of eucalyptus, but also feeds on insects psyllids and lerps, seeds and fruits.

It is a tree Harvester, forages mainly in the eucalyptus, but from time to time low to the ground to feed on seeds, fallen flowers, fruit and Lerp. During the breeding season, the nectar from the flowers of the Eucalyptus globulus (Tasmanian Blue Gum) is the main source of food.

Sometimes they voraciously consume nectar in areas very accessible and this makes them reluctant to fly making them vulnerable to attack by cats, especially when forage among low foliage. His agility and alertness in flight can also be affected by the consumption of large quantities of nectar, possibly increasing the risk of collisions with artificial or hard-to-see objects.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 21.500 km2

The Swift Parrot, as its name suggests, migrates through the bass strait, between Tasmania and the Australian continent. Comes to Tasmania in September and returned to the southeast of Australia between March and April.

You can get to be as far north as the South-East of Queensland and get up to adelaide from the West, Although the most recent sightings are restricted to the southeastern part of the State.

Conservation:

They estimated that the current population probably contains about 2.000 mature individuals and is declining.

The population of this species is suspected to be declining in line with habitat loss and degradation..
The sugar gliders they are the main predators of the broods of the Swift Parrot on the island of Tasmania, being the cause of the 85% of deaths, but they are not present on the Islands Bruny and Maria


Endangered


• Current IUCN Red List category: Danger

• Population trend: Decreasing

The logging of a particular species is also responsible for the decline of population, eucalyptus, which constitute the 90% your diet.

– The Swift Parrot is classified as a species in danger of extinction in the law of conservation of biodiversity and protection of the environment of 1999 of Australia.

– The Migratory Perico It is listed as a threatened species under the Victorian Wildlife Guarantee Act. (1988). According to this law, a state action must be carried out for the recovery and future management of this species.. In addition the Migrator parakeet is classified as endangered on the list of advisory on threatened vertebrate fauna of Victoria of 2007.

"Swift Parrot" in captivity:

There are no populations in captivity, they are being handled or propagated actively by reintroducing. But, the Swift Parrot is easily propagated in captivity, and many of them are housed in private collections.

Alternative names:

Swift Parrot (ingles).
Perruche de Latham (French).
Schwalbensittich, Schwalbenlori (German).
Periquito-andorinha (Portuguese).
Periquito Migrado (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Lathamus discolor
Citation: (Shaw, 1790)
Protonimo: Psittacus Discolor

Images “Swift Parrot”:

Videos "Swift Parrot"

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“Swift Parrot” (Lathamus discolor)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– BirdLife.org
Wikipedia
– mundoexotics.com
environment.gov.au

Photos:

1 – By original photograph by frank woutersderivitive work Snowmanradio (talk) 18:52, 4 October 2008 (UTC) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
2 – “Lathamus discolor-captive-8-ec” by Lathamus_discolor_-captive-8. jpg: Ernst Viknederivative work: Snowmanradio (talk) – originally posted to flickr at IMG_4454.JPG and uploaded to commons at Lathamus_discolor_-captive-8. jpg. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
3 – “Lathamus discolor Bruny 1” by JJ Harrison (jjharrison89@facebook.com) – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
4 – bonapartemadar.hu
5 – Swift Parrot, Lathamus discolor. Photograph Geoffrey Dabb 27.04.2005 at Mount Majura nature reserve – majura.org

Sounds: Vicki Powys (Xeno-canto)

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Blue-fronted Lorikeet
Charmosyna toxopei

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

16 cm.. length.

Blue-fronted Lorikeet

The forecrown of the Blue-fronted Lorikeet (Charmosyna toxopei) is bright green, the front of the crown, above the eyes is bright blue; rest of the head green. Upperparts green, bright in the rump. Wings Green with blackish inner feathers. The underwing-coverts green; flight feather Blackish with yellow band in the whole lower part of the secondaries. The underparts brighter yellowish green. Tail green, with red bases and blackish stain. The bill orange; the irises yellow orange; legs orange-red.

Habitat:

If recent observations were in fact of the Blue-fronted Lorikeet, species can be nomadic, moving from high to low altitude on the basis of the availability of food (like some other small parrots). This could explain the paucity of records, especially for a species already by itself it is distributed sparsely. The other possibility is that the birds are distributed only in the forested hills.

Interviews with local residents suggest that the species moved to the lowlands during the two annual seasons of heat, in March-April and August-November.

Reproduction:

There is no data.

Food:

The locals who live in the plateau frog They reported that the bird feeds on nectar and pollen from the trees in flower.

Distribution:

Endemic to Buru, Indonesian. Obviously, is a rare species, and virtually nothing is known of its State. The original specimens were collected in the wooded hills between 850 m and 1.000 m.

In 1980 the species was reported to be quite common in plantations, secondary and primary forest, but this record has been suggested as a reference to the Red-flanked Lorikeet (Charmosyna placentis) (the record of this species from Buru It is in fact wrong). In 1989 two flocks of five to six birds, supposedly this species, they were seen during a selective felling of forests to 600 meters on the Teluk Bara. There is also a report of 1993 of four small unidentified parakeets seen in the same area as the observations of 1.980. The species are now considered endangered by Birdlife International, although a thorough search must be carried out before its status can be fully determined. VULNERABLE.

Conservation:


Critically Endangered

• Current IUCN Red List category: Critical Hazard

• Population trend: Decreasing

• Population size: 50-249 mature individuals

Although there are few records (confirmed or unconfirmed) of the species, It is suspected that it is declining due to loss of forests in the lowlands.

Most of the forests in the coastal lowlands of Buru have they been clarified, and much of the forest in the northern part of the island has been connected shape selective or degraded and fragmented by migratory agriculture, in such a way that only a few small patches of lowland primary forest remain. But, the island's gardens still contain many indigenous tree species. In 2010, There was at least one search operation on a large scale above Buru, located in the lowlands. But, extensive forests of mountain of the island remain largely without being scanned. The topography of the mountain range Kaplamandan is the hope that almost all of the montane forest is inaccessible to loggers (A. Gray in litt. 2010).

All of the original specimens were captured alive using lime, However, the species is not kept as a pet, does not seem to be listed. Have a distribution of mountain which is close to the maximum altitude within its distribution area, does this species is potentially susceptible to climate change (BirdLife International data not publ.).

"Blue-fronted Lorikeet" in captivity:

Not found in captivity.

Alternative names:

Blue-fronted Lorikeet, Blue fronted Lorikeet, Buru Lorikeet (ingles).
Lori de Buru (French).
Burolori, Burulori (German).
Lori de Buru (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Charmosyna
Scientific name: Charmosyna toxopei
Citation: (Siebers, 1930)
Protonimo: Hypocharmosyna toxopei

Images "Blue-fronted Lorikeet"

————————————————————————————————

“Blue-fronted Lorikeet” (Charmosyna toxopei)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife

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Pygmy hanging parrot
Loriculus exilis

Pygmy hanging parrot

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

10 to 11 cm.. length.

Pygmy hanging parrot

The head of the Pygmy hanging parrot (Loriculus exilis) is green, brighter around the base of the bill and bathed in bluish green at the chin, the throat, the cheeks and the part front of it crown.

The underparts is green, with the rump and uppertail-coverts dark red (very extended below the tail); the sides and the base of the rump are greenish-yellow. Wings green. Under, the wings Turquoise with coverts green. Throat of color red bordered of blue pale and extending is about part superior of the chest; rest of the underparts green, slightly more clear that the upperparts. The tail, at the top, Green with yellowish tips; undertail, the tail is of a pale color green blue.

The bill coral red; irises yellow; legs oranges.

The females lack of the bib red (or have very small bib). Also have a reduced blue diffusion in the chest and irises brown.

The young birds they have a bib Red small, a bill yellowish brown, and a pale brown iris.

Habitat:

Usually little-known. It is distributed by forests, coastal mangroves, around the villages and in the open field, from the lowlands to the wooded hills to some 1.000 m, altitudes and in similar habitats to the of the Great hanging parrot.

The birds are found in groups of up to five copies, feeding in the canopy of figs or the trees in flower nectar; their power moves have been compared with the movements of crawling in the Pygmy Parrot Micropsitta. Larger flocks have been found in the mangroves during may, Although the species can reproduce twice a year, in February and August; it is not known if these represent post-breeding concentrations or nomadic groups.

Reproduction:

A hole in a dead palm tree is the only known record of a zone of nesting.

Food:

Feeds of figs or nectar.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 103.000 km2

Endemic to Sulawesi, where is located from the North, on Minahassa Peninsula, to the South.

Conservation:


Status


• Current IUCN Red List category: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, Although it is estimated at more than 10.000 specimens. The species is described as uncommon and rare.

There are no data on trends in the population, but the species is suspected to be decreasing at a moderately fast pace, due to degradation of the habitat.

"Pygmy hanging parrot" in captivity:

Very rare in captivity.

Alternative names:

Red-billed Hanging-Parrot, Celebes Lilliput Hanging-Parrot, Green Hanging Parrot, Green Hanging-Parrot, Lilliput Hanging-Parrot, Pygmy Hanging Parrot, Pygmy Hanging-Parrot, Red billed Hanging Parrot, Red-billed Hanging Parrot, Talabula Hanging-Parrot (ingles).
Coryllis vert (French).
Däumlingspapageichen, Däumlings-Papageichen (German).
Lorículo Exiguo (Portuguese).
Lorículo Exiguo (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Loriculus
Scientific name: Loriculus exilis
Citation: Schlegel, 1866
Protonimo: Loriculus exilis

Videos "Pygmy hanging parrot"

Videos "Pygmy hanging parrot"

————————————————————————————————

“Pygmy hanging parrot” (Loriculus exilis)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – By Peter Waanders – Caged female has attracted wild male. lynx
(2) – Loriculus exilis by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Mike Nelson (Xeno-canto)

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Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot
Micropsitta bruijnii

 Microloro Pechirrojo

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

9 cm.. length between 12 and 16 g. of weight.

The crown of the tiny Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot (Micropsitta bruijnii) various of pink to Brown towards the nape; cheeks, chin and ear-coverts, pale pink; line that goes from eyes up to the nape, iridescent blue. Banda wide in the part back from the nape, iridescent blue, rest of the upper region Green with fine dark margins. The flight feather Black finely lined in green; under wing-coverts Green with centers black. feathers of the wings grey-black.

The underparts are pink, with collar narrow blue iridescent in the part superior of the chest, merging is in color green in them lower flanks and blue in the part back from the neck; sides chest, blue. Uppertail Pink dark. Central feathers of the tail of color blue opaque, dotted black; Black yellow-orange-tipped outer.

Bill grey, cere pink, irises brown; legs grey.

Female mainly green and devoid of underparts Roses and the neck Blue of the male. The crown Pink is replaced by the blue (with the exception of the front that is pink), and uppertail-coverts are of color green yellow, not pink. The wing feathers show some brands of color green and the throat is grayish white.

Immature are like females, but are orange in the underparts, and they have forecrown and lores White.

Note: scientific name bruijnii commemorates the Dutch merchant's feathers Antonie Augustus Bruijn.

Subspecies description

Description 5 subspecies
  • Micropsitta bruijnii bruijnii

    (Salvadori, 1875) – Nominal.

  • Micropsitta bruijnii buruensis

    (Arndt, 1999)

  • Micropsitta bruijnii necopinata

    (Hartert, 1925) – Crown the male is brown with a yellowish Center. The cheeks, the throat and the part middle of the chest and abdomen are reddish in colour. The uppertail-coverts are yellow. The female is like the female of the nominal but the crown it's more purple-blue.

  • Micropsitta bruijnii pileata

    (Mayr, 1940) – The male has the crown of color red more dark that the nominal, and extends below, to nuchal collar blue.

  • Micropsitta bruijnii rosea

    (Mayr, 1940) – The Red of the underparts is richer, but restricted to the center of the part inferior of the chest and the abdomen. The Red of the cheeks and Arch of crown also is more rich. Female as the female of the nominal.

  • Note: Birds observed recently in OBI, Center-North of Moluccas, possibly belong to a new subspecies. (Mittermeier, J.C., Cottee-Jones, H.E.W., PURBA, E.C., Attack, M.., Hesdianti E. & Supriatna, J. (2013)
    A survey of the avifauna of Obi island, North Moluccas, Indonesian. Forktail 29: 128–137.)

Habitat:


The microloro pechirrojo they can be observed in primary and secondary forests on mountain, along the forest margins, and also have been recorded in the Albizia moluccana, in coffee plantations. They are usually between 500 and 3.000 m, but they can be found at lower altitudes. There is a record of a wandering bird observed at the level of the sea.

The species is usually found in pairs or in groups of up to 20 individuals, quickly moving in small groups through the second half of upper canopy. They are most commonly found for their high-pitched calls..

Birds prefer the dead trees and can “Skip” from one branch to another in search of fungi and lichens to feed on. They also take fruit and flowers.

Unlike other Pygmy parrots, they build their cavities for nesting on the sides of the dead trees, not in termite mounds. The entrance tunnel leads up into the cavity and enters from the rear. One of the registered tunnels had 100 x 55 mm. with a coating of wood inside.

Reproduction:

The breeding season, according to sources, is between the months of December and April. The nest It is a hole in a stump or dead tree to an altitude that ranges between 3 and 4 meters above the ground; apparently one of these nests counted with the presence of one male and two females.

Food:

Fungi and lichens, Sometimes they feed on fruit and flowers.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 269.000 km2

The Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot are distributed by the islands of Buru and Seram, and in the mountain forests along the New Guinea, the Bismarck Archipelago, and three of the Solomon Islands. In New Guinea, are observed in the mountains Tamrau and Parotia of Vogelkop, along the Onin Peninsula, and through the central mountain range, including the mountains, Kubor, and coming up to Adelbert, Saruwaged and Owen Stanley ranges in the North and Southeast. There are also in New Britain and New Ireland (Hans Meyer Range) and in Bougainville, Kolombangara and Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands.

Subspecies distribution

Distribution 5 subspecies

    Conservation:


    Status


    • Current IUCN Red List category: Least concern

    • Population trend: Stable

    The size of the world population It has not been quantified, probably over the 100,000 specimens. The species is released between common and rare due to deforestation and loss of habitat in this limited range.

    The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.


    "Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot" in captivity:

    It is not in captivity. Difficult to keep alive for more than a few hours or days.

    Alternative names:

    Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot, Mountain Pygmy Parrot, Mountain Pygmy-Parrot, Red breasted Pygmy Parrot, Red-breasted Pygmy Parrot, Rose-breasted Pygmy Parrot (ingles).
    Micropsitte de Bruijn, Perruche pygmée de Bruijn (French).
    Rotbrust-Spechtpapagei (German).
    Papagaio-pigmeu-de-peito-vermelho (Portuguese).
    Microloro de la Montaña, Microloro Pechirrojo (español).


    scientific classification:

    Salvadori Tommaso

    Order: Psittaciformes
    Family: Psittaculidae
    Genus: Meeki
    Scientific name: Micropsitta bruijnii
    Citation: (Salvadori, 1875)
    Protonimo: Nasiterna bruijnii


    Images “Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot”:

    Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot

    ————————————————————————————————

    “Red-breasted Pygmy-Parrot” (Micropsitta bruijnii)


    Sources:

    Avibase
    – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    – Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    – Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – A pair was found foraging on the trunk of a tree By high mehdhalaouate – lynx
    (2) – © Bernard I've had enough – bernardvanelegem

    Sounds: Hans Matheve (Xeno-canto)

▷ The world of Pets: Dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, amphibians

Green Racquet-tail
Prioniturus luconensis


Green Racquet-tail

Content

Description

29 cm.. length.

The Green Racquet-tail (Prioniturus luconensis) has the head of color green light, impregnated of green yellowish around them lores and the base of the bill. Mantle light green, slightly yellowish. Wings green; vane outer, the first three primaries green, impregnated blue; vane Dark internal, the more internal with pale inner edge. Wing feathers greenish yellow, underside of flight feather impregnated of blue dark. The underparts brighter yellowish green, more yellow in the undertail-coverts. Upper, the tail green, lateral feathers strongly impregnated dark bluish-green and dark-tipped; undertail, the tail bluish.

Bill grey bluish pale ; irises dark brown; legs grey.

The female has the rackets of the tail shorter.

The juveniles they do not have rackets on tail.

Habitat:

Previously reported in the strata media of the land low of forest primary, and in the nearby cornfields, mostly below 700 m. Recent records are from small groups of a maximum of seven birds that live most degraded or selectively, in exploited forests outside of settlements.

Reproduction:

Young have been observed in Luzon during the month of may. The nest It , apparently, a hollow tree. Little more is known about the habits of this rare Parrot.

Food:

The diet includes fruit, Tender corn, rice, seeds and flowers.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 93.500 km2

Endemic to Luzon and Marinduque, North of Philippines. Although the species was considered quite common at the end of the last century in the center of Luzon, seems to have suffered a rapid decline in recent years. Has not been registered in the Cordillera Central in this century, and now you can have their stronghold in the Sierra Madre, where it was reported to be generally rare or uncommon in the decade of 1990. It is rare in all currently considered Luzon except perhaps in the Subic Bay Naval Reserve Forest (Bataan, to the East of Manila). There are no recent records of Marinduque.

Conservation:


Endangered


• Current category of the Red List of the UICN: Danger

• Population trend: Decreasing

The population is in the band of 1,000 to 2,499 mature individuals.

The threats by the tala generalized and their captures to the trade of birds of cage, suggest that this species is experiencing a downhill fast in the population.

There is no national legislation to protect trade and hunting, Although this is often violated. It is currently known from two protected areas, the Bataan Natural Park / Subic Bay forest reserve and the Parque Natural del North Sierra Madre. Receive nominal protection in the Maria Aurora Memorial Park.

In captivity:

Parrot moderately loud, with nice voice. New birds are highly susceptible to diseases. Initially shy, but eventually he acclimatizes to the caregiver.

Practically unknown in captivity.

Alternative names:

Green Racquet-tail, Green Racket-tail, Green Racket-tailed Parrot, Green Racquet tail, Green Racquet-tail Parrot, Green Racquet-tailed Parrot, Green recket-tailed parrot, Green-crowned Racket-tailed Parrot, Green-headed Racket-tailed Parrot, Green-headed Racquet-tailed Parrot (ingles).
Palette verte, Perroquet à raquette verte (francés).
Luzon-Spatelschwanzpapagei, Luzonpapagei (alemán).
Prioniturus luconensis (portugués).
Lorito momoto de Luzón, Lorito Momoto Verde, Lorito-momoto de Luzón (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Prioniturus
Scientific name: Prioniturus luconensis
Citation: Steere, 1890
Protonimo: Prioniturus Luconensis

Images "Green Racquet-tail"

Videos "Green Racquet-tail"

————————————————————————————————

“Green Racquet-tail” (Prioniturus luconensis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – By marco cooked – Forum of The European Ornithological Association

Sounds: Cedric MROCZKO (Xeno-canto)

▷ The world of Pets: Dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, amphibians

Regent Parrot
Polytelis anthopeplus

Regent Parrot

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

37 to 42 cm.. length and around 114 g. of weight.

The Regent Parrot (Polytelis anthopeplus) has the yellow head, tending to yellow olive in it crown and nape. Green olive the the mantle; scapulars of color Brown olive dark; floor area of the back and tail showy yellow, tending to yellow olive in uppertail-coverts. Smalls and medium corbeteras, Yellow; greater coverts of color black blue in them pens external, Red with yellow tips on the innermost feathers; tertiary black grey in vane inner; reddish pink, with yellow tip in the vane outer; primary coverts bluish-black; primaries and secondaries bluish-black, with black inner tubes. Wing feathers yellow; underside of flight feather brown, almost black. The underparts Yellow, more off the yellow olive in undertail-coverts with some brands Orange indistinct around it area anal.

The tail is of color black with infiltrations of color blue dark in the part superior of their feathers Central and of the threads internal of their feathers side.

The bill is pinkish-Red. The irises are of color brown orange; legs grey.

The female has the underparts grey and of color green it top. Lords and ear-coverts are of colour more greenish. The strip of color blue dark of the feathers is more broad and it extends to the under wing-coverts that are more than color yellow-green that in the male. The rump is green olive opaque, not yellow. The red dot of the wing is less developed and has less brightness. Tail of color green blue by over. It has a pink tip below.

The youth they resemble females, However, young males have more yellow in the head.

Description 2 subspecies.

  • Polytelis anthopeplus anthopeplus

    : (Lear 1831) – The nominal.


  • Polytelis anthopeplus monarchoides

    : (Schodde 1993) – The male has much more brightness that it nominal species, particularly, the yellow of the underparts.

Habitat and habits:

Regent Parrot

The Regent Parrot they reside mainly in the East, although the birds disperse after the breeding season.

More regular movements have been recorded in the Western population, with spread towards the South during the summer, and a concentration below 32° S in the fall.

The birds move to the northeast in winter; movements of up to 320 km have been recorded. Oriental birds are linked to the banks of the rivers, where is the red rubber (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) trees with mallee Shrublands partners (Eucalyptus gracilis). They are also distributed in forests of eucalyptus, areas with thin Cypress pine (Callitris preissii), orchards and vineyards.

In the West, the species is less dependent from the Mallee and they reside in mixed plots of acacia and eucalyptus (wandoo, salmonophloia) and within agricultural land.

The Regent Parrot they are not in the forests of the South-western area, Although there have been in the forest clearings.

outside the breeding season, the birds can be found in noisy flocks of a hundred or more individuals, being in general cautious. They feed primarily on Earth.

Reproduction:

The nesting season takes place between January and August. These birds nest either in single pairs or in small colonies composed of a maximum of 18 couples. Before the mating, There are ritual offerings of food.

The site selected for reproduction is usually a great tree of the gum dead or dying, to 20 metres above the ground and near a permanent water course. These nests are often reused.

The spawning includes of 3 to 6 white eggs You settle on a layer of decaying wood shavings. The female incubates alone during 21 days. His companion, who deserted the nest tree and joined an all-male group, it comes to collaborate with food tasks. The chicks have white down. Usually, leave the nest after 5 to 6 weeks, but after feather, remain in the family group for a few weeks yet.

Food:

The diet usually comprises seeds of grasses, herbs, fruit, berries, sprouts and flowers. They also take crops of cereals and dried fruits from orchards, as well as grain spilled on highways.

In the East, males tend to feed in the mallee scrub (for example White Mallee Eucalyptus dumosto and Red Mallee Eucalyptus socialis) during the breeding season.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 1.520.000 km2

Confined to Australia, where in two very distant populations. In Western Australia are distributed mainly in the wheat belt, extending north to Ajana, on the inside of Laverton and Karonie, and down in Israelite Bay, on the South Coast; is also located to the South of Perth, but they have not fully colonized the wooded area Southwest.

In the southeast of Australia the range has shrunk in recent years. In the South of Australia, the species occurs along of the murray river, around Morgan at the border of New South Wales, Victoria (seven colonies).

In Victoria are distributed in the Wyperfeld National Park and along the wimmera river to the South of the Lake Hindmarsh, but the reproduction, probably, ceased to occur in the Lake Albacutya as recently as 1988.

In New South Wales is isolated along foci of the murray river, and around the mouth of the murrumbidgee river.

Along the border of New South Wales, Victoria, they are now grouped into four areas, and is absent 100 kilometres on both sides of Mildura; There are some couples throughout the North of the darling river in Pooncarie, and along the the Wakool River the east.

There is some post-breeding dispersal, but the birds is unlikely it lies to the northeast of Balranald or to the South of Castenaso, except perhaps during periods of drought.

Locally common in areas of riparian forest and Mallee (Eucalyptus gracilis).

The world's population is believed to be superior to the 15.000 individuals, but the subspecies of the East is by far the smaller of the two.

Completely protected by law in all but a few regions of the South-West.

A moderate number of captive.

Distribution 2 subspecies:

  • Polytelis anthopeplus anthopeplus

    : (Lear 1831) – The nominal. Southwest of Australia.


  • Polytelis anthopeplus monarchoides

    : (Schodde 1993) – Interior West of the part of Southeast of Australia (Southeast of the South of Australia, Southwest of New South Wales and Northwest of Victoria).

Conservation:


Status


• Current category of the Red List of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

The species has an estimated world population in 21.500 individuals (Garnett and Crowley 2000).
The population of the subspecies anthopeplusis It is estimated in 20.000 individuals.
The population of the subspecies monarchoides It is estimated in 1.500 individuals (Garnett and Crowley 2000).

The population of the subspecies anthopeplusis is probably stable as a whole, While the subspecies monarchoides could be declining (Garnett and Crowley 2000).

degradation areas Mallee (eucalyptus), accidents on the road, occupation natural cavities of swarms of bees and persecution due to farmers, they are the threats more recurrent. Despite its original development in areas of the southwest through the development of agriculture, even in these areas, It is considered a slight decline. The hope comes from the fact that can go to colonizing New Territories in forest areas in the South-western end. By now, the species is considered not presenting no major problem. But, in nearly all regions, except in areas of intensive agriculture, benefits from the protection.

"Regent Parrot" in captivity:

It is a bird very quiet. It is customary to his carer quickly enough. Friendly, It will also tolerate other non-aggressive species. Very active in the morning and afternoon. They may be prone to infections in the eyes and feet.

One sample was still alive after 13,8 years in captivity. It has been reported that these animals can live up to 27,5 years in captivity but it has not been able to be verified; the same study reported that these animals can reproduce from around the first year of age in captivity.

Not very common in captivity.

Alternative names:

Regent Parrot, Black-tailed Parakeet, Black-tailed Parrot, Black-throated Parrot, Blossom-feathered Parakeet, Mallee Smoker, Marlock Parakeet, Marlock Parrot, Mountain Parrot, Plaide-wing Parrot, Regal Parrot, Rock Pebbler, Royal Parrot, Smoker, Smoker Parrot, Yellow King-Parrot (ingles).
Perruche mélanure, Perruche à queue noire (French).
Bergsittich (German).
Periquito-regente (Portuguese).
Perico Regente, Periquito de Rock Pebbler (español).

scientific classification:

Edward Lear
Edward Lear

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Polytelis
Scientific name: Polytelis anthopeplus
Citation: (Lear, 1831)
Protonimo: Palaeornis anthopeplus


Images “Regent Parrot”:

Videos "Regent Parrot"

————————————————————————————————

“Regent Parrot” (Polytelis anthopeplus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife
– AnAge: The Animal Ageing and Longevity Database – Anage entry for Polytelis anthopeplus

Photos:

(1) – A juvenile Regent Parrot (Polytelis anthopeplus) at the Bird Walk (Walk-in Aviary), Canberra, Australian National Territory, Australia By Polytelis_anthopeplus_2. jpg: JJ Harrison (jjharrison89@facebook.com)derivative work: Diliff (Polytelis_anthopeplus_2. jpg) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – An adult male perched by Josep del Hoyo – Lynx
(3) – A juvenile Regent Parrot (Polytelis anthopeplus) also known as the Rock Pebbler, Black-tailed Parakeet, Smoker, Marlock Parakeet and sometimes Regent Parakeet By Rainey06au at en.wikipedia [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Two Regent Parrots in an aviary in Australia. It is also known as the Rock Pebbler, Black-tailed Parakeet, Smoker, Marlock Parakeet and sometimes Regent Parakeet By Kristina (originally posted to Flickr as Parrots) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A Regent Parrot in Flying High Bird Sanctuary, Australia. The parrot is feeding on seeds from the left hand of small boy’s outstretched arm By paulgear (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – The Cape Parrot (Polytelis anthopeplus) Started by Dallas – Gros-becs.net

Sounds: Scott Connop (Xeno-canto)