Striated Lorikeet
Charmosyna multistriata

Striated Lorikeet

Description

They weigh around 40 to 50 g. and length of 18 cm..

The plumage of the Striated Lorikeet (Charmosyna multistriata) It is predominantly green with yellow stripes on the belly and in the chest.

The throat, the forecrown and sides of the head They are slightly more yellow. The neck and the back of the head They are brown with some orange yellow stripes. The tail is olive green on top and having a tip dark yellow. The bottom of the tail It is greenish yellow with some red feathers around the vent. The most characteristic feature of the Striated Lorikeet is the bill two colors. Upper bill is blue-gray with a touch of red orange, While the bottom is completely reddish-orange. Only one other Lori with a peak of two colors and that is the Musk Lorikeet. The irises It is red and legs They are gray with black nails.

Both sexes are the same color, the male is slightly larger and has a bill longer. They are also a little colored in the head.
The immature They have the same colors as adults, only the bill it is more black and darker stripes.

Habitat:

It inhabits in the mountains and hills and forest edges. Mainly found between 180 and 1.800 m, but they have been at much lower altitude, about 80 m. Found in pairs or in small groups of up 20 birds, sometimes fellowship with the Red-flanked Lorikeet and the Fairy Lorikeet (observed in mid-February in mixed flocks with these species). similar to the behavior Red-flanked Lorikeet, the consorts, but although they have observed flocks Striated Lorikeet fly with the Red-flanked Lorikeet, they usually form discrete individual groups.

Reproduction:

Habits of nesting and breeding unknown.

Food:

Prefer treetops in bloom where it feeds on pollen and nectar, but they may also feed on epiphytes.

Distribution:

Tamaño del área de distribución (reproducción/residente) 170,000 km2

Endemic to the montane forests of the center of West Papua New and Papua New Guinea, South of the cordillera central. The world population It is believed to be of less than 10.000 specimens, but it is probably stable. A small number in captivity.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

Its habitat is locally threatened by logging and clearing for agriculture. Reports of the species in Ok Tedi They show that the population of the Striated Lorikeet It dropped dramatically after the severe drought in 1997-1998 (P. Gregory in litt., 2010).

The species may be threatened by the presence of a large copper and gold open pit mine in Ok Tedi, but the impacts of this mine are currently unknown. It is likely to be tolerant of uneven and degraded forests and although it may have a small population in general, do not believe that it is declining very rapidly.

In captivity:

In aviculture the Striated Lorikeet It has become one of the rarest species. These birds have not been imported in large quantities, and many of the birds that survived the journey later died due to infections by fungi and other diseases. Few breeders were able to raise them on a regular basis.

Alternative names:

- Striated Lorikeet, Streaked Lorikeet, Yellow Streaked Lory, Yellow-streaked Lorikeet (ingles).
- Lori strié (francés).
- Streifenlori (alemán).
- Lori Estriado (español).

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittaculidae
- Genus: Charmosyna
- Nombre científico: Charmosyna multistriata
- Citation: (Rothschild, 1911)
- Protónimo: Charmosynopsis multistriata

Striated Lorikeet images:

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Striated Lorikeet (Charmosyna multistriata)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife
loryclub

Photos:

1 – Author: Jaroslav Chloupekbiolib.cz
2 – by DavyVanthuyne ’ s Bucket
3 – Birds-pet-wallpapers – link
4 – Author iggino – lynx
5 – tierportraet.ch – link

Pygmy Lorikeet
Charmosyna wilhelminae

Pygmy Lorikeet

Description

The Pygmy Lorikeet (Charmosyna wilhelminae) has an approximate length of 13 cm.. and a weight of 20 g..

The head is green; the forecrown brighter yellowish green; crown of color purple dark, with broadcast Blue in them tips and color turquoise bright in the feathers of the nape; rear of the nape with wash of olive. Mantle green; low back and tail reddish color; at the top, the tail blue purple. The wings, by up green with parts internal of the flight feather Blackish and blackish the primary coverts. The wings below rosa-salmon; Tips from the flight feather blackish. The underparts Green yellowish with prominent veins on the chest. Upper, the tail green, Red at the base (normally hidden in the field); olive brown below with red and yellow tips on the base. The bill reddish orange-tipped yellow; cere color red pink; Grey the ring perioftalmico; irises yellow to orange-red; legs light grey.

Female lack of red on it rump and in the wings view in flight.
Immature generally more muted and upperparts slightly more Brown. Lacks blue at the tips of the feathers of the nape. Yellow stripes on the top of the chest less distinct or absent. The bill and the irises brown.

Habitat:

Mainly inhabits in forests moist and in the edge of the forest, but also by forest savanna and established secondary vegetation. It is usually between the 1.000 meters of altitude and the 2.200 m, but in the South and around Port Moresby It is occasionally much closer to sea level, in the forests of lowlands. It forages in couples and small flocks of up to 20 birds in the trees in flower, often in the company of Goldie's Lorikeet and Fairy Lorikeet. Very Active When it feeds and, often difficult to identify due to its size and predominantly green plumage. It is not uncommon, but easily overlooked. and has been found in groups of up to 200 individuals. It has often been seen flying in mixed flocks above the canopy, where can be hardly identified due to its small size.

Reproduction:

Unknown nesting habits and breeding.

Food:

Feeds of nectar and pollen.

Distribution:

Tamaño del área de distribución (reproducción/residente): 290.000 km2

North of New Guinea in Irian Java (Indonesia) and Papua New Guinea. The range of the Mountains Parotia on Doberai peninsula, in the West of the island of New Guinea, through the cordillera central, the Huon peninsula, and South-East of the mountain range of Owen Stanley. In the immediate vicinity of Port Moresby (for example, area Sogeri) There is little (but possibly regular between May and November).

The population world will think that is of less than 50.000 specimens and is considered to be stable. There are few in captivity.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but the species according to sources is usually very rare.

The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

In captivity:

Rare.

Alternative names:

- Pygmy Lorikeet, Pygmy Streaked Lorikeet, Pygmy Streaked Lory, Wilhelmina's Lorikeet, Wilhemina's Lorikeet (ingles).
- Lori de Wilhelmina (francés).
- Elfenlori (alemán).
- Lori Pigmeo (español).

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittaculidae
- Genus: Charmosyna
- Nombre científico: Charmosyna wilhelminae
- Citation: (Meyer,AB, 1874)
- Protónimo: Trichoglossus Wilhelminae

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Pygmy Lorikeet (Charmosyna wilhelminae)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

1 – loromania

Blue-fronted Lorikeet
Charmosyna toxopei


Description

16 cm.. length.

Blue-fronted Lorikeet

The forecrown of the Blue-fronted Lorikeet (Charmosyna toxopei) is bright green, the front of the crown, above the eyes is bright blue; rest of the head green. Upperparts green, bright in the rump. Wings Green with blackish inner feathers. The underwing-coverts green; flight feather Blackish with yellow band in the whole lower part of the secondaries. The underparts brighter yellowish green. Tail green, with red bases and blackish stain. The bill orange; the irises yellow orange; legs orange-red.

Habitat:

If recent observations were in fact of the Blue-fronted Lorikeet, species can be nomadic, moving from high to low altitude on the basis of the availability of food (like some other small parrots). This might explain the scarcity of records, especially for a species already by itself it is distributed sparsely. The other possibility is that the birds are distributed only in the forested hills.

Interviews with local residents suggest that the species moved to the lowlands during the two annual seasons of heat, in March-April and August-November.

Reproduction:

There is no data.

Food:

The locals who live in the plateau frog They reported that the bird feeds on nectar and pollen from the trees in flower.

Distribution:

Endemic of Buru, Indonesia. Obviously, is a rare species, and virtually nothing is known of its State. The original specimens were collected in the wooded hills between 850 m and 1.000 m.

In 1980 It was reported that the species was fairly common in plantations, secondary and primary forest, but this record has been suggested as a reference to the Red-flanked Lorikeet (Charmosyna placentis) (the record of this species from Buru It is in fact wrong). In 1989 two flocks of five to six birds, supposedly this species, they were seen during a selective felling of forests to 600 meters on the Teluk Bara. There is also a report of 1993 of four small unidentified parakeets seen in the same area as the observations of 1.980. The species are now considered endangered by BirdLife International, Although a thorough search should be performed until their status can be determined by full. VULNERABLE.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Danger critic

• Population trend: Decreasing

• Population size: 50-249 mature individuals

Although there are few records (confirmed or unconfirmed) of the species, It is suspected that it is declining due to loss of forests in the lowlands.

Most of the forests in the coastal lowlands of Buru have they been clarified, and much of the forest in the northern part of the island has been connected shape selective or degraded and fragmented by migratory agriculture, in such a way that only a few small patches of lowland primary forest remain. However, the gardens of the island still contain many species of indigenous trees. In 2010, There was at least one search operation on a large scale above Buru, located in the lowlands. However, extensive forests of mountain of the island remain largely without being scanned. The topography of the mountain range Kaplamandan is the hope that almost all of the montane forest is inaccessible to loggers (A. Gray in litt. 2010).

All of the original specimens were captured alive using lime, However, the species is not kept as a pet, does not seem to be listed. Have a distribution of mountain which is close to the maximum altitude within its distribution area, does this species is potentially susceptible to climate change (BirdLife International data not publ.).

In captivity:

Not found in captivity.

Alternative names:

- Blue-fronted Lorikeet, Blue fronted Lorikeet, Buru Lorikeet (ingles).
- Lori de Buru (francés).
- Burolori, Burulori (alemán).
- Lori de Buru (español).

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittaculidae
- Genus: Charmosyna
- Nombre científico: Charmosyna toxopei
- Citation: (Siebers, 1930)
- Protónimo: Hypocharmosyna toxopei

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Blue-fronted Lorikeet (Charmosyna toxopei)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

New Caledonian Lorikeet
Charmosyna diadema

New Caledonian Lorikeet

Description

18 to 19 cm.. length.

The females of the New Caledonian Lorikeet (Charmosyna diadema) are green in general, with the crown Violet Blue intense and the thighs Blue dark, a face Beige and it bottom side and anal region red. The tail It is green above and yellowish olive below, with the four lateral feathers with red basal markings followed by a band of black, with yellow tip on the bottom. The bill is red-orange, the irises dark orange, probably, similar to the legs.

The males they have not been registered. On the basis of similar species, they probably have a more red coloration, probably including the face, the bottom of the primaries and the sides of the rump; and it is likely to be slightly larger than. The immature should look like females but paler.

Habitat:

This bird is difficult to track because it is Nomad and is relatively little visible. The species believed that it can live in humid montane forests but (seasonally). Flying in and out of the lowland forests of Melaleuca. Most of the reports come from such lowland forests, but this probably reflected only a better accessibility for observation. Mt. Ignambi It is believed that it is an ideal habitat for the species. The report Yacht Lake was an area of low scrub.

Reproduction:

Data playback of the New Caledonian Lorikeet (Charmosyna diadema) are only available the of the Red-flanked Lorikeet (Charmosyna placentis) and the Red-fronted Lorikeet (Charmosyna rubronotata). The breeding season, probably, is from July to December, and possibly until February, or even all year round. They dig in the arboreal nests of termites or in Epiphytic ferns. Link gives as a result the implementation of two (sometimes three?) White rounded eggs; the incubation period likely to be similar to other species of Loris.

Food:

The bird apparently is fed into the tops of the trees.
Related species eat nectar, pollen, flowers and sometimes delicate fruits, in pairs or small groups feeding (usually less than 10). The Erythrina specifically mentioned as plants that this species feeds.

Distribution:

Tamaño del área de distribución (reproducción/residente): 1 km2

Possibly extinct. Endemic of New Caledonia known from two female specimens collected in 1859. The species also could have been observed in the forests of the North of the island in the year 1900. and it was identified by the Islanders with the reference of a picture (at Delacour 1966) of Anthony Stokes in December of 1976. One Islander claimed to see a single individual in the Decade of 1920, and another had observed two the 3 in June of 1976 to the West of Monte Panie. This last comment was made by an observer with experience that he noticed the birds by their call, and said it was different to Coconut Lorikeet. The authors are in agreement with Necklace et to the. (1994) in the extension of remaining forests in New Caledonia and the size of the island indicate that well still can exist this species and that the observations and studies must be within a habitat right including the Monte Panie, Mount Humboldt and other forest areas of the Highlands. IN DANGER.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Danger critic

• Population trend: Unknown

The population It is estimated between 1 and 49 individuals mature.

This species has not been recorded with certainty since 1913, Despite specific searches in 1998, and it may have decreased as a result of a number of different threats. However, cannot be assumed that they have become extinct, because there were local reports in the Decade of 1950 and in 1976, and parrots of the genus are notoriously difficult to detect, being discreet and nomadic, more studies are needed. Any remaining population is likely to be small, and for these reasons it is in Danger critic.

The humid Montane forest is not under threat, but it is possible that this species has a requirement for other habitats, some of which, forests semi-deciduous in particular, the lowlands, they have almost disappeared from the island (Ekstrom et to the. 2000, Ekstrom et to the . 2002). Several Lori headband have suffered severe population decreases and fluctuations by unknown causes (Forshaw 1989). The introduction of any disease is possible (such as malaria, avian) or more likely the mammals (especially rats) they may have been one of the causes of the decline of this species.(Bregulla 1992, Ekstrom et to the. 2000, Ekstrom et to the ., 2002).

In captivity:

Not found in captivity.

Alternative names:

- New Caledonian Lorikeet, New Caledonia lorikeet (ingles).
- Lori à diadème, Loriquet à diadème (francés).
- Diademlori (alemán).
- Lori Diadema (español).

Scientific classification:


- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittaculidae
- Genus: Charmosyna
- Nombre científico: Charmosyna diadema
- Citation: (Verreaux,J & Des Murs, 1860)
- Protónimo: Psitteuteles diadema


New Caledonian Lorikeet (Charmosyna diadema)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • BirdLife

  • Photos:

1 – Birds-pet-wallpapers – link

  • Sounds:

Meek's Lorikeet
Charmosyna meeki

Description

Of 16 cm.. length and a weight between 23 and 32 g..

Meek's Lorikeet

The head of the Meek's Lorikeet (Charmosyna meeki) is bright green, more yellowish in the Chin and throat, darker Crown and scratching at ears shelters; patch of dark green blue above and in front of the eye. Green upper parts with fused olive through the mantle.

The wings of green at the top. Under the yellowish-green wing coverts. The yellowish green underparts, lighter in the back and more yellow from the chest to the belly. Top of tail dark green with yellow tip; the yellow bottom. Orange peak; pale red irises; legs Orange.

Both sexes are equal. Immature with the paler beak with base brown color and shorter tail.

  • Sound of the Meek's Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori the Meek.mp3]
Habitat:

Nomad. It is distributed in the wet hills and mountain forests, but they have also found found in lowland coconut palms. Usually found alone or in small flocks of about of 10 to 15 birds flying through or above the forest cover. Larger groups can gather in the blooming of trees to feed on pollen and nectar. It can be associated with other parrots as the Duchess Lorikeet, Finsch's Pygmy-Parrot, Yellow-bibbed Lory and Coconut Lorikeet

Reproduction:

Information is not available.

Food:

Its diet includes pollen and nectar.

Distribution:

Endemic to the mountains of the largest islands in the Group of Solomons: Bougainville, New Georgia, Malaita, Kolombangara, Guadalcanal and in the past Santa Isabel. Moves starting from the 300 m, until the 1.700 m, but according to reports rarely in the lowlands or above 1.200 m. The world's population is believed to be below 50,000 exemplary but probably stable.

Conservation:
[stextbox id=”alert” float=”true” width =”280″]

• Current IUCN Red list category: Near threatened
• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, It is believed that it is below 50,000 specimens, but the species is described as abundant at the Summit of Kolombangara.

There is still evidence of a decrease in its population, but I would be threatened by any future export trade on a large scale

In captivity:

They are not known to be in captivity.

Alternative names:

- Meek's Lorikeet (ingles).
- Lori de Meek (francés).
- Salomonenlori (alemán).
- Lori de Meek (español).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Charmosyna meeki
Citation: (Rothschild & Hartert, 1901)
Protonimo: Hypocharmosyna meeki

Lori Meek images:

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Meek's Lorikeet (Charmosyna meeki)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Sounds: Mark Todd (Xeno-canto)

Red-chinned Lory
Charmosyna rubrigularis

Description

17 to 20 cm.. length between 33 and 40 g. of weight.

Red-chinned Lory

The Red-chinned Lory (Charmosyna rubrigularis) has the head green; ear-coverts of bright emerald green with stripes of pale green and showing even more pale in the crown; chin, top of the throat and lower lores, surrounded by yellow red. The upperparts, Green olive darker than the underparts. The wings Green with the part internal black and them edges yellow. Yellowish-green below-wing coverts; flight feather grey and black with stripe yellow central.

Underparts brighter yellowish green, clearly more gentle to them upperparts. The tail above it is green with yellow tips, lateral feathers marked in red, black and orange in the bases; by below with broad lateral feathers red, with tips yellow (more or less hidden red rest), central feathers Black with them ends yellow.

Bill orange red; irises orange; legs orange-yellow.

Both sexes are equal.

Immature they are similar to the adult with less red in the chin and throat.

  • Sound of the Red-chinned Lory.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori Barbirrojo.mp3]
Habitat:

With distributed by the Rainforest, mainly in the mountains. Usually found in small flocks of up to ten birds, feeding in the canopy or flying above. Can be seen in company of others Loris that is feed from nectar, including the much larger Coconut Lorikeet. You can be assured while feeding.

Reproduction:

Unknown breeding habits.

Food:

Feeds of pollen and nectar and it has been noted that they frequent native Palms in the mountains of New Ireland.

Distribution:

Tamaño del área de distribución (reproducción/residente): 185.000 km2

In Karkar island (off the northeast coast) and the Bismarck Archipelago (New Britain, New Hanover and New Ireland), Papua New Guinea. In Karkar is found from sea level to the top but rarely below 625 m, and more common between the 1.150 meters of 1,280 m. Common from the 450 meters up in New Britain and in New Ireland from 1.500 metres to the Summit of the Hans Meyer Range; Although found as low as a 70 m. It tends to replace Red-flanked Lorikeet at higher altitudes, but it may be sympatric with species in some areas.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The population World has not been quantified, but the species according to information is common and abundant (pit et to the. 1997).

Justification of trend

It is suspected that the population is stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

In captivity:

The species does not arise today as a cage bird.

Alternative names:


- Red-chinned Lory, Red chinned Lorikeet, Red-chinned Lorikeet (ingles).
- Lori à menton rouge (francés).
- Rotkinnlori (alemán).
- Lori Barbirrojo, Lori de Barba Roja (español).

Philip Sclater
Philip Sclater

Scientific classification:


- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittaculidae
- Genus: Charmosyna
- Nombre científico: Charmosyna rubrigularis
- Citation: (Sclater,PL, 1881)
- Protónimo: Trichoglossus rubrigularis

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Red-chinned Lory (Charmosyna rubrigularis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Sounds: Frank Lambert (Xeno-canto)

Palm Lorikeet
Charmosyna palmarum

Description

17 cm.. length and an approximate weight of 35 g..
Palm Lorikeet

The head of the Palm Lorikeet (Charmosyna palmarum) is bright green, showing some red markings around the base of the bill, lores and the chin. The upperparts are bright green with a light washed olive brown through the mantle.

The wings are green. Under the greenish-gray wing coverts. The lower parts are bright green, more yellowish in the chin, the throat and the center of the belly (males sometimes also with some feathers red in the abdomen and the thighs). Tail Green with yellow in the Center and by the side of the feathers; Below the tail is yellow.
Bill orange; cere orange; irises yellow; legs yellowish-orange.

In the females, Red in the face is reduced or absent. Immature similar to the female, but in general most off. Iris ochre-coloured. Bill yellowish brown.

Habitat:

The Palm Lorikeet It is distributed in the forests and wooded lands, most common in the hills in the lowlands, and mostly uninhabited cloud forests of the larger islands above 1.000 m. He travels a lot between feeding sites and is found in pairs or flocks in the tops of the trees, where its Green plumage blends with the surroundings when it feeds among the flowers.
In flocks, couples have been observed grooming are, indicating that the partner link is maintained when birds are in larger groups.

A constant talk reveals the presence of these parrots in their search for food.

Reproduction:

Breeding habits they are little known, but a nest with two chicks in Holy (Vanuatu), It was found, in December of 1961, in a branch of a hollow tree to 6 meters above the ground in the cloud to 1,600 m forests. altitude.
They appear in the lowlands of sporadically, especially when the Erythnna and the Sago Palm they are in flower.

Food:

Feeds in the Palms, lianas, fig trees and shrubs, taking nectar, pollen, fruits and berries, and particularly fond with the the Sago Palm (Cycas circinalis).

Distribution:

Tamaño del área de distribución (reproducción/residente): 11.300 km2

Distributed by Southwest of Polynesia in Vanuatu, the Duff Islands, Santa Cruz Islands and Banks Islands.
Range seems to expand and contract, and it has been speculated that this may be related to the effect of cyclones, or sporadic colonies as a result of blooms. For example, in Vanuatu It was noted from Efate in 1879 for the first time in 30 years, and was still present there in the Decade of 1930, but by the Decade of 1960 He had disappeared.

Has also been recorded in Vanuatu from Holy Spirit, Aoba, Maewo, Pentecost, Malakula, Ambrym, Paama, Lopévi, Tongoa, EMAE, Nguna, Eromanga, Tanna and Futuna; in Banks group in Santa Maria. Ureparapara, Vanua Lava Lava and Mere; and in the Group of Tinakula Santa Cruz, Utupua and Vanikoro.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Vulnerable

• Population trend: Decreasing

The total size of the population It is estimated that it will fall within the band of 1,000-2,499 mature individuals.

Avian malaria, the cyclones and the natural cycles are suggested causes of the fluctuating range. Lowland forests, especially in small islands with high populations human, It is clearing for agriculture, domestic demand for timber and commercial logging, avoiding this kind of habitat can be regularly used by this species.

In captivity:

Very rare poultry.

Alternative names:

- Palm Lorikeet, Green Palm Lorikeet (ingles).
- Lori des palmiers (francés).
- Palmenlori (alemán).
- Lori Palmero (español).

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittaculidae
- Genus: Charmosyna
- Nombre científico: Charmosyna palmarum
- Citation: (Gmelin, 1788)
- Protónimo: Psittacus palmarum

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Palm Lorikeet (Charmosyna palmarum)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

1 – taenos

Chattering Lory
Lorius garrulus


Chattering Lory

Description

30 cm.. length and a weight between 180 and 250 g..

The Chattering Lory (Lorius garrulus) has the head, the nape and the the mantle top of color Scarlet bright. Great stain yellow in the center of the the mantle surrounded above and below a light spread of green opaque; scapulars Scarlet, a little darker than the the mantle; rump and top of the tail, bright Scarlet.

Flight feathers green up; coverts a little more pale and with a vague diffusion in bronze. The great coverts a dark gray at their ends; the alula Blackish green with yellow spot in the bend of wing and along the edge of the Carpus.

Lori White ilustracion

The bottom of the flight feather of color black with band broadband of color tints in the Center, the coverts yellowish green. Underparts bright Scarlet; Green thighs. The feathers of the tail red, with the black end fade Green. The bill orange; irises Orange to yellowish brown; legs grisaceo-negro color.

Both sexes are equal.

Immature with the bill brown, and the irises dark brown.

Description and distribution of subspecies
  • Lorius garrulus garrulus

    (Linnaeus, 1758) – (Halmahera, the Widi Islands and Ternate) The nominal

  • Lorius garrulus flavopalliatus

    (Salvadori, 1877) – (Bacan and OBI) Large yellow patch in the the mantle with much less greenish broadcasting.

  • Lorius garrulus morotaianus

    (Bemmel, 1940) – (Morotai and Riau) Small yellow patch in the mantle of green-dyed.

  • Sound of the Chattering Lory
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori Garrulo.mp3]
Habitat:

Although White and Bruce they say that the species is common in the coastal lowlands with coconut palms, recent observations seem to point to forested areas of high land as their main habitat. It is unclear if the capture is responsible for the apparent absence of their previously preferred habitat. Seasonal movements or behavior nomads could also be factors in the absence of the coastal lowlands. The Chattering Lory they occur more often in mature primary and secondary forests, far from human settlements from the lowlands up to 1.300 m.

They are usually in pairs, and are noisy and visible in flight but, like many other parrots, It can be difficult to detect when quietly feeding in the canopy of the forest to.

Reproduction:

Little is known about the reproduction of the species in the wild. A couple was seen building a nest in June, other records include the observation of a baby feeding during October and November, and a couple occupying a nest high in a dead tree, also during October.

In captivity the implementation is two eggs and the abandonment of the nest of young to the 76 days.

Food:

The primary food of the Chattering Lory It is believed to be the nectar and pollen, with local reports of feeding on the flowers of coconut along the coast, Although fruits and corn are also included in your diet.

Distribution:

Endemic to the North of the Moluccan Islands, Indonesia, from Morotai, Riau, Halmahera, Ternate, Bacan, OBI and, possibly, Kasiruta and Obilatau. The Chattering Lory has also been released in Sangihe, to the North of Sulawesi.

Locally common, but around human settlements have apparently been reduced by means of traps. It is very popular in the trade because of its imitative abilities.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Vulnerable.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

The main threat comes from the capture for the cage bird trade. This is the most popular bird exported from the East of Indonesia, largely due to his large imitative abilities. Thousands of copies were legally caught each year in your environment during the Decade of 1980 and principles of 1990, but the real value is probably much higher.

The legal trade was reduced at the end of the Decade of 1990 and ceased in 2003; However, the illegal trade continues: in 2007 about 2.800 birds were recorded as looted and in the 2008, 60 were recorded for trade in the markets of birds of Java.

Forests within its area of distribution are largely intact since the beginning of the Decade of 1990, but the exploitation by timber companies has become intensive. Important nesting trees are felled because of its large size, and logging roads greatly facilitating access for trappers, create the perfect combination to bring to the Chattering Lory as threatened species.

Ongoing conservation actions –> view in BirdLife

In captivity:

It was formerly very common, now not so much.

Smart, playful and good imitators. The Chattering Lory, However, is very aggressive with other birds. Also messed up mainly due to their diet liquid.

Alternative names:

- Chattering Lory (ingles).
- Lori noira, Lori des Moluques, Lori noir (francés).
- Prachtlori, Gelbmantelllori (alemán).
- Lóris-amor-amor (portugués).
- Lori Gárrulo, Tricogloso Gárrulo (español).

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittaculidae
- Nombre científico: Lorius garrulus
- Genus: Lorius
- Citation: (Linnaeus, 1758)
- Protónimo: Psittacus garrulus

Chattering Lory images:

————————————————————————————————

Chattering Lory (Lorius garrulus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

1 – By Benjamint444 (Own work) [GFDL 1.2], via Wikimedia Commons
2 – Birds-pet-wallpapers – link
3 – by Alexkant in Israel. Kiryat Motzkin – zoochat
4 – Photos Zoochat – link
5 – by Josep de el Hoyo – lynx
6 – riscosapenas – link

Sounds: Marc Thibault (Xeno-canto)

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