Pileated Parrot
Pionopsitta pileata

Pileated Parrot

Description:

22 cm.. length and a weight between 98-120 g..

Pileated Parrot

The Pileated Parrot (Pionopsitta pileata) has the forecrown, lores, crown anterior upper cheeks to behind eyes, bright red; patch reddish brown in ear-coverts; the lower cheeks, sides and rear of the neck, green.

The upperparts, green. Primaries and greater coverts, alula and feathers bend of wing, violet blue; other coverts, green. Outerwebs of the primary and secondary, violet blue with blue-green edges. Under, the wings bluish green, coverts with some darker blue feathers. Underparts green with bluish tint in the chest and throat, and with a yellowish tint in the belly and undertail-coverts. Upper, the tail centrally green, laterally violet blue; undertail, bluish green.

Bill dark brown, becoming dark horn distally in both mandibles; bare periophthalmic naked, pale grey, irises and legs, grayish brown.

The female has most of its head green but with a pretty pale blue in the forecrown.

Immature as female, but with grayish green or green spots and dark spots on the base bill; young male sometimes with red limited in forecrown with a patch orange behind.

  • Sound of the Pileated Parrot.

Habitat:

They inhabit in forests, including tropical rain forests and mountains dominated by araucarias, mainly in lowlands in the south of the mountain range, although penetrating the coastal mountains Brazil, at altitudes of 300 to 1.500 m; also in areas partially cleared. Gregarious in groups of approximately 10 birds; apparently rare in greater numbers.

Reproduction:

They nest in the cavities of trees. probably reproduce mainly in the months of November to January. Clutch 3-4 eggs in captivity.

Food:

The fruits of Euterpe edulis They are among the favorite foods during the winter in eastern Paraguay; also recorded fruits Podocarpus and Solanum, and bark Eucalyptus; visit when ripe fruit orchards in Rio Grande do Sul.

Distribution and status:

Size of its range (breeding/resident ): 1.650.000 km2

The Pileated Parrot It is located in southeast Brazil, to the South of Bay, through the belt of the Atlantic forest in Espirito Santo, probably east of Minas Gerais, Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Paraná and Santa Catarina, until Rio Grande do Sul, extending to the east Paraguay and northeast of Argentina in Missions and possibly in Currents (no recent records); also they have been reported east of Chaco in Argentina, where they can arrive as an irregular visitors.

Some seasonal movements occur Paraná, where birds depart from the coast inland plateau after breeding, and in Paraguay where it is in Amambay in October.

Nomad in the Intervales State Park of São Paulo. Its population is widespread but declining due to the extensive loss of forests by urban growth, agriculture and mining.

Described as uncommon to fairly common in Missions, Argentina. Apparently even their population is not at risk from habitat loss as the birds remain quite numerous where forest fragments are (for example, East of Paraguay) and travel between them on land without trees. More numerous are more extensive where the remains of forest, It is more common in eastern Paraguay and adjacent Paraná and São Paulo in Brazil.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the red list category

This species has a very large range and therefore it is not close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of size range (Extension Occurrence <20,000 km2 combinada con un tamaño de rango decreciente o fluctuante, extensión / calidad de hábitat o tamaño de población y un pequeño número de lugares o fragmentación severa). La demographic trend appears to be stable and, therefore, the species does not approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criteria of population trend (> 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size It has not been quantified, but it is not believed to be close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un descenso continuo estimado> 10% in ten years or three generations or a population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as the least concern.

Justification of the population

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, but this species is described as “rare” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

They suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

Lorito Pileado in captivity:

Very rare in captivity.

Alternative names:

Pileated Parrot, red-cappe parrot, Red-capped Parrot (English).
Caïque mitré, Perroquet mitré (French).
Scharlachkopfpapagei, Scharlachkopf-Papagei (German).
Cuiú-cuiú, caturra, cuiú, cuiuiú, curica-cuiú, maitaca-de-cabeça-vermelha, periquito-rei, tui-maritaca (Portuguese).
Catita cabeza roja, Catita decabeza roja, Lorito cabeza roja, Lorito de Cara Roja, Lorito Pileado (Spanish).
Catita cabeza roja, Catita decabeza roja (Argentina).
Lorito cabeza roja (Paraguay).

Giovanni Antonio Scopoli
Giovanni Antonio Scopoli

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pionopsitta
Scientific name: Pionopsitta pileata
Citation: (Scopoli, 1769)
Protonimo: Psittacus pileatus

Images Pileated Parrot:

————————————————————————————————

Pileated Parrot (Pionopsitta pileata)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Pileated Parrot Loro Parque – Tenerife (Spain) by Florin FeneruFlickr
(2) – Pileated Parrot Loro Parque – Tenerife (Spain) by Florin FeneruFlickr
(3) – Pileated Parrot Loro Parque – Tenerife (Spain) by Florin FeneruFlickr
(4) – Pionopsitta pileata by Taguató yetapaFlickr
(5) – Red-capped parrot (Pionopsitta pileata) – “Cuiú-cuiú” Campina Grande do Sul | The Birds of Brazil by Ben TavenerFlickr
(6) – Catita Red Head by Argentavis - Birds of Argentina

Brown-necked Parrot
Poicephalus fuscicollis

Brown-necked Parrot

Description:

32 cm.. length and weight between 310-400 g..

The Brown-necked Parrot (Poicephalus fuscicollis) has a plumage variable; head and neck gray-brown / light pink, slightly festooned with orange / brown; band orange / red through crown on female (absent in the males); back and wings, dark green; rump and underparts, green; the thighs, bend of wing and the carpal edge, red / orange; tail black / brown; irises dark brown; eye ring white / grey; bill color horn.

Immature with the head and the neck, green to yellow / brown; body dark green / oliva.

Taxonomic status:

In a study initiated in 1992, the taxonomic status of Lorito was revised Robusto (Poicephalus robustus) (Gmelin), and two species were proposed; Poicephalus robustus, restricted to montane forests of southern Africa, Poicephalus fuscicollis suahelicus, with wider distribution in wooded areas, and Poicephalus fuscicollis fuscicollis, similar to the Poicephalus fuscicollis suahelicus ostensibly, but with discontinuous, restricted to a narrow range of forests and West Africa.

  • Sound of the Brown-necked Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Poicephalus fuscicollis.mp3]

Description 2 subspecies:

  • Poicephalus fuscicollis fuscicollis

    (Their Robust de Kuhl) (Kuhl, 1820) – Nominal.

  • Poicephalus fuscicollis suahelicus
  • Poicephalus fuscicollis suahelicus

    (Gray-headed parrot) (Reichenow, 1898) – With a plumage variable; head and neck silver / grey, festoneado slightly orange / brown; band orange / red through crown on female (absent in the males); back and wings, dark green; rump and lower partess, green / blue ; the thighs, bend of wing and the carpal edge, orange / red; tail black / brown; irises dark brown; eye ring white / grey; bill color horn.

Habitat:

Usually, prefers habitats of forests, as Mopane (Colosphermum mopane), miombo (Brachystegia) and riparian forests.

Most populations are residents but in the dry season become nomads, wandering in search of food.

Reproduction:

Nest in natural cavities of trees, usually on the trunk or at the bottom of a branch. The laying is of 2-4 eggs, they are incubated only by the female during 28-30 days. The male contributes to providing food for the female and chicks. Them They learn to fly when they have a 68-83 days old, only become fully independent 4-5 months later.

Food:

It feeds almost exclusively on fruit, mainly foraging in the upper canopy, using its beak to climb branches. The following foods have been recorded in your diet:

Sclerocarya birrea (Marula)
Pseudolachnostylis maprouneifolia (Kudu-berry)
Commiphora mollis (Velvet cork)
Xanthocercis zambesiaca (Nyala tree)
Terminalia (cluster leaves)
Gmelina arborea (Melina)

Distribution:

It is distributed from South Democratic Republic of the Congo and Tanzania until Zambia, Angola, Malawi and South of Africa; It is rare in the Caprivi Strip (Namibia), North of Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, the Limpopo and Southeast of South Africa.

Distribution 2 subspecies:

  • Poicephalus fuscicollis fuscicollis

    (Kuhl, 1820) – Nominal. Inhabits most mangrove forests including and can be found in West Africa, from Gambia and South of Senegal to the North of Ghana and Togo.

  • Poicephalus fuscicollis suahelicus

    (Reichenow, 1898) – Is located in South Africa, North of Zimbabue, Mozambique, areas Namibia, Angola, Zambia, North of Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda and the southern part of the South Africa.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

This species has a extremely large range and therefore it is not close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of size range (Extension <20,000 km2 combinada con un tamaño de rango decreciente o fluctuante, extensión o calidad de hábitat o tamaño de población y un pequeño número De lugares o fragmentación severa). A pesar de que la population trend appears to be declining, do not believe that the decline is fast enough for approaching the threshold of vulnerable under the criterion of population trend (> 30% decline in ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to be close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con una disminución continua estimada> 10% in ten years or three generations or a population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as least concern.

Local and most uncommon in the range, Although more numerous and frequent in Ghana. South Subspecies considered vulnerable in South Africa where, although erratic movements give the impression that the population fluctuates, It has suffered a decline due to the capture of the LBMs, the habitat destruction and persecution by farmers of pecan nuts; There are only fragmented patches of native vegetation. Generally scarce or rare across West Africa (except Ghana).

We know very little about the biology released subspecies Poicephalus fuscicollis suahelicus.
Although it has a very wide distribution area and is not classified as threatened, an analysis of the UICN and CITES They recorded a significantly high traffic Poicephalus robustus (including the Poicephalus fuscicollis suahelicus) between 1991 and 1995, It is involving a risk to natural populations. The lack of data on the ecology and behavior of this species restricts the establishment of conservation measures necessary to protect and effectively manage populations.

Brown Neck Parrot in captivity:

It easily adapts to captivity and is seen in the pet trade.

Alternative names:

Brown-necked Parrot, Angola Brown-necked Parrot, Brown-necked Parrot (Brown-necked), Gambia Brown-necked Parrot, Uncape Parrot (English).
Perroquet à cou brun, Perroquet à cou brun (nominal), Perroquet à cou brun (nominale), Perroquet à cou brun (race nominale) (French).
Graukopfpapage (German).
Brown-necked Parrot (Portuguese).
Loro de Cuello Marrón, You You Fuscicollis (Spanish).

Kuhl, Heinrich
Heinrich Kuhl

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Poicephalus
Scientific name: Poicephalus fuscicollis
Citation: (Kuhl, 1820)
Protonimo: Psittacus fuscicollis

Images Brown-necked Parrot:

Poicephalus [robustus or fuscicollis] suahelicus

Poicephalus [robustus or fuscicollis]

Poicephalus [robustus or fuscicollis] suahelicus

Poicephalus [robustus or fuscicollis] suahelicus

————————————————————————————————

Brown-necked Parrot (Poicephalus fuscicollis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Birdlife
Parrots.org

Photos:

(1) – Youth, captive, friendly Poicephalus robustus fuscicollis by Bob CorriganFlickr
(2) – Brown-necked Parrot By Tremeau de Rochebrune, Alphonse [CC BY 2.0 or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Peter Boesman (Xeno-canto)

Norfolk Island Kaka
Nestor productus †

Norfolk Island Kaka

Description:

The Norfolk Island Kaka (Nestor productus) was their large with a bill, wings short and wide, and with legs and feet large.

Norfolk Island Kaka

He had 38 centimeters long. The top of his head era gris pardusca, while its face varied from yellow to orange, sometimes with a reddish tint. It was said that his Hip It was greenish yellow, and upperparts, including the wings, They were mostly gray-brown, slightly darker than the top of the head, with the bottom of the back and rump orange or dark red and the tail brown. Upper chest It was brown and gray bottom bright yellow, with the belly and sides reddish orange (Forshaw & Cooper 1981, 2002; Greenway 1958).

Its social structure and dispersion are not registered, but the Norfolk Island Kaka of New Zealand, he watched alone or in small groups of up 10 individuals (Higgins 1999).

Habitat:

Habit in the native forest in the Norfolk Island and about Phillip Island (Greenway 1958). The species could be observed both in the canopy of tall trees, and soil, the rocks (Gould, 1865, Greenway 1958).

Given its endemism in the Norfolk Island, the Norfolk Island Kaka It was presumably sedentary.

Reproduction:

Little is known of reproductive cycle of the Norfolk Island Kaka; just put on record of four eggs in tree holes (Gould 1865).

Food:

It is known that he fed on nectar Flowers tree white wood (Lagunaria) (Gould 1865). Certainly should be more varied. The captive birds They ate lettuce and other vegetables leaves, and dairy foods and fruit juice (Gould 1865). Presumably he foraged in both the soil and the canopy (Gould, 1865).

Distribution:

Its range was about 15,5 hectares.

It was endemic to the Norfolk island (in Australia) and nearby Phillip Island, Australia. It became extinct in the wild in mid-century 19 on Norfolk Island, and possibly a little later Phillip Island.

It is believed that the species had a very limited ability to move between islands, and probably he spent his whole life on the island of his birth (Gould, 1865).
In the Norfolk Island Kaka occasionally kept in captivity, as the birds were gentle and easy to capture alive (Gould 1865). The species He survived in captivity until after it had been extinct in the wild (Greenway 1958). There are no known captive populations and none has been reintroduced into the wild. The last known bird was alive in captivity in London in 1851 (Garnett et to the., 2011).

No made extensive studies for this species. However, there have been a series of ornithological studies in the Norfolk Island since the species disappeared from the island (p.ej. Bell 1990, Robinson 1988, Schodde et al., 1983, Smithers y Disney 1969), no signs have been found of the species.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: extinct.

Justification of the red list category

This species was known in the Norfolk Island, but it was Extinguished to mid 1800. It is believed that the elimination of habitat and hunting have been the main drivers.

According to reports, era tame and, Therefore, hunted strongly convicts and early settlers and easily trapped as a pet.

No information is available on the population size before its decline.

Norfolk Kaka in captivity:

They were captured by his meekness and they were common in the Norfolk Island

Alternative names:

Norfolk Island Kaka, Norfolk Island Kea, Norfolk Island Parrot, Norfolk Kaka (English).
Nestor de Norfolk (French).
Dünnschnabelnestor, Norfolkkaka, Norfolk-Kaka (German).
Kākā-de-norfolk (Portuguese).
Kaka de Norfolk (Spanish).

John Gould
John Gould

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Strigopidae
Genus: Nestor
Scientific name: Nestor productus
Citation: (Gould, 1836)
Protonimo: produced Plyctolophus

Norfolk Island Kaka images:

————————————————————————————————

Norfolk Island Kaka (Nestor productus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Australian Government – Department of the Environment and Energy (Nestor productus — Norfolk Island Kaka)

Photos:

(1) – Natural Science Curatorial Trainee – Birmingham’s Norfolk kaka
(2) – Nestor productus Gould, 1836 by Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Nestor productus By Gould, 1836 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Norfolk Island Kaka (Nestor productus). The last bird in captivity died in London in 1851. Specimen from the Zoological Museum in Firenze, Italy by Thomas WesenerFlickr
(5) – Nestor productus By Gould, 1836 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – The Norfolk Island Kākā (Nestor productus) from the plate in the Bulletin of the Liverpool Museum. From the specimen in the Tring Museum by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

White-capped Parrot
Pionus seniloides

White-capped Parrot

Description:

28 to 30 cm.. high and about 229 g. of weight.

White-capped Parrot

The White-capped Parrot (Pionus seniloides) is easily identifiable by the bill yellow, head usually white, with the crown with reddish speckles, feathers of the nape and sides of the head with dark blue edges and red dyes which gives the appearance of flake.

Breast with greenish blue edges, under belly and internal base tail red.

Iris of color Brown and legs gray-green.

The youth have crown and chest green, and green spots on the sides of the head and neck.

Note:

Previously he was treated as a subspecies of the species Pionus tumultuosus, namely, Pionus tumultuosus seniloides. A midyear 2014 it is considered as own species.

  • Sound of the White-capped Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://White-headed www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Loro canto.mp3]

Habitat and behavior:

It is a kind rare.
It inhabits in rainforest and borders, from the 1900 to 3000 m. It is mainly a species of temperate zone, but you can descend to lower elevations.

Like most parrots highland, the White-capped Parrot are rather nomads, widely wandering in search of fruits and seeds (now perhaps more as a result of extensive deforestation). Usually observed in flocks 3-25 birds, sometimes more. More active with grey weather, overcast skies. Hard to see while feeding or resting in the upper canopy. Its silhouette in flight resembles a Amazona but with the beating of wings deepest.

Reproduction:

It nests in tree hollows.

Food:

Feeds of seeds, fruit of Turpinia paniculata and plants of the family Clusiaceae; sometimes in cornfields, causing damage to their crops.

Distribution:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 1.020.000 km2

Live west of Venezuela (from the border TrujilloLara) through the East of the Andes of Colombia (rare in the western Andes), and on both sides of the Andes in Ecuador and Northwest of Peru (west to Cajamarca and this, at least until Freedom)

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common“, but irregular distribution (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

They suspected that the population is declining due to the continuous habitat destruction.

Seniloide parrot in captivity:

Rare in captivity. In Europe they arrived first at the beginning of the century 20 and then the early 70. In captivity, However, They were raised for the first time in the second half of the 80.

Alternative names:

White-capped Parrot, Speckle-faced Parrot (White-capped), White-headed Parrot (English).
Pione givrée (French).
Greisenkopfpapagei, Glatzenkopfpapagei, Greisenkopf-Papagei (German).
White-capped Parrot (Portuguese).
Loro de Cabeza Blanca, Loro seniloide, Loro gorriblanco (Spanish).
Cotorra Cabeciblanca (Venezuela).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pionus
Scientific name: Pionus seniloides
Citation: (Massena & Souancé, 1854)
Protonimo: Psittacus seniloides

Images White-capped Parrot:

————————————————————————————————

White-capped Parrot (Pionus seniloides)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Book parrots, Parrots and macaws Neotropical
parrots.org

Photos:

(1) – By Francesco Veronesi [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons White-capped Parrot (Pionus seniloides), Ecuador by
(2) – Iconographie des perroquets :Paris :P. Bertrand,1857 by Biodiversity Heritage LibraryFlickr

Sounds: Andrew Spencer

Orange-cheeked Parrot
Pyrilia barrabandi


Orange-cheeked Parrot

Description:

The Orange-cheeked Parrot (Pyrilia barrabandi) measured, approximately, 25 cm., has the head and throat black, except for the bright colored area amarillento-naranja that goes from the base of the bill up to the lower cheek well behind the eyes.

Parrot-carinaranja-6

Upperparts green, lesser coverts, yellow-orange; edge front of the wing red; primary coverts blue-black; greater coverts bluish green; other coverts, green. Primary, dark blue at the base and in outerweb, If not black; underwing-coverts, bright red, flight feather opaque green. Upper zone of the chest Golden, its bottom and belly, bright blue green, the thighs with orange-yellow feathers. Tail Green with blue tip, with yellow bases to the innerwebs of outer feathers.

Bill grey; brown the irises; legs grey.

Both sexes are similar.

The immature has the head Brown golden colour with yellowish brown in cheeks inferiores. Younger birds also has less yellow in the bend of wing, some green feathers in the underwing-coverts and yellow on the tips of the primaries.

  • Sound of the Orange-cheeked Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Cotorra Cabecinegra.mp3]

Description 2 subspecies:

  • Pyrilia barrabandi aurantiigena

    (Gyldenstolpe, 1951) – Lesser coverts, curve of the wing and the thighs intense Orange instead of yellow-orange.

  • Pyrilia barrabandi barrabandi

    (Kuhl, 1820) – Nominal.

Habitat:

They inhabit mainly in lowland forests, apparently less frequently in forests and marshes. They are distributed at the edge of forests and partially disturbed forest, occasionally in small groves in deforested areas. Observed in altitudes of 150-300 metres in Venezuela and 500 meters in the southeast of Colombia. Seen individually, in pairs and in small groups of up to 10 individuals (sometimes more in banks of land rich in minerals). Are activated more early, In the morning, than other parrots and will rest later.

Reproduction:

There is no information about the nesting, but that suggests the registration of immature birds in February and March breeding season It can be between the months of September/October until the end of year.

Food:

Observed taking seeds or fruits of Ficus sphenophylla, Pourouma, Pseudolmedia, Mimosa, Pithecellobium and Heisteria and possibly larvae of the gall wasps. Usually, they feed in the canopy of the trees, or just below them; less frequently in low branches. Regularly visit areas with soil rich in minerals in the company of other species of parrots.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution(reproduction / resident): 3.470.000 km2

This is a kind of basin of the Western Amazon and the Alto Orinoco. Its length extends from the southeast of Colombia, from the Caquetá Western and bass Río Inírida, Guainía, until Venezuela in Amazon and the Center and South of Bolivar and in Brazil in the upper part of the Amazon to the West, from the rivers Black and Madeira through the rivers Juruá and Purus and to the South towards Mato Grosso, through the East of Ecuador and East of Peru and to the Northwest of Bolivia, in Beni.

They are generally considered rare throughout its distribution area, Although they are fairly common in the Northwest of Bolivia and many in the sandy Woods of bass Inírida River, to the southeast of Colombia. Its population has fallen locally due to deforestation, Although large tracts of primary forest remain in all range States. Live in several areas protected.

Distribution 2 subspecies:

  • Pyrilia barrabandi aurantiigena

    (Gyldenstolpe, 1951) – Is located in the East of Ecuador and to the East of Peru, where is this in the Manu National Park. In the North of Bolivia is it described as frequent to numerous. The extension also comes to Brazil: is limited by the Amazon in the North and Rio Madeira from the East (pit et to the., 1997).

  • Pyrilia barrabandi barrabandi

    (Kuhl, 1820) – Nominal.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Almost threatened.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “rare” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

It is suspected that this species has lost 12.1-15% of habitat within its distribution over three generations (21 years) based on a model of Amazon deforestation (Soares-Filho et to the., 2006, Bird et to the., 2011). Given the susceptibility of the species to the fragmentation and degradation of forest and potentially your hunting and/or trapping, It is suspected that its population will decrease at a rate close to the 30% during three generations.

Threats

The main threat This species is the acceleration of the deforestation on Amazon basin with large tracts of land used for cattle raising and soybean production; It is highly susceptible to degradation and fragmentation due to its dependence of primary forests (Soares-Filho et to the. 2006, Bird et to the. 2011, A. Lees in litt. 2011). It can also be vulnerable to the hunt (A. Lees in litt. 2011). The changes proposed by the Forest code of Brazil they reduce the percentage of land that a private owner has the legal obligation to maintain as forest and include an amnesty for owners who have deforested before July of 2008 (that would be subsequently absolved of the need to reforest lands illegally cleared) (Bird et to the. 2011).

Lorito Carinaranja in captivity:

It is very rare see you in captivity outside of Brazil.

Alternative names:

Orange-cheeked Parrot, Barraband’s Parrot, Orange cheeked Parrot (English).
Caïque de Barraband (French).
Goldwangenpapagei, Goldwangen-Papagei (German).
curica-de-bochecha-laranja, curica, curuca (Portuguese).
Cotorra Cabecinegra, Lorito Carinaranja, Lorito de Mejillas Amarillas (Spanish).
Cotorra Cabecinegra (Colombia).
Loro de Mejilla Naranja (Peru).
Perico Cachete Amarillo (Venezuela).

Kuhl, Heinrich
Heinrich Kuhl

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrilia
Scientific name: Pyrilia barrabandi
Citation: (Kuhl, 1820)
Protonimo: Psittacus Barrabandi

Orange-cheeked Parrot images:

————————————————————————————————

Orange-cheeked Parrot (Pyrilia barrabandi)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Orange-cheeked Parrot (Pyrilia barrabandi) Cristalino Jungle Lodge, Mato Grosso, Brazil by Amy McAndrewsFlickr
(2) – Orange-cheeked Parrot at Napo Wildlife Reserve, Ecuador by ocelot123Flickr
(3) – Cobalt Winged Parakeet , Scarlet Shouldered Parrotlet and Orange Cheeked Parrot at 3rd lick by Vince SmithFlickr
(4) – Cobalt Winged Parakeet , Scarlet Shouldered Parrotlet and Orange Cheeked Parrot at 3rd lick by Vince SmithFlickr
(5) – Cobalt Winged Parakeet , Scarlet Shouldered Parrotlet and Orange Cheeked Parrot at 3rd lick by Vince SmithFlickr
(6) – Oiseaux brillans du Brésil.. Paris,1834.. biodiversitylibrary.org/page/47697228

Sounds: controles-canto.org

Speckle-faced Parrot
Pionus tumultuosus

Speckle-faced Parrot

Description:

28 to 31 cm.. tall and around 250 g. weight.

Speckle-faced Parrot

The Speckle-faced Parrot (Pionus tumultuosus) It is distinguishable by color from whitish crown up to the nape; base bill red rose, with forecrown redder. Cheeks whitish with red and purple tint to the neck; Purple chest.

Shoulder with thin strip yellow with reddish tint, inside base tail and crissum, red; the rest of the tail is green with blue on the outer feathers; under belly with red feathers with green edge.

ocula ringr greyish

The youth They have almost all head green and the wings, greenish yellow.

Taxonomic note:

The Speckle-faced Parrot It is probably the rarest and most controversial genre Pionus. It is sometimes divided into two species, in which case, the Pionus tumultuosus South is known as Speckle-faced Parrot, while the North, Pionus seniloides, They are known as White-capped Parrot (which leads to easy confusion with Pionus senilis).

Habitat:

It inhabits in Andean and sub-Andean cloud forests and forest edges, between 1600 and 3200 meters above sea level.
It is highly Nomad with temporal variations in the number of individuals who can be registered in a locality.

Reproduction:

With reproduce In September. In captivity puts 4 eggs which incubated about 26 days. more aspects of reproductive biology are unknown.

Food:

It has been registered consuming fruits of Turpinia paniculata and sometimes they are observed in large numbers feeding on corn crops in cultivated areas and banana plantations.

Distribution:

Its population is distributed in the southern Andes, from the center of Peru until Bolivia.

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 329.000 km2

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common, but irregular distribution” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

It is suspected that the population is in decline due to the continuous habitat destruction.

Parrot tumultuous captive:

This species is virtually nonexistent in poultry farming. There is only a small collection, private property in the United States. The Fundación Loro Parque in Tenerife, Spain, It has some copies.
The majority of the Speckle-faced Parrot imported to United States They were victims of aspergillosis - Probably caused by stress suffered during the import process.

In captivity They were observed as the to intelligent species, inquisitive and sometimes timid and nervous. Will get used to their caregiver over time. You can interact with a person and jealously attacking others. Prone to obesity.

Alternative names:

Speckle-faced Parrot, Plum-crowned Parrot, Speckle-faced Parrot (Plum-crowned) (inglés).
Pione pailletée, Pione pourprée (francés).
Purpurstirnpapagei (alemán).
Curica-de-cara-manchada (portugués).
Cotorra Gorriblanca, Loro Rosado, Loro Tumultuoso (español).

Tschudi Johann Jakob von
Tschudi Johann Jakob von

Clasificación científica:

Orden: Psittaciformes
Familia: Psittacidae
Genus: Pionus
Nombre científico: Pionus tumultuosus
Citation: (von Tschudi, 1844)
Protónimo: Psittacus tumultuosus

Imágenes Loro tumultuoso:


Loro tumultuoso (Pionus tumultuosus)

    Fuentes:

    Avibase
    – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    – Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Par
    Birdlife
    – Libro Loros, Pericos y Guacamayas Neotropicales

    Fotos:

    (1) – Eduardo Nogueira
    (2) – Speckle-faced Parrot at La Merced Zoo By josecajacuri [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Speckle-faced Parrot “Pionus tumultuosus” on the grounds of the Pueblo Hotel, Aguas Calientes by Carol FoilFlickr
    (4) – Speckle-faced Parrot “Pionus tumultuosus” on the grounds of the Pueblo Hotel, Aguas Calientes by Carol FoilFlickr
    (5) – Speckle-faced Parrot “Pionus tumultuosus” on the grounds of the Pueblo Hotel, Aguas Calientes by Carol FoilFlickr
    (6) – PIONUS TUMULTUOSUS By Allen, Edgar W.; Erxleben, J.; Hanhart, Michael; Hanhart, N; Keulemans, J. G.; Mintern Bros.; Rowley, George Dawson; Smith, J.; Walther, T. [CC BY 2.0 or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

    Sonidos: Sebastian K. Herzog

Saffron-headed Parrot
Pyrilia pyrilia

Saffron-headed Parrot


Description:

22,8 to 25,4 cm.. height.

Saffron-headed Parrot

The Saffron-headed Parrot (Pyrilia pyrilia) is characterized by the lores naked; head, rear and both sides of the neck, bright yellow. Upperparts green. The spots of the upperwing-coverts are bright yellow with some red feathers at the base; Red at the front edge of the wing with the external medium upperwing-coverts blue, or green with blue tips. The primary coverts are black, with the coverts remaining of the party top, green, sometimes with blue tips.

Primary and secondary bluish black with narrow green margin to the outerweb; tertiary green. Under the wings and axillary bright red, flight feather of color bluish pale. Breast Yellow olive; belly Green but paler and more yellowish than the top; undertail-coverts green. At the top the tail with yellow in the innerwebs and blue tips; yellowish below. Bill color pale horn; cere blackish; dark grey skin nude of the lores extends around the eye ring; eye ring whitish; irises dark brown; legs grey.

Both sexes similar. The immature has the crown and shoulders Green with yellow yellowish brown in the face and throat.

  • Sound of the Saffron-headed Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Casanga cabeciamarilla.mp3]

Habitat:

Little known throughout its distribution. It inhabits in jungles wet, very wet, high secondary forest and cleared areas, between the 300 to 1700 m. In Venezuela can be seen in tropical and subtropical areas at altitudes of 150-1650 m (perhaps only seasonally to higher altitudes) and 1.000 metres in Colombia. Generally gregarious, seen in groups of up to 10 individuals.

Reproduction:

With reproduce during the first half of the year.
Birds in conditions of breeding observed in the months of March to June in Antioquia (Colombia). Immature seen during the month of July in Sierra de Perija (Venezuela and Colombia).

Food:

Just have your feed data, Although it more likely is that your diet is composed of of fruit, berries and seeds.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 577.000 km2

The Saffron-headed Parrot is distributed in the this of the Province of Darien, Panama, to the North of Colombia and Northwest of Venezuela.

There are two records in the Northwest of Ecuador, a wandering pair alleged in the Book ecológica Cotacachi-Cayapas and a flock of about 20 birds in the Pedro Vicente Maldonado Canton, in the Northwest of Pichincha (Ridgely and Greenfield 2001), Although their status is uncertain (JF Freile in litt., 2000, Ridgely and Greenfield 2001).

Today it is rare to see to the Saffron-headed Parrot in accessible areas, Although still being common in the Serrania of them Quinchas (Boyacá) and in the Hill of the peace (Santander) (Donegan et to the., 2003), Colombia and is soon likely to have decreased significantly in the Chocó, Colombia, or Darien (GR Angehr in litt., 1999, G. Stiles in litt., 1999).

There are few recent records, but still can be numerous in the base North of them Andes, Córdoba, North of Antioquia and Bolivar, and in the Valley of the Magdalena, to the East of Caldas and to the southeast of Antioquia, Colombia (Hilty and Brown 1986, A. Cuervo in litt., 1999).

Seems to have decreased in Venezuela, where recent records are from the area of Merida, the South-East slopes of the Cordillera de Mérida, Barinas (Kirwan and Sharpe 1999, C. Sharpe, J. and F. Rodriguez Rojas-Suárez in litt., 1999) and Sierra de Perija (CJ Sharpe in litt. 2011).

The population total may have fallen below 10.000 individuals (Juniper and Parr 1998, G. Stiles in litt., 1999). In fact, is estimated that the Western population (West of Sinu) is of 2.000 to 4.000 individuals (the majority of the habitat intact), the population Center (Serranía de San Lucas) is probably less than 1.000 individuals, the slopes West of the Eastern Cordillera It is estimated at approximately 1.000 individuals and the eastern slope of the Eastern Cordillera and Merida perhaps less than 1.000 individuals (C. Sharpe, J. and F. Rodriguez Rojas-Suárez in litt., 1999).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Near-threatened.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the red list category

This species has a population moderately small suspected is declining, and therefore qualifies as near-threatened. It is considered nationally vulnerable in Colombia (Renjifo et to the., 2002) and Venezuela (Sharpe 2008).

Justification of the population

The population is estimated at at least 7.000 copies in total, more or less equivalent to 4.700 mature individuals (PGW Salaman in litt., 2006).

Justification of trend

A slow to moderate and continuous decrease in population is suspected on the basis of the rates of habitat loss: its preferred habitat is severely threatened (T. Donegan in litt 2006.).

Lorito Cabecigualdo in captivity:

Very difficult acclimating to captivity, susceptible to diseases in captive State.

Alternative names:

Saffron-headed Parrot, Bonaparte’s Parrot, Saffron headed Parrot (English).
Caïque de Bonaparte (French).
Goldkopfpapagei, Goldkopf-Papagei (German).
Saffron-headed Parrot (Portuguese).
Cotorra Cariamarilla, Lorito Cabecigualdo, Lorito de Cabeza Dorada (Spanish).
Cotorra Cariamarilla (Colombia).
Perico Cabecidorado (Venezuela).

Charles Lucien Bonaparte
Charles Lucien Bonaparte

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrilia
Scientific name: Pyrilia pyrilia
Citation: (Bonaparte, 1853)
Protonimo: Psittacula pyrilia


Saffron-headed Parrot (Pyrilia pyrilia)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife

  • Photos:

(1) – Saffron-headed Parrot (Pyrilia pyrilia) by Ron KnightFlickr
(2) – Iconographie des perroquets: Paris :P. Bertrand,1857. by Biodiversity Heritage Library – Flickr

  • Sounds:

Indigo-winged Parrot
Hapalopsittaca fuertesi


Indigo-winged Parrot

Description:

23-24 cm.. height.

In 2002 It was the rediscovery of the the Indigo-winged Parrot (Hapalopsittaca fuertesi), an enigmatic parrot that it had lost in the world during more than 90 years and continues being one of the birds more rare of the Earth. It has a plumage mainly yellowish-green and is highlighted by the blue of the crown and olive yellow tone of the forecrown (except a strip), cheeks and sides of the eyes, narrow strip in the forecrown, under abdomen and shoulders red. End of the wing blue violet dark, tail Blue with red base.

The bill Horn colored with blue color, Grey at the base of the upper mandible. Iris Green-yellow.

The immature It has less yellow streaks and more off face.

  • Sound of the Indigo-winged Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Loro Coroniazul.mp3]

Habitat:

Is a kind of range restricted, very rare and difficult to observe. It inhabits high Andean forests and frequent cloud subparamos, between 2600 and 3800 m on the level of the sea, being the majority of the records between 2.900 and 3.150 m. With guavas, encenillo and laurels "where consumed fruits of the"matapalo”, and with Oak (Quercus humboldtii).

Observed in fairly open forests, and possibly disturbed, with small Palm trees and tree ferns.

Fly in flocks of 6 to 25 individuals.

Reproduction:

It believes that the nests they make them in cavities of tall, mature trees.

The nesting period takes place from January to may. The average size clutch is three eggs. The incubation be carried out only by the female, Although the attention back to the hatching is biparental (Diaz 2006).

Food:

The ecology of the breeds and the power of the Indigo-winged Parrot is practically unknown, but it has been observed the birds feeding of berries, and is likely to show a preference for the berries of mistletoe.

Distribution:

Size distribution (reproduction / resident): 100 km2

Restricted to a small strip on the western slope of the Andes Central of Colombia, near the border of the Quindio, Risaralda and Tolima.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Critically Endangered.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

In accordance with the categories of the UICN is considered in Danger critic (CR), due to the accelerated process of deforestation in the Andean forests.

Since ago 90 years it was thought that the bird was extinct until it was rediscovered in 2002, When a few biologists of the Fundación ProAves in the montane forest of the municipality of Genoa, Department of Quindío, where the group more large observed consisted of 25 birds and the total population was of approximately 60 individuals.

Currently there are some 300 mature free individuals.
Thanks to the efforts made by different project is have retrieved data of them fluctuations in the abundances of them individuals during the year associated to its reproduction. Is very likely that the offer of the artificial nests This already having a positive impact that the length of the project It has observed an increase in the size population.

Strong parrot in captivity:

They do not exist in captivity.

Alternative names:

Indigo-winged Parrot, Fuerte’s Parrot, Fuertes’s Parrot, Indigo winged Parrot (English).
Caïque de Fuertes, Caïque de Colombie (French).
Fuertespapagei, Chapmans Zwergamazone, Zwergamazone (German).
Indigo-winged Parrot (Portuguese).
Cotorra Aliazul, Lorito de Fuertes (Spanish).
Cotorra Aliazul, Loro coroniazul (Colombia).

Frank Chapman
Frank Chapman

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Hapalopsittaca
Scientific name: Hapalopsittaca fuertesi
Citation: (Chapman, 1912)
Protonimo: Pionopsitta fuertesi

————————————————————————————————

Indigo-winged Parrot (Hapalopsittaca fuertesi)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
proaves.org
– Book parrots, Parrots and macaws Neotropical

Photos:

(1) – Conservationbirding.org

Sounds: controles-canto.org

Use of cookies

This web site uses cookies so that you have the best user experience. If you continue browsing you are giving your consent for the acceptance of the aforementioned cookies and the acceptance of our cookies policy, Click the link for more information.plugin cookies

TO ACCEPT
Notice of cookies