Stephen's Lorikeet
Vini stepheni

Stephen's Lorikeet

Description

19 cm.. length and a weight between 42 and 55 g..

The plumage of the Stephen's Lorikeet (Vini stepheni), in general is green.

The upper part of the head is light green. The region of the windows of the nose, the cheeks, the ear-coverts, the neck, the chest and the abdomen They are red. It has a belt Variable greenish purple size chest. Thighs and bottom of the abdomen They are purple. The Hip is yellowish-green. The feathers wing-coverts They are red and green; the primaries, longer, are black. The upper part of the tail It is yellowish green and the bottom darker yellow with green.

The irises It is reddish brown, the legs and the bill are orange.

The immature they have the underparts green with purple and red marks on the throat and the abdomen. Tail dark green. The bill and eyes Brown.

  • Sound of the Stephen's Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori of Stephen.mp3]

Habitat:

Its usual habitat are dense shrubs and trees, Palm trees, handles, coconut and banana plantations.

They make daily trips from the forest into the coastal strips to feed in coconut palms.

They live in pairs or in small groups outside the breeding season. They are very active and difficult to see in dense vegetation; the easiest way to see them is in flight, they are easy to distinguish by their bright red plumage. Their flight is fast with a characteristic wings hum. They are not shy and view them up close, are especially when eating.

Reproduction:

There are no data about its reproduction in the wild.

Food:

The Stephen's Lorikeet is omnivore, consumes nectar, pollen and fruits of a wide variety of plants. The flowers of the plants Scaevola sericea and Timonius polygamus They provide the main sources of nectar. Arthropods are part of the diet, including lepidopteran larvae found in the sporangia fern Phymatosorus

Distribution:

Stephen distribution of Lori

The Stephen's Lorikeet is limited to Henderson island in the Pitcairn Islands, a small island uninhabited and surrounded of coral limestone cliffs, in the South-Central area of the Pacific Ocean.

The Pitcairn Islands, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno There are four volcanic islands in the South Pacific Ocean. These islands are a British overseas territory (formerly a British colony), the last one left in the Pacific.

In 1987, the total population It was estimated between 720 and 1.820 specimens.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Vulnerable

• Population trend: Stable

This species may prove to be the only member of its genus whose habitat and population size have been little affected by adverse changes in their environment. However, is qualified as vulnerable, Since it is only on a small island.

He seems to have adapted to the presence of the single introduced predator, Pacific rat (Rattus exulans). In August of 2011, a rat eradication operation was carried out in the Henderson island to eradicate R. exulans of the island. However, the accidental introduction of a more aggressive predator, as other species Rattus, It could be devastating. Diseases such as malaria avian and smallpox are another potential threat. The introduction of exotic species of plants could have serious consequences for native vegetation and, Therefore, for this species.

Rat eradication could save seabirds on Henderson Island

Averted a potentially serious threat in 1983 When an American millionaire sought to make a home in the Henderson island. The request was rejected by the Government of the United Kingdom. Henderson is now a world heritage site.

Stephen Lori captive:

Currently there are no known to any Stephen's Lorikeet in captivity. VULNERABLE.

Due to its endangered status, any specimen that can not be returned to their natural habitat (natural range) It should be placed preferably in a breeding program well managed to ensure the survival of the species.

Alternative names:

Stephen’s Lorikeet, Henderson Island Lorikeet, Henderson Island Lory, Henderson Lorikeet, Henderson Lory, Stephen’s Lory, Stephens’s Lory (English).
Lori de Stephen (French).
Hendersonlori, Henderson Lori (German).
Stephen Lori (Portuguese).
Lori de Stephen (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Vini
Scientific name: Vini stepheni
Citation: (North, 1908)
Protonimo: Calliptilus ? stepheni

Images Stephen's Lorikeet:

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Stephen's Lorikeet (Vini stepheni)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

1 – by © Pawl Warren – UK OVERSEAS TERRITORIES CONSERVATION FORUM
2 – By Peter Fitzgerald, Andrew J.Kurbiko, Hansbaer, Openstreetmap (File:Pitcairn Islands map.svg) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Mark Todd (Xeno-canto)

Kuhl's Lorikeet
Vini kuhlii


Kuhl's Lorikeet

Description

18 cm.. long and an approximate weight of 55 g..

Males and females of the Kuhl's Lorikeet (Vini kuhlii) they are identical in appearance. Adults have the cheeks, the chest and the part forward of the belly bright red.

The upperparts the body has different shades of green with the exception of a few Feather erection of color blue dark in the neck.

Its tail is multicolored, the Central feathers are red and purple sides, with the Green terminal part.
A zone blue-violet in the belly around the the thighs. The bill and legs are orange, the tail is short.

The birds youth they have the underparts opaque red.

  • Sound of the Kuhl's Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori of Rimatara.mp3]

Habitat:

The natural habitat of the Kuhl's Lorikeet they are tropical rainforests. On the Islands desforestadas also is in coconut plantations. It is a nectarivore that feeds sucking nectar with his rough tongue.

Reproduction:

Observed in the month of March, April and August.
Nest in the trunks of coconut trees or FARA (Pandanus tectorius) dead or in cavities of hotu. Sometimes one or two rectangular holes mark the entrance of these nests. Only a litter has been found with two chicks.

Food:

Nectar and pollen from the banana flowers (Musa sp.), Kapok (Ceiba pentandra), pacayers (Inga edulis), Mango (Mangifera indica), avocado (It persea americana), the coconut (Cocos nucifera), the Cordyline (fructicosa Cordyline) , the NASE (Barringtonia asiatica), the tafano (Guettarda speciosa), the Pomeroy (Syzygium jambos) and ATAE (Erythrina variegata).

The small seeds of purau (Hibiscus tiliaceus) and AITO (Casuarina equisetifolia). Axillary buds and young shoots of hotu, purau and falcata (Paraserianthes falcataria).

They lick the surface of the leaves of banana. Make sudden movements in the leaves of certain trees without flowers or fruit (including dead Palm trees), also tends to dig small holes – clearly too superficial to serve as a nest -, This we do think that also can be insectivorous.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident) 510 km2

Endemic of Rimatara in the Tubuai Islands, Center-South Pacific (France), where the population is estimated at 905 birds. It has also been introduced in Kiribati including Teraina (Washington Island) and Tabueran (Fanning island), both before 1798, and Kiritimati (Christmas Island), where six specimens were transferred in 1957.

Occasional appearances in the Thbuai island about Rimatara they are probably elopements pets.

Although the species is relatively common in Rimatara. the recent introduction of rats is cause for concern.
The population of Tabueran (c. 200 birds) It is also vulnerable because of predation of nests by rats.

In Teraina There are a few 1.000 birds and with no confirmed threat. It is possible that one or two individuals can still survive in Kiritimati. IN DANGER OF EXTINCTION.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Danger

• Population trend Decreasing

Although populations are believed to be stable in Rimatara and Teraina and grow in Atiu where it was recently introduced, invading predators are probably causing a decrease in Tabuaeran and Kiritimati, Therefore, the general trend is suspected to be a moderate and continuous descent is its population.

Excessive exploitation of its red feathers is the most likely reason for the extinction of the Kuhl's Lorikeet in the Cook Islands.

A serious threat to all Broods in the Pacific Islands, It is the depredation caused by rats in the nests, especially on the part of the Black Rat (Rattus rattus). In Rimatara, There was a wide shot of black rats (Rattus rattus), to leave the island away from them in the year 2000. However the Pacific rats (R. exulans) they remained very abundant.

In Teraina, There is no evidence of the presence of the (R. Rattus), Although the Pacific rat (R. exulans) is abundant, While in Tabuaeran and Mitiaro, still having black rats (R. Rattus). Cats can be a threat in Kiritimati. The Common mine (Acridotheres tristis) It is a threat to the introduced population in Atiu, Since it competes for nesting sites and usually attacking young people Kuhl's Lorikeet.

Ongoing conservation actions:

Appendix II of CITES.
– In Kiribati, the species is fully protected.
– In the French Polynesia the species is protected by national laws and regulations from 1996.
– In Rimatara It has been protected by a traditional tapu (taboo) from 1900.

– 27 birds were reintroduced in Atiu from Rimatara in May of the 2007, after which organized a community contest to find the first young birds, with a reward given to the winner.
– Monthly count of birds in Atiu carried out to evaluate the success of the effort of introduction.
– A control program of the Common mine started in Atiu in May of 2009, including harassment and capture, with a bounty for each dead bird.
– For October of the 2009, the population of the birds Mine had been reduced in a 60% and this program is permanent.
– In Rimatara, 21 bait stations were established in the main Pier in September of 2009 to prevent black rats invading the island and raising awareness is taking place among children about the importance of protecting the avifauna of the island.

Lori Rimatara in captivity:

It is not in captivity.

Due to its State, in danger of extinction, any specimen that can not be returned to their natural habitat (natural range) It should be placed preferably in a breeding program well managed to ensure the survival of the species.

Alternative names:

Kuhl’s Lorikeet, Kuhl’s Lory, Kühl’s lory, Rimatara Lorikeet, Rimitara Lorikeet, Ruby Lorikeet, Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (English).
Lori de Kuhl (French).
Rubinlori (German).
Lóris-de-kuhl (Portuguese).
Lori de Rimatara (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Vini
Scientific name: Vini kuhlii
Citation: (Vigors, 1824)
Protonimo: Psittacula kuhlii

Kuhl's Lorikeet images:

————————————————————————————————

Kuhl's Lorikeet (Vini kuhlii)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – Miles to the wild – link
2 – Miles to the wild – link
3 – Miles to the wild – link
4 -Miles to the wild – link
5 – Duncan WrightTo feltoltő sajat munkaja: „Vini australis”. Engedely: GFDL, Forrás: Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Matthias Feuersenger (Xeno-canto)

Blue-crowned Lorikeet
Vini australis


Blue-crowned Lorikeet

Description

19 cm.. of length and a weight of 40 to 55 g..

Samoa distribution of Lori

The Blue-crowned Lorikeet (Vini australis) has a plumage in their great majority color green. The upper part of the head is dark blue with light blue streaks. The region of the windows of the nose, the cheeks, the ear-coverts, the neck and the abdomen They are red. the lower part of abdomen and the thighs they are purple blue. The back is green, the interior of the tail is yellowish-green. The irises is reddish brown. The legs are of color red and the bill is orange.

The youth are equal to adults, but with less red in the face and throat, little or no abdominal patch, stripes blue shorter in the crown, No purple in the the thighs, Brown the eyes.

  • Sound of the Blue-crowned Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori of Samoa.mp3]

Habitat:

It is found in forests, coconut palms or any habitat where flowering trees; coastal mountains, gardens and agricultural areas. Nomad, sometimes traveling between the Islands.

Daily movements in search of food. Aggressive but gregarious, they often move in flocks of up to 12 individuals, except during the breeding season living with their partners.

In Samoa It is common around villages and plantations and less common in moist forests, higher elevations in the rain forest and secondary growth.

Reproduction:

Nests in holes or hollows of trees, It has also been reported that they dig burrows in the banks of Earth, Although it has not confirmed. The laying is one or two white eggs. Breeding registered in June and August. In captivity the incubation It has been calculated in 23 days.

Food:

It feeds on nectar, pollen and red fruits. It particularly prefers Erythrina, Wild hibiscus and coconut.

Distribution:

Extends over the archipelagos of Samoa, Tonga and LAU, distributed by Islands: ʻAlofi, Fotuhaʻa, Fulago, Futuna, Haʻafeva, Niuafoʻou, Moce, Niuē, Ofu, Olosega, Sāmoa, Savaiʻi, Tafahi, Taʻu, Tofua, Tungua, ʻUiha, ʻUpolu, Varoa, Vavaʻu and Voleva. In the past was also in ‘USA, Tongatapu and Mata-Utu but there has been extinguished.

Conservation:

– Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern.

– The population trend: Decreasing.

The world population It has not been quantified, but the species is informed that it is common in much of its restricted area of distribution.

The population is suspected to be in decline due to the predation by species invasive.

It is still fairly common throughout its range, but it has become extinct on many islands and it is decreasing in Tonga (probably because of the rats).

Lori de Samoa en cautividad:

Like the others Vini lories, the Blue-crowned Lorikeet It is still quite rare in poultry, probablemente como resultado de la protección que reciben en see you soon países nativos del Pacífico Sur.

Alternative names:

Blue-crowned Lorikeet, Blue crowned Lorikeet, Blue-crowned Lory (English).
Lori fringillaire (French).
Blaukäppchen (German).
Loris Vini Australis (Portuguese).
Lori de Samoa (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Vini
Scientific name: Vini australis
Citation: (Gmelin, 1788)
Protonimo: Psittacus australis

Blue-crowned Lorikeet pictures:

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Blue-crowned Lorikeet (Vini australis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – “Vini australis-London Zoo, England-8a” by William Warby from London, England – Unknown-Tropical BirdUploaded by Snowmanradio. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
2 – “Vini australis-two on a perch-8a-4c” by Vini_australis_-two_on_a_perch-8a.jpg: TJ Lin – originally posted to Flickr as Dscn6140 and uploaded to commons at Vini_australis_-two_on_a_perch-8a.jpg. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
3 – By Duncan Wright (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
4 – By Steven G. Johnson on commons (same as unnormalized on flickr) (Dsc_0014uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
5- by Zambar – zoochat.com

Sounds: Samuel Jones (Xeno-canto)

Purple-crowned Lorikeet
Parvipsitta porphyrocephala

Purple-crowned Lorikeet


Description

The Purple-crowned Lorikeet (Parvipsitta porphyrocephala) has a length of 16 cm.. and a weight between 40 and 50 g..

The part forward of the crown is orange, merging is in red in the lores. Above and in front of the eyes, orange-yellow. Crown Color Purple dark, merging into green at the nape, also showing a few feathers of orange-red.
The ear-coverts, yellowish-orange, Red Centre. Chin and throat, of color turquoise light.
Upperparts, of color green with washed Brown in the the mantle and rump more bright, slightly greenish-blue.

The upperwing green color, bright blue marked in the curve and on the edge of the carpal area.

The interior of the flight feather color black; fine yellow margins in primaries.
Coverts interiors, red. Breast , neck and upperparts, of color green with a wash light blue turquoise; sides chest top with slight brownish wash; Center of belly washed turquoise with flanks and coverts, of color color green; yellowish stains on the bottom sides of the chest hidden with the wing folded. Green the upper part of the tail and yellow on the inside.

Its small bill curved is black, their legs grayscale and the irises her Brown eyes.

The female is similar but has the irises darker, the ear-coverts more clear and lacks of the staining Crimson.

The immature are more muted tones and lack of purple coloration of the head.

Habitat:

It is a nomadic local that often are found in the forests dried sclerophyllous, especially when the eucalyptus Bloom.
Nomadic flocks may also travel far, Sometimes the inside of the Australian continent.

The flowering of the eucalyptus is mainly responsible of its movements unpredictable, Although in some areas, the birds may be present throughout the year.

Found in diverse areas forming large flocks of hundreds of individuals, often with groups mixed from others Lori including the Musk Lorikeet.

Found commonly in Woods and forests, but also visitors are urban areas, where feed on ornamental flowers.

Casual visitors during the winter of banksias in habitats of Heath.

The Purple-crowned Lorikeet It is characteristic of drier areas, lightly lined, especially eucalyptus Woods.
Can convert it in a plague to the orchards.

Roosts in large groups, sometimes very far from the feeding areas. Manso and discreet While feeds, except the constant calls. Usually feed on low branches and shrubs.

Reproduction:

The breeding season It includes the months of August to December. The nests are located in holes in trees, preferably a eucalyptus near the water. Several couples often occupy neighboring holes in the same tree.

The cycle of of reproduction in captivity gives a period of incubation of around 22 days, with the young people of 6 to 7 weeks weaned high is after the hatching.

Food:

Feed primarily of nectar and pollen of the flowering of the eucalyptus, but they can also attack the orchards to feed on ripe fruit.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 938.000 km2

The Purple-crowned Lorikeet are located in two areas separate from Australia to the Southwest and Southeast of the continent. Separate ranges, but racial differences are not recognized, and it is possible that the birds can travel from time to time between the two areas of distribution. Also located in the Kangaroo Island, Although not found in Tasmania.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

The world population It is believed that it is superior to 50.000 individuals.
This species has a very large range, and therefore not approaching the thresholds for Vulnerable According to the criterion of size range.

While the trend of the population seems to be decreasing, the descent do not believe that it is sufficiently fast for approaching the thresholds of Vulnerable According to the criterion of population trend.

For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Lori Coronipúrpura in captivity:

It is a bird noisy, sociable and always in motion.

Very rare in captivity out of Australia.

Alternative names:

Purple crowned Lorikeet, Purple-crowned Lorikeet (English).
Lori à couronne pourpre (French).
Blauscheitellori (German).
Lorikeet Roxo-coroado (Portuguese).
Lori Coronipúrpura, Lori de Corona Púrpura (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Parvipsitta
Scientific name: Parvipsitta porphyrocephala
Citation: (Dietrichsen, 1837)
Protonimo: Trichoglossus porphyrocephalus

Purple crowned Lorikeet images:


Purple-crowned Lorikeet (Parvipsitta porphyrocephala)

Sources:

Avibase
Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – by Ian Colley – IBC.lynxeds.com
2 – „Purple-crowned Lorikeet"von KeresHEigenes Werk. Lizenziert unter CC BY-SA 3.0 über Wikimedia Commons.
3 – by Nick Talbot – IBC.lynxeds.com
4 -by Nick Talbot – IBC.lynxeds.com
5 – gopixpic.com

Sounds: nick talbot (Xeno-canto)

Little Lorikeet
Parvipsitta petty


Little Lorikeet

Description

16 to 19 cm.. length and an approximate weight of 40 g.. The Little Lorikeet (Parvipsitta petty) is the smallest of the Parrots Australian.

Distribution Lori Carirrojo

The body is bright green, the area of the nose, the forecrown, the neck, part of the forecrown and cheeks They are red.

The ear-coverts are of color green with stripes of color green light. The neck and back top are brown-green. Under the wings brighter yellowish green. The primary flight feathers they have a very narrow yellowish Board, their underparts is yellowish-green.

The feathers of the tail has reddish orange base, the circle around the eyes is narrow and black, the irises is orange, the legs grayscale and the bill black.

The immature have more off the Red of the face; the Brown of the upper mantle is minimum. Bill Dark Brown and brown the eye.

This small Lori is likely to be confused with the Purple-crowned Lorikeet (Parvipsitta porphyrocephala).

Habitat:

The Little Lorikeet dispatched virtually all areas and at all altitudes with trees. They prefer open areas with trees that are flowering or fruit trees and rivers. Found up to one altitude of 1600 m.

Occasionally seen in orchards and farming areas.

Are nomads and gather in small groups outside the breeding season of 4 to 12 birds.

They prefer the tops of high trees and are difficult to visualize because of its small size and its green color. They prefer trees of eucalyptus that they are in bloom and they can attend major meetings when they are feeding, often associated with other lori as the Coconut Lorikeet and the Musk Lorikeet.

Ruidoso. Their flight is flapping fast and straight, accompanied by shrill calls.

Reproduction:

The breeding season It is going may in the North, or August in the South, to December. It nests in the Hollows of trees, where sets of 3 to 5 rounded whitish eggs. The incubation hard ones three weeks.

Food:

It feeds mainly from fruits and flowers, including native plants such as those belonging to the genera Xanthorrhoea and (Melaleuca and Loranthus, and introduced as the sapodilla plants (Eriobotrya japonica). Occasionally visit orchards.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 788.000 km2

The Little Lorikeet is located in the East and Southeast of Australia, from the vicinity of Cairns to the South by Queensland and New South Wales from the slopes of the Great dividing range until the eastern coasts to most of Victoria and Southeast of Southern Australia. Also located in Tasmania, Although there is little abundant.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

The main threats to these small parrots are the loss of places of breeding and of those resources food by the clearing of land in course. The majority of breeding records come from the western slopes, where has been a great loss of habitat trees. The loss of trees nest along the verges of Highway, often associated with roadwork, It is still a constant threat.

Lori Carirrojo in captivity:

Although it was exported to Europe for the first time in 1877, the Little Lorikeet rarely seen outside of Australia. And even in the country of which is indigenous is rare in captivity. It has a reputation of being difficult to maintain.

Alternative names:

Little Lorikeet, Little Red Lorikeet (English).
Lori à masque rouge, Petit Loriquet (French).
Zwergmoschuslori (German).
Loris Pusilla (Portuguese).
Lori Carirrojo, Lori de Cabeza Roja (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Parvipsitta
Scientific name: Parvipsitta petty
Citation: (Shaw, 1790)
Protonimo: Psittacus Pusillus

Little Lorikeet images:


Little Lorikeet (Parvipsitta petty)

Sources:

Avibase
Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Wikipedia
environment.NSW.gov.au

Photos:

1 – By JJ Harrison ([email protected]) (Hand darbas) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
2 – By Joxerra Aihartza (Ñire argazki bilduma / own picture) [FAL], via Wikimedia Commons
3 – Little Lorikeets by Julian Robinson, on Flickr – Flickr
4 -Little Lorikeets (Glossopsitta pusilla) by David Cook, on Flickr – Flickr
5 – Musk Lorikeet [Glossopsitta concinna] again! by Norm Hanson, on Flickr – Flickr

Sounds: Marc Anderson (Xeno-canto)

Musk Lorikeet
Glossopsitta concinna

Musk Lorikeet


Description

20 to 23 cm.. length and a weight between 52 and 56 g..

The general plumage of the Musk Lorikeet (Glossopsitta concinna) is green.

The part forward of the crown, lores and coverts headphones are of color Scarlet. Top of the head and cheeks, of color green impregnated of Turquoise under eye. The underparts of color green with a washed Brown olive around the sides of the chest. Green bright it rump. Wing coverts green, flight feather of color gray to black and a band of color yellow in the area of the shoulders. The feathers of the tail with brands reddish orange.
Part back from the neck yellowish green. Beside the edges of the wings colour yellow. Bill black-tipped Red. The irises Orange and the legs greenish Brown.

The blue area in the crown of the female It is smaller and paler which in the male.

The name of the species derives from a musky odor that is said to emit these birds.

Subspecies description:

  • Glossopsitta concinna concinna

    (Shaw, 1791) – Nominal.

  • Glossopsitta concinna didimus

    (Mathews, 1915) – Less blue in the crown, nearly absent in the female.

Habitat:

Seasonally nomadic Depending on the flowering of the eucalyptus, at least at the ends of their range.
Found in many habitats of open forest, agricultural and suburban areas, including forests of eucalyptus, dry forests, dense rainforest (particularly in Tasmania) and riparian forests.

It avoids the high open woods and high altitude. Often found in large flocks of more than one hundred of individuals, where couples who form strong bonds, they often live together. It is extremely trusting when feeds.

Flocks have been seen, frequently, flying at high altitude.

Reproduction:

Season of mating from August to January. The nests they are built in holes of eucalyptus. The two eggs are incubated for about 25 days and the brood leaves the nest between 6 and 7 weeks after hatching.

Food:

As the majority of others Lori, the diet consists in nectar and pollen, as well as small fruit and some insects. They can RAID orchards, vineyards and crops, forming herds with the Swift Parrot (Lathamus discolor) and other gender lori Glossopsitta.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 664.000 km2

The Musk Lorikeet are located in the East of New South Wales, Victoria, South of Australia and Tasmania.

Distribution of subspecies:

  • Glossopsitta concinna concinna

    (Shaw, 1791) – Nominal.

  • Glossopsitta concinna didimus

    (Mathews, 1915) – Tasmania, sometimes King Island. Small population wild in Perth.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The world population It has not been quantified, but the species is reported be very common (pit et to the. 1997).

The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

Lori Almizclero en cautividad:

Rare out of Australia, small number in the aviaries of United States and United Kingdom.

A delight, playful, more quiet that the Iris Lorikeet; they can imitate sounds; a bit messy due to a diet of nectar.

Alternative names:

Musk Lorikeet (English).
Lori à bandeau rouge, Loriquet musqué (French).
Moschuslori (German).
Loris Musk (Portuguese).
Lori Almizclero (Spanish).

George Shaw
George Shaw

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Glossopsitta
Scientific name: Glossopsitta concinna
Citation: (Shaw, 1791)
Protonimo: Psittacus concinnus

Musk Lorikeet images:


Musk Lorikeet (Glossopsitta concinna)

Sources:

Avibase
Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – By JJ Harrison ([email protected]) (Own work) [GFDL 1.2 or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
2 – By Steve (originally posted to Flickr as Musk Lorikeet.) [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
3 – free-pet-wallpapers.com
4 – “Musk Lorikeet 2” di JJ Harrison ([email protected]) – It operates propria. With license CC BY-SA 3.0 Transact Wikimedia Commons.
5 – Image: Steven Kuiter – biodiversitysnapshots.NET.au

Sounds: Marc Anderson (Xeno-canto)

Goldie's Lorikeet
Psitteuteles goldiei


Goldie's Lorikeet

Description

19 cm.. long and weighing between 45 and 60 g..

The Goldie's Lorikeet (Psitteuteles goldiei) has the top red. Its neck is surrounded by a strip blue opaque that it extends to the edge of the eye.

The mumps and their cheeks they are pink with multiple streaks of dark blue. The upperparts of color green dark streaked of black in the part inferior of the neck and of color yellow greenish mottling on the sides of the layer.
The feathers that cover the wing are dark green, as well as the part superior of the tail.
The feathers they have a green color with black internal wires and a fine yellow edge.

The underparts are yellowish green with many streaks of dark green, more concentrated in the area of the chest. The bottom of the tail is of color yellow grey.

The bill is black, brown the iris. The legs son grises.

The females adult, they have the top more opaque and less developed.

In the immature, the top is reddish with dark blue spots. The upper mantle is spotted of yellow.

There are no geographic variations. The species is considered monotypic.

  • Sound of the Goldie's Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori of Goldie.mp3]

Habitat:

The Goldie's Lorikeet It is distributed mainly by primary forests, mountain forests and eucalyptus between 1.000 and 2.200 meters above sea level. However, These birds are very Mobile and their habitat may vary from sea level to the 2.800 m.

At higher altitudes, sometimes be parked in the forests of beech and false Podocarpus. They are also set fairly regularly in the areas where the trees are in bloom and around small mountain villages. They have been , occasionally, in small groups of trees isolated in the middle of open spaces.

The Goldie's Lorikeet they are very sociebles. They are often associated with other Charmosyna type Loris: Fairy Lorikeet (Charmosyna pulchella) and Lori Flanquirrojo (Charmosyna placentis).

Most of the time live in large groups of 30 or more individuals. These birds make long flights daily, often in the company of the Pygmy Lorikeet (Charmosyna wilhelminae). Move from their places of rest to its feeding sites found at the middle level, or at the top of the tall trees in flower.

They probably perform seasonal migrations to meet specific needs of power. Between mid June and early January, the Goldie's Lorikeet they are common in the forests of the lowlands around Port Moresby.

Reproduction:

We really know very little about the total freedom. Apparently, the nest is well hidden inside a tree in thick foliage dry, most large pandanus. The female lays two white eggs.

In captivity, the incubation period ranges between 23 and 24 days. Young are altricial, and leave the nest after 8 to 9 weeks.

Food:

The Goldie's Lorikeet they have a scheme rather similar to all the lori, namely, they are almost exclusively vegetarian. Its menu consists mainly of pollen, nectar, flowers and fruits than that found in the trees of the genus Casuarina in shrubs of the genus honey Grevillea and of the eucalyptus.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 307.000 km2

This species is endemic of New Guinea. Lives exclusively in the mountains in the center of the island and stretches to the mountains of the Huon peninsula and Owen Stanley.

Conservation:

– Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

– The population trend: Stable

The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

The world population It has not been quantified, It is estimated above 100.000 specimens, but the species is reported to be locally common depending on the availability of food.

Lori Goldie in captivity:

The Goldie's Lorikeet is a bird prized as a pet. His character is not aggressive, or destructive and is quite silent for a parrot. They can be taken in pairs or in large communities. Some of them come to imitate the human voice.

Alternative names:

Goldie’s Lorikeet, Red-capped Streaked Lorikeet, Red-capped Streaked Lory (English).
Loriquet de Goldie (French).
Veilchenlori (German).
Lóris-de-goldie (Portuguese).
Lori de Goldie, Tricogloso de Goldie (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Psitteuteles
Scientific name: Psitteuteles goldiei
Citation: (Sharpe, 1882)
Protonimo: Trichoglossus Goldiei

Goldie's Lorikeet images:

————————————————————————————————

Goldie's Lorikeet (Psitteuteles goldiei)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife.org
Wikipedia

Photos:

1 – “Psitteuteles goldiei - Pittsburgh National Aviary-8-3 c” by derivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)Psitteuteles_goldiei_-Pittsburgh_National_Aviary-8.jpg: Benny Mazur – originally posted to Flickr as Goldie completo Lorikeet and uploaded to commons as Psitteuteles_goldiei_-Pittsburgh_National_Aviary-8.jpg. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
2 – animalhouse.Re.it
3 – “Goldies Lorikeet” by LtshearsOwn work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.
4 – Jackson Zoological Park – Jackson, MS, USA © 2004 Jeff Whitlock
5- Bird feeding on fruit in a tree. by David Cook Wildlife Photography – IBC.lynxeds.com

Sounds: Michiel de Boer (Xeno-canto)

Iris Lorikeet
Psitteuteles iris


Iris Lorikeet

Description

20 cm.. length and a weight between 65 and 75 gr.

The Iris Lorikeet (Psitteuteles iris) It has three subspecies recognized including the nominal, the extension and the gradation of red and purple coloration in the head varies between the three subspecies:

  • Psitteuteles iris iris

    The Iris Lorikeet (Psitteuteles iris) has a plumage, in general, Green with stripes of color green light in the underparts.

    The forecrown, lores and area that is spread in a line close around it Crown rear, red.
    Cheeks yellowish green. The eye-stripe and headphones feathers of color purple.
    Center of the crown, Turquoise, extending it until it nape in a large yellow-green necklace.
    The chest and abdomen are yellowish-green. The feathers of the neck and the chest they have dark green edges. Wings and tail green.
    Bill and irises orange. The legs greyish black.

    It presents sexual dimorphism. The Red coloration of the female on head It is more off and less extensive that in the male.

  • Psitteuteles iris rubripileum

    It has all the forecrown and crown Red and the headphones feathers Violet Blue.

  • Psitteuteles iris aprosmictus

    Larger, the crown It is red and mixed with Violet Blue variable extension. The cheeks they are dark green. The chest bright yellow contrast with the Panza green.

Note:

It has placed at times as subspecies to the Neopsittacus. The validity of the subspecies Psitteuteles iris rubripileum, is questionable, and it was claimed that the differences with the nominal species It may be due to age or individual variation.

  • Sound of the Iris Lorikeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lori Iris.mp3]

Habitat:

Found up to a height of 1.500 meters above the sea level.

The Iris Lorikeet They inhabit monsoon forests, plantations and farmland with trees in bloom.
Although they are apparently more common in the higher elevations, its local abundance is based on the availability of trees with flowers for food, as it is the case with most of the Lori.
The flight of the Iris Lorikeet fast and slightly wavy.

Reproduction:

Little is known of the ecology of breeding of this species in its natural environment. A record of a breeding captive affirms that it laying is of two eggs, with a period of incubation of 23 days and emancipation some nine weeks more afternoon.

Food:

Feeds of nectar of the flowers Sesbania sp.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 31.300 km2

Endemic to the Islands Wetar and Timor (Indonesia).

Distribution of subspecies:

  • Psitteuteles iris Iris

    : West of Timor.

  • Psitteuteles iris Rubripileum

    : East of Timor.

  • Psitteuteles iris Wetterrensis

    : Wetar island.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

There are no data on population trend; However, the species is suspected to be in decline due to the capture and the degradation of the habitat.

Previously considered common, but not found in the Island of Wetar during a search in 1990, found only in two places during a study of nine weeks in the jungle in Timor West in 1993. Considered main many that the Olive headed Lorikeet and the Coconut Lorikeet in East Timor. World population around 10.000 specimens. VULNERABLE.

Lori Iris en cautividad:

Quite rare.

Alternative names:

Iris Lory, Iris Lorikeet (English).
Loriquet iris, Loriquet d’Iris (French).
Irislori (German).
Lóris-íris (Portuguese).
Lori de Goldie, Lori Iris, Tricogloso Iris (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Scientific name: Psitteuteles iris
Citation: (Temminck, 1835)
Protonimo: Psittacus iris

Iris Lorikeet Images:

————————————————————————————————

Iris Lorikeet (Psitteuteles iris)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife.org

Photos:

1 – By Dirk (originally posted to Flickr as DSC_7897) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
2 – By Dirk (originally posted to Flickr as DSC_2608) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
3 – By Asim Bharwani (originally posted to Flickr as San Diego Zoo) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
4 – By tinyfroglet [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
5 – By Liam from Washington DC, USA (IMG_9040Uploaded by snowmanradio) [CC-BY-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Filip Noel (Xeno-canto)

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