Sun Parakeet
Aratinga solstitialis

Aratinga Sol

Description:

Ilustración Aratinga-Sol

Of 30 cm.. length and a weight between 120 and 130 g.

Of great beauty, the Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) has the lores, ocular region and ear-coverts golden yellow, changing to shades red orange glossy; the forecrown, crown and nape are of a rich color yellow brilliant with color orange.

Bright yellow in the the mantle, the back and rump; uppertail-coverts of color yellow with exotic feathers of color blue. Scapulars Green Tips and the vane inner blue; the coverts smaller and medium, of color yellow with variable staining Green; greater coverts with tips of color green beige, primary coverts, blue. Flight feather, green above, primaries with tips and vane inner blue; grayish brown then. Undertail-coverts yellow (or orange / yellow). The throat Orange with yellow shading at the top of the chest; lower chest and the belly orange; Flanks and area of the vent yellow.

Upper, the tail mainly of color green yellowish with tips of color blue; undertail, of color grey with dye beige.

The bill of color Brown dark to black; the irises dark brown; legs distant.

Both sexes similar.

Immature usually with more muted than adults with the yellow colors of the head and the body replaced by an orange-Green. Lesser and medium uppertail-coverts green.

  • Sound of the Sun Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Sun Conure.mp3]

Habitat:

In general, live in Savanna, in dry forests with Palm trees and some times in flooded areas, until 1200 m. Cross the habitats more open only when traveling between the patches of forest. Are Bird social, usually observed in flocks of 30 or more individuals, with aggregations over large in tree fruit.

Reproduction:

It nests in hollow of trees or palms (for example, Mauritia).
Nest with a chick only in the month of February in Suriname. The size medium of laying is of 3 to 4 eggs. These eggs are hatch during 23 to 27 days, that is almost the forty percent more that it from other birds, in comparison with the mass of egg.

Food:

Their diet is poorly documented, Although it probably consists of locally available food, such as different fruits, berries, nuts, sprouts and flowers. Some foods known including pods of legumes, small fruits of the family Melastomataceae, fruits Red's Cactus and possibly berries of the genus Malpighia.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 96.600 km2

The Sun Parakeet are distributed in the northeast of South America, from the Monte Roraima in the extreme north of Brazil (a single record in 1848 previously attributed to Venezuela), areas adjacent of it Pacaraima mountains in Venezuela and North of Guyana, to Pomeroon River, eastward through Suriname (apparently unknown in the North) and French Guayana until Brazil in Amapá.

Observed also in For and Eastern Amazonas (with boundary to the West around Rio Branco and locally to the South of the Amazon, from Santarém to the region of the River Canumã).

Although in general can be considered is usual, records sporadic suggest appearances local of the Sun Parakeet in an extended range of its distribution area.

Maintained locally as domestic fowl and trapped for the bird trade Vivas.

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: In danger of extinction

• Population trend: Decreasing

A well known in the South flock of Guyana has registered with a maximum number of 200 individuals (Bergman 2009), with other recent records in Roraima (Laranjeiras et to the. 2011). The population is estimated therefore between 1,000-2,499 mature individuals, based on recent records. This is equivalent to 1,500-3,749 birds in total, rounded in 1.500-4.000 individuals.

The population of the Sun Parakeet It is thought that can be in continuous descent, because, probably, continuous pressure which is subjected due to hunting.

THREATS:

Due to the high demand for this species in the pet market, its population has declined drastically over the past twenty years (J. Gilardi in litt., 2007).

Have been exported largely from Guyana during this time, What has led her to virtual extinction in that country. Trappers of Guyana and French Guiana have traveled to the border with Brazil to buy these birds for export (T. Arndt in litt. 2007, L. Silveira in litt., 2007).

A fit annual of export of 600 bird was established in Guyana in the years 1980 and it is believed that more than 2.200 they were imported into the United States between 1981 and 1985 (J. Gilardi in litt., 2007).

Its trade is in course, and because of the ease with which these birds may be attracted by bait (for example corn) and the long distances that will be traveling, It is easy to catch all individuals in a given area(J. Gilardi in litt., 2007).

Conservation Actions Underway:

    • It is very common in captivity, but it is not known what percentage of this population are hybrids between the Aratinga solstitialis and the parakeet maculata (Silveira et to the., 2005, LF Silveira in litt. 2012).

Conservation Actions Proposed:

    • Consider the inclusion of species in Appendix I.

    • Prevent the trade cross-border immediately CITES.

    • Work with them inhabitants indigenous of the land indigenous Raposa Serra do Sol and it community Amerindian in Karasabai for avoid its entrapment and protect the habitat right.

    • Survey to locate other important additional subpopulations.

    • Establish lines of breeding in captivity of birds of pure race.

Aratinga Sol en cautividad:

The Sun Parakeet is known for its quacking very strong in comparison with its size relatively small. It is capable of imitating human beings, but not as well as some larger parrots.
Are popular as pets, due to their bright coloration while they have a very limited ability to speak.

Due to its inquisitive temperament, demand much attention from their owners, and sometimes they can be very noisy.

Alternative names:


Sun Parakeet, Sun Conure, Yellow Conure (English).
Conure soleil, Perriche soleil, Perruche soleil (French).
Sonnensittich (German).
Jandaia-sol, cacaoé, guaruba, Jandaia, jandaia-amarela, quijuba (Portuguese).
Aratinga Sol, Periquito Dorado (Spanish).
Perico Dorado (Venezuela).

Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Aratinga
Scientific name: Aratinga solstitialis
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Protonimo: Psittacus solstitialis

Images Sun Parakeet:

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Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Cover photo:

(1) – Sun Conure or Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) at a bird park in Singapore By Michael Gwyther-Jones (originally posted to Flickr as Singapore) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Image Gallery:

(2) – Three Sun Parakeets (also known as Sun Conure) at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore. The bird in the middle of the photograph has been wing clipped By Michael Gwyther-Jones from UK (FlickrUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Sun Parakeets (also known as Sun Conures) at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore By Michael Spencer (originally posted to Flickr as Jurong Bird Park) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Sun Parakeet (also known as Sun Conure) at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore By Michael Spencer (originally posted to Flickr as Jurong Bird Park) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Sun Conures at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore. Wing clipped By Doug Janson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

(6) – Sun Parakeet (also known as Sun Conure) perching on a branch and eating white flowers at Hamilton Zoo, New Zealand By Brian Gratwicke [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(7) – Sun Conures, at Pairi Daiza, Brugelette, Belgium © Hans Hillewaert /, via Wikimedia Commons
(8) – A pet Sun Parakeet (also known as Sun Conure) perching on a shoulder. It has been wingclipped By turtlemom4bacon from Orlando, FL, USA [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(9) – A Aratinga solstitialis at Baltimore Aquarium, USA By Chris Williamson [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(10) – Feeding a Sun Conure, also known as a Sun Parakeet at Discovery Cove, Orlando, Florida, USA By eric from USA (IMG_4596) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(11) – He loves it when you blow on his face and it makes him puff! By Sarah G from Tulsa, USA (Sherbie Sherbie Puffs-Alot) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(12) – Wing clipped Sun Parakeets (also known as Sun Conures) at Kobe Kachoen, a bird and flower park located on Port Island in Kobe, Japan By merec0 (originally posted to Flickr as niji) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(13) – Sun Conure, at Pairi Daiza, Brugelette, Belgium © Hans Hillewaert /, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo illustration:

(14) – An adult Sun Parakeet or Sun Conure (Aratinga solstitialis) . Jacques Barraband [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Jandaya Parakeet
Aratinga jandaya

Aratinga Jandaya

Description:

30 cm.. length.

The Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya) they have both sides of the neck, cheeks, lores, ear-coverts and forecrown orange, deeper in the ear-coverts, around the eyes and in the lores; the crown and nape are yellowish-Orange (Some birds with paler yellow tones in the head).

Mantle and scapulars olive green; back and top of the rump, Green with orange-red horizontal bars; lower rump and uppertail-coverts olive green. Main feathers of the wings blue, the others feathers, green (brightest that in the the mantle). The flight feather blue color above, on the vane outer, Blackish towards the tip and grey below. Underwing-coverts orange-red. The underparts orange-red, slightly paler in the upper part of the chest and in the throat; undertail-coverts green.

Upper, the tail of olive with blue tips; undertail, charcoal grey.

Bill grey-black; bare periophthalmic pale grey; irises brown; legs grey.

Both sexes similar.

The immature has the head yellow and the neck with green markings; Dim Orange below.

  • Sound of the Jandaya Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Aratinga jandaya.mp3]

Habitat:

The Jandaya Parakeet move between deciduous woodlands, closed, bushes and cleared areas of rainforest. Sporadically at the edge of the rainforest and the caatinga. In palm groves of coconut on the coast of Pernambuco. Also frequent croplands and pastures. (Usually in flocks of approximately 12 birds, but sometimes in pairs or individually.

Reproduction:

Nests in tree cavities, at least a 15 metres in height. Observed offspring in the nest of December in Maranhão; eggs hatch between August-December, in the area of Belém. Clutch, probably composed of three eggs.

Food:

Food reported include seeds, berries and fruits of certain Melastomataceae, Mangifera, Palms Mauritia and Cecropia. They can sometimes damage the crops of corn.

Distribution:

Distributed by northeast of Brazil. The species extends from the vicinity of Belém, Northeast of For, and São Luís, Maranhão, from South to North and East of Goiás and more eastward through Piauí, Ceará, Rio Grande do Norte, Paraíba, Pernambuco, Alagoas and probably the north end of Bay.

Locally common, While perhaps decreasing in some areas. It is possible that usually it is to expand its range through colonization of the cleared areas of rainforest high, especially in For and Maranhão.

Their status in the East its area of distribution is unknown.

Maintained in captivity with consequences serious, Perhaps derived from the illegal trade internal in Brazil and, possibly, by smuggling towards Asia South-East.

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

This species has a range very large, and therefore not approaching the thresholds for vulnerable under the criterion of size range

The size of the world population of Jandaya Parakeet It has not been quantified, but this species has been described as “rare” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Its population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

Aratinga Jandaya en cautividad:

Pretty common in captivity and easy to raise.

Like all the Aratinga, This species is not characterized by their ability to speak, Even so, can get to say some words with crystal clarity.

Its food is made up of different fruits, vegetables, Soak vegetables and specific feed for parrots. There are species Meek and intelligent to which are the trains very well and are playful, What makes them good pet to maintain in a House. Being aves gregarias, is convenient to provide them a companion, Since solo can be quite noisy.

Enjoy the baths, and is advisable to keep them in an Aviary or in cage of good proportions; It is also convenient to let the small flights out of its enclosure.

Its longevity often haunt them 20 years in captivity, being able to get to the 30 years, Depending on your care.

Alternative names:

Jandaya Parakeet, Flaming Conure, Flaming Parakeet, Jandaya Conure (English).
Conure jandaya, Conure à tête jaune, Perriche jandaya, Perruche à tête jaune, Perruche jandaya (French).
Jandayasittich, Jendajasittich, Jendayasittich (German).
Jandaia, jandaia-verdadeira (Portuguese).
Aratinga Jandaya, Periquito Rojo (Spanish).

Gmelin Johann Friedrich
Gmelin Johann Friedrich

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Aratinga
Scientific name: Aratinga jandaya
Citation: (Gmelin, JF, 1788)
Protonimo: Psittacus Jandaya

Jandaya Parakeet Images:

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Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya) aka Janday Conure. Photographed in Puerto Rico at the Mayaquez Zoo By Dick Daniels (http://carolinabirds.org /) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

(2) – Jandaya Parakeet (also known as Jenday Conure) in Beale Park, Reading, Berkshire, England By David Long from London, United Kingdom (IMG_4798Uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(3) – Jenday Conure or Jandaya Parakeet in a tree. By GIANNIZZZERO at English Wikipedia [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

(4) – Jenday Conure or Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya) at Iguaçu Bird Park, Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil. Photographed on 23 April 2003 By Arthur Chapman [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(5) – Jenday Conure (Aratinga jandaya) at the Las Vegas Zoo By ZooFari (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(6) – Aratinga jandaya and Aratinga solstitialis at Kobe Kachoen (Kobe Flowers and Birds Garden) in Kobe, Hyogo prefecture, Japan By Chris Gladis from Kyoto, Japan (Jandaya Parakeet) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(7) – Jendayasittiche (Aratinga jandaya) im Karl-Foerster-Garten des Tierparks Berlin-Friedrichsfelde By Lotse (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(8) – A Jandaya Parakeet (also known as Jenday Conure) at Beale Park, Lower Basildon, Reading, Berkshire, England By David Long (originally posted to Flickr as IMG_4800) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(9) – Jandaya Parakeet (also known as Jenday Conure) in Beale Park, Reading, Berkshire, England By David Long from London, United Kingdom (IMG_4802Uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: GABRIEL MILK (Xeno-canto)

Golden-capped Parakeet
Aratinga auricapillus

Aratinga Testadorada

Description:

Of 30 cm.. of length and a weight of 130 g..

The Golden-capped Parakeet (Aratinga auricapillus) It is often treated as the same species as the Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) and Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya).

The lores, frontal band and ocular region of this kind are of color red glossy; the crown is bright golden yellow; ear-coverts, cheeks and both sides of the neck, green. The area of the nape and the the mantle are pale green: the back and the top of the rump with different hues of green and tips of red or orange; floor area of the rump and uppertail-coverts, green; the small and medium-sized upperwing-coverts, green; the large coverts and primaries, secondaries, vane outer and tips from them primaries, blue.

Underwing-coverts, orange-red; underside of flight feather grey. The chin and throat yellowish green with orange discoloration on the top of the chest and deep color red pale in the belly; vent, the thighs and undertail-coverts, green. Upper, the tail, of colour brownish with them tips blue, sometimes with the vane external foreign blue feathers; undertail, the tail, grey.

The bill, grey-black; grey, the bare skin of the bare periophthalmic; irises yellowish; legs grey.

Both sexes similar.

Immature It has little or nothing red in the rump, more off the yellow colour of the crown; the top of the chest is greener and less extensive red on the belly.

  • Sound of the Golden-capped Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Aratinga testadorada.mp3]

Subspecies description:

  • Aratinga auricapillus auricapillus

    (Kuhl, 1820) – The species nominal.

  • Aratinga auricapillus aurifrons

    (Spix, 1824) – The upperparts totally green (without red margins on the feathers of the back and Hip top). More green in the upper zone of the chest, lacking Orange dye of the nominal species.

Habitat:

They live in forests, as well as in the clearings and edges of the same, including coastal forests moist Atlantic of Evergreen and deciduous forests closed type of inside. They prefer primary formations.

Scarce or absent grassland with trees or secondary vegetation, even in the vicinity of the remaining original forests. Observed to 2.180 m (Parque nacional do Caparaó, to the South of Espírito Santo). Gregarious, usually observed in flocks of 12-20 individuals, more rarely in groups of up to 40.

Reproduction:

There are few details about the reproductive ecology of this species, Although probably nest in the months of November-December.

Implementation size in captivity is of 3-5 eggs.

Food:

Diet Golden-capped Parakeet includes various seeds and fruits. Reported foods include the maize, okra and fruits red sweet unspecified.

Considered one pest of crops in some areas before its abrupt population decline.

Distribution:

The Golden-capped Parakeet (Aratinga auricapillus) are distributed in the area South-East of Brazil; from the North of Bay, Eastern part of Goiás and Minas Gerais, Brazil, to the East and South, on the East coast of Brazil (Espírito Santo, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Paraná and possibly, Santa Catarina).

The observations in Rio Grande do Sul, apparently they are wrong, Although the species still can be found at the East end of Mato Grosso from the South.

A single record in 1918 in Paraguay, near the border with Paraná, expected from any exhaust.

Generally rare and irregular distribution, residents, extinct in many places with their current range defined by the remaining forests.

He greater stronghold population of the species is located in Minas Gerais, Brazil, where the species was considered common in 1987 in several areas. They are very rare or they have become extinct in Santa Catarina, Paraná, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Espirito Santo, and scarce in Goiás and Bay.

The decrease in the population is must to the continuous logging of forests and to their captures for the trade of birds.

There are several protected areas with populations of the Golden-capped Parakeet, such as the Monte Pascoal National Park (Bahia) and Parque Estadual do Rio Doce (Minas Gerais, Brazil).

Rare in captivity, mostly out of Brazil.

Distribution of subspecies:

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Near-threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the population of the Golden-capped Parakeet It has not estimated formally and in the absence of sufficient data, it is estimated that you there are more than 10.000 specimens, more or less equivalent to 6.700 mature individuals; However, detailed research is required.

The population the species is suspected that it may be in decline due to the continuous loss of habitat and to his capture to the pet trade.

• There has been a broad and continuous clearing and fragmentation of the suitable habitat for this species, for use as coffee plantations, soy and sugar cane in São Paulo, and livestock in Goiás and Minas Gerais, Brazil (Snyder et to the., 2000).

• The capture for trade, He has probably had a significant impact, Since it was relatively common in illegal Brazilian markets in the middle of the Decade of 1980, importing hundreds of birds to Western Germany in the Decade of 1980. However, the precise effect obfuscates a great number of birds bred in captivity, that presumably see reduced pressure on wild populations remaining (LF Silveira in litt., 1999).

• Despite their tendency to nest, times, near human settlements, It is apparently not the most favoured species for the pet trade (VT Lombardi in litt. 2011).

• There are records of persecution in response to the degradation of crops.

Conservation Actions Underway:

Conservation Actions Proposed:

    • Survey to locate new populations important and define the limits of its current range.

    • Study to determine their population dynamics and dispersal ability, as well as providing a detailed analysis of their requirements of habitats in different sites.

    •Guarantee protection of key reserves.

    • Protect species under Brazilian law.

Aratinga Testadorada en cautividad:

Rare in captivity, mostly out of Brazil.

Their life expectancy is about 30 years.

Alternative names:

Golden-capped Parakeet, Flame-capped Conure, Flame-capped Parakeet, Gold-capped Conure, Golden capped Parakeet, Golden-capped Conure (English).
Conure à tête d’or, Conure à tête dorée, Perriche à tête d’or, Perruche à tête d’or (French).
Goldkopfsittich, Goldkappensittich (German).
jandaia-de-testa-vermelha, cara-suja, jandaia, periquito-de-cabeça-vermelha (Portuguese).
Aratinga Testadorada, Maracaná corona dorada, Periquito de Cabeza Dorada (Spanish).
Maracaná corona dorada (Paraguay).

Kuhl, Heinrich
Heinrich Kuhl

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Aratinga
Scientific name: Aratinga auricapillus
Citation: (Kuhl, 1820)
Protonimo: Psittacus auricapillus

Golden-capped Parakeet images:

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Golden-capped Parakeet (Aratinga auricapillus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A Golden-capped Parakeet at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore By Peter so (Golden-capped ParakeetUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(2) – Picture of a Golden-capped Parakeet in the zoo of Wrocław (Poland) By Nicolas Guérin (messages) (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – A Golden-capped Parakeet (also known as Golden-capped Conure) in Seattle, Washington, USA By Matthew Wilson (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Two Golden-capped Parakeets (also known as Golden-capped Conures) in Seattle, Washington By Matthew Wilson (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A Golden-capped Parakeet (also known as Golden-capped Conure) in captivity By Patrick Hawks from Sint Maarten (Bird is the wordUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Douglas Meyer (Xeno-canto)

Dusky-headed Parakeet
Aratinga weddellii

Aratinga Cabecifusca

Description:

Anatomy-parrots-eng

Of 25-30 cm.. length and a weight between 95-115 g.

The head of the Dusky-headed Parakeet (Aratinga weddellii) is greyish Brown, with off blue stripes that give it a scaly appearance. The upperparts are green, the feathers of the nape they have yellowish margins (some banks in the mantle), the back and Hip with Brown centers, giving an appearance of Brown altogether. The scapulars with varying between Brown and green edges; the minor, large and medium-sized inner coverts green grass with paler green margins; the outer and the primary coverts are dark blue. Primary and secondary most of blue color with vane outer Green or green margins toward the vane external in the primaries; very dark (almost black) the Tips. Underwing-coverts green: underside of the flight feather opaque gray. Top of the chest pale green with turquoise suffusion; belly and undertail-coverts pale yellowish green, greener on the flanks. Upper, the tail green, Blue towards the tip: undertail, opaque gray.

Dusky-headed Parakeet

The bill shiny black; cere pinkish grey; wide area orbital off-white; irises yellowish white; legs dark gray.

Both sexes similar.

The immature are like adults but with the irises darker.

Habitat:

Dusky-headed Parakeet Video

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Aratinga

They inhabit in rainforest, semi-humid, swamps, involved swamp forest and stubble, until 500 metres in Colombia and exceptionally 750 metres in Bolivia. Its preferred habitats are the forests and marshes and flooded forests in swampy areas. Also in the remnants of forest in wet savannahs and cleared with patches of remnant forest areas. Also observed in coffee and sugarcane plantations; apparently rarely fly over the dense forest. Usually, in pairs or in small groups, but flocks of up to 75 individuals reported where food is abundant.

Reproduction:

It nests in trees and palms of marshy or riparian areas, between June and August. They also used the cups of dead Palm trees and termite nests.
Four nests observed in Leticia, Colombia, between 4 and 15 metres in height. Birds incubating in the month of February in Colombia. Bird in reproductive condition in the month of August in Bolivia. Observed breeding of the month from June to September in Loreto, Eastern Peru; from April to July in the Mato Grosso.
A normal start is of 3 to 5 eggs and both parents feed the chicks.

Food:

Its diet consists of seeds, fruit, flowers, berries, as well as insects and their larvae found in the trees decaying and stumps.

Distribution:

Its distribution ranges from the southeast of Colombia, East of Ecuador and Peru to the East of Bolivia and West of Brazil.

Apparently Nomad in some parts of the distribution. In general common, even in partially deforested areas, and perhaps increase due to clearing and fragmentation of dense forest.

Conservation:

Conservation status ⓘ

Status
Least Concern ⓘ (UICN)ⓘ

• Red list category of the UICN current: Least concern

• Population trend: Growing

The size of the world population Dusky-headed Parakeet It has not been quantified, but this species is described as common (Stotz et to the. (1996)).

This species is suspected that it has been lost between the 15 and the 17,7% of its suitable habitat within its range over three generations (21 years) based on a model of deforestation of the Amazon (Soares-Filho et to the., 2006, Bird et to the. 2011). Given the susceptibility of this species to the hunting or trapping, It is suspected that its population may decrease in around the 25% in three generations.

Dusky-headed Parakeet in captivity:

It is not common in captivity, but in the past was part of the international trade. They are common in cultivation areas, for this reason they are common in homes of peasants.

The Dusky-headed Parakeet is not known for its ability to mimic the speak human, but they are nevertheless birds very fun, kind and loving – provided that they have been hand reared and socialized properly. They are not as active and noisy as other species of parrots, they only emit sounds, not too high, when excited.

Wonderful pets. His charming personality makes them good pets for children. They are not demanding, they spend happy hours playing with their favorite toys but still much enjoy human company.

They are relatively easy to raise. They may have several broods per year; However, good breeding practices stipulate that it should not be allowed having more than two or three clutches to allow your rest. The size of Sunset is of 3 to 4 eggs, they are incubated for a few 23 days. Both parents are responsible for rearing the young. The chicks leave the nest After a few 50 days.

In nature, According to sources, females have been estimated can live up to 25 years. Its longevity in captivity It has not been studied in detail. It has been observed a muscle aging in wild animals.

Alternative names:

Dusky-headed Parakeet, Dusky Conure, Dusky headed Parakeet, Dusky Parakeet, Dusky-headed Conure, Weddell’s Conure (English).
Conure de Weddell, Conure à tête sombre, Perriche de Weddell, Perruche de Weddell (French).
Weddellsittich, Weddell-Sittich (German).
Aratinga-de-cabeca-escura, aratinga-de-cabeça-suja, jandaia-de-cabeça-azulada, jandaia-de-cara-suja, periquito-de-cabeça-suja (Portuguese).
Aratinga Cabecifusca, Perico Canoso, Periquito de Cabeza Gris, Perico cabezagris(Spanish).
Loro canoso, Perico Canoso, Cotorra cabecigris, Cotorra cabeciparda (Colombia).
Cotorra de Cabeza Oscura, San Pedrito, Lorito cabeza gris (Peru).
Perico cabecioscuro (Ecuador).
Tarechi (Bolivia).
Ipií (Chimane).
Bambaorito (I ingano).
Sacara (Cofán.).
Butuquiria (Macuna).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Aratinga
Scientific name: Aratinga weddellii
Citation: (Deville, 1851)
Protonimo: Conurus Weddellii

Dusky-headed Parakeet images:

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Dusky-headed Parakeet (Aratinga weddellii)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Dusky-headed Conure or Weddell’s Conure (Aratinga weddellii) in captivity. Kobe Kachoen By merec0 (originally posted to Flickr as 神戸花鳥園 (32)) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – A Dusky-headed Parakeet at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore By Sham Edmond [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Dusky-headed Conure or Weddell’s Conure (Aratinga weddellii) By Steve Beger [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Dusky-headed Conure or Weddell’s Conure (Aratinga weddellii) By en:user:Jhwodchuck (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:DuskyConure.jpg) [GFDL, GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Aratinga weddellii – conură cu cap negricios – Dusky-headed conure – conure à tête sombre by Florin FeneruFlickr
(6) – Ilustración Dusky-headed parakeet by Biodiversity Heritage LibraryFlickr

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Scarlet-fronted Parakeet
Psittacara wagleri

Scarlet-fronted Parakeet

Description:

Anatomy-parrots-eng

34 to 36 cm.. of length and a weight of 162 to 217 g..

The Scarlet-fronted Parakeet (Psittacara wagleri) He has the crown and forecrown bright red; lores and cheeks dark green with red feathers scattered in some birds. Of the nape even up to the uppertail-coverts dark green. Upperwing-coverts dark green; flight feather green, dyed Emerald above and olivaceous at the bottom. The greater underwing-coverts, also of color olivaceous, the remaining underwing-coverts, green. The underparts brighter yellowish green, sometimes with scattered red feathers on the throat and in the the thighs. Upper, the tail dark green; by down olive green.

Ilustración Aratinga de Wagler

The bill color pale horn; bare periophthalmic grey; irises yellow; legs distant.

Both sexes similar.

The immature with a reduction (or even absence) Red Feather in the head.

Subspecies Psittacara description wagleri
Subspecies
  • Psittacara wagleri frontatus

    (Cabanis, 1846) – Red of the head vaster than the species nominal, extending to the rear of the eyes. Red in the the thighs and bend of wing in the majority of birds. Larger than the species nominal (40 cm.).

  • Psittacara wagleri minor

    (Carriker, 1933) – Similar to the subspecies Frontata but smaller (38 cm.) and more green with pale red in the wings. Some specimens with yellow in the bend of wing.

  • Psittacara wagleri transilis

    (Peters,JL, 1927) – Darker than the species nominal, with less extensive red on the rear of the crown. Smaller that the species nominal (34 cm.).

  • Psittacara wagleri wagleri

    (Gray,GR, 1845) – The species nominal

Habitat:

Scarlet-fronted Parakeet video

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Psittacara

They inhabit in moist forests, deciduous, Gallery, cloudy and second-growth forests with Acacias, Prosopis and Ochroma, mainly in the lower subtropical and upper tropical zones, Although they can also penetrate in sub-templadas areas.

In Peru, observed in cloud forests semi-arid.

Reported at lower elevations in wet plantations, fields of corn and cactus scrub. Key requirement in their habitat are the cliffs, where breeding and resting.

In general, observed the altitudes of 2.000 m, above the 3.000 metres in Peru. Gregarious, usually in close flocks to the 20 individuals, sometimes up to 300 birds.

Communal hangers on the cliffs with diurnal movements towards the areas of power.

Reproduction:

Nest communally in Rocky steep, between December and June in the North of Colombia and between April and June in Venezuela. Average of the laying of 3 to 4 eggs and the incubation is of 23 or 24 days. The pups they leave the nest after 50 days, with a plumage green.

Food:

Its diet includes a variety of fruits, nuts and seeds; You can include cereal crops and fruit plantations. Usually they feed in the canopy.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 866.000 km2

The Scarlet-fronted Parakeet is distributed discontinuous by the Northwest and West of South America, in the area of the Andes, from Venezuela until Peru.

In Venezuela stretching from West of the Paria peninsula in the foothills of the Andes (between 500 and 2,000m, more altitude farther south), up to the Serranía del Perijá and in the North of Colombia, including the Department of Magdalena and the West and center of the mountain range of the Andes Although apparently absent in the southwestern tip of Colombia.

Their status in the eastern slope of the Andes in Colombia is uncertain. Found around the skirts of the Andes in the South of Ecuador and South of Peru until Tacna in I8 ° S latitudes.

Apparently, observed in the Western Andean slopes in the Peru with some reports from the South of the Valley of the Marañón River until Ayacucho and Apurimac, in the Central Andes.

Generally residents Although seasonal visitors in some areas. Irregularly-common, often abundant, Although scarce or non-existent in many areas; more scarce in the South. Decrease in its population in some areas (for example, Colombia), due to loss of habitat.

Trapped for the trade in live birds, with 16.644 specimens exported from Peru in 1982.

The large number of birds escaped from her cage makes it considered them are introduced in Spain, Florida, Hawaii and California.

Subspecies Psittacara distribution wagleri
Subspecies
  • Psittacara wagleri frontatus

    (Cabanis, 1846) – West of Ecuador and South of Peru, approximately 18° S

  • Psittacara wagleri minor

    (Carriker, 1933) – South of the Valley of the Marañón River until Ayacucho and Apurimac in the center of the Peruvian Andes.

  • Psittacara wagleri transilis

    (Peters,JL, 1927) – The northeastern coastal mountains of Venezuela up to the Paria peninsula, Sucre. Possibly records in Bethlehem, Caquetá, on the eastern slope of the East of the Of the Andes in Colombia. Unclear relationship with the species nominal.

  • Psittacara wagleri wagleri

    (Gray,GR, 1845) – The species nominal

Conservation:

Conservation status ⓘ


Status
Near Threatened (UICN)ⓘ

• Red list category of the UICN current: Near-threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The population trend of the Scarlet-fronted Parakeet apparently it has not quantified, but you suspect that your decline It moderately fast due to the persecution and change of land use (pit et to the., 1997).

The species has been the subject of a intense trade and individuals captured in nature have been recorded in international trade (UNEP-WCMC trade database CITES).

A high internal trade This species has been observed in Venezuela (pit et to the., 1997).

Pursued, due to its status as a crop pest, It can also be contributing to their decline.

Current levels of hunting pressure and persecution are not known, but it is assumed that it is producing a negative trend in their population.

Although this species shows a flexible use of the habitat and makes use of the crops, It is suspected that the the land use change It is contributing to a population decline of the species, and habitat clearance is presumed that it has led to the decline of this species in Colombia (pit et to the. 1997).

Conservation Actions Underway:

• The species appears in Appendix II.

Conservation Actions Proposed:

• Conduct surveys to assess the size of the population of the species and the trend.

• Quantify the current impact of entrapment.

• Monitor the levels of trade.

• Carry out awareness-raising activities to reduce the capture and trade of Psittacidas activities.

• Increase the area of suitable natural habitat that receives effective protection.

Scarlet-fronted Parakeet in captivity:

The breeding in aviculture of the Scarlet-fronted Parakeet rarely achieved since this species is difficult to obtain and hard to maintain. This Parrot will only spawn several years kept in captivity.

It is a bird animated, Although, initially timid, that is because you provide a environment of Cologne, even in the breeding season. It´s resistant Once you have moved. Pretty noisy, something that must be taken into account if the neighbors are close.

Chomping hard, in need of a steady supply of fresh branches to meet the great need to chew. Enjoy the daily bath.

Alternative names:

Scarlet-fronted Parakeet, Red-fronted Conure, Red-fronted Parakeet, Scarlet fronted Parakeet, Scarlet-fronted Conure (English).
Conure de Wagler, Conure à front rouge, Perruche de Wagler (French).
Columbiasittich (German).
Periquito-de-cara-vermelha (Portuguese).
Aratinga de Wagler, Perico Frentirrojo, Periquito de Frente Roja (Spanish).
Loro frentirrojo, Perico Frentirrojo, Perico Chocolero (Colombia).
Cotorra de Frente Escarlata (Peru).
Chacaraco (Venezuela).
Perico frentiescarlata (Ecuador).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Psittacara
Scientific name: Psittacara wagleri
Citation: (Gray, GR, 1845)
Protonimo: Conurus Wagleri

Scarlet-fronted Parakeet pictures:

————————————————————————————————

Scarlet-fronted Parakeet (Psittacara wagleri)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Scarlet-fronted Parakeet (Aratinga wagleri) at Jurong BirdPark, Singapore By Michael Gwyther-Jones (originally posted to Flickr as Singapore 2006 249) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(2) – Scarlet-fronted Parakeet, also called Scarlet-fronted Conure at Jurong Birdpark, Singapore By Lynn Zheng (bird park_012) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – pericon found By the Selimalabi (Own work) [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or FAL], via Wikimedia Commons By Selimalabi (Own work) [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or FAL], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Chacaraco [Scarlet-fronted Parakeet] (Aratinga wagleri transilis) by barloventomagicoFlickr
(5) – Chacaraco / Scarlet-fronted Parakeet (Aratinga wagleri) by Erick HouliFlickr

(6) – Illustration By Gray, George Robert; Hullmandel & Walton; Hullmandel, Charles Joseph; Mitchell, D. W. [CC BY 2.0 or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Red-masked Parakeet
Psittacara erythrogenys

Aratinga de Guayaquil

Description Aratinga of Guayaquil:

Anatomy-parrots-eng

33 cm.. length between 165 and 200 g.. weight.

The Red-masked Parakeet (Psittacara erythrogenys) It is very similar to birds Scarlet-fronted Parakeet and to the Mitred Parakeet, but smaller and with more red area in the face, extending continuously up to the throat and nape.

Has the forecrown, crown, lores, the cheeks and the area around the eyes, bright red, generally forming a complete red mask to join to the chin (Sometimes the mask extends up to the throat). Since the nape up to the uppertail-coverts dark green, sometimes with scattered red feathers. The upperwing-coverts children with some feathers of red and the bend of wing red; remaining upperwing-coverts dark green, with dye Emerald to them vane outer the primary. The flight feather Brown Gold below; underwing-coverts minors, bright red, the greater coverts yellowish brown. The underparts brighter yellowish green, sometimes with mottled red and almost always with the the thighs red. Upper, the tail dark green; by below grayish brown.

The bill color pale horn; bare periophthalmic off-white; irises yellow; legs distant.

Both sexes similar.

The immature with the head and the thighs green.

Habitat Red-masked Parakeet:

Red-masked Parakeet video.

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Psittacara

The Red-masked Parakeet It occupies a wide range of vegetation types, from arid zones to moist forests, Since the sea level to altitudes 2.500 m, Although its usual habitat is below of the 1.000 m, in moist forests, deciduous forests, areas of dry thorny scrub and arid with cactus; They also live in degraded forest, areas cultivated with scattered trees, and around the urban areas. They tend to prefer arid and semi-arid habitats, not avoiding rainforest habitats.

Outside the breeding season, is a bird gregarious; in general, observed in pairs or in groups of up to 12 individuals, forming groups of up to 200 birds in the places where their communal roosts are. Formerly registered flocks of thousands of birds in Guayaquil, Ecuador.

Often associated in mixed flocks with the Grey-cheeked Parakeet (Brotogeris pyrrhoptera) and also observed in mixed flocks with the Bronze winged Parrot (Pionus chalcopterus).

Reproduction Red-masked Parakeet:

Nests in holes of mature trees, for example of Ceiba trichistandra or Cochlospermun vitifolium, There are also records of nests in termite mounds, with a report in a nest on a cliff. The breeding season in the southwest of Ecuador recorded during the rainy season (January-March). The laying, between 2 and 4 eggs. The female the incubated eggs during 23 to 24 days. The young they are born very little developed, blind and naked. They are fed with food previously digested by their mothers.

Food Aratinga of Guayaquil:

Few details exist about food preferences of the Red-masked Parakeet, Although seasonal movements from the more arid areas are probably related to food supply.

Reported foods include fruits of Hieronyma, Anacardiaceae, Oleaceae and Boraginaceae, as well as flowers of Erythrina.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 151.000 km2

The Red-masked Parakeet is distributed to the West of Ecuador and the Northwest corner of Peru.

In Ecuador, the species has been recorded from Manabi near South of the Equator, through Pichincha, The rivers, Guayas, Azuay, Gold and Loja, until Tumbes, Piura, Lambayeque and Cajamarca, in the North of Peru and the region of Chachapoyas, Amazon (610 ’ S).

In Ecuador, the distribution of the Red-masked Parakeet is limited to the lowlands of the Pacific, Western slope of the Andes and valleys, Although it is apparently absent from the eastern slope; similar pattern in the Peru most Eastern records in the basin of the Amazon (Valley of the Utcubamba River) to 7754 ° ’ W.

The seasonal movements to and from the more arid areas, otherwise, residents.

Usually considered to be common (described as the most common parrot in several towns of the province of Gold, Ecuador), but the numbers fluctuate widely in some localities due to irregular seasonal movements. In some areas there has been a very drastic decrease of copies, reflecting the combined effects of the loss of habitat and your capture for the trade in live birds, for example, in Guayas, Ecuador.

There are at least eight protected areas, of which seven are in Ecuador.

There are leaks in Spain; well as in EE. UU., with breeding populations in the California cities of San Diego, Los Angeles, San Gabriel, Sunnyvale and San Francisco, You can see them eating fruits of cultivated tropical plants, and nesting in Palm trees.

Maintained in captivity at the local level (where is the most common Parrot kept in captivity) and commercialized in large quantities at the international level, especially since Peru.

Conservation:

Conservation status ⓘ


Status
Near Threatened (UICN)ⓘ

• Red list category of the UICN current: Near-threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the population This species has not been estimated officially, but, in the absence of sufficient data, It is suspected that it may be in around the 10.000 specimens, more or less equivalent to 6.700 mature individuals.

The population of the species is suspected that it may be subjected to a moderately rapid decrease, due to its capture for him pet trade together with the loss of habitat and fragmentation. Further research is required.

Conservation Actions Underway:

  • Appendix II of CITES.

Conservation Actions Proposed:

  • Carry out surveys to get an estimate of the population.
  • The current threat of trade research.
  • Enforcing trade restrictions.
  • Census of population and monitoring.
  • Monitor the rates of loss and fragmentation of habitat.
  • Study its ability to persist in altered and fragmented habitats.

The Red-masked Parakeet in captivity:

Shy and suspicious. Little common in captivity outside its area of distribution.

They may live until 25 years, Although the average tends to be between 10 and 15 years.

Their diet: fruit as, Apple, pear, orange, bananas, grenades, Kiwi, papaya, cactus fruits, they form a 30 percent of the diet. Vegetables, such as: carrot, celery, Green beans and peas in the pod, the sweet corn on COB, green leavess, such as: Chard, lettuce , Kale, healer, Dandelion, Aviary grass, spray millet, mixture of small seeds, such as: Millet and small amounts of oats, buckwheat, safflower and hemp.

This species is found threatened from the wild bird trade local in Peru and Ecuador, where are rates of mortality due to mismanagement and stress high.

Never buy these birds in the illegal trade, Since these tend to come from its natural environment and it must be remembered that the Red-masked Parakeet is one endangered species.

Alternative names:

Red-masked Parakeet, Red Masked Conure, Red masked Parakeet, Red-headed Conure, Red-headed Parakeet, Red-masked Conure (English).
Conure à tête rouge, Conure à tête cerise, Conure à tête écarlate, Perriche à tête rouge, Perruche à tête rouge (French).
Guayaquilsittich (German).
Periquito-de-cabeça-vermelha (Portuguese).
Aratinga de Guayaquil, Loro de cara roja, Periquito de Cabeza Roja, Perico Cara Roja (Spanish).
Loro de cara roja (Chile).
Cotorra de Cabeza Roja (Peru).
Perico caretirrojo (Ecuador).

Scientific classification:

René Primevère Lesson
René Primevère Lesson

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Psittacara
Scientific name: Psittacara erythrogenys
Citation: (Lesson, 1844)
Protonimo: Psittacara (psittacus) Erythrogenys

Red-masked Parakeet pictures:

————————————————————————————————

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
Feather wind

Photos:

(1) – A feral Red-masked Parakeet (also known as the Red-masked Conure and Cherry-headed Conure) in San Francisco, USA By Ingrid Taylar [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Red-masked parakeet, Aratinga erythrogenys. Two birds in a tree in San Francisco, California By Jef Poskanzer (Flickr) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Red-masked Parakeet (Psittacara erythrogenys) at the Presidio, San Francisco, California By Frank Schulenburg (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Red-masked parakeet (Aratinga erythrogenys). A juvenile parrot which is mostly green and just starting to get some red feathers on its head By Eliya Selhub (Flickr) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Red-masked Parakeet preening on a branch in San Francisco, USA By Ingrid Taylar from San Francisco Bay Area – California, USA [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Red-masked Conure at Birds of Eden, South Africa By Dick Daniels (http://carolinabirds.org /) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
(7) – A feral Red-masked Parakeet (also known as the Red-masked Conure and Cherry-headed Conure) in San Francisco, USA By Ingrid Taylar [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(8) – Two feral Red-masked Parakeets in San Francisco, USA By Ingrid Taylar from San Francisco Bay Area – California, USA (Wild in SFUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(9) – Several Red-masked Parakeets eating a discarded apple in San Francisco, USA By Ingrid Taylar from San Francisco Bay Area – California, USA (A Big Find for ParrotsUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Mitred Parakeet
Psittacara mitratus

Mitred Parakeet

Description:

Of 31 to 38 cm.. length and a weight between 219 and 275 g.

The Mitred Parakeet (Psittacara mitratus) has the forecrown reddish brown with a fusion of bright red at the front of the crown; the lores and cheeks to the rear of the eyes, bright red; the sides of neck dark green with scattered red feathers. The upperparts from the back of the crown up to the uppertail-coverts, dark green with some scattered red feathers (especially in the nape).

Upperwing-coverts and flight feather, at the top, green, sometimes with one or two dark red feathers on the bend of wing; flight feather color marron-oliva below. Underwing-coverts opaque green. The underparts, dull, Green pale with dye olive, usually with scattered red marks, especially in the the thighs. Upper, the tail dark green with Brown tips; Brown down.

The bill off-white; bare periophthalmic creamy white; irises beige color; legs distant.

Both sexes similar.

The Immature with fewer red feathers on the head, in special, in the cheeks and Brown, not Orange, the irises.

Subspecies description:

  • Psittacara mitratus chlorogenys

    (Arndt, 2006) – Front band Red that extends to the lores and Strait, e incomplete bare periophthalmic; upper zone of the cheeks and ear-coverts, green.

  • Psittacara mitratus mitratus

    (Tschudi, 1844) – The subspecies nominal.

  • Psittacara mitratus tucumanus

    (Arndt, 2006) – The front of the crown, the lores up to the cheeks and ear-coverts red.

Habitat:

They usually inhabit in areas of dry subtropical vegetation, There are also records in temperate zones: montane deciduous forest, cloud forests drier, cultivated areas, hills covered with tall grass, areas populated with scattered trees and fields, as well as sheets of legumes dry grasslands with patches of forests of Prosopis.

Often can be seen near high and steep rock walls. Usually, at altitudes of 1.000 to 2.500 Metros in Argentina, Although there are records to 4.000 metres in the Peru. Rarely, or never, descends to the lowlands. Commonly views in groups of 2 to 3 birds, but until 100 individuals outside the breeding season.

Reproduction:

They nest in cliffs or hollow trees. There has been a egg laying in Oran, Argentina. Probably the clutch is between 2 and 3 eggs.

Food:

It usually feeds in areas of Virgin forest, but also full of grain crops in populated areas. This and other parrots migrate to the Lerma Valley in the Northwest of Argentina for feeding of the berries in maturity during the month of October.

Distribution:

The Mitred Parakeet are distributed in the southwest of South America, from the South of Peru through the Center-West of Bolivia, to the North of Argentina. Observed in the great valleys of the center of the Peru, from Huanuco until Cuzco. Disintegrated in the valleys of the Eastern Andes in the Centre-West of Bolivia, where there are records in Peace, Santa Cruz, Cochabamba, Oruro, Padilla and South of Sucre, to the Northwest of Argentina in Jujuy, Salta, Tucumán and South of Catamarca, until La Rioja and Córdoba.

In general residents, Although some with seasonal movements in the North of Argentina and Bolivia.

Locally distributed within its range, Although most widespread in the South of Cochabamba, Bolivia. In Argentina, generally common, abundant in some locations (apparently more numerous in Catamarca and Salta), but perhaps decreasing.

Colonies in coastal areas of the southwest of the United States, from Malibu to Long Beach and northwest coast of Orange County, also in the basin of Los Angeles and the San Gabriel Valley; small amounts from San Francisco to the southern region of the San Francisco Bay, and sightings also in San Diego and areas of Sacramento (Garrett 1997).

Maintained in captivity and sold in large quantities at the international level (mainly from Bolivia) at the end of 1980.

Distribution of subspecies:

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The size of the world population Mitred Parakeet It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “common” but irregular distribution (Stotz et to the., 1996).

The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats, Although it has been the subject of intense trade: from 1981 When it was included in the Appendix II, 158,149 individuals were captured in the wild and reported in the international trade (UNEP-WCMC trade database CITES, January 2005).

Aratinga Mitrada en cautividad:

This bird is usually available in pet stores or breeders.

They are known to be very attached to their owners. Very playful, they can also become good conversadoras and are considered the more strong and lively group of Aratinga parrots. The Mitred Parakeet It is good for owners who want a large bird and is easy to care for and handle. Can entertain herself if you give it a lot of toys, but they also enjoy interacting and playing with his human flock.

Alternative names:

Mitred Parakeet, Mitred Conure, Mitred Parakeet (Mitred) (English).
Conure mitrée (French).
Rotmaskensittich (German).
Aratinga mitrata (Portuguese).
Aratinga Mitrada, Perico mitrata (Spanish).
Calacante cara roja (Argentina).
Buhito menor (Honduras).
Tiakeru (Quechua).

Tschudi-Johann Jakob of
Tschudi-Johann Jakob of

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Psittacara
Scientific name: Psittacara mitratus
Citation: (Tschudi, 1844)
Protonimo: Conurus mitratus

Images Mitred Parakeet:


Mitred Parakeet (Psittacara mitratus)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife

  • Photos:

(1) – A feral Mitred Parakeet in Fort Lauderdale, Florida By http://www.birdphotos.com (Own work) [CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Mitred Parakeet (Aratinga mitrata), Inka Trail to Machu Picchu, Peru By D. Gordon E. Robertson (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Mitred Parakeet by vil.sandiFlickr
(4) – Mitred Parakeet (Psittacara mitrata) by Gregory “Slobirdr” SmithFlickr
(5) – Member of an escaped flock roughly 35-50 strong in Sunnyvale, CA By Shravans14 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – A pair of parakeets in the escaped flock in Sunnyvale, CA. This flock has been around for at least 20 years By Shravans14 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(7) – Wild parrot (Mitred Parakeet) in Redondo Beach. (Aratinga mitrata) by Ingrid TaylarFlickr
(8) – A pet Mitred Parakeet (also known as the Mitred Conure) By Lee (originally posted to Flickr as Gaspar4) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(9) – A wild SoCal parrot (Mitred Parakeet) eating Bottlebrush in Redondo Beach. This bird is part of a local flock that frequents the neighborhood by Ingrid TaylarFlickr

White-eyed Parakeet
Psittacara leucophthalmus

Aratinga Ojiblanca

Description:

Of 32 cm. length and a weight between 140 and 170 g..

The White-eyed Parakeet (Psittacara leucophthalmus) has the head dark green with small scattered red feathers, especially in the area of the lores, cheeks, sides neck and throat. The head and nape Some birds are almost entirely green, others have solid red spots in the cheeks, with numerous scattered red feathers elsewhere.

The upperparts are dark green, with one or two scattered red feathers. Upper, the wings dark green, with a little red in the curve; undertail, with golden brown flight feathers, the outer red and green small coverts inner; Yellow large coverts external and green internal.

The underparts Green with scattered red feathers on the throat and the chest, sometimes forming irregular patches. Upper, the tail dark green; Brown down.

The bill hooked is color Horn and its gray tip; bare periophthalmic grayish white; irises yellow-orange; legs grey.

The plumage of the male and the female, they are identical.

The immature they have more muted colors; some feathers Red in the head, No red in the bend of wing and olive in the underwing-coverts outermost.

Subspecies description:

  • Psittacara leucophthalmus callogenys

    (Salvadori, 1891) – They have head, neck and throat, green grass dark with small feathers red color above the cheeks. The the mantle, the wing-coverts, the tail and primary feathers of the tail are dark green. The lower part of the chest and flanks of the body are green clear. The feathers largest of the wings and secondaries are dark green with a grey reflection at the ends. Smaller feathers of the wings and the area of the wing curvature are bright red; small coverts feathers are red; the feathers of the greater coverts are yellow. The top of the large feathers of the tail are dark green, the underparts is olive green.

    The eyes are black with the irises orange-brown. The bare periophthalmic is grayish white. Bill color horn, the sides and the tip of the upper part are dark gray. Legs brownish grey, Black nails.

    On average largest the species nominal with the bill more robust. Birds in the West have a green dark.

  • Psittacara leucophthalmus leucophthalmus

    (Statius Müller, 1776) – The species nominal.

  • Psittacara leucophthalmus nicefori

    (Meyer de Schauensee, 1946) – Similar to the species nominal, except for having a red frontal band.

Habitat:

The White-eyed Parakeet It is in a great range of forest habitats and forests, mainly in lowlands, even if they manage to reach altitudes of 1.700 meters in the Ecuador and 2.500 meters in Bolivia.

In the Amazon, they are in tropical rainforests, for the most part along the rivers (including the forests and marshes), in scattered areas of woodland and in land grown in wetlands, mangroves, sheets and the forests of Palms in the Guianas, chaco types of forests in the South of its range, Gallery forests and alluvial forests in Bolivia.

The White-eyed Parakeet they are highly gregarious, they form flocks, usually, hundreds of birds (usually up to 90), covering large expanses between the roosts and feeding areas.

In the Amazon, in general, the birds travel along the banks of the rivers, crossing also large tracts of forest to reach the meanders and hidden Marsh.

They form large community groups to sleep in trees, sugar cane fields and caves.

Associated with the Blue-crowned Conure (Psittacara acuticaudatus), the Blue-headed Parrot (Pionus menstruus), the Chestnut-fronted Macaw (Ara severus) and
Crimson-bellied Parakeet (Pyrrhura perlata), in mixed flocks, especially while they forage.

Reproduction:

The nest It consists of a natural cavity in a tree, often a palma, but also in limestone caves in Mato Grosso, Brazil. The female deposits there usually 3 white eggs, What incubates alone during 24 or 25 days. During this period, It is fed by the male. At birth the chicks are completely naked, a gray marker appears at the end of the first week. Are fed by parents for approximately 6 weeks, those that leave the nest and get together with the family group. They are still dependent parents during 2 to 3 months.

The breeding season It has been reported in the months of November-December, in Argentina; July-August, in the East of Peru; From January to April, Mato Grosso; in Guianas during the month of February.

Food:

The diet of this species depends on the habitat, including a variety of dried fruits, seeds, fruit, berries, flowers and insects.

In general, they feed in the canopy, Although also feed on of grass seeds. Other reported foods include fruits of Palms and Goupia glabra, Tetragastris altissima and Allantoma lineata, as well as flowers of Erythrina and ficus.

Distribution:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 13200000 km2

The White-eyed Parakeet are widespread in much of the North of South America, to the East of the Andes, to the North of Argentina.

Are distributed from the West of the Guianas (absent from Guyana), through Venezuela, from Anzoátegui and Monagas through the Delta Amacuro, until Bolivar and Amazon, and up to the Colombian Amazon, to the North of the Department of the Goal. They live in much of Ecuador and Peru.

Extend through the entire interior of Brazil and possibly reach the coast of São Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul (absent in the arid zones of the Northeast, mountainous areas of the northern basin of the Amazon in Brazil and Venezuela, and the basin of the Rio Negro in Brazil and Colombia).

Are also distributed to the East of Bolivia through Paraguay until Argentina, to the South of Santa Fe and Entre Rios (possibly in the North of Buenos Aires), including Tucumán and Catamarca (There are no recent reports in Catamarca or Santa Fe, While reports of Santiago del Estero, Córdoba and San Luis they are probably incorrect).

  • Narosky and Di Giacomo (1993) they consider that the population in the city of Buenos Aires and its surroundings would have possibly originated from specimens escaped from captivity, i.e. released or escaped pet, owners or traffickers of fauna.

Observed in the highest parts of Uruguay.

In general resident, Although some seasonal movements seem to occur in some areas. The most numerous in the center of the range, the least, at the edges. Locally abundant in the Amazon central and Mato Grosso, Brazil, as well as in the East of Peru. Common in Colombia. Fairly common in the forests of the coast of Suriname and in the Gallery forests of Santa Cruz in Bolivia. Unevenly distributed in the North of Bolivia, where is described as from common to rare. Common in Argentina, especially in the North.

The Aratinga Ojiblanca It adapts easily to the degradation and urban areas, long as no sources of food and nesting places (ceilings and other cavities) and this occurs in several cities.

Large captive population with high volume of international trade, in particular from Argentina, where the species, Perhaps, is being threatened due to the capture.

Distribution of subspecies:

  • Psittacara leucophthalmus callogenys

    (Salvadori, 1891) – East of Ecuador, Northeast of Peru and Northwest of Brazil.

  • Psittacara leucophthalmus leucophthalmus

    (Statius Müller, 1776) – The species nominal.

  • Psittacara leucophthalmus nicefori

    (Meyer de Schauensee, 1946) – Its validity is based on a single specimen found in an area around Guaicaramo in the Guavio River, Department of the Goal, Colombia.

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the world population White-eyed Parakeet It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

The species has undergone intense trade: from 1981, When it was included in the Appendix II, 60.207 individuals have been captured in the wild, registered for the international trade (UNEP-WCMC trade database CITES, January 2005).

Aratinga Ojiblanca en cautividad:

The White-eyed Parakeet they are among the best talkers within the family Aratinga. Well socialized they can become a good companions. Rarely are destructive and usually they are not pijas, they often take the choice to imitate human speech in place. Personality always varies from one bird to another, but they are generally known to be very playful and curious.

Imported birds are, in its most, shy and slow to take confidence with your caregiver.

Alternative names:

White-eyed Parakeet, White-eyed Conure, Green Conure, White eyed Parakeet (English).
Conure pavouane, Perriche pavouane, Perruche pavouane (French).
Pavuasittich (German).
Aratinga-de-bando, araguaí, araguari, aratinga, arauá-i, aruaí, guira-juba, maracanã, maracanã-malhada, maricatã, periquitão-maracanã (Portuguese).
Aratinga Ojiblanca, Calacante ala roja, Calancate Ala Roja, Loro Barranquero, Loro de ala roja, Loro Maracaná, Maracaná ala roja, Perico Ojiblanco, Periquito Verde (Spanish).
Calacante ala roja, Calancate Ala Roja, Loro de ala roja (Argentina).
Loro ojiblanco, Perico Ojiblanco (Colombia).
Cotorra de Ojo Blanco (Peru).
Maracaná ala roja (Paraguay).
Loro Barranquero, Loro Maracaná (Uruguay).
Perico Ojo Blanco (Venezuela).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Psittacara
Scientific name: Psittacara leucophthalmus
Citation: (Statius Müller, 1776)
Protonimo: Psittacus leucophthalmus

White-eyed Parakeet images:


White-eyed Parakeet (Psittacara leucophthalmus)

Sources:

Avibase
Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – White-eyed Parakeet (also known as the White-eyed Conure) in Piraju, São Paulo, Brazil By Dario Sanches [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – White-eyed Parakeet at the aviary at the Mayaguez Zoo in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico By Kati Fleming (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – A White-eyed Parakeet in Reserva Guainumbi, São Luis do Paraitinga, São Paulo, Brazil By Dario Sanches from São Paulo, Brazil [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Praça Barão do Rio Branco, Serra Negra-SP By Dario Sanches [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – White-eyed Parakeet (also known as White-eyed Conure) in Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil By Wagner Machado Carlos Lemes [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – White-eyed Conure (Aratinga leucophthalmus) – upper body, neck and face. In captivity in the Parrot’s Garden (Jardim dos Louros), in the Botanical Garden of Funchal, Madeira island, Portugal By jmaximo [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(7) – White-eyed From The Crossley ID Guide Eastern Birds By Richard Crossley (Richard Crossley) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(8) – White-eyed Conure, also called White-eyed Parakeet, in Brazil By Dario Sanches [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(9) – Couple of white-eyed parakeets (Aratinga elucophthalma). Spotted in São Carlos, Brazil By Leoadec (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

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