Cuban Parrot
Amazona leucocephala

Cuban Parrot

Content

Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description:

28-33 cm.. length and 260-301 g. of weight.

The Cuban Parrot (Amazona leucocephala) has a plumage rather variable, a main color ranging from bright green to olive color,, some birds feathers yellow dispersed in wings and in the back.

Front, fore crown, lores and area around eyes, white; lower cheeks and throat, red-pink; feathers the back of the crown and nape, bluish-green with black margins, giving the whole a heavy barred effect; similar pattern on the sides of neck but with the bluish tint absent; ear-coverts charcoal grey. Feathers of the back and the mantle, green with black distal margins but less intense than in the nape and head; rump and uppertail-coverts, dark green with weak margins to some feathers rump.

Cuban Parrot

Alula, greater coverts and flight feather, blue on the outerweb, gray on inner; remaining coberteras green with dark margins, showing most distinct barring on lesser coverts. Under the wings, green with dark margins, flight feather grey. Breast green with dark margins to most feathers; feathers on belly with vinaceous base showing green at margins forming a patch variable-sized, barely noticeable in some birds, striking in other; the thighs green or with some vinaceous feathers; undertail-coverts green. feathers tail green with red at base. Bill yellow-horn: irises reddish brown; legs yellowish brown.

Both sexes are similar, but males of the subspecies caymanenis reportedly larger and brighter than females. Usually, the immature show less black borders on the body feathers and less red wine in the belly.

  • Sound of the Cuban Parrot.

Description 4 subspecies:
  • Amazona leucocephala bahamensis

    (Bryant,H, 1867) – Larger that the nominal species, with slate blue on the back of the crown and more extensive white color head. Pens red wine in the belly, reduced or absent and red at the bottom of the tail less extensive.

  • Amazona leucocephala caymanensis

    (Cory, 1886) – It differs from other subspecies by the turquoise dye in the chest and in the rump and rosacea suffusion (sometimes yellowish) in white feathers head. Plumage Barred yellower and less thick than the nominal species (especially below and on upperwing-coverts), with less white in the head and much less pronounced the patch red wine belly.

  • Amazona leucocephala hesterna

    (Bangs, 1916) – Smaller and darker than the nominal species and that the subspecies caymanensis, Most individuals with red confined to a point under the eye and patch smaller target in the crown, it lacks the rosy tint of the subspecies caymanensis. Patch red wine in the larger belly than the subspecies caymanensis.

  • Amazona leucocephala leucocephala

    (Linnaeus, 1758) – Nominal.

Habitat:

Cuban Parrot Video

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Amazona

The Cuban Parrot They inhabit in different habitats in different islands. In Cuba They inhabit dense forests; in the Bahamas, in native broadleaf forests and pine forests, and in the Cayman Islands, in dry forests in the plateau ridge and agricultural lands nearby (Bond 1979, King 1981, Sibley y Monroe 1990). Usually in small groups but forages while forming larger groups in places where food is plentiful; couples or family groups in flocks discernable. More usually in pairs during breeding. They sleep communally outside the breeding season.

Reproduction:

The Cuban Parrot make their nests in cavities or palm tree hollows created by termites or woodpeckers. The population of Abaco It is particularly interesting because nests in natural holes in substrate limestone in the soil (O'Brien et al., 2006); there, chicks and adults are completely isolated from the frequent fires in the pine forests They are forming their habitat. Breeding March until mid-summer Cuba and Abaco. The laying usually it comprises between 2 and 4 eggs, the incubation period hard of 26 a 28 days and the chicks remain in the nest between 56 and 60 days.

Food:

The diet It includes yema Leaf Roystonea, the cones and new shoots tender the Pinus caribea, sea ​​grape uvifera and Conocarpus erretis, fruits and seeds of Smilax, Sabal, Durant, Exothea, Ernodea, Tabebuia, Acacia, Metopium, Tetrazygia, Swietenia, Cupania and Lisiloma. Sometimes they are persecuted for damage cultivated fruits like Mango (Mangifera) and grain.

Distribution and status:

Size of its range (breeding/resident): 590.000 km2

The Cuban Parrot live in Cuba, Island Pines, Bahamas and Cayman Islands. Formerly observed throughout the island Cuba but it is now difficult to see or are extinct in much of the island. Still locally they distributed throughout the provinces but only remain common in a few redoubts, including peninsulas Zapata and Guanahacabibes and in Sierra de sewage.

You can see in the Isle of Pines (Isle of youth) which dropped dramatically in the twentieth century, especially during the sixties, with most of the population surviving on Lanier Swamp National Park.

Formerly distributed by all the major islands of the Bahamas, but currently extinct, Except in Gran Inagua (spread south, east and north) and Abaco (especially in the southern third). You can visit Little Inagua from Great Inagua.

Mainly in the central and eastern parts of Grand Cayman where habitat loss is less severe. A residual population persists Cayman Brac but it became extinct in little Cayman about 1932.

Mainly resident, but with some seasonal movements, for example in the Isle of youth, where birds possibly (at least once) they moved to the coast from the interior dry non-breeding season.

The decline across the range is due to the habitat destruction and capture of birds Vivas (for use as pets locally and for export).

Poor breeding success Grand Cayman in the seventies it was due to mosquito attacks against the offspring. Birds that nest on the ground in Abaco attacked by wild cats. The hurricanes They can cause shortages of food and nesting sites. It is likely that Bahamas are stable, but generally decreasing. You can not be considered safe in most of its range.

Distribution 4 subspecies:

Conservation:

Conservation status ⓘ


Status
Near Threatened (UICN)ⓘ

Justification of the red list category

The Cuban Parrot It is classified as near threatened because it is suspected to have suffered a reduction in population in Cuba, which has not ceased, mainly due to the capture and destruction of nesting sites.

• Current red list category of the UICN: Near-threatened.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

• Population size : 13600-23000

Justification of the population

Population estimates for Bahamas and Cayman Islands they are as follows: 2.000 in Grand Cayman in 1995 (Bradley 2000), about 450 in Cayman Brac in 2013 (Marsden, 2013), 8.000-13.000 in Great Inagua, 3.000-5.000 in Abaco and around 10 individuals in new Providence (Bahamas National Trust 2016, S. Cant-Woodside in a bit., 2016). It is estimated that the population of Cuba amounts of 7.000 a 14.000 copies based on estimates recorded population density and the fact that it is likely that only a proportion of the estimated extent of occurrence deal. Therefore, the total population It is estimated in 20.460-34.460 individuals, which is equivalent to 13.640-22.973 mature individuals, round here 13.600-23.000 mature individuals.

Justification of trend

It is considered that the species is declining mainly due to the capture and destruction of nesting sites. It is considered that the population of the Bahamas It has remained stable or increased. The population of the Cayman Islands It has increased since the species was protected in 1989 (Bradley 20000). It is believed that the Cuban population It has decreased in recent years, mainly due to the poaching (Canizares 2012, M. Canizares in a bit., 2016). Although there is no data on the extent of this decline, the species has been classified as Vulnerable in Cuba (Canizares 2012). Therefore, It is suspected that the total population has decreased 10-20% over three generations.

Conservation Actions Underway

CITES Appendix 1.

• Protected in Bahamas under the Wild birds Protection Act (Protection).

• Legally protected in the Cayman Islands from 1989.

• The artificial nests a variety of designs are in use in several locations Cuba and they have been used by more than 1.300 birds (Waugh 2006). The facts of artificial materials have proved more durable (Waugh 2006).

• The volunteers counts in the center of Cuba They have been conducted twice a year since 2009 and more than 1.500 local people are involved in the activity.

• For reforestation and forest enrichment important plant species are used for feeding parrots.

Conservation Actions Proposed

• Discourage catch birds of nature through public education campaigns.

• Promote best practices for keeping birds increase the longevity of captive birds and reduce the demand for wild populations.

• In Abaco, protect vital areas of broadleaf forests.

• In Cuba, make and erect more artificial nests.

• To monitor population trends across its range.

Cuban Parrot in captivity:

Currently international trade Cuban Parrot It is legally prohibited; However, at regional level, the illegal traffic This species is one of the most worrying in Cuba.

Each captive specimen of this species which is capable of reproducing, It is placed in a well-run program of captive breeding and not be sold as a pet, in order to ensure its long-term survival.

Alternative names:

bahaman parrot, Caribbean Amazon, Caribbean Parrot, Cuban Amazon, Cuban Parrot, Rose-throated Parrot, White-headed Amazon, White-headed Parrot (English).
Amazone à face rouge, Amazone à tête blanche, Amazone de Cuba (French).
Kubaamazone (German).
Papagaio-de-cuba (Portuguese).
Amazona Cubana, Cotorra (Spanish).

Carl Linnaeus

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Amazona
Scientific name: Amazona leucocephala
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Protonimo: Psittacus leucocephalus

Images Cuban Parrot:


Cuban Parrot (Amazona leucocephala)

Sources:

(1) Avibase
(2) Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
(3) Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
(4) Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Rose-throated Parrot. Amazona leucocephala Long Beach, Zapata N.P. Cuba by gailhampshireFlickr
(2) – A Cuban parrot (amazona leucocephala) in Naturarte Center. santa Clara, Cuba 2011 by lezumbalaberenjenaFlickr
(3) – A Cuban parrot (Amazona leucocephala) Vega de Palma, Camajuaní, Cuba by lezumbalaberenjenaFlickr
(4) – Amazona leucocephala by Ekaterina Chernetsova (Papchinskaya)Flickr
(5) – Amazona leucocephala by Ekaterina Chernetsova (Papchinskaya)Flickr
(6) – Cuban Parrot (Amazona leucocephala) by HeathFlickr
(7) – Cuban Amazon by Eric SavageFlickr
(8) – Two Cuban Amazons in Matanzas, Matanzas Province, Cuba By Laura Gooch (BI110211-174 – Cuban Parrot) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(9) – Cuban Amazon parrot on Grand Cayman Island By Lhb1239 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(10) – Cuban Amazon (also known as the Rose-throated Parrot) at Jungle Island, Miami, USA By Chris Acuna from Miami, USA (Jungle Island-20090823-086) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(11) – A Cuban Amazon in Isla de la Juventud, Cuba. It is in a small round cage on a balcony By Alex Graves (Parrot) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(12) – A Cuban Amazon flying in Matanzas, Matanzas Province, Cuba By Laura Gooch (BI110211-159 – Cuban Parrot) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(13) – Cayman parrot (Amazona leucocephala caymanensis), Grand Cayman By Charlesjsharp (Own work, from Sharp Photography, sharpphotography) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(14) – Parrots in captivity /. London :George Bell and Sons,1884-1887 [i.e. 1883-1888] by Biodiversity Heritage LibraryFlickr

Sounds: Hans Matheve, XC256757. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/256757

Chatham Parakeet
Cyanoramphus forbesi

Chatham Parakeet


Description:

23 cm. length and 95 g. of weight.

The Chatham Parakeet (Cyanoramphus forbesi) They are one of the two medium bright green parrots of Chatham Islands. Although they look very similar to those Yellow-fronted Parakeet (Cyanoramphus auriceps) of New Zealand continental, the color of the crown is not a reliable indicator of taxonomic relationships.

It believes that the Chatham Parakeet descended from an ancient lineage of parrots who reached the Chatham Islands before the division Yellow-fronted Parakeet and Red-fronted Parakeet happened in New Zealand continental, after which the Red-fronted Parakeet (Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae) also they colonized Chatham Islands.

The Chatham Parakeet They are medium-sized parrots, of tail long, with wings wide and rounded and plumage predominantly emerald. have a crown front bright yellow and crimson frontal band that does not reach the eyes, unlike in the Red-fronted Parakeet. Males are larger than the females.

taxonomy:

From 1930 It is commonly treated as a subspecies of Yellow-fronted Parakeet (Cyanoramphus auriceps), and clearly the two are closely related; the species differ, However, in size considerably, It is larger species Cyanoramphus forbesi. Currently considered Monotypic.

Habitat:

The Chatham Parakeet They are at higher densities in forests and dense vegetation regenerating areas than in open grassland. Despite its rather erratic flight, They fly hard and move easily between islas Mangere and little Mangere. Occasionally they have been observed Chatham Parakeet individual in the forests of southern Chatham Island (> 20 km from the Mangere Island) and nearby islands Pitt and owner. Their social behavior is similar to other species of parakeets Cyanoramphus. They are strongly territorial around nests, calling loudly and chasing intruders from nearby.

Reproduction:

The Chatham Parakeet They have a long breeding season, with eggs laid between October and March. Are nesters cavity, preferring tree holes but also using rock crevices and under dense vegetation. The size medium of laying is of 5 eggs. Like all the other parakeets Cyanoramphus, females are responsible for preparing the nest, incubation, breeding and feeding the chicks until 10-14 days old. During this period all their food is provided by your partner. From then on, male and female parrots feed the chicks in the nest until they leave the nest.

The incubation usually begins after the start of the second egg, It is resulting in chicks within a clutch that vary greatly in size and age. Unhatched chickens in the past are often born at a younger age and are less developed than their older siblings. You can try more than one breeding if the initial nest fails or if the food supply permits.

Food:

The foods consumed by Chatham Parakeet They are affected by seasonal availability, and include seeds, flowers and leaves of various plants, It is the most important invertebrates in spring. They feed extensively in soil in open areas.

Distribution and status:

Sw extension of its distribution area (reproduction / resident): 3 km2

The Chatham Parakeet It is restricted to of Tapuaenuku ISLA ISLA Pequeña Mangere and Mangere in the Group of Chatham Islands, New Zealand. In 1930 He quenched in Mangere Island, but in 1973 He had re-colonized and numbered 40 birds and a small number of hybrids with the subspecies Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae chathamensis (of whom had 12 on the island) (Higgins 1999).

In 1996, two estimates indicated that the population of the Mangere Island It was from 50 a 120 Purebred birds. The population on the small island of little Mangere It is little known because the few visits made (H. Aikman a slightly. 1999). In 1999, it was estimated that the total population was about 120 birds (Aikman et al. 2001), but studies 2003 estimated 900 individuals on Isla Mangere (Aikman y Miskelly 2004, D. Houston y C. Miskelly a slightly. 2008).

A recent study estimated that more than 50% of the population of parakeets in Isla Mangere It consisted of individuals hybrid (Chan et al. 2006), but this is expected to decrease due to mating positive range (T. Greene a slightly. 2012); the number of phenotypes Forbes It is approaching the threshold management 10% (D. Houston a slightly. 2012) (namely, the number above which the sacrifice can be resumed as a management tool). There have been birds visiting South isla Chatham, the Pitt island and ISLA ISLA Chief of Sudeste (Taylor 1998, D. Houston y C. Miskelly a slightly. 2008, T. Greene a slightly. 2012).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Vulnerable.

• Population trend: Stable.

• Population size : 250-999 individuals.

Justification of the red list category

This species may still have a small Purebred adult population. Possible removal by hybridization has been avoided thanks to three decades of conservation efforts, which they have seen increasing population size. It is restricted to one place (given the proximity of the small islands that lives and mobility), and its small population size means it still deserves to be included in a threatened category, but it is likely that their population size has been more than 250 mature for more than 5 years, so it has been transferred to the category of Vulnerable.

Justification of the population

The population of phenotypes similar to those of Forbes It has increased dramatically in the Mangere Island, with best estimates place the population between 800 and 1.000 individuals. A survey in 2011 It assessed that the phenotypes of interest are in the 10%, the trigger level for management action (D. Houston a slightly. 2012). It is likely that populations have exceeded 250 mature for more than 5 years, so now it is in the range of 250-999 mature individuals.

Justification trend

The population has shown minor fluctuations in recent years, since the species recolonized the Mangere Island over the years 70 and it has benefited from habitat restoration, while hybridization has also suffered. In general, It is estimated that the population has remained stable during the last ten years, and It is probably increasing (T. Greene a slightly. 2012).

Threats

• the Disappeared Mangere Island due to a combination of deforestation for grazing, decades of burning, the effects of introduced mammals grazing and predation by feral cats (Higgins 1999).

• The biggest threat is the hybridization with the Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae chathamensis, subspecies Red-fronted Parakeet (Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae) What, despite the sacrifice, still it is settling in Mangere Island (J. Kearvell a slightly. 1999).

• It is believed that the rate of hybridization High above is the result of the then low population sizes of the two species (D. Houston y C. Miskelly a slightly. 2008).

• levels hybridization They have remained below 10% of the total population of parakeets Mangere Island over the past decade, so no management intervention was not necessary.

Conservation Actions Underway

Appendix I and II of CITES. The Mangere Island It has been substantially replanted (Aikman et al. 2001, D. Houston y C. Miskelly a slightly. 2008).

• An environmental and genetic research has investigated the population dynamics, the hybridization and selection of partners (H. Aikman a slightly. 1999, Chan et al. 2006).

• During 1976-1999, hybrid birds and individuals of the subspecies Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae chathamensis They were sacrificed population (Nixon 1994).

• In 1998, 40 hybrid And six Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae chathamensis were killed, leaving 10 copies between hybrid and Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae chathamensis after the operation (H. Aikman a slightly. 1999).

• surveys the relative proportion of hybrid regarding type phenotypes Forbes They are held every two years (D. Houston a slightly. 2012).

• The translocation a fenced area predator proof in Chatham Island It is planned for 2017 (D. Houston a slightly. 2012).

Conservation Actions Proposed

• Complete investigation ecological, biological and genetic, including analysis and dissemination of results.

Monitor trends in the extent and quality of forest habitats on the island of Mangere.

Restore forest habitats Mangere Island to increase the number and reduce hybridization.

• To work for the establishment of one or more populations in Chatham Island (H. Aikman a slightly. 1999).

Chatham parakeet in captivity:

There are no data from Chatham Parakeet in captivity.

In nature, its lonjevidad is probably similar to that of Yellow-fronted Parakeet (Cyanoramphus auriceps): 10 years.

Alternative names:

Chatham Island Yellow-crowned Parakeet, Chatham Islands Parakeet, Chatham Parakeet, Forbes’s Parakeet (English).
Kakariki de Forbes, Kakariki des îles Chatham, Perruche des Chatham, Perruche des îles Chatham (French).
Chathamsittich (German).
Periquito-de-peito-amarelo-da-Ilha-chatham (Portuguese).
Perico de las Chatham (Spanish).

Lionel Walter Rothschild
Lionel Walter Rothschild

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Cyanoramphus
Scientific name: Cyanoramphus forbesi
Citation: Rothschild, 1893
Protonimo: Cyanorhamphus [sic] Forbes

Images of the Chatham Parakeet:

Perico-de-las-Chatham


Sources:

Avibase
• Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
• Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
• Greene, T.C. 2013 [updated 2017]. Forbes’ parakeet. In Miskelly, C.M. (ed.) New Zealand Birds Online. www.nzbirdsonline.org.nz

Photos:

(1) – Chatham Islands Parakeet on Mangere Island by Markanderson72 [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Andrew Sutherland, IBC1065693. Photo of Chatham Parakeet Cyanoramphus forbesi at Chatham Islands, New Zealand. Accessible at hbw.com/ibc/1065693.

Crimson Shining-Parrot
Prosopeia splendens

Crimson Shining-Parrot

Description:

42 cm. length and 280 g. of weight.

The Crimson Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia splendens) is very similar to the Red Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia tabuensis). has the head and underparts red intense and bright, slightly darker in ears; broad collar rear violet-blue, which becomes turquoise toward the trailing edge. The rest of upperparts bright pale green with darker edges and fine bright in back and wings. Coverts medium green, greater coverts blue green; primary coverts and primaries deep blue-violet with black on innerwebs; secondaries blue to green in the innermost feathers. Underwing-coverts marked blue-green and red; axillary pale green. Uppertail green with blue tip, violet blue with side feathers innerwebs blackish; undertail black. Bill black; irises red-orange; legs black.

The male has the bill and head larger

taxonomy:

Consanguíneo generally considered the Prosopeia Tabuensis, but may be closer Prosopeia Personata. Monotypic.

  • Escarlata sound Papagayo.

Habitat:

It is found in forests, farmland and villages, both in the lowlands and hills.

Reproduction:

Food, habits and reproductive behavior presumably similar to those of the Red Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia tabuensis) With which, until very recently, consanguíneo he considered.

Food:

Similar al al Red Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia tabuensis).

Distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 910 km2

It is endemic Fiji, where it is found naturally in islas de Kadavu (including around Vunisea) and Ono. It has also been introduced in Viti Levu and probably in the Group Yasawa and Ovalau in the past (There are no recent records).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Vulnerable
• Population trend: decreasing.

The species may be declining in Viti Levu due to trade, although at present the possible negative effects of competition are not known with Masked Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia personata). It is estimated that the world population It is between 5.000 and 10.000 specimens. NEAR THREATENED.

Justification of the population

Although recent fieldwork on Kadavu it not specifically focused on this species, seems to occur in population densities similar to those of Masked Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia personata) (86 Crimson Shining-Parrot They were recorded in Kadavu 38 standardized observation times in the two studies BirdLife, similar to the average 1,9 of the Masked Shining-Parrot /time recorded in 18 sites across the Viti Levu). The Masked Shining-Parrot It was estimated at around 29 in native lowland forest birds / km2 (Jackson y Jit 2004). The area of ​​dense forest and medium density Kadavu it's around of 225 km2 (National Forest Inventory 1991-1993), so a reasonable estimate of the population Crimson Shining-Parrot would be 6.000 birds or 4.000 mature individuals.

Conservation Actions Underway

Appendix II of the CITES. It is protected by law in Fiji, which has recently been revised, the old Law Poultry and game has been partly overtaken by the Law on Protection of Endangered Species, which provides protection (SPREP 2000, D. Watling a slightly. 2007). Conservation projects have reduced the trade in this species (Jackson y Jit 2004). Four communities have declared a protected area covering community 1.535 hectares of forest and local volunteers monitor bird populations and evaluate habitat status on its own initiative (V. Masibalavu a slightly. 2007). Conservation actions aimed at fire prevention (including awareness following the amendment of the decree concerning arson) They have improved in recent years (V. Masibalavu in litt. 2012, M. Tabudravu in little. 2012).

Conservation Actions Proposed

Establish standards for maintenance of parrots in captivity to reduce demand (SPREP 2000). Monitor the numbers caught and transported to Suva. Determining population densities in various habitats. Investigate the needs and breeding success. Promote the creation of community forest reserves. Use as set species to promote ecotourism in Kadavu.

Scarlet macaw in captivity:

Captive numbers are unknown, and everything indicates that captive breeding has rarely been achieved. It is caught in small quantities, and islanders returning to the capital, Suva (Watling 2000), the birds are carried as a gift, and there is at least some illegal trade abroad (J. S. Kretzschmar a lie. 2000).

In the nineteenth century it was imported by zoos in London, Berlin and Hamburg. In the United States, He kept San Diego Zoo, which was partially successful with the offspring when a young man born in 1973,

As they are at serious risk of extinction, only the most experienced should try to keep them in their aviaries, and all bred in captivity should be better placed in breeding programs to establish a larger population and participate in the conservation of this species of bird.

Alternative names:

Crimson Shining Parrot, Crimson Shining-Parrot, Kadavu Shining Parrot, Kandavu Shining Parrot, Kandavu Shining-Parrot (inglés).
Perruche écarlate, Perruche masquée écarlate (francés).
Fidschi Sittich, Fidschisittich (alemán).
Papagayo Escarlata (portugués).
Papagayo Escarlata, Papgayo Escarlata (español).

Peale, Titian Ramsay

Clasificación científica:

Orden: Psittaciformes
Familia: Psittaculidae
Género: Prosopeia
Nombre científico: Prosopeia splendens
Citación: (Peale, 1848)
Protónimo: Platycercus splendens

Imágenes Papagayo Escarlata:


Fuentes:

Avibase
• Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
• Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Par
Birdlife

Fotos:

(1) – Auckland Museum [CC BY 4.0]

Cuban Macaw †
Ara tricolor

Cuban Macaw


Description of Cuban Macaw:

Cuban Macaw

The Cuban Macaw (Ara tricolor) ave a great era, He is having a length between 45 and 50 centimeters, the forecrown It was red and orange and yellow the nape.

Around the eyes He had white areas devoid of feathers. Face, abdomen, chest and the thighs They were also orange and legs and the tip of the bill brown. The upper portion was a brownish red with festooned with feathers in green, while feathers below tail, on top of this and the lower back region they were blue. Also this color combined with purplish red wings were.

The external appearance of both male and the female It was the same. As for the flight, as it described, takeoff opened and displayed in its entirety the splendid tail in a truly magnificent spectacle.

Habitat:

Little is known about the habits Cuban Macaw. Local people reported the Cuban naturalist, born in Germany, Juan Gundlach (1876) What anidaba holes in palm trees and lived in couples and family groups. He said he had a strong similar to that of the macaws in Central vocalization (Gundlach 1893).

apparently small populations bred in scattered locations.

Reproduction:

Little is known about the reproduction of this species, unless they are nesting in holes palm trees and lived in couples and family groups.

Food:

They ate fruits, Palmas, tree seeds cinnamon (Meliá azedarach), tender shoots and buds (Wiley & Kirwan 2013).

Olson & Suarez (2008) skull suggest that the tablet back-ventral, in other macaw is an adaptation for a strong muscle attachment, is an indication that this species feeds on palm nuts extremely hard shell, and distribution of birds may have been closely related to the availability of this food source.

Distribution:

Distributed in the past by the island of Cuba, and probably the Isle of youth. It is said that there were many people in the Cienaga de Zapata to the South of Matanzas. There is no evidence of the historical existence of this guacamayo or another Hispaniola, where it has hinted at the existence of this species (although possibly they were observed on that island, the latest registered individuals 1820.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Extinct.

• Population trend: extinguished.

Justification of the Red List Category

This species is known at the island of Cuba, but hunting led to its population to extinction. The latest reports of the species dating 1885.

Its extinction was caused by his hunting as food and the Deforestation for nesting capture young birds and their use as pet (Forshaw and Cooper 1989).

It said the last known specimen that existed was killed in La Vega, about the Cienaga de Zapata in 1864. Then testimonies of sightings occurred up 1885 which were not confirmed.

† Cuban macaw in captivity:

It is believed that the Cuban Macaw It was quite common in Cuba. First he began to increase his capture in order to give them to the Kings of Spain. As the nineteenth century progressed increased human population and this not only cut down the trees and forests deforested, but also he hunted the bird as Food- despite concerns that his meat tasted bad- ransacked their nests to take pets young birds. Thus they were eliminating their habitats, until he ended up becoming extinct.

Alternative names:

Cuban Macaw, Hispaniolan Macaw, Hispaniolan or Cuban Macaw, Hispaniolan, Cuban or Jamaican Macaw (English).
Ara d’Hispaniola, Ara tricolore, Ara tricolore ou A. de Cuba, Ara tricolore, A. de Cuba ou A. de Gosse (French).
Dreifarbenara (German).
arara-vermelha-de-cuba (Portuguese).
Guacamayo cubano (Spanish).

Johann Matthäus Bechstein
Johann Matthäus Bechstein

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: ARA
Scientific name: Ara tricolor
Citation: (Bechstein, 1811)
Protonimo: Ara tricolor

Cuban Macaw pictures:


Cuban Macaw † (Ara tricolor)

Sources:

Avibase
• Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
• Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
cubaconecta

Photos:

(1) – Ara tricolor, recreación digital By Digitally treated by Rod6807 from the original image of Peter. [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Cuban Macaw. Eleven-Thirteenths Natural Size—from specimen in Liverpool Museum By John Gerrard Keulemans (1842 – 1912) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Now tricolor Bechstein, 1811 by Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Now tricolor Bechstein, 1811 Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis Biodiversity Center [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Ara tricolor By Bechstein, 1811 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Watercolour by Jacques Barraband (circa 1800) of a Cuban Red Macaw (Ara tricolor) by Jacques Barraband [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Carolina Parakeet †
Conuropsis carolinensis

Carolina Parakeet


Description:

32 a 34 cm. length and 280 g. of weight.

Carolina Parakeet

Male and female adults of Carolina Parakeet (Conuropsis carolinensis) They were identical in plumage, however males were slightly larger than females.

Most plumage It was green with underparts light green. The primary feathers They were mainly green, but with yellow edges in outer primary. The shoulders They were yellow, continuing along the outer edge of the wings. The the thighs They were green and yellow up to the feet. The legs and feet They were light brown. The most distinctive feature of this species was the forecrown and face orange. The feathers Orange extended to behind eyes and upper cheeks (lores). The skin around the eyes It was white and bill They were pale flesh color. The plumage of the head It was completely bright.

The immature They differed slightly in coloration of adults. The face and all body They were green, with underparts paler. Lacked yellow plumage or orange in face, wings and thighs. Hatchlings were covered with gray mouse-gray, up to approximately 39-40 the days when they appear wings and queues green. The chicks They had full adult plumage around 1 año de edad.

Subspecies description:

  • Conuropsis carolinensis carolinensis †

    (Linnaeus, 1758) – Nominal.

  • Conuropsis carolinensis ludoviciana †

    (Gmelin, 1788) –

Habitat:

The habitats Preferred of Carolina Parakeet lands were overgrown and heavily forested swamps and rivers bordering. These parrots also lived in farmland and crops were eaten. Anidaban in large groups of hollow shafts. Prefierían forests sicomoro and swamp cypress. (” Parakeets”, 2000; Fuller, 2001; Mauler, 2001; Snyder and Russell, 2002)

They were traveling in flocks of 100 a 1000 birds. Anidaban up 30 birds in a nest. It was assumed that they were Monogamie. It was about very social birds, it was probably one of the many factors that led to their extinction. When a man shot a bird, fellow herd member flitted over his lost flock, making them vulnerable too. Farmers were shooting all flock to save their crops. It is doubtful that the Carolina Parakeet migrated, as it is seen in the northern states during the cold winters. They were attracted by the salt and pacifiers were observed ingesting salt water, earth and sand.

The Carolina Parakeet They are walking, They are jumping and climbing trees using their beaks as a third leg. Its flight was registered as a fast and elegant, but very noisy as birds rarely stayed silent during flight. Were involved in cleaning and grooming to keep their social cohesion. During the day they rested, They slept or sunned. They fed in the morning and evening. (“Parakeets”, 2000;”Nature Serve, Conuropsis carolinensis”, 2005; Howell, 1932; Rising, 2004; Snyder and Russell, 2002; Strattersfield y Capper, 2000)

Reproduction:

Some sources say that Carolina Parakeet they were Monogamie, having only one partner for life. However, no studies were conducted on mating systems and many birds apparently shared nests. (Laycock, Audobon Magazine, March of 1969; Snyder and Russell, 2002)

There is little information available upon the reproduction of this species. They reproduced in spring, producing 2 a 5 eggs These perpetual Nidada, which then incubaban during 23 days. (Snyder and Russell, 2002; Snyder and Russell, 2002)

Food:

The Carolina Parakeet they ate mainly seeds of genre Xanthium. Also consumed the fruits and seeds many other plants, as well as flower buds and, occasionally, insects. They were recorded as ruin of many fruit crops. They rip off the immature fruit of the tree and ate seeds. Flocks could ruin the fruit of a tree in minutes. when they ate, the Carolina Parakeet They are taking food with their beaks, They placed them in their claws and held while using its beak to eat. (Greenway, JR. 1967; Howell, 1932; Snyder and Russell, 2002; Strattersfield y Capper, 2000; Greenway, JR. 1967; Howell, 1932; Snyder and Russell, 2002; Strattersfield y Capper, 2000)

Distribution:

the former Conuropsis carolinensis It was found from southern Florida until North Carolina and in coastal areas as far north as New York City. The Carolina Parakeet he was in the states Gulf as far west as Texas East and north along the rivers Arkansas, Missouri, Mississippi and Ohio and its tributaries. They were also recorded in South Dakota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio and W.V.. The westernmost appearances were in eastern Colorado. (” Nature Serve, Conuropsis carolinensis”, 2005; Fuller, 2001; Laycock, Audobon Magazine, March of 1969; Snyder and Russell, 2002)

Distribution of subspecies:

  • Conuropsis carolinensis carolinensis †

    (Linnaeus, 1758) – Nominal.

  • Conuropsis carolinensis ludoviciana †

    (Gmelin, 1788) – Paler overall than the nominal.

Conservation:

This species was previously in the southeastern United States, but now it is EXTINCT, primarily as a result of persecution. Records are the last wild subspecies Conuropsis carolinensis ludoviciana in 1910.

The main causes of extinction of the species were the persecution (for feeding, crop protection, poultry production and trade of hats for ladies), and also deforestation (especially lowland), probably aggravated by his gregarious nature (Saikku 1991), and competition with introduced bees (McKinley 1960).

Carolina Parakeet † captive:

One of the reasons for his extinction He was hunting birds released before attempting to breeding to sell as pets, possibly because it was more profitable and it was difficult to grow up in captivity. They could live up 30 years in captivity.

Alternative names:

Carolina Conure, Carolina Parakeet, Carolina Paroquet, Louisiana Parakeet (English).
Conure de Caroline, Perriche à tête jaune, Perruche à tête jaune, Perruche de la Caroline du Sud (French).
Carolinasittich, Karolinasittich (German).
Periquito-da-carolina (Portuguese).
Cotorra de Carolina (Spanish).

Carlos-Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: conuropsis
Scientific name: Conuropsis carolinensis
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Protonimo: Psittacus carolinensis

Carolina Parakeet Images:

————————————————————————————————

Carolina Parakeet (Conuropsis carolinensis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
Animal Diversity Web

Photos:

(1) – axidermied Carolina Parakeet. Teaching and research collections, Laval University Library By Cephas (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Conuropsis carolinensis (Linnaeus, 1758) – the extinct Carolina parakeet (mount, public display, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, Illinois, USA). By James St. John (Conuropsis carolinensis (Carolina parakeet) 2) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Mounted specimen of Conuropsis carolinensis, Museum Wiesbaden, Germany By Fritz Geller-Grimm (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Taxodermic bird specimen in the Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, Vermont, USA. By Daderot (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Conuropsis carolinensis Linnaeus, 1758 by Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Carolina Parakeet (Conuropsis carolinensis) by Biodiversity Heritage LibraryFlickr

Cactus Parakeet
Eupsittula cactorum

Cactus Parakeet

Description:

Anatomy-parrots-eng
25 cm.. length and 75-90 g. of weight.

The Cactus Parakeet (Eupsittula cactorum) has the forecrown, lores lower cheeks and brown off; crown with slaty tinge; sides neck, the nape and upperparts up to the rump grass-green.

The primary coverts They are bluish green in the outerweb, the remaining are green grass. Flight feather (above) green on innerwebs, blue green on outerweb, blue black at the tips (below) gray. Underwing-coverts greenish yellow. Throat and upper breast dull brown; lower breast and belly fairly bright orange-yellow, the thighs and vent greenish-yellow color. Uppertail green, four distal blue central feathers; undertail gray.

Cactus Parakeet

Upper mandible horn, greyish at base and on lower mandible; perioftálmico patch naked white; irises brown-orange; gray-gray legs.

Both sexes similar. Immature paler than adult, with crown green, more olive upper chest and throat, and the irises darker.

  • Sound of the Cactus Parakeet.

Subspecies description:

  • Eupsittula cactorum cactorum

    (Kuhl, 1820) – Nominal.

  • Eupsittula cactorum caixana

    (Spix, 1824) – Generally paler than nominal, with belly yellow instead of orange.

Habitat:

Video Cactus Parakeet

Parrots in the world

Especies del género Eupsittula

  • Eupsittula nana
    • —- Eupsittula nana astec
    • —- Eupsittula nana nana
    • —- Eupsittula nana vicinalis
  • Eupsittula canicularis
    • —- Eupsittula canicularis canicularis
    • —- Eupsittula canicularis clarae
    • —- Eupsittula canicularis eburnirostrum
  • Eupsittula aurea
  • Eupsittula pertinax
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax aeruginosa
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax arubensis
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax chrysogenys
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax chrysophrys
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax griseipecta
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax lehmanni
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax margaritensis
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax ocularis
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax paraensis
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax pertinax
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax surinama
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax tortugensis
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax venezuelae
    • —- Eupsittula pertinax xanthogenia
  • Eupsittula cactorum
    • —- Eupsittula cactorum cactorum
    • —- Eupsittula cactorum caixana

Its distribution area closely matches the dried vegetation and prickly caatinga Northeast Brazil, but it encompasses higher drier semi-desert areas created by overgrazing and dry forests (caatinga arborea) and seasonal savannah lusher (closed). Usually in pairs or (mainly outside the breeding season) flocks of up to 20 birds, most abundant where food is abundant (as rice crops).

Reproduction:

Crianza undocumented released. Clutch six eggs in captivity.

Food:

The diet includes seeds, fruits (including cactus), berries, dried fruits, flowers and cocoons, taken both trees and shrubs and soil. Sometimes it attacks crops (for example rice, grapes and corn).

Distribution and status:

Population expansion (breeding / resident): 1.220.000 km2

Distributed by the interior Northeast Brazil. The Cactus Parakeet extending from the drier parts of Bay and adjacent northeast Minas Gerais, Brazil north through Piauí and Southeast of Maranhão, up to Pernambuco and Paraíba, passing by Rio Grande do Norte and Ceará. Absent in coastal areas: a record of Belém at the mouth of Amazon in For It seems wrong or possibly refers to a leak.

It is usually common (the most common parrot in some locations) with a stable population, although the decline is inevitable in some areas due to massive loss of habitat by agriculture and plantations of exotic trees. Continuing degradation and conversion caatinga by grazing and cultivation they represent a long-term threat. Present in the Serra da Capivara National Park. Any Local persecution due to predation crop. Atrapada to trade small numbers in captivity.

Distribution of subspecies:

Conservation:

Conservation status ⓘ

Status
Least Concern ⓘ (UICN)ⓘ

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

• Population size : Unknown.

Justification of the red list category

The trend population seems to be stable and, therefore, the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population trend (> 30% decrease in ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 mature individuals with an estimated> 10% continuous decline in ten years or three generations, or specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification of the population

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common(Stotz et to the. (1996).

Justification trend

It is suspected that the population is stable the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threat.

Threats

Local persecution because of the invasion of crops. This species is also trapped for pet bird trade.

Cactus Parakeet in captivity:

Young birds are removed from their nest before they can fly, and then sold, for example, at the fair in inner cities.
These birds can become very tame, and it is not rare to see a Cactus Parakeet living “on freedom” in the owner's house, as a member of the family so to speak. It however is seeing a rare bird in captivity outside their range. Not as common as other species more familiar aratinga. In addition, usually they reach very high prices.

The illegal trade It has greatly reduced the population of these Aratingas in nature, and threatens the survival of the species in many areas. Habitat destruction appears to be a minor problem.

For more information – Loro Parque

Alternative names:

Caatinga Conure, Caatinga Parakeet, Cactus Conure, Cactus Parakeet (English).
Conure des cactus, Perriche des cactus, Perruche des cactus (French).
Kaktussittich (German).
Aratinga-vaqueira, giguilim, Jandaia-gangarra, merequém, periquito-da-caatinga, periquito-gangarra (Portuguese).
Aratinga Cactácea, Aratinga de los cactos, Periquito de los Cardones (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Kuhl, Heinrich
Heinrich Kuhl

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Eupsittula
Scientific name: Eupsittula cactorum
Citation: (Kuhl, 1820)
Protonimo: Psittacus cactorum

Images Cactus Parakeet:


Cactus Parakeet (Eupsittula cactorum)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife

  • Photos:

(1) – The pet Caatinga Parakeet in Riachão do Jacuípe, Baiano northeast, Brazil By Paulo Marcos from Painted-BA, Brazil (Periquito MartinsUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Caatinga Parakeet (also known as Cactus Parakeet) in Brazil By Phillipe (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Eupsittula cactorum – Conura cactus – Cactus conure – conure cactus by Florin FeneruFlickr
(4) – Parakeet CAATINGA (Eupsittula cactorum) by Cantosdanatureza WITH
(5) – Parakeet cactuses - aratinga cactácea by Animal Encyclopedia 2
(6) – Cactus parakeet – conographie parrots :.Paris :P. Bertrand,1857.. biodiversitylibrary.org/page/47804387

Cliff Parakeet
Myiopsitta luchsi

Cliff Parakeet

Description:

26-28 cm.. length and a weight between 120 and 140 g..

Cliff Parakeet

The Cliff Parakeet (Myiopsitta luchsi) It has a medium size and is mainly green; the front of the crown, lower face and the chest, They are whitish, becoming bright yellow on the lower chest and the belly; the primaries and tail (medium-sized long), They are bright metallic blue.

Similar Monk Parakeet has less extensive white color crown, pale yellow instead of bright yellow in the belly and the pale gray chest It has a scaling effect that give centers feathers dark.

Bill color horn.

The immature They are similar to adults but with forecrown gray tinged with green.

  • Sound of the Cliff Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Cotorra Boliviana.mp3]

Taxonomic note:

      This species was described in 1868 by Finsch as Bolborhynchus luchsi, with specimens from Bolivia. Later, the species was transferred to the genus Myiopsitta and the name Myiopsitta luchsi It was used apparently to 1918 by Cory. From 1943, Bond & de Schauensee and they treat it as a subspecies of monachus (Myiopsitta monachus luchsi), approach that has been followed by all modern authors, but Necklace (1997) finally he considers that the morphological characters and their way of nesting are sufficient to raise again species level.

Habitat:

It shares the same habitat with another endemic parrot, the Red-fronted Macaw (Ara rubrogenys), although both species do not compete because they feed on different plants.

They found in dry woodland or open fields including fields with trees Gallery forests, isolated groups of trees, Palm trees, forests, savannah and scrubland thorny cactus. It is also found in cultivated areas. Visitors from some urban areas. Until 3000 m.

Reproduction:

The breeding season It is between December and March in crevices in cliffs, constructing a bulky nest branches. Unlike Monk Parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus), the Cliff Parakeet not commonly nests, but often nests are placed immediately adjacent to each other. The female is in charge of making this nest, and their maintenance.
Couples are for life. The laying is of 5 a 8 eggs per clutch, and incubation lasts a few 26 days. At six weeks old chicks can now leave their nest.

Food:

It feeds on seeds of various fruits, including those of fruits cactus Neocardenasia herzogiana and seeds of the Acacia furcatispina; It is also known to feed on corn grown.

Distribution:

Size of its range (breeding/resident): 148.000 km2

Restricted to xerophytic vegetation, near cliffs in intermountain valleys of eastern Andes of Bolivia, from the southeast of Peace, South of Cochabamba and West Santa Cruz, to the North of Chuquisaca and possibly other areas.

Its range is very similar to the Red-fronted Macaw (Ara rubrogenys).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Unknown.

Justification of the population

The size of the population has not been estimated, but the species has been described as “quite common” (pit et to the., 1997) and “possibly quite rare” (Juniper and Parr 1998).

Justification of trend

The population trend is difficult to determine due to uncertainty about the extent and severity of threats to the species.
However, like many parrots, They face the traffic of wildlife and wild captivity. Also they suffer direct and immediate consequences of the destruction of their habitat by deforestation and the advance of the agricultural frontier.

Conservation Actions Underway

The species is listed in Appendix II of the CITES.

Cotorra Boliviana in captivity:

Fairly common. Very sociable, but shy with humans.
It is able to vocalize or imitate words, although this quality is far from possessing the capabilities of some genera of the same family.

Alternative names:

Cliff Parakeet, Bolivean monk parakeet, monk parakeet, Monk Parakeet (Cliff) (English).
Perriche des falaises, Conure de Luchs, Conure des falaises, Conure des rochers (French).
Luchssittich, Bolivien Mönchsittich, Bolivien-Mönchsittich (German).
Cliff Parakeet (Portuguese).
Cotorra Boliviana (Spanish).

Friedrich Hermann Otto Finsch
Friedrich Hermann Otto Finsch

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Myiopsitta
Scientific name: Myiopsitta luchsi
Citation: (Finsch, 1868)
Protonimo: Luchs Bolborrhynchus

Images Cliff Parakeet:

————————————————————————————————

Cliff Parakeet (Myiopsitta luchsi)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
FAUNA – Psittacidae

Photos:

(1) – Bolivian Parrot, Bolivia, Sud Chichas, Churquipampa by giorgetta.ch
(2) – Bolivian Parrot, Bolivia, Sud Chichas, Cerro Elefante by giorgetta.ch
(3) – Bolivian Parrot, Bolivia, Sud Chichas, Churquipampa by giorgetta.ch
(4) – A couple of Bolivian parrots in their nest located in the chalky wall of Churquipampa where its waters fall almost freely 330 meters to the creek. The female is arranging the main entrance of the nest while the male takes delight in watching her work by giorgetta.ch
(5) – Bolivian Parrot, Bolivia, Sud Chichas, Churquipampa by giorgetta.ch
(6) – Myopsittacus luchsi = Myiopsitta (monachus) luchsi, Cliff Parakeet, sometimes treated as a subspecies of the Monk Parakeet by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Andrew Spencer (Xeno-canto)

Crimson-bellied Parakeet
Pyrrhura perlata

Crimson-bellied Parakeet

Description:

24-25 cm. of length and weight 85-94 g

Crimson-bellied Parakeet

The Crimson-bellied Parakeet (Pyrrhura perlata) has the lores and cheeks of color yellowish-olive with dye Brown; The forecrown, the crown and back neck Dark Slate with velvety probes, giving a mottled appearance, especially in parts where increases the blue at the bases of the feathers.

The upper mantle is blue; robe bottom up to the uppertail-coverts green. Scapulars green at the base, blue down; the lesser wing coverts, olive green; the medium-sized and large coverts, with a predominance of the color blue. The flight feather, blue top, secondaries with green in the outerweb; slate grey dark below.

Underwing-coverts bright red. Sides of the neck, the throat and the top of the chest, with a predominance of brown color, with some brands blue and tips velvety, giving a scaly appearance; The under chest and most of the belly bright crimson; Flanks, the thighs and undertail-coverts, Blue with greenish tint. Upper, the tail, with predominance of color Brown, shades of green and some blue feathers; below, the tail, dark gray.

The bill brown-black color; eye ring whitish grey; Iris dark brown; legs black slate.

Both sexes similar.

Immature lack of the colour Crimson shining on them underparts; Sometimes with dark margins in the scapulars.

The Pyrrhura perlata was formerly known as Pyrrhura rhodogaster.

  • Sound of the Crimson-bellied Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Crimson-bellied Conure.mp3]

Habitat:

They usually inhabit humid forest from the Mainland, clear forest, secondary and probably drier formations in the North of Mato Grosso and have been registered also dominated by fig trees in eastern forests of Bolivia.

Usually views in small flocks and, sometimes in mixed groups with the Golden-winged Parakeet and Painted Parakeet. Larger family groups have been reported previously. Often they had been down to rivers and streams to bathe and drink.

Reproduction:

With reproduce between August and November, probably in April and June, They nest in tree cavities. Incubation period: 24-25 days.

The put in captivity is of 3-9 eggs, being 5 the average.

Food:

Reported foods include catkins Cecropia, small fruits of Trema micrantha, fruits of the ficus, Eugenia and Zanthoxylum, and flowers of Bertholletia excelsa and Dioclea glabra.

Distribution:

Can be found in Brazil, in the area of the great South-Central Amazon basin, in West For and in the western area of Amazon, in the basins of the rivers Madeira and South of the Tapajós, to the extreme north of Mato Grosso, Rivers Roosevelt and Aripuanã.

Observed in adjacent parts of Bolivia and probably widely distributed East of the river Mamoré in Beni and Santa Cruz.

In general common, but perhaps decreasing due to the loss of forests in some parts of its area of distribution (for example, along the river JI-Paraná in Rondônia, Brazil).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Vulnerable

• Population trend: Stable

Justification of the population:

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend:

It is suspected that this species has lost 23-30.3% of habitat within its distribution area for three generations (18 years), based on a model of Amazon deforestation (Soares-Filho et to the., 2006, Bird et to the., 2011). Given the susceptibility of species the hunting and capture, they suspected that the population of Crimson-bellied Parakeet decrease by ≥ 30% during three generations.

Cotorra Ventrirroja in captivity:

It is not very common in captivity. Its diet idónea sería a base de frutas tales como: Apples, Pears, oranges, bananas, grenades, cactus fruits , which form the 30 percent of their food, vegetables, such as: carrots, celery, Green beans, pea in the pod, fresh corn, green leaves, such as: Chard, lettuce, Dandelion, chickweed, healer, millet; a mixture of seeds as such: Canary Islands, small amounts of wheat and millet, oats, safflower and hemp, Sunflower, cooked beans and vegetables and cooked corn.

Es una ave muy playful a la que le encanta bañarse, so it would have to provide toys and a bowl shallow water.
Moderate voice, but when are they excited can be somewhat noisy. It is not aggressive with other species.
Price per couple: 500-600 EUR

Alternative names:

Crimson-bellied Parakeet, Crimson bellied Parakeet, Crimson-bellied Conure, Pearly Conure, Pearly Parakeet, Rose-bellied Conure, Rose-breasted Conure, Rose-breasted Parakeet (English).
Conure à ventre rouge, Conure perlée, Perriche à ventre rouge, Perruche à poitrine cramoise, Perruche à ventre rouge (French).
Rotbauchsittich, Blausteißsittich, Blausteiss-Sittich, Rotbauch-Sittich (German).
Tiriba-de-barriga-vermelha (Portuguese).
Catita cola granate, Cotorra Ventirroja, Cotorra Ventrirroja, Perico de Pecho Rojo, Perico Perla (Spanish).
Catita cola granate (Paraguay).

Johann Baptist von Spix
Johann Baptist von Spix

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrrhura
Scientific name: Pyrrhura perlata
Citation: (von Spix, 1824)
Protonimo: Aratinga reported

Crimson-bellied Parakeet images:

————————————————————————————————

Crimson-bellied Parakeet (Pyrrhura perlata)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Crimson-bellied Parakeet (Pyrrhura perlata) also called the Crimson-Bellied Conure By derivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)Juan_Caparrós_cabeza. JPG: Juan Caparrós [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – A Crimson-bellied Parakeet (also known as the Crimson-bellied Conure) captive by Pyrrhura_perlata_-captive-8a.jpg: Nori Almeidaderivative work: Snowmanradio [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Crimson-bellied Conure in the Walsrode Bird Park, Germany By Quartl (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Cotorra ventrirroja by pixabay
(5) – Pyrrhura perlata by Florin FeneruFlickr
(6) – Conurus rhodogaster=Pyrrhura perlata by Joseph Wolf [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Xeno-canto

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