Yellow-faced Parrot
Alipiopsitta xanthops

Yellow-faced Parrot

Content

Description

Yellow-faced Parrot

26 - 27 cm.. tall and about 260g. weight.

The Yellow-faced Parrot (Alipiopsitta xanthops) It is distinguished by the large area of ​​yellow in the head, with green tint nape; orange to the sides of body and upper base of the tail; collar yellowish green, belly almost all yellow, the thighs and green inner core tail green; the back it is usually green with yellow tints.

blackish brown with yellow edges; iris yellow .

The youth less yellow in body.


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Habitat:

It inhabits in dry forests, also called deciduous forests, in lowlands, with the presence of palmas Mauritia, Although they prefer water courses.
They can be seen in pairs or flocks of up 50 specimens.

Reproduction:

Conservation status ⓘ


Status Near Threatened (UICN)ⓘ

Video "Yellow-faced Parrot"

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Amazona

Although little information regarding this is available, it is known that nest in the hollows of the highest trees closed; the laying usually three eggs and the incubation period is 23-24 days.

Food:

It's a species of which there are few studies of their natural habitat. Its main food It consists mainly of fruits and seeds. Very fond of mangoes, usually visit their trees full of fruit.

Distribution:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 2.700.000 km2

Inside of Brazil and adjacent area to the east of Bolivia and Horqueta, in the East of Paraguay.

Conservation Alipiopsitta xanthops:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Near-threatened.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

In 1993 two thirds of the Cerrado, This species inhabited, It had been moderate or severely altered by agriculture, heavy livestock, invasive grasses, the use of pesticides and annual burning.

Conservation Actions Proposed:

• Collate sample data and recent records to provide an improved assessment of the distribution and status.

• Estimate the total wild population (Bianchi 2009).

• Assess the impact of habitat loss (Snyder et to the . 2000).

• Create a network of large reserves in Bahia, Maranhão and Piauí.

Yellow-faced Parrot in captivity:

Bird rare in the world of poultry farming.

Active, curious and playful. Aggressive with other parrots. They can become very noisy. Prone to obesity

Its reproduction rarely been achieved in captivity. The basic requirement would be to isolate a compatible couple during the breeding season due to increased aggression towards other birds during this period; also require spacious accommodations and a nest box of 25 x 25 x 60 cm. . with input from 8 cm in diameter.

They tend to be aggressive toward their caregivers. The breeding season begins in early May. The implementation is of 2 - 4 eggs, which are incubated during 26 days. The young leave the nest when they are near the 8 weeks of age.

Alternative names:

Yellow faced Parrot, Yellow-crowned Amazon, Yellow-crowned Parrot, Yellow-faced Amazon (English).
Amazone à face jaune (French).
Goldbauchamazone, Schoapapagei (German).
Papagaio-galego, chorão, curau, papagaio-acurau, papagaio-curraleiro, papagaio-de-barriga-amarela (Portuguese).
Amazona Chica, Amazona del Cerrado, Loro cara amarilla, Lora chica (Spanish).


Scientific classification Alipiopsitta xanthops:

Johann Baptist von Spix

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Alipiopsitta
Scientific name: Alipiopsitta xanthops
Citation: (von Spix, 1824)
Protonimo: Psittacus xanthops


Images Yellow-faced Parrot:



Sources:

  • Book parrots, Parrots and macaws Neotropical
  • Avibase
  • parrots.org
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Yellow-faced parrot (Alipiopsitta xanthops) green morph, the Pantanal, Brazil By Charlesjsharp (Own work, from Sharp Photography, sharpphotography) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Yellow-faced parrot (Alipiopsitta xanthops) yellow morph, the Pantanal, Brazil By Charlesjsharp (Own work, from Sharp Photography, sharpphotography) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Alipiopsitta xanthops, Yellow-faced Parrot; two in a cage By TJ Lin (originally posted to Flickr as yellow-faced amazon) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Yellow-faced Parrot in Giza Zoo By Hatem Moushir (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Registration in the city of Três Lagoas-MS, urban area. A band landed a foot tangelo to feed By Jairmoreirafotografia (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Illustration does not look like A. xanthops (Yellow-faced Parrot). Fisch’s Papageien monograph discusses this dubious specimen by Francis de Laporte de Castelnau [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: João Antonio de B. Vitto

Hispaniolan Parrot
Amazona ventralis

Hispaniolan Parrot

Content

Description:

28-31 cm.. length and 250 g. of weight.

The Hispaniolan Parrot (Amazona ventralis) has the forecrown Lords color and white (variable extension); the crown and upper cheeks with blue feathers and black colored ends; ear-coverts and lower cheeks, charcoal colored (variable measure); feathers nape and the sides of the neck, emerald green with visible black tips.
Hispaniolan Parrot
Mantle and back green grass with black tips, which become progressively less visible to the bottom; rump green, slightly yellowish; uppertail-coverts brighter yellowish green. greater coverts blue; remaining coberteras grass-green. Primaries and secondaries, blue, darker towards the tips, on the innerwebs. Under the wings, green; flight feather bluish green.

The underparts usually green, slightly yellowish, with most showing very visible black feathers margins (especially in the upper region) but sometimes with some red feathers chin; patch resizable brown in the center of belly; undertail-coverts pale yellow-green. Upper, the tail is green (perhaps a little darker than the rest of the upperparts) with visible yellowish tip and outerweb external feathers with blue margins; undertail, the tail It is yellowish with the bases of the outer feathers red. Bill Pink; cere brownish white; skin bare periophthalmic white; brown the irises; legs pale grey.


Anatomy-parrots-eng

There is no sexual dimorphism. Immature as an adult but less blue in the crown and the patch abdominal is paler brown.

NOTE

Some authors consider that the Hispaniolan Parrot It conspecific (belonging to the same species) with the Cuban Parrot. Although closely related, It is believed to be quite different due to differences in hue pronounced plumage.

  • Sound of the Hispaniolan Parrot.

Habitat:

Video "Hispaniolan Parrot"

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Amazona

The Hispaniolan Parrot They are distributed in a variety of forested habitats, from sandy savannas of palm trees in lowland to mountain pine forests and mountain rain forests. Currently most commonly observed in mountain forests on the island Hispaniola, due to continued deforestation, although birds also feed at lower altitudes. Observed above 1,500 m (Hispaniola).

Views in pairs during breeding; outside the breeding season, observed in small flocks, usually up to a dozen birds; much larger meetings, until 500 reported in the nineteenth century birds. Couples and couples with young often identifiable in flocks.

Reproduction:

Nests generally constructed in tree cavities, but also in rock crevices, cactus voids and cavities in coconut. Territorial and very aggressive while playing. The breeding season It covers the months of February to May. Clutch 2-3 eggs.

Food:

They feed on, among others, of seeds or fruits of Caesalpinia, Psidium and Ficus, seeds of oranges wild Citrus, maize and bananas.

Distribution:

Size of its range (breeding/resident): 99.000 km2

The Hispaniolan Parrot are distributed by the islands of Hispaniola (Dominican Republic and Haiti), Gonâve Island (Haiti), Isla Saona (Dominican Republic), Puerto Rico and probably Culebra (Puerto Rico) in the West Indies. It is found in moderate numbers in parts of the Sierra de Bahoruco, Sierra Neiba and Cordillera Central in Dominican Republic. More restricted and less numerous in Haiti, with the remaining population appears largely in the south.

introduced in Puerto Rico, where the wild population derived from captive birds escaped and at least one consignment of illegally traded birds were released after discovering an attempt to import Puerto Rico. Also wild populations in US Virgin Islands.

Formerly very common in Hispaniola, although there have been during the twentieth century a strong decline in its population, mainly due to the habitat destruction (arising from agriculture and charcoal production). Also persecuted due to crop damage, hunted for food and trapped for sale as pets at local and international level.

In the Decade of 1930 It was limited to the interior mountain forests of the island of largely Hispaniola.

Although still locally common, it is enough rare and rare in the wild.

The population in Puerto Rico It is at least several hundred birds and apparently increasing.

Conservation:

Conservation status ⓘ


Status Least Concern ⓘ (UICN)ⓘ

• Current red list category of the UICN: Vulnerable.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

• Population size : 6000-15000

Justification of the red list category

This species is considered Vulnerable because anecdotal evidence suggests there has been a rapid reduction of the population. The size of the population and the exact extent of the decline are unclear, clarification and may lead to the species be reclassified as near threatened.

Justification of the population

The population size It is preliminarily estimated to fall in the band between 10.000 and 19.999 individuals. This is equivalent to 6,667-13,333 mature individuals, round here 6,000-15,000 mature individuals.

Justification of trend

No new data on population trends, but it is suspected that the species is declining quickly, as a result of the hunting, the loss of habitat and capture.

Threats

The agricultural conversion and charcoal production have destroyed the most suitable habitat. It is also persecuted as a crop pest, hunted as food and trapped for Local trade and above for international trade cage birds. (Juniper and Parr 1998).

Trapping adults and steal hatchlings from nests to supply the Local pet trade It is a particular concern because in some areas most families own a parrot, and they only live a few years before they have to be replaced (G. Woolmer in some. T. White one bit., 2012). In addition, activities theft nests often they cause destruction of the nest cavity or nest tree, further aggravating the loss of nesting habitat other causes (T. White in a little .

Conservation Actions Underway

CITES Appendix II.

• It has initiated a education strategy with community participation to protect species (Vasquez et to the., 1995).

• In 1997-1998, 49 birds bred in captivity were released and you radiographed in East National Park, Dominican Republic (Vilella et al., 1999).

• The Biological Reserve Loma Charco Azul, created in 2009, It has populations of the species. Also, They have carried out recent activities public education and outreach, including some actions of law enforcement, in several communities surrounding the Jaragua National Park, near the border with Haiti.

• In January 2012 there was also a Liberation of 10 parrots raised in captivity which had been confiscated as young chicks nest poachers. These chicks were raised and rehabilitated in National Zoological Park, and released successfully in the grounds of the zoo (T. White in a little ).

Conservation Actions Proposed

Assess current population size.

• Establish a program comprehensive monitoring.

• Determine the extension remaining habitat.

• Determine the impact of various threats.

Apply laws and regulations that protect this species and its habitat (Snyder et to the., 2000).

• Promote best practices for keeping birds reducing demand for wild birds and develop a captive breeding program.

• Educate the public about the negative impact of pet trade in native Dominican Republic (T. White in a bit., 2012).

The Hispaniolan Parrot in captivity:

It is easily reproduced in captivity and used as substitute mother to raise the offspring of Puerto Rican Parrot as part of the recovery program for the species (highly threatened).

Each captive specimen of this species which is capable of reproducing, It is placed in a well-managed program captive breeding and not be sold as a pet, with the objective of ensure their survival long-term.

Alternative names:

Hispaniolan Amazon, Hispaniolan Parrot, Salle’s Amazon, Salle’s Parrot, San Domingo Amazon, San Domingo Parrot (English).
Amazone à ventre pourpre, Amazone de Sallé, Amazone d’Hispaniola (French).
Blaukronenamazone, Haitiamazone (German).
Papagaio-de-hispaniola (Portuguese).
Amazona de la Española, Amazona Dominicana, Cotorra, Cotorra de la Española (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Amazona
Scientific name: Amazona ventralis
Citation: (Statius Müller, 1776)
Protonimo: Psittacus ventralis

Images Hispaniolan Parrot:



Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – The parrot Cuca – Cuca The Parrot by Jose Uribe AlneyFlickr
(2) – Hispaniolan Amazon. Two in a cage By TJ Lin (originally posted to Flickr as DSCN0712) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Couple of parrots Amazona ventralis in the Jaragua National Park, Dominican Republic By Yolanda M. Leon (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – A Hispaniolan Amazon in a cage By Patrick Hawks (originally posted to Flickr as Hispaniolan Parrot) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Blaukronenamazone (Amazona ventralis) Bávaro, Punta Cana, Dominican Republic By Martingloor (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – BARRABAND, Jacques (1767/8-1809) [Parrot red faced male (Hispaniolan Amazon [Amazona ventralis])] From Natural History of Parrots (by Francois Levaillant, 1801-1805) – Wikimedia

Sounds: Ante Strand, XC15749. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/15749

Tres Marias Parrot
Amazona tresmariae

Tres Marias Parrot

Content

Description:

38-40 cm.. length and 580-650 g. of weight.

The Tres Marias Parrot (Amazona tresmariae) has head and throat yellow.

The upperparts are green. The underparts They are green but more yellowed than upperparts. Thighs yellow. Primaries and secondaries green, violet-blue becoming the tip. should carpal yellow. Speculum red on the basis of the five outer secondaries. The curve wings, pale red, with some yellow.

The tail is green, with yellowish green tip and lateral feathers basically marked with red on the inner band; outermost feathers fringed blue. The legs They are pale gray. The irises It is orange. The bill is horn-colored, gray towards the base of the upper mandible. Cere dark gray.


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Both sexes are similar. The immature They are completely green head, except the yellow patch in forecrown. The curve wings, green. should carpal yellowish green.

Taxonomic note:

It is granted status species by the International Ornithological Congress.

Habitat:

Video "Tres Marias Parrot"

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Amazona

They have preference by deciduous forests or evergreen, clear, Savanna Woods, pine forests, dense gallery forests; less commonly in dry thorn forest, mangroves or coastal marshes and cultivated areas with scattered trees.

Resident throughout its area of distribution.

Reproduction:

Nest in holes in tree trunks or fallen branches.

Food:

consume outbreaks, leaves news, fruits palm, seeds of Acacia, fruits of Macuna, figs and some fruits of cultivated land.

Distribution:

Endemic to the Islas Marias, on the west coast of Mexico.

Amazon tresmariae Conservation :

Conservation status ⓘ


Status Least Concern ⓘ (UICN)ⓘ

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

The Tres Marias Parrot It has an extremely large range and, therefore, it does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable at the discretion of the distribution area size (Extension <20,000 km2 combined with a size decreasing or fluctuating range, extent or quality of habitat or population size and a small number of places or severe fragmentation).

Although the population trend appears to be declining, It not believed to be declining fast enough to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criteria of population trend (> 30% decline over ten years or three generations).

The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed that approximates Vulnerable thresholds under the criterion of population size (<10.000 mature individuals with an estimated continuing decline> 10% in ten years or three generations or a population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Usually it regarded as a subspecies of the Yellow-crowned Parrot (Amazona ochrocephala).

Tres Marias Parrot in captivity:

These birds belong to Appendix I of the CITES, with special protection because they are highly sought.

Alternative names:

Panama yellow-crowned amazon, Tres Maria Yellow-headed Parrot, Tres Marias Amazon, Tres Marias Parrot, Yellow-headed Parrot (Tres Marias Is.) (English).
Amazone à tête jaune (forme des Tres Marias), Amazone de Três Marias, Amazone des Tres Marias (French).
Gelbkopfamazone-tresmariae, Tres-Marias-Amazone (German).
Tres Marias Parrot (Portuguese).
Tres Marias Parrot, Tres Marias Amazon, amazona de Tres Marias, Amazona cabeciamarilla de tres marias, Loro de las islas María (Spanish).


Scientific classification Amazon tresmariae:

Edward William Nelson
Edward William Nelson

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Amazona
Scientific name: Amazona tresmariae
Citation: Nelson, 1900<

Tres Marias Parrot images:


Tres Marias Parrot (Amazona tresmariae)


Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr

Photos:

(1) – Amazona tresmariae at Cougar Mountain Zoological Park, USA perching on a zoo keepers left hand By Derrick CoetzeeCamera location47° 33′ 11.72″ N, 122° 04′ 50.26″ W View this and other nearby images on: Openstreetmap – Google Earth 47.553255; -122.080628 [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Amazona tresmariae in a cage at Cougar Mountain Zoological Park By Derrick Coetzee from Seattle, USA (Tres Marias Amazon in cage 2) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Amazona tresmariae at Cougar Mountain Zoological Park, USA. There are two with a woman zoo keeper By Derrick Coetzee [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Tres Marias Amazon in cage by D CoetzeeFlickr
(5) – Yellow-headed parrot Tres Marias Islands by (c) Juan Cruzado Cortés – naturalista.mx

Flores Lorikeet
Trichoglossus weberi

Flores Lorikeet

Content

 Flores Lorikeet

Description Lori Flores:

25 cm. length and 100-150 g. of weight.

The Flores Lorikeet (Trichoglossus weberi) is generally Green; light green / blue stripes on the forecrown and lores, the rest of the head with brighter green stripes; underwing-coverts yellow / green. The chest and the thighs are yellowish or reddish. The bill It is orange-red and irises orange-red. The legs son grises. Smaller size than other species Trichoglossus.

The youth they are similar to adults.

    taxonomy:

Sometimes you think you're closer Olive headed Lorikeet (Trichoglossus euteles). With one exception, so far it has been treated as a subspecies within the complex Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), but differs in its chest rather pale green; abdominal patch medium green; head dark green with streaks of bright green; small size (less than a Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus forsteni) relatively small). Monotypic.

  • Sound of the Flores Lorikeet. (1)

(1) Some species are under extreme pressure because of traps and harassment. The open availability of high-quality recordings of these species may further worsen problems. For this reason, transmission and download of these recordings is off. Recorders are free to share in xeno-edge, but they will have to approve access to these recordings.

Habitat:

It's more common in the lowlands, but it is up 2400 meters above sea level. Wide variety of areas including settlements, forests, coconut plantations, Savanna, eucalyptus forests and mangroves.

It is found in mixed flocks with other parrots; small and noisy groups. Nomads, since they depend on flowering trees. It perches communally in groups of hundreds of birds.

Reproduction:

Birds have been recorded in conditions reproduction in June and is reported reproduction between February and August (White and Bruce 1986, Reeve y Rabenak 2016).

It will nest on the ground in some of the predator-free islands.

Food:

It feeds mainly from nectar, but also feeds on figs, insects and can be found around artificial feeding stations.

Distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 25.500 km2

The Lori Flores are endemic to the Flores Island, Indonesia, where it is described as common (pit et to the. 1997).

Conservation Lori Flores:


Status

1. Current category Red List UICN: Near-threatened.

2. The population trend: Decreasing.

3. Population size : 10000-19999 individuals.

    Justification of the red list category

It is believed that this species has recently split a moderately small population (approaching 10.000 mature individuals), forming one subpopulation, inferring that is suffering moderately rapid decreases due to the pressure of capture and loss of habitat. Therefore, It has been classified as Near threatened, but more information on population size, trends and threats can lead to a reassessment of their status.

    Justification of the population

It is believed that the population of Flores Lorikeet It is moderately small (namely, approaching 10.000 mature individuals).

    Justification trend

They suspected that the population is declining due to loss of habitat and unsustainable levels of exploitation.

    Threats

The habitat destruction through the combined impacts of firewood collection, commercial logging, timber extraction for construction materials and clearance for agriculture may represent the most relevant threat.

The loss and fragmentation of forests It is already extensive in Flowers, where no semi-permanent forest below 1.000 meters is included within protected areas published in the Official Gazette. These threats are exacerbated by the expansion of human population, with large volumes of timber needed for housing construction, and the fact that the application of the laws by the government is little or no.

Deciduous rain forest is being cut extensively through land grabbing and the establishment of agricultural areas, a factor that is inevitably reducing the range and population of this species. Logging continues in the coastal belt to make way for crops, illegal logging continues in the protected areas.

It is presumed that the capture for trade in wild birds It represents an additional threat, as for other subspecies of the complex (Trichoglossus haemotodus).

Conservation actions and research in progress

Appendix II of the CITES. CMS Appendix II. It has been recorded in the Mbeliling Forest Reserve (Reeve y Rabenak 2016).

Conservation actions and research proposals

1 – Estimate the population and assess population trends and scale of the pressure catch.

2- Conduct a specific study of the species to identify important sites, in order to provide protection.

3- Carry out research on their status and habitat use (with special attention to feeding ecology and fragmentation of forests) so that long-term management of the species facilitate.

4- Monitor trade to investigate whether this represents a significant threat.

5- Initiate campaigns sensitization to get the support of local people in forest protection.

In captivity:

In captivity it is kind enough rare de lori. He was raised for the first time Great Britain, in 1969, in Germany in 1984.

Because of its endangered status, Any suitable specimen can not be released back into their natural habitat (native range) It should preferably be placed in a breeding program well managed to ensure the continued survival of this species.

Alternative names

Flores Island rainbow lory, Flores Lorikeet, Leaf Lorikeet, Rainbow Lorikeet (Leaf) (English).
Loriquet à tête bleue (Weber), Loriquet à tête bleue (weberi), Loriquet de Flores, Loriquet de Weber (French).
Flores Blauwangenallfarblori, Flores-Allfarblori, Webers Lori (German).
Periquito-arco-íris (weberi) (Portuguese).
Lori de Flores, Lori Arcoiris (weberi) (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus weberi
Citation: (Büttikofer, 1894)
Protonimo: Psitteuteles weber

Images “Flores Lorikeet”:

Videos "Flores Lorikeet"


“Flores Lorikeet” (Trichoglossus weberi)


    Sources:

    1. Avibase
    2. Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    3. Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    4. Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – Flores Lorikeet, Trichoglossus (haematodus) weberi, at New Port Aquarium, Cincinnati, USA by derivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)Trichoglossus_haematodus_weberi_-New_Port_Aquarium-8.jpg: Serge Melki [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (2) – Weber’s Lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus weberi) at Newport Aquarium by Ltshears [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], from Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Fig. 1: Flores Lorikeet (Trichoglossus = Psitteuteles Weber Weber)
    Fig. 2: Olive-headed Lorikeet (Trichoglossus euteles = Psitteuteles euteles) by A Weber’s lorikeet (Trichoglossus weberi) at the Jerusalem Biblical Zoo by SuperJew [CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – Trichoglossus haematodus weberi Buttikofer, 1894 bt Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis Biodiversity Center [CC BY-SA 3.0]

    (5) – Weber’s lorikeet, Picture taken at Loro Parque in Puerto de la Cruz / Tenerife by Dominik DeobaldFlickr
    (6) – Johann Büttikofer [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

    Sounds: Raf Floats, XC350575. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/350575

Yellow-faced Parrotlet
Forpus xanthops

Yellow-faced Parrotlet

Content

Yellow-faced Parrotlet

Description:

14 cm.. height.

The Yellow-faced Parrotlet (Forpus xanthops) is plump appearance and a tail short ending in point. Distinguished by the crown, face, chest and belly yellow, with strong blue patch on the wing , in flight blue occupies almost half of wing . Dorsally gray cafesoso, with the rump blue. Its bill It is ocher.

The female has blue patch on the rump and wings pale smaller.

taxonomy:

Closely related Pacific Parrotlet (Forpus coelestis); in the past it has been considered a subspecies of this, but there are clear differences in size and color. Monotypic.

Habitat:

The Yellow-faced Parrotlet It Gregarious, He lives in varied habitats, usually arid, riparian forests in the gallery in the tropics and subtropics, between 1000 - 1600 m, Although it has been reported to 2745 m.

Reproduction:

Nest in communal area, using tree hollows or sand. The breeding season It is from March to April.

In captivity, They are made of 3 - 6 eggs and breed up to three broods per year.

Food:

Their diet includes cactus, besides fruit trees. If you know that feeds on Cercidium praecox, paté flowers Bombax discolor and plum fruit Prunus domestica (Begazo 1996, F. Angulo Prato Longo a slightly. 2012).

Distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 4,800 km2

The Yellow-faced Parrotlet It endemic North Peru in the Valley of the Marañón River, South of this country and Western Amazon.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Vulnerable.

• Population trend: Stable.

• Population size : 350-1500 individuals.

In accordance with the categories of the UICN It is considered Vulnerable (VU). Habitat degradation and trade are adversely affecting the population.

Justification of the population

The population It is estimated in 250-999 mature individuals, according to surveys Begazo (1996) and subsequent recovery of the small-scale. This equates to a total of 375-1,499 individuals, rounded here 350-1,500 individuals.

The ban on the capture and trade has improved the status of this species. The rate of decline was very rapid in the Decade of 1980, Although at present has been reduced and even stabilized. However, the population is still very small, with records in very few places.

Conservation Actions Underway

Appendix II of the CITES.

– This protected legally in the Peru, but enforcement is poor.

– Catch rates have declined significantly since the ban, and trappers capture the species apparently only on request (Begazo 1996).

There are no protected areas within its range.

Conservation Actions Proposed

– Examine the population, especially in the less accessible center of its range, and between the distribution areas of the two known species of Forpus.

Monitor the population, working with local people to generate the will to preserve the species in situ (Begazo 1996).

– Study their biology and ecology over an annual cycle.

– controlling trade and enforce laws capture.

– Create at least one protected area within the range of the species (Angulo et al. 2008).

"Yellow-faced Parrotlet" in captivity:

Captured for wild bird trade, It is estimated that 17.000 birds were captured between 1981 and 1994. The rate of mortality during capture is estimated between the 40% and the 100%. Rare and unknown in captivity until 1979-1980.

It´s territorial, temperament quiet, active and initially timid, usually it takes in trust although this depending more on their previous experiences, age, type of farming (Hand or natural breeding).

Notes on captive breeding of Forpus xanthops

Alternative names:

Yellow faced Parrotlet, Yellow-faced Parrotlet (English).
Perruche-moineau à tête jaune, Toui à tête jaune (French).
Gelbmaskenpapagei, Gelbmasken-Sperlingspapagei (German).
Tuim-de-cabeça-amarela (Portuguese).
Catita Enana de Cara Amarilla, Cotorrita Carigualda (Spanish).
Periquito de Cara Amarilla (Peru).


Salvin Osbert
Salvin Osbert

Scientific classification:


Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Forpus
Scientific name: Forpus xanthops
Citation: (Salvin, 1895)
Protonimo: Psittacula xanthops

Yellow-faced Parrotlet images:


Yellow-faced Parrotlet Video

Sources:

Avibase
• Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
• Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
• Parrots Book, Parrots and macaws Neotropical
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – An adult male Yellow-faced Parrotlet perching on the top of its cage by Ruth Rogers [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – An adult male Yellow-faced Parrotlet photographed at the 2002 AFA convention in Tampa, Florida, USA by Rogers [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – An adult Yellow-faced Parrotlet photographed at the 2002 AFA convention in Tampa, Florida, USA by Rogers [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – An adult male Yellow-faced Parrotlet photographed at the 2002 AFA convention in Tampa, Florida, USA by Ruth Rogers [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Forpus xanthops Marañon near Canyon Ferry, Cajamarca, Peru by Nick AthanasFlickr
(6) – John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain] – Novelty Zoologicae, too.. 2

Crimson Shining-Parrot
Prosopeia splendens

Crimson Shining-Parrot

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description:

42 cm. length and 280 g. of weight.

The Crimson Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia splendens) is very similar to the Red Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia tabuensis). has the head and underparts red intense and bright, slightly darker in ears; broad collar rear violet-blue, which becomes turquoise toward the trailing edge. The rest of upperparts bright pale green with darker edges and fine bright in back and wings. Coverts medium green, greater coverts blue green; primary coverts and primaries deep blue-violet with black on innerwebs; secondaries blue to green in the innermost feathers. Underwing-coverts marked blue-green and red; axillary pale green. Uppertail green with blue tip, violet blue with side feathers innerwebs blackish; undertail black. Bill black; irises red-orange; legs black.

The male has the bill and head larger

taxonomy:

Consanguíneo generally considered the Prosopeia Tabuensis, but may be closer Prosopeia Personata. Monotypic.

  • Escarlata sound Papagayo.

Habitat:

It is found in forests, farmland and villages, both in the lowlands and hills.

Reproduction:

Food, habits and reproductive behavior presumably similar to those of the Red Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia tabuensis) With which, until very recently, consanguíneo he considered.

Food:

Similar al al Red Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia tabuensis).

Distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 910 km2

It is endemic Fiji, where it is found naturally in islas de Kadavu (including around Vunisea) and Ono. It has also been introduced in Viti Levu and probably in the Group Yasawa and Ovalau in the past (There are no recent records).

Conservation:


Vulnerable


• Current red list category of the UICN: Vulnerable

• Population trend: decreasing.

The species may be declining in Viti Levu due to trade, although at present the possible negative effects of competition are not known with Masked Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia personata). It is estimated that the world population It is between 5.000 and 10.000 specimens. NEAR THREATENED.

Justification of the population

Although recent fieldwork on Kadavu it not specifically focused on this species, seems to occur in population densities similar to those of Masked Shining-Parrot (Prosopeia personata) (86 Crimson Shining-Parrot They were recorded in Kadavu 38 standardized observation times in the two studies BirdLife, similar to the average 1,9 of the Masked Shining-Parrot /time recorded in 18 sites across the Viti Levu). The Masked Shining-Parrot It was estimated at around 29 in native lowland forest birds / km2 (Jackson y Jit 2004). The area of ​​dense forest and medium density Kadavu it's around of 225 km2 (National Forest Inventory 1991-1993), so a reasonable estimate of the population Crimson Shining-Parrot would be 6.000 birds or 4.000 mature individuals.

Conservation Actions Underway

Appendix II of the CITES. It is protected by law in Fiji, which has recently been revised, the old Law Poultry and game has been partly overtaken by the Law on Protection of Endangered Species, which provides protection (SPREP 2000, D. Watling a slightly. 2007). Conservation projects have reduced the trade in this species (Jackson y Jit 2004). Four communities have declared a protected area covering community 1.535 hectares of forest and local volunteers monitor bird populations and evaluate habitat status on its own initiative (V. Masibalavu a slightly. 2007). Conservation actions aimed at fire prevention (including awareness following the amendment of the decree concerning arson) They have improved in recent years (V. Masibalavu in litt. 2012, M. Tabudravu in little. 2012).

Conservation Actions Proposed

Establish standards for maintenance of parrots in captivity to reduce demand (SPREP 2000). Monitor the numbers caught and transported to Suva. Determining population densities in various habitats. Investigate the needs and breeding success. Promote the creation of community forest reserves. Use as set species to promote ecotourism in Kadavu.

"Crimson Shining-Parrot" in captivity:

Captive numbers are unknown, and everything indicates that captive breeding has rarely been achieved. It is caught in small quantities, and islanders returning to the capital, Suva (Watling 2000), the birds are carried as a gift, and there is at least some illegal trade abroad (J. S. Kretzschmar a lie. 2000).

In the nineteenth century it was imported by zoos in London, Berlin and Hamburg. In the United States, He kept San Diego Zoo, which was partially successful with the offspring when a young man born in 1973,

As they are at serious risk of extinction, only the most experienced should try to keep them in their aviaries, and all bred in captivity should be better placed in breeding programs to establish a larger population and participate in the conservation of this species of bird.

Alternative names:

Crimson Shining Parrot, Crimson Shining-Parrot, Kadavu Shining Parrot, Kandavu Shining Parrot, Kandavu Shining-Parrot (inglés).
Perruche écarlate, Perruche masquée écarlate (francés).
Fidschi Sittich, Fidschisittich (alemán).
Papagayo Escarlata (portugués).
Papagayo Escarlata, Papgayo Escarlata (español).

Clasificación científica:

Peale, Titian Ramsay


Orden: Psittaciformes
Familia: Psittaculidae
Género: Prosopeia
Nombre científico: Prosopeia splendens
Citación: (Peale, 1848)
Protónimo: Platycercus splendens

Imágenes Papagayo Escarlata:

Videos del "Papagayo Escarlata"

Fuentes:

Avibase
• Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
• Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Par
Birdlife

Fotos:

(1) – Auckland Museum [CC BY 4.0]

Burrowing Parakeet
Cyanoliseus patagonus

Burrowing Parakeet

Content

Burrowing Parakeet

Description:

39-52 cm. length between 260 and 280 g. of weight.

The Burrowing Parakeet (Cyanoliseus patagonus) has the forecrown, crown, lores, cheeks and nape olive brown with slight yellowish tinge; sides of neck, the mantle and back Brown olive; rump and uppertail-coverts bright canary yellow.

Blades brown, some slightly blue; covered primary blue, other yellowish olive brown. Primaries and Outer secondaries dark blue with edges innerwebs distal; inner secondary bluish brown. Underwing-coverts Yellow olive; underside of flight feather brown. Breast olive brown with white-cream area at the top of chest; rest of the underparts yellow-orange red patch through central belly. Uppertail brown tinted blue, especially next to the tips; undertail brown.

The bill It is grayish-black; the periophthalmic skin skin whitish; the irises is pale yellow; the legs They are pale yellowish brown.

Both sexes similar. Immature has horn upper mandible and the irises brown.

  • Sound of the Burrowing Parakeet.

Description Burrowing Parakeet subspecies
  • Cyanoliseus patagonus andinus

    (Dabbene & Lillo, 1913) – Similar to the species nominal but it lacks the bright yellow belly with pale areas on the sides of chest and rump olive colored duller. This and subspecies Cyanoliseus patagonus conlara they have the upperwing-coverts more brown than the nominal species.


  • Cyanoliseus patagonus bloxami

    (Olson, 1995) – Size larger than the nominal species (wings 250-263), upperparts, throat lower chest and dark brown; bill larger and heavier and patches creamy most extensive on the sides of chest (in some birds merge to form a band breast pale).


  • Cyanoliseus patagonus conlara

    (nores & Yzurieta, 1983) – Breast darker than the other Argentine subspecies.


  • Cyanoliseus patagonus patagonus

    (Vieillot, 1818) – Nominal.

Habitat:

The species usually inhabit areas open pastures, although it has also been reported in Savanna, wooded valleys cliffs and farmland some 2.000 m. Usually in a fairly arid land, although often it found near elevations or streams. Gregarious, forming large flocks, sometimes exceeding 1.000 birds, with common roosts trees, on wiring (sometimes in villages) and tunnels dug to nest.

Reproduction:

It reproduces colonially in warrens carved into cliffs (usually limestone or sandstone Chile) often with stunning views. In San Luis, Argentina, reproduction is reported in the wet season (November–April), the birds return to nest in the cliffs lay eggs in September and November to December in San Luis, spreading of bird breeding sites in April; apparently earlier in Chile. Clutch 2-4 eggs. The male takes care of feeding the female during the incubation period. The young leave the nest to 2 months of age, However, They continue to be fed by their parents until 6 months of age.

Food:

The diet of the Burrowing Parakeet It consists mainly of seeds and fruits predominance of fruit in the summer months (November to February). Food reported include berries of buckthorn joke and Discaria, fruit of Geoffroea decorticans, Prosopis caldenia, P. chilensis and P. flexuosa and seeds of Carduus mariana. Sometimes damaged grain crops; often it feeds on the floor or around.

Distribution:

Extending its range (breeding / resident): 1.590.000 km2

The Burrowing Parakeet They are distributed by the South South America, extending from northern Santa Cruz and Chubut in Argentina, passing by Rio Negro and Pampa, up to Buenos Aires, San Luis and Córdoba, San Juan, La Rioja, Catamarca, Tucumán and Salta, reaching westward across southern Uruguay.

They were recorded in the early 1920 from the center of Formosa, Argentina, away from Andes mountains, and above the center Chile from the North of The lakes to north of Atacama, but now they are confined to a few localities in the foothills of the Andes, for example in Bio Bio.

Will produce some seasonal movements, including the northward migration of birds south in the Argentine winter and shifts down Chile.

In Argentina It is locally common or abundant, although in some places (p. e.g.. in Córdoba and Buenos Aires Eastern) They are rare or occasional. Few and far between in Uruguay. drastic decline during the twentieth century Chile, so that the subspecies Cyanoliseus patagonus bloxami It is considered at risk, with an estimated population of less than 3.000 individuals at the end of the decade 1980. The decrease in parts of the Argentina It is attributed to the catch for the trade, the hunting for food, converting grassland and arable land persecution as crop pest. Probably continues to decline overall.

Burrowing Parakeet subspecies distribution

Conservation:


Status


• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

• Population size : 95000 individuals.

Justification of the red list category

Although the demographic trend It appears to be declining, It not believed to be declining fast enough to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable at the discretion of the demographic trend (> 30% decrease in ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and therefore does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un descenso continuo estimado en >10% in ten years or three generations, or specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification of the population

The species is still common in many parts of its range in Argentina, with only small contractions reported in range Córdoba (R. M. Fraga a slightly. 2003). The population size of four subspecies was estimated as follows by MASELLO et al. (2011): Cyanoliseus patagonus patagonus 43.330 nests, Cyanoliseus patagonus conlara 1.700 individuals, Cyanoliseus patagonus andinus 2.000 nests, Cyanoliseus patagonus bloxami 5.000-6.000 individuals. Based on these figures, the population Total overall can be about 95.000 mature individuals.

Justification trend

They suspected that the population is declining due to continuing habitat destruction and unsustainable levels of exploitation.

Threats

The species has been the subject of a intense trade: from 1981, year it was included in the Appendix II of the CITES, they have been 122.914 individuals caught in international trade (UNEP-WCMC CITES CITES Trade Database, January 2005).

Conservation actions underway

The species is included in the Appendix II of the CITES.

"Burrowing Parakeet" in captivity:

The average life expectancy is of 15-20 years in captivity. Protected by Appendix II of the CITES.

To help conservation Burrowing Parakeet, You can report your hunt, sale, trade and illegal possession, thus, We will be cooperating with the conservation of this species and not be complicit in the decline of their populations and their future extinction of wild.

Alternative names:

Burrowing Conure, Burrowing Parakeet, Burrowing Parrot, Patagonian Burrowing Parrot, Patagonian Conure, Patagonian Parrot (English).
Conure de Patagonie, Perriche de Patagonie, Perruche de Patagonie (French).
Felsensittich, Felsen-Sittich (German).
Periquito-das-barreiras (Portuguese).
Loro Barranquero, Loro de la Patagonia, Loro Patagonico, Tricahue (Spanish).
Loro barranquero (Argentina).
Tricahue (Chile).
Loro barranquero, Loro Patagonico (Uruguay).
Perico Barranquero (Mexico).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: cyanoliseus
Scientific name: Cyanoliseus patagonus
Citation: (Vieillot, 1818)
Protonimo: Psittacus patagonus

Images “Burrowing Parakeet”:

Videos "Burrowing Parakeet"

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“Burrowing Parakeet” (Cyanoliseus patagonus)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A Burrowing Parrot captive in Madeira By Rakkhi Samarasekera from London, United Kingdom (P6122982Uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Two Burrowing Parrots in Limari Province, Chile By Gerzo Gallardo (Flickr: Parrots) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Tricahues couple burrowing parrot on the RN River Cypresses By BioVipah (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Burrowing Parrot (also known as the Patagonian Conure) to Lille Zoo, France By Olivier Duquesne (originally posted to Flickr as Perroquet) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A Burrowing Parrot at Birds of Eden, an aviary in Western Cape, South Africa By Dick Daniels (http://carolinabirds.org /) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – A painting of a Burrowing Parrot, also known as Patagonian Conure, (originally captioned “Psittacara patagonica. Patagonian Parrakeet-Maccaw”) by Edward Lear 1812-1888 – Wikipedia

Sounds: Cristian Pinto, XC380836. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/380836.

Sulphur-winged Parakeet
Pyrrhura hoffmanni

Sulphur-winged Parakeet

Content

Sulphur-winged Parakeet

Description:

23 cms. length and 84 g. of weight.

The Sulphur-winged Parakeet (Pyrrhura hoffmanni) It, mostly, green with some individual variations in plumage.

It has a distinctive tail long and round about ear-coverts crimson red. Yellow at the top of the wings, largely hidden when the bird is at rest, but perfectly visible in flight.

The feathers of the forecrown, crown, cheeks and nape, They are green with yellow centers (the proportion of the yellow color is higher in the forecrown, lower in the back of the crown). Above predominantly green, It is the leading edges of the wings, sometimes, yellow. The lesser coverts and median are, generally, green, sometimes with some yellow in outer median coverts and feathers alula.

Yellow at the base of the outerweb of the greater coverts. Outerwebs of primaries, to a great extent, blue; primaries and secondaries with bright yellow patch, especially on the basis of innerwebs; flight feather with black tips. Under, the wings with the lesser coverts green, the majors, greenish yellow; a central portion flight feather yellowed with greyish tips.

Chin reddish; throat, sides neck and the top chest, green with yellow tips on feathers, which gives an overall light effect Scaled. The belly, the flanks and undertail-coverts, are green. Upper, the tail is green, below, reddish.

The bill and cere They are pink colored horn; bare periophthalmic white or yellowish white; the irises brown; legs pale grey.

Both sexes are similar, but the male player has yellow stripes on pens crown.
The Immature It has less yellow in head, the chest and wings.

  • Sound of the Sulphur-winged Parakeet.

Subspecies description:

  • Pyrrhura hoffmanni gaudens

    (Bangs, 1906) – Very similar to nominal, although feathers crown and nape They have yellower, with their ends red or red and orange (in some birds, red ends of the feathers may extend over the back, the throat and the chest). Underparts slightly darker.


  • Pyrrhura hoffmanni hoffmanni

    (Cabanis, 1861) – Nominal.

Habitat:

Observed, mainly, in mountainous areas, preferring montane forests in the subtropical zone, mainly 1.000 - 2.400 meters above sea level, although views 550 meters in the region Almirante Bay, Panama and a 3.000 metres in Costa Rica.

They appear to tolerate a considerable disturbance of habitat, including managed forests, areas and the second growth partially cleared, forests and wooded pasture shrubs. Usually seen in pairs or small flocks of 5-15 birds. You can perform altitudinal movements daily to feed, returning to the mountains to rest. Forage occurs in the canopy or smaller trees and bushes near the edge of the woods.

Reproduction:

They nest in tree hollows, including old nests woodpeckers, - 8-20 meters of land. With reproduce dry season (January June). Clutch six eggs in captivity.

Food:

Its diet includes fruit of Ficus, Croton, Leandra, Myrtus and Miconia.

Distribution and status:

Extending its range (players / residents): 18.400 km2

Confined south of Costa Rica and western Panama.

The species is found in the highlands of the southern half of Costa Rica, including the slopes of Caribbean, the mountains of the central plateau south and the two sides of the Cordillera de Talamanca, sometimes the region Cartago and Paradise and the Irazu volcano.

In western Panama They are mainly distributed in the west and center Chiriquí and areas adjacent in Bull's mouths, in the highest mountains (including the Chiriqui volcano and the high ridges on Boquette) and at lower elevations around, for example, of the Chiriqui Lagoon and Admiral Bay.

The easternmost Panamanian registry was found east of the central mountain range in 1868.

Some altitudinal movements (higher in the dry season). Birds are perhaps only sporadic in the extremities of their range. Apparently, It is common in middle to high elevations Cordillera de Talamanca and in isolated areas, and it is believed to be quite numerous throughout the main range.

Its Habitat It is now highly fragmented, though still apparently numerous, even in areas where the forest is partly cloudy. Rare in captivity.

Distribution of subspecies:

  • Pyrrhura hoffmanni gaudens

    (Bangs, 1906) – West of Panama and Caribbean slope of Bull's mouths.


  • Pyrrhura hoffmanni hoffmanni

    (Cabanis, 1861) – Nominal. South of Costa Rica.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

• Population size : Unknown.

Justification of the red list category

Although this species may have a small range, it is not believed that approximates the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criteria of size range (Extension <20,000 km2 combinada con un tamaño de rango decreciente o fluctuante, extensión / calidad del hábitat o tamaño de la población y un pequeño número de lugares o fragmentación severa). La trend of the population It appears to be stable, so that the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criteria of population trend (> 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size It has not been quantified, but it is not believed to be close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un declive continuo estimado> 10% in ten years or three generations or a population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Justification of the population

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

They suspected that the population of Catana Cotorra is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

"Sulphur-winged Parakeet" in captivity:

Rare in captivity. Quieter than other parakeets. In Panama the export of these birds is prohibited from 1980.

Alternative names:

Hoffmann’s Conure, Hoffmann’s Parakeet, Hoffman’s Conure, Hofman’s Conure, Sulfur-winged Parakeet, Sulphur winged Parakeet, Sulphur-winged Conure, Sulphur-winged Parakeet (English).
Conure de Hoffmann, Perriche de Hoffmann, Perruche de Hoffmann (French).
Hoffmann Sittich, Hoffmannsittich, Hoffmann-Sittich (German).
Tiriba-de-asa-amarelada (Portuguese).
Cotorra Catana, Perico aliazufrado, Perico de Hofman (Spanish).
Perico aliazufrado (Costa Rica).


Jean Louis Cabanis
Jean Louis Cabanis

Scientific classification:

Its name refers to the German naturalist Karl Hoffman.

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrrhura
Scientific name: Pyrrhura hoffmanni
Citation: (Cabanis, 1861)
Protonimo: Conurus hoffmanni

Sulphur-winged Parakeet Images:

————————————————————————————————

Sulphur-winged Parakeet (Pyrrhura hoffmanni)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Sulphur-winged Parakeet (Pyrrhura hoffmanni). Photographed at Savegre, in Costa Rica By Dominic Sherony [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Parakeet HOFFMAN (Pyrrhura hoffmanni) Loro Parque, Tenerife by ZOOTOGRAFIANDO
(3) – A Sulphur-winged Parakeet at Savegre, Costa Rica By Dominic Sherony [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Sulphur-winged Parakeet (Pyrrhura hoffmanni) at Savegre Lodge, near San Gerardo, Costa Rica By Michael Woodruff [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Sulphur-winged Parakeet or Hoffmann’s Conure (Pyrrhura hoffmanni) by elite-pets
(6) – Conurus hoffmanni = Pyrrhura hoffmanni by Joseph Smit [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Mike Nelson, XC107214. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/107214