Orange-fronted Parakeet
Eupsittula canicularis

Orange-fronted Parakeet

Description:

20,5 cm. length and 80 g. of weight

Orange-fronted Parakeet

The Orange-fronted Parakeet (Eupsittula canicularis) It has in forecrown a wide band orange-red which extends over the lores and the part front of it crown; the rest of the crown is blue, fading from nape up to the upperparts in a shade of green grass.

Upperwing-coverts green. Flight feather, at the top, blue on the outerweb; spiked green and black borders innerwebs; undertail, grey. Underwing-coverts brighter yellowish green. Throat, the sides of neck and the chest a shading pale yellow and pale olive oliváceo in belly and in the undertail-coverts. Upper, the tail green with blue tip; undertail, pale yellow olive. Bill color pale horn; cere whitish; bare periophthalmic whitish: irises pale yellow; legs grey-brown.

Both sexes are similar. The immature has a front patch Orange much smaller and irises brown.

  • Sound of the Orange-fronted Parakeet.

Description 3 subspecies:

  • Eupsittula canicularis canicularis

    (Linnaeus, 1758) – Subspecies nominal.

  • Eupsittula canicularis clarae

    (Moore,RT, 1937) – Similar to the species nominal but with the frontal band Orange smaller, lores Blue and sides of the lower mandible dark gray.

  • Eupsittula canicularis eburnirostrum

    (Lesson,PA, 1842) – Similar to the species nominal but the sides of the lower mandible They are gray and belly It is yellower.

Habitat:

They inhabit in fields slightly woody or open areas with scattered trees lowland ASAL, including thorny deciduous forests and tropical forests; the Orange-fronted Parakeet They are more abundant below 600 m, even they reach 1.500 meters in the high arid lands of central Honduras after breeding, forming flocks near the 50 birds, sometimes many more.

The Orange-fronted Parakeet They are well adapted to partially clear habitats, reposing in plantations Palma and handle, often near cities. Communal roosts were observed in the company of White-fronted Parrot
(Amazona albifrons) in riparian forests Guatemala. Generally arboreal.

Reproduction:

An active termitero, usually Nasutitermes nigriceps, It is the preferred place to nest construction of Orange-fronted Parakeet; Several couples sometimes dig holes next few other; also they use tree cavities (for example, hole made by woodpeckers).

Reproduction March to May in Oaxaca, Mexico; January-may in El Salvador; during the dry season in Costa Rica.
The laying is of 3 to 5 eggs). Only the female incubates. The incubation lasts around 30 days. The chicks leave the nest to 6 weeks.

Food:

In its natural habitat the the diet of the Orange-fronted Parakeet includes seeds of Ceiba and Inga, fruits of Ficus, Bursera and Brosimum, and flowers of Gliricidia and Combretum. Sometimes they invade causing farmland damage in maturation maize and the banana.

Distribution and status:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 1.490.000 km2

They live in the shed Pacific of Central America, from northwest Mexico to the Northwest of Costa Rica. The Frentinaranja Aratinga can be seen from Sinaloa and West Durango, south along the lowlands of Mexican Pacific until Chiapas and Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua, until Costa Rica, lthough there is a recent contraction of their distribution in the northwest.

Habitat in the mountains of Caribbean It is limited to Comayagua Valley in the Honduran central highlands. Resident very common; Partly nomads after breeding when birds can move to higher altitudes.

As introduced species They are located around the city of Miami (Florida), around town New York City and in the South of Texas, around town Santa Ana (United States).
They can also be seen in City of Mexico.

The capture for trade in live birds apparently he led to a decrease in their number, and shrinking the scope of its population Costa Rica and possibly elsewhere; however the volume for international trade bird cage is small.

Distribution 3 subspecies:

  • Eupsittula canicularis canicularis

    (Linnaeus, 1758) – Subspecies nominal. shed Pacific Southwestern Mexico, from the Tehuantepec isthmus and Chiapas through the west region Central America to the Northwest of Costa Rica.

  • Eupsittula canicularis clarae

    (Moore,RT, 1937) – Sinaloa and West of Durango ell towards south to Michoacán, Mexico.

  • Eupsittula canicularis eburnirostrum

    (Lesson,PA, 1842) – lowlands Pacific South of Mexico, from the east Michoacán until Oaxaca. The range in relation to the Eupsittula canicularis canicularis, is uncertain

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the Red List Category

This species has a very large range, and therefore does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (extent of occurrence <20.000 kilómetros2 combinado con un tamaño gama disminución o fluctuante, hábitat medida / calidad, o tamaño de la población y un pequeño número de localidades o fragmentación severa). The trend of the population appears to be stable, and therefore the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion population trend (> 30% decrease of more than ten years or three generations). The size of the population is very large, and therefore does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con una disminución continua estimada en> 10% in ten years or three generations, or a specified population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification population

Partners in Flight estimate the total population in 500,000-4,999,999 individuals (A. they Panjabi in a little. 2008).

Justification trend

The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats.

Aratinga Frentinaranja en cautividad:

Becoming less common. Its population has declined in many areas because of its capture for the illegal pet trade.
Protected by the Appendix II of CITES.

Alternative names:

Half-Moon Conure, Half-Moon Parakeet, Orange fronted Parakeet, Orange-fronted Conure, Orange-fronted Parakeet, Petz’s Conure (English).
Conure à front orange, Conure à front rouge, Conure de Petz , Perriche à front rouge, Perruche à front orange, Perruche à front rouge, Perruche de Petz (French).
Elfenbeinsittich (German).
Periquito-de-testa-laranja (Portuguese).
Aratinga Frentinaranja, Conuro Frente Anaranjada, Perico de Frente Anaranjada, Perico Frente Naranja, perico frente-naranja, Perico Frentinaranja, Periquito Centroamericano, Periquito naranjera (Spanish).
Perico frentinaranja (Costa Rica).
Periquito naranjera (Honduras).
perico frente naranja, perico frente-naranja, Perico Frentinaranja (Mexico).
Perico Frentinaranja (Nicaragua).

Carlos-Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Eupsittula
Scientific name: Eupsittula canicularis
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Protonimo: Psittacus canicularis

Images Orange-fronted Parakeet:

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Orange-fronted Parakeet (Eupsittula canicularis)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Orange-fronted Parakeet or Orange-fronted Conure (Aratinga canicularis) also known as the Half-moon Conure. Photo taken in a front garden, San Diego, USA By derivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)Aratinga_canicularis_-pet-4.jpg: awnisALAN [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – A wild Orange-fronted parakeet (Aratinga canicularis) along the beach of the Gulf of Papagayo (Papagallo), Costa Rica. The parakeet was seen in a group of 3 birds feeding on seeds of this tree By Cwood1 Charlene Wood (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Orange-fronted Parakeet or Orange-fronted Conure (Aratinga canicularis) also known as the Half-moon Conure. Photo taken in a front garden, San Diego, USA By awnisALAN (originally posted to Flickr as [1]) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Two Orange-fronted Parakeets in Costa Rica By Don Faulkner (Orange-fronted ParakeetUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A pair of Orange-fronted Parakeets in Rincón de la Vieja Volcano National Park, Costa Rica By Brian Ralphs from Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, UK (Orange-fronted ParakeetsUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Iconographie des perroquets :.Paris :P. Bertrand,1857.. by Biodiversity Heritage LibraryFlickr

Sounds: Bernhard Kroeger, XC67365. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/67365

Mexican Parrotlet
Forpus cyanopygius

Mexican Parrotlet

Description:

13–14 cm. long and 30-37 grams.

Mexican Parrotlet

The Mexican Parrotlet (Forpus cyanopygius) has lores, cheeks, forecrown and ear-coverts, brighter yellowish green.

The average area crown to the top of the back, green; lower back, rump and uppertail-coverts, turquoise. Great coverts turquoise, other coverts, green. Primaries green, secondaries dark turquoise blue color with narrow edges outerweb. Under the wings turquoise blue and green, the flight feather dark blue-green. Underparts green tinged with yellow. Upper, the tail is green; undertail, duller. Bill and cere pale grayish; bare periophthalmic grey; irises dark brown; legs pink.

Female all green. Immature as female, with some blue feathers on the rump and in the wing-coverts, in the case of young male.

hybrids:

Forpus [conspicillatus x cyanopygius] (hybrid)
Forpus [coelestis x cyanopygius] (hybrid)
Forpus [cyanopygius x passerinus] (hybrid)

  • Sound of the Mexican Parrotlet.

Description 2 subspecies:

Two subspecies. However, some authorities regarded the northern birds range as a third subspecies (Forpus cyanopygius pallidus), doubtfully distinct from the nominees. See also Note on Blue-winged Parrotlet (Forpus xanthopterygius).

Habitat:

The Habitat of the Mexican Parrotlet are the gallery forests and deciduous forests, plantations, scrub, semiarid open field and trees cultivated areas; mainly observed in lowlands and foothills largest number of records in southern Sonora to 360-455 m; at higher altitudes in western Durango and Zacatecas, with higher limit 1.320 m.

Aptitudes breeding birds have been observed above 900 indicating possible breeding meters higher altitudes. Gregarious, forming flocks 4-30 or more, sometimes in company Orange-fronted Parakeet (Eupsittula canicularis).

Reproduction:

Breeding season may July. Clutch three eggs in captivity.

Food:

Little information on diet or breeding: birds observed taking fruits Ficus, berries and grass seed soil.

Distribution y status:

Size of its range (breeding/resident): 177.000 km2

Endemic West Mexico from Alamos in the South of Sonora to the South by Sinaloa, Nayarit (including the Islands Three Marias) and Jalisco until Colima, with the southernmost record in the Manzanillo Bay (19 ° 03’N).

Its range extends eastward Durango and Zacatecas. irregular population with widely fluctuating local abundance, perhaps in relation to the availability of local foods. There has been a large-scale modification of habitats within range but the species remain common (at least locally). Birds in the Tres Marias Island Perhaps they are in risk of extinction.

Distribution 2 subspecies:

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Near-threatened.

• Population trend: In decline.

Justification of the red list category

The species has risen to near threatened because its population has probably been reduced to a rate close to 30% during three generations (12 years), depending on the estimated operating levels and reducing the area of ​​occupancy and extent of occurrence; almost meet the listing requirements as threatened under the criteria A2cd + 3cd + 4cd. If the declinations are found to exceed the 30% then the species would qualify for Vulnerable lift. If there is evidence suggesting that the global population of this species is <10.000 mature individuals, and it is suffering a steady decline in> 10% in three generations (until 100 years in the future), also qualify to lift Vulnerable.

Justification of the population

Partners in Flight estimated that the population number less than 50.000 individuals (A. Punjabi in some. 2008), so it is placed in the band 20.000 to 49.999 copies here.

Justification of trend

It is suspected that the population is declining rapidly due to moderately heavy pressure from his capture by illegal trade (Cantu et al ., 2007, Marín-Togo et al ., 2012). According to reports, the population of the island Three Marias It has decreased (Collar y Bushman 2014).

Threats

The capture for trade in wild birds It poses a serious threat to a 8.000 individuals illegally caught per year (Cantu et al ., 2007). The range of the species is found in one of the main routes for illegal trade in parrots Mexico and it is thought that the heavy exploitation of the species is an important factor in their apparent absence of suitable habitat areas.

Conservation actions and research in progress

CITES Appendix II.

Conservation and research actions proposed

Implement legislation to prevent illegal trade. Raise awareness of the species.

Cotorrita Mexicana en cautividad:

Quite frequently seen in aviculture.

Capture for trade in wild birds represents a serious threat to a 8.000 individuals illegally caught per year.

In captivity is not a very long-lived bird; According to sources a specimen lived 10,5 years in captivity.

Each captive specimen of this species which is capable of reproducing, It must be placed in a program well managed captive breeding and not be sold as a pet, in order to ensure its long-term survival.

Alternative names:

Blue-rumped Parrotlet, Mexican Parrotlet (English).
Perruche-moineau à croupion bleu, Perruche-moineau turquoise, Toui du Mexique (French).
Blaubürzel-Sperlingspapagei (German).
Tuim-mexicano (Portuguese).
Catita Enana Mejicana, Cotorrita Mexicana, Perico Catarina, Periquito Mexicano (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Forpus
Scientific name: Forpus cyanopygius
Citation: (Souancé, 1856)
Protonimo: Psittacula cyanopygia

Imágenes Mexican Parrotlet:


Mexican Parrotlet (Forpus cyanopygius)

Northern Mealy Parrot
Amazona guatemalae

Northern Mealy Parrot

Description:

Anatomy-parrots-eng
38 cm.. length and 705-766 g. of weight.

The Northern Mealy Parrot (Amazona guatemalae) is a large parrot, mainly green, with a large bare periophthalmic white; head green, increasingly off toward the area nape.

The youth similar to adults but eyes brown.

taxonomy:

Subspecific treated for decades manner within the species Amazona farinosa. Based on a genetic study of the year 2012 They came to be regarded as a full species.

Subspecies description:

  • Amazona guatemalae guatemalae

    (Sclater,PL, 1860) – Mostly green, with the crown, forecrown and lores, blue; carpal edge Green Wing / yellow; Feathers edges wing , blue; Red in the secondary feathers; feathers of the tail dark green to light green at the tip. Bill dark grey. Eye ring white, irises red.

  • Amazona guatemalae virenticeps

    (Salvadori, 1891) – Mostly green with less blue on the crown that the subspecies Amazona guatemalae guatemalae; yellower shades / green; carpal edge green / yellow, with varying shades of red; crown green; lores and forecrown, green tinted blue. Bill black / horn. Eye ring white, irises red.

Habitat:

Video Northern Mealy Parrot

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Amazona

They inhabit in dense humid lowland forests, especially near the gaps and edges; also they extend lower montane forest plantations and frequent, crops, gallery forests and deciduous forests.

They are in pairs or groups up 20 individuals, with larger congregations in feeding areas. Form noisy flocks in communal roosts on top of large trees outside breeding season, sometimes with several hundred birds. Well camouflaged while feeding quietly on the upper floors of the forest canopy.

Reproduction:

Season April-May Guatemala. Nests in tree holes, to 3-30 height m, once observed in the crack of a stone wall in a Mayan temple. The laying usually three eggs.

Food:

No known differences with Amazona farinosa.

Distribution:

Size of its range (Standard playback): 919.000 km2

It is present along the slope of Caribbean of Central America, from Veracruz and Oaxaca, Mexico, to the South by Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Costa Rica, to western Panama. They are also found in the shed Pacific of Costa Rica and West Panama. Their abundance varies locally, but it is common in many areas.

Distribution of subspecies:

  • Amazona guatemalae guatemalae

    (Sclater,PL, 1860) – Caribbean coast from southeast Mexico to the Northwest of Honduras.

  • Amazona guatemalae virenticeps

    (Salvadori, 1891) – From Honduras (Sula Valley) to western Panama.

Conservation:

Conservation status ⓘ


Status
Near Threatened (UICN)ⓘ

• Current red list category of the UICN: Near-threatened.

• Population trend: In decrease.

Justification of the red list category

He suspected this species is undergoing a rapid decrease in moderately population due to habitat loss and unsustainable levels of hunting and trapping.

Population size: Unknown

The population trend: In decline.

The Amazona mealy northern captive:

Little known in poultry.

Alternative names:

Mealy Parrot [guatemalae or virenticeps], Northern Mealy Amazon, Northern Mealy Parrot (English).
Amazone guatémaltèque, Amazone poudrée [guatemalae or virenticeps], Amazone poudrée [guatemalae ou virenticeps] (French).
Guatemalaamazone (German).
Northern Mealy Parrot (Portuguese).
Amazona harinosa norteña (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Philip Sclater
Philip Sclater

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Amazona
Scientific name: Amazona guatemalae
Citation: (Sclater, PL, 1860)
Protonimo: Chrysotis guatemalae

Images Northern Mealy Parrot:


Sources:

Avibase
Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Amazona farinosa guatemalae By Adalberto Hernandez Vega from Copan Ruinas, Honduras (Macaw Mountain Bird Park – Copan Ruinas, Honduras) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Guatemalaamazone Amazona farinosa guatemalae By Martingloor (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Amazona farinosa guatemalae by Ulises MuñizFlickr
(4) – Amazona farinosa guatemalae By Katrin Lorenzen (IMG_4685) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) –
Amazona farinosa guatemalae By Adalberto Hernandez Vega from Copan Ruinas, Honduras (Macaw Mountain Bird Park – Copan Ruinas, Honduras) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Puerto Rican Parrot
Amazona vittata

Puerto Rican Parrot

Description:

Anatomy-parrots-eng
29 cm.. length and 320 g. of weight.

The Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata) has the forecrown and lores, red; rest of the head and nape, feathery green grass bordered with black color, giving a strong intricate scaly appearance.

Feathers of the the mantle grass-green; back and scapulars with less pronounced dark margins; rump and uppertail-coverts, paler, more green-yellow. The large external coverts they are blue; rest of the coverts color green grass. Primaries and outerweb of the outer secondaries, blue; the innerwebs of the external side and secondary internal, green. Under, the wings They are green and flight feather bluish green.

Underparts green stained yellowish; feathers throat and the chest with dark edges. Upper, the tail is green; below is more yellowish, with its end yellow; both with outerweb blue towards outer feathers. Bill color pale horn; brown the irises; legs pale grey.

Both sexes similar. Immature adult-like, but with the bill light yellow with gray on the basis of upper mandible.

  • Sound of the Puerto Rican Parrot.

Description 2 subspecies:

  • Amazona vittata gracilipes†

    (Ridgway, 1915) – Extinct. Of smaller and with feet smaller and thinner than the species nominal.

  • Amazona vittata vittata

    (Boddaert, 1783) – Nominal.

Habitat:

Video Puerto Rican Parrot

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Amazona

The Puerto Rican Parrot formerly he frequented the main types of natural vegetation (various forest habitats, from mangroves to montane forests) in Puerto Rico, with the possible exception of dry forests in the southern coastal regions.

Its Current small population remainder inhabits the mountain rainforest to 200-600 m. In the lower mountain slopes dominated by trees tabonuco of the species Dacryodes excelsa, in swampy forests at higher elevations characterized by the abundance of Cyrilla racemiflora and areas Sierra palm Prestoea montana.

Observed in pairs or (especially when they fed) in small flocks, having formed, formerly, flocks of several hundred.

Reproduction:

The Amazona Puerto Rican nidifican in large and deep cavities of trees; in the past he puts their nests in hollow limestone, in the west of the island. The Amazon of Luquillo usually nest in species Cyrilla racemiflora. They defend their territory aggressively in the vicinity of the nest while playing. The egg laying, between February and April, possibly to coincide with the availability of fruit. Clutch 2-4 eggs (usually three).

From 2001, all nesting known in the wild they have occurred in artificial cavities (White et al ., 2006).

Food:

The diet of the Puerto Rican Parrot It consists of a variety of fruit, seeds, flowers and leaves, among which include fruit of Prestoea montana and Dacryodes excelsa, flowers of Piptocarpha tetrantha and bracts of Marcgravia sintenisii.

Distribution and status:

Size of its range (breeding/resident): 1.000 km2

The Puerto Rican Parrot It is endemic to Puerto Rico and the former neighboring islands Mona and Culebra; there are reports of parrots Vieques and St Thomas, probably belonging to this species. Formerly found in all forested regions Puerto Rico (with the possible exception of dry coastal strip south), but from around 1960 their habitat was limited to the Luquillo forest, in the East.

drastic population decline and rank the mid-nineteenth century. The pre-European population was probably hundreds of thousands of birds. There was a dramatic decline, which it reduced its population to about 2.000 copies in 1937 and in 1950 they were only a 200: a search in 1968 only revealed the existence of 24 birds.

The conservation program, initiated in 1968, It includes captive breeding, the provision of nests, detailed investigation ecology and reproductive biology and the control predators and competitors.

In 1992 the wild population was 39-40 birds 58 in captivity (all in Puerto Rico). Its population has declined, to near extinction, mainly by habitat loss (in 1912 only 1% the virgin forests of the island they remained), the hunting and capture as pets. The continuing threats to the tiny remaining population include impact of hurricanes (wild population halved to 21-23 after the passage of birds hurricane Hugo in 1989), competition with introduced bees Apis mellifera by tree cavities, loss due to eddy offspring flies Philornis pici, losses caused by predators and competition for nesting cavities with Pearly-eyed Thrasher (Margarops fuscatus). The Puerto Rican Parrot, inhabitants of the Culebra island (dubiously separated as subspecies Amazona vittata gracilipes), extinguished early twentieth century, probably because of persecution due to damage of crops and the impacts of hurricanes. existing population protected inside of the El Yunque National Forest.

Description 2 subspecies:

Conservation:

Conservation status ⓘ


Critically Endangered
Critically Endangered (UICN)ⓘ

• Current red list category of the UICN: Critically Endangered.

• Population trend: Increasing.

• Population size: 33-47.

Justification of the red list category

Once you have done a count of birds, are only 13 Puerto Rican Parrot in the nature, leaving the species on the verge of extinction. The conservation action the population has increased from 1975, but remains Critically Endangered because the number of mature individuals remains miniscule. If the released birds breed successfully in nature and the figures remain stable or increase, the species can justify a change of state in the future.

Justification of the population

From 2011, the population was between 50-70 individuals divided into two areas, approximately equivalent to 33-47 mature individuals. In 2013, its population had only increased to 80-100 individuals in the nature (64-84 in Down river and 15-20 in The anvil). However, since the released birds are not counted as mature individuals until they have successfully bred in nature (UICN 2011), and the entire population of Down river It is derived from released birds. The total number of mature individuals is uncertain but may well be less than 50, therefore, estimating 2011 of mature is maintained in this figure.

Justification of trend

It is estimated that increase 1-19% It has occurred in the last ten years, based on regular accounts of the total wild population.

Conservation Actions Underway

CITES Appendix I.

• A Recovery Program the species has involved a partnership between the Fish and Wildlife of the United States, the Forest service of the United States and the World Wide Fund for Nature together with Department of Natural and Environmental Resources of Puerto Rico (White et al. 2012).

• In 1968 an important intervention was initiated to preserve the species, the provision of artificial nests highly successful, the predator control nest and its competitors, and captive breeding and reintroduction.

• Successful Newborns parrots It monitored using radio telemetry (Meyers 1996).

• All the other habitat is protected in the El Yunque National Forest (above the Caribbean National Forest) (Snyder et to the., 2000) and in the Río Abajo State Forest (T. White in a little.

• The population is monitored to help inform management decisions.

• The predator control exotic mammals (Entrapment and toxic bait) It has proven to be a highly profitable way to preserve the species (Engeman et al. 2003, 2006, R. M. Engeman in some. 2012).

• Catch data have shown that Luquillo Forest It has between densities black rat studied highest in the world and optimal strategies have been devised rat bait for application during the nesting.

• The economic analysis based on empirical costs production of parrots raised in captivity rates showed very high cost-effective to manage predators, estimating that preventing a loss of parrot each 4-12 years more than makes up all forms of predator management (for all species) intervention time (Engeman et al., 2003).

• There are two centers captive breeding, one The anvil which it was established for the first time 1973 with a new facility built in 2007 and one in Down river built in 1989 with the first birds transferred The anvil to Down river in 1993 (White et al 2012).

• About 280 birds are currently in captivity in Down river and The anvil (T. White one bit., 2012).

• The captive birds are being managed to preserve greater genetic diversity possible.

• A release technique known as precision release was tested with six birds in 2008. This involves the release of a small number of sub-adult parrots bred in captivity in each active nest immediately after hatching chicks, and it aims to promote the immediate and close interaction between wild parrots and birds released (T. White in a bit., 2005, 2008).

• Near 100 birds have been released the aviary Down river in an attempt to establish a second population, which may be helped by a lower annual precipitation in the site, lower levels of predation and a change in management techniques (T. White in a little. ).

• Although after release mortality remains high, there has been a successful breeding and the size and range of the flock is increasing (Breining 2009, Valentin 2009, T. White in a little.)

• The newly established population Down river It is located around the site Aviary of Down river and it is believed that the presence of captive birds encouraged released birds to establish their population close (White et al., 2012).

• Forty copies were released in The anvil between 2000 and 2004, eight 2008 and six birds in 2010 (Velez-Valentin 2011). In 2013 plans were made to establish a third population on the island in the Maricao State Forest (West of Puerto Rico) (Anonymous 2014).

Conservation Actions Proposed

• Continue to monitor the population trends.

• Follow the fate of the released birds.

• Keep the integrated conservation management program.

• Improve synchronization breeding of wild and captive birds to increase the number of chicks bred in captivity that can be promoted by wild parents (Thompson 2004).

• Integrate predator control of exotic mammals (black rat, small Indian mongoose, wild cats) in the management program and monitor existing conservation predator populations to study the effectiveness of these measures (R. M. Engeman in some. 2012).

The Puerto Rican Parrot in captivity:

According to sources, A copy of Puerto Rican Parrot lived 10,1 years in captivity. However, considering the longevity of similar species, likely maximum longevity is underestimated in this species. In fact, it has been reported that They can live up to 27,2 years in captivity, what it is plausible but has not been confirmed. Given that the Cuban Parrot (Amazona leucocephala), closely related, You can live up 50 years (Wilson, et to the., 1995), It may be an age close to the latter figure possible for Puerto Rican Parrot.

Each captive specimen of this species which is capable of reproducing, It is placed in a well-run program of captive breeding and not be sold as a pet, in order to ensure its long-term survival.

Alternative names:

Puerto Rican Amazon, Puerto Rican Parrot, Red-fronted Amazon, Red-fronted Parrot (English).
Amazone à queue courte, Amazone de Porto Rico (French).
Puertoricoamazone, Puerto-Rico-Amazone (German).
Papagaio-de-porto-rico‎ (Portuguese).
Amazona Portorriqueña, Amazona Puertorriqueña, Cotorra de Puerto Rico, Cotorra Puertorriqueña (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Pieter Boddaert
Pieter Boddaert

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Amazona
Scientific name: Amazona vittata
Citation: (Boddaert, 1783)
Protonimo: Psittacus vittatus

Images Puerto Rican Parrot:

————————————————————————————————

Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Amazona vittata – Photo via Good Free Photos
(2) – A Puerto Rican Amazon By Pablo Torres of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region (PRParrot_cototrapuertorriqueña byPablo Torres) [Public domain or CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – A Puerto Rican Amazon at Iguaca Aviary, Puerto Rica By Tom MacKenzie ofU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region (Puerto Rican parrot 4) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – A Puerto Rican Amazon at Iguaca Aviary, Puerto Rica By Tom MacKenzie of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region (Puerto Rican parrot 4) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A pair of Puerto Rican Amazons See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – A Puerto Rican Amazon at Iguaca Aviary, Puerto Rica By Tom MacKenzie of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region (Puerto Rican Parrot by Tom Mackenzie) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(7) – Amazona vittata – Author: Mike Morel, USFWS – pixnio
(8) – Flying Parrot, blue feathers visible By Tom MacKenzie [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
(9) – A Puerto Rican Amazon at Iguaca Aviary, Puerto Rica By Tom MacKenzie of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region (Puerto Rican parrot 1) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Eric DeFonso, XC173411. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/173411

Pileated Parrot
Pionopsitta pileata

Pileated Parrot

Description:

22 cm.. length and a weight between 98-120 g..

Pileated Parrot

The Pileated Parrot (Pionopsitta pileata) has the forecrown, lores, crown anterior upper cheeks to behind eyes, bright red; patch reddish brown in ear-coverts; the lower cheeks, sides and rear of the neck, green.

The upperparts, green. Primaries and greater coverts, alula and feathers bend of wing, violet blue; other coverts, green. Outerwebs of the primary and secondary, violet blue with blue-green edges. Under, the wings bluish green, coverts with some darker blue feathers. Underparts green with bluish tint in the chest and throat, and with a yellowish tint in the belly and undertail-coverts. Upper, the tail centrally green, laterally violet blue; undertail, bluish green.

Bill dark brown, becoming dark horn distally in both mandibles; bare periophthalmic naked, pale grey, irises and legs, grayish brown.

The female has most of its head green but with a pretty pale blue in the forecrown.

Immature as female, but with grayish green or green spots and dark spots on the base bill; young male sometimes with red limited in forecrown with a patch orange behind.

  • Sound of the Pileated Parrot.

Habitat:

They inhabit in forests, including tropical rain forests and mountains dominated by araucarias, mainly in lowlands in the south of the mountain range, although penetrating the coastal mountains Brazil, at altitudes of 300 to 1.500 m; also in areas partially cleared. Gregarious in groups of approximately 10 birds; apparently rare in greater numbers.

Reproduction:

They nest in the cavities of trees. probably reproduce mainly in the months of November to January. Clutch 3-4 eggs in captivity.

Food:

The fruits of Euterpe edulis They are among the favorite foods during the winter in eastern Paraguay; also recorded fruits Podocarpus and Solanum, and bark Eucalyptus; visit when ripe fruit orchards in Rio Grande do Sul.

Distribution and status:

Size of its range (breeding/resident ): 1.650.000 km2

The Pileated Parrot It is located in southeast Brazil, to the South of Bay, through the belt of the Atlantic forest in Espirito Santo, probably east of Minas Gerais, Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Paraná and Santa Catarina, until Rio Grande do Sul, extending to the east Paraguay and northeast of Argentina in Missions and possibly in Currents (no recent records); also they have been reported east of Chaco in Argentina, where they can arrive as an irregular visitors.

Some seasonal movements occur Paraná, where birds depart from the coast inland plateau after breeding, and in Paraguay where it is in Amambay in October.

Nomad in the Intervales State Park of São Paulo. Its population is widespread but declining due to the extensive loss of forests by urban growth, agriculture and mining.

Described as uncommon to fairly common in Missions, Argentina. Apparently even their population is not at risk from habitat loss as the birds remain quite numerous where forest fragments are (for example, East of Paraguay) and travel between them on land without trees. More numerous are more extensive where the remains of forest, It is more common in eastern Paraguay and adjacent Paraná and São Paulo in Brazil.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the red list category

This species has a very large range and therefore it is not close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of size range (Extension Occurrence <20,000 km2 combinada con un tamaño de rango decreciente o fluctuante, extensión / calidad de hábitat o tamaño de población y un pequeño número de lugares o fragmentación severa). La demographic trend appears to be stable and, therefore, the species does not approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criteria of population trend (> 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size It has not been quantified, but it is not believed to be close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un descenso continuo estimado> 10% in ten years or three generations or a population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as the least concern.

Justification of the population

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, but this species is described as “rare” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

They suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

Lorito Pileado en cautividad:

Very rare in captivity.

Alternative names:

Pileated Parrot, red-cappe parrot, Red-capped Parrot (English).
Caïque mitré, Perroquet mitré (French).
Scharlachkopfpapagei, Scharlachkopf-Papagei (German).
Cuiú-cuiú, caturra, cuiú, cuiuiú, curica-cuiú, maitaca-de-cabeça-vermelha, periquito-rei, tui-maritaca (Portuguese).
Catita cabeza roja, Catita decabeza roja, Lorito cabeza roja, Lorito de Cara Roja, Lorito Pileado (Spanish).
Catita cabeza roja, Catita decabeza roja (Argentina).
Lorito cabeza roja (Paraguay).

Giovanni Antonio Scopoli
Giovanni Antonio Scopoli

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pionopsitta
Scientific name: Pionopsitta pileata
Citation: (Scopoli, 1769)
Protonimo: Psittacus pileatus

Images Pileated Parrot:

————————————————————————————————

Pileated Parrot (Pionopsitta pileata)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Pileated Parrot Loro Parque – Tenerife (Spain) by Florin FeneruFlickr
(2) – Pileated Parrot Loro Parque – Tenerife (Spain) by Florin FeneruFlickr
(3) – Pileated Parrot Loro Parque – Tenerife (Spain) by Florin FeneruFlickr
(4) – Pionopsitta pileata by Taguató yetapaFlickr
(5) – Red-capped parrot (Pionopsitta pileata) – “Cuiú-cuiú” Campina Grande do Sul | The Birds of Brazil by Ben TavenerFlickr
(6) – Catita Red Head by Argentavis - Birds of Argentina

Plain Parakeet
Brotogeris tirica

Plain Parakeet

Description:

23 cm.. long and about 63 g. of weight.

Plain Parakeet

The Plain Parakeet (Brotogeris tirica) has the forecrown, lores, crown and cheeks, pale green with yellowish tint. Sides of the neck and nape, green, duller than in the head.

The upperparts green, slightly darker than the rest of the plumage. Most of the under wing-coverts, green, some feathers dyed olive brown, especially in lesser and median coverts. Primary coverts, primaries and outer secondaries, violet blue with green margins close to outerweb. Underwing-coverts greenish yellow, flight feather, bluish green. Underparts, pale yellowish green, tinged with bluish color on the sides of chest, the the thighs and undertail-coverts; flanks yellowish. Upper, the tail green with bluish tint to the central feathers; undertail, the tail is grayish blue-green. Bill color pale horn: irises brown: legs Rosaceae.

Both sexes are similar. Immature with little or no blue in primary coverts.

  • Sound of the Plain Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Catita tirica.mp3]

Habitat:

The Plain Parakeet They are experts in the art of adaptation; They can be found in a wider range of habitats than any other endemic parrot Brazilian Atlantic forest: in the lowlands and highlands, in the forest canopy and forest edges, parks and gardens (for example, of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo), farmland with trees, scattered patches of forest and secondary growth. Apparently more numerous in the forest edge habitats. Generally observed in the lowlands, but reported to 1.200 metres in the Itatiaia National Park on the border between the state of River and São Paulo. Gregarious. Generally seen in pairs or small groups, although sometimes you can see several hundred birds together.

It is the most common parrot São Paulo, where you can find even in the slums of the city.

Reproduction:

Observed in arboreal termite nests, in the crowns of Palmas or natural openings of trees; in the city of São Paulo nest in crevices of buildings and roofs, regularly using the balconies to feed.

The breeding season It has been recorded in September; observed immature in January. The clutch common in captivity is four eggs. They stay together for life.

Food:

Its diet it is very varied, It includes pulp of Posoqueria latifolia; seeds of Ficus, Trema micrantha, Xylopia brasiliensis, Vriesea, rhipsalis, Cecropia glazioui, Hyeronima alchorneoides and Merostachis; seeds and flowers of Tibouchina mutabilis and Psitticanthus; flowers of Norantea brasilensis and Eucatyptus and nectar of Pseudobombax. Sometimes they feed of insects and their larvae.

Distribution:

Size of its range (breeding/resident ): 1.010.000 km2

The Plain Parakeet They found in southeast Brazil, from Alagoas south through the eastern and southern Bay, Espirito Santo, in the South of Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro, East of São Paulo and Paraná until Santa Catarina.

The only records Rio Grande do Sul and Goiás They are considered doubtful.

Some seasonal movements. Uncommon to fairly common depending on the location, but apparently only reported very common in the city of Sao Paulo. Its population has declined in the Eastern European settlement Brazil, although less than other endemic parrots in the region. Live in several areas protected (for example, Itatiaia National Park).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the red list category

This species has a very large range and therefore it is not close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of size range (Extension Occurrence <20,000 km2 combinada con un tamaño de rango decreciente o fluctuante, extensión / calidad de hábitat o tamaño de población y un pequeño número De lugares o fragmentación severa). La demographic trend appears to be stable and, therefore, the species does not approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criteria of population trend (> 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to be close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un descenso continuo estimado> 10% in ten years or three generations or a population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as the least concern.

Justification of the population

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, but this species is described as “common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

They suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

Catita Tirica en cautividad:

They are not very common in aviculture.

Alternative names:

Plain Parakeet, All-green Parakeet, Tirica Parakeet (English).
Toui tirica, Perruche tirica (French).
Tirikasittich, Tiricasittich (German).
periquito-rico, periquito, periquito-verdadeiro, periquito-verde, tuim (Portuguese).
Catita Tirica, Periquito Amarillento (Spanish).

Gmelin Johann Friedrich
Gmelin Johann Friedrich

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Brotogeris
Scientific name: Brotogeris tirica
Citation: (Gmelin, JF, 1788)
Protonimo: Psittacus Tirica

Images Plain Parakeet:

————————————————————————————————

Plain Parakeet (Brotogeris tirica)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A Plain Parakeet in Morretes, Paraná, Brazil By Ben Tavener from Curitiba, Brazil [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Plain Parakeet in Brazil By Jonathan Cunha [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Plain Parakeet in captivity By Lucas de Melo [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Independence Park, Ipiranga museum, São Paulo By Dario Sanches from SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL (PERIQUITO-RICO ( Brotogeris tirica)) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Plain Parakeet (Brotogeris tirica) in São Paulo By Dario Sanches [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Independence Park, Ipiranga museum, São Paulo By Dario Sanches from SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL (PERIQUITO-RICO ( Brotogeris tirica)) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(7) – Indepedencia Park, Ipiranga museum, São Paulo Species in phase moulting By Dario Sanches from SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL (PERIQUITO-RICO ( Brotogeris tirica)) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(8) – Brotogeris tirica, Independence Park, Ipiranga museum, São Paulo By Dario Sanches from SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL (PERIQUITO-RICO ( Brotogeris tirica)) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(9) – The Plain Parakeet in the Serra da Cantareira State Park, São Paulo, Brazil By Dario Sanches (Flickr: PERIQUITO-RICO (Brotogeris tirica)) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(10) – Illustration Ricardo Sanches, parakeets rich(Brotogeris tirica) in ABES-SP

Sounds: Jerome Fischer (Xeno-canto)

Norfolk Island Kaka
Nestor productus †

Norfolk Island Kaka

Description:

The Norfolk Island Kaka (Nestor productus) was their large with a bill, wings short and wide, and with legs and feet large.

Norfolk Island Kaka

He had 38 centimeters long. The top of his head era gris pardusca, while its face varied from yellow to orange, sometimes with a reddish tint. It was said that his Hip It was greenish yellow, and upperparts, including the wings, They were mostly gray-brown, slightly darker than the top of the head, with the bottom of the back and rump orange or dark red and the tail brown. Upper chest It was brown and gray bottom bright yellow, with the belly and sides reddish orange (Forshaw & Cooper 1981, 2002; Greenway 1958).

Its social structure and dispersion are not registered, but the Norfolk Island Kaka of New Zealand, he watched alone or in small groups of up 10 individuals (Higgins 1999).

Habitat:

Habit in the native forest in the Norfolk Island and about Phillip Island (Greenway 1958). The species could be observed both in the canopy of tall trees, and soil, the rocks (Gould, 1865, Greenway 1958).

Given its endemism in the Norfolk Island, the Norfolk Island Kaka It was presumably sedentary.

Reproduction:

Little is known of reproductive cycle of the Norfolk Island Kaka; just put on record of four eggs in tree holes (Gould 1865).

Food:

It is known that he fed on nectar Flowers tree white wood (Lagunaria) (Gould 1865). Certainly should be more varied. The captive birds They ate lettuce and other vegetables leaves, and dairy foods and fruit juice (Gould 1865). Presumably he foraged in both the soil and the canopy (Gould, 1865).

Distribution:

Su área de distribución era de alrededor de 15,5 hectares.

It was endemic to the Norfolk island (in Australia) and nearby Phillip Island, Australia. It became extinct in the wild in mid-century 19 on Norfolk Island, and possibly a little later Phillip Island.

It is believed that the species had a very limited ability to move between islands, and probably he spent his whole life on the island of his birth (Gould, 1865).
In the Norfolk Island Kaka occasionally kept in captivity, as the birds were gentle and easy to capture alive (Gould 1865). The species He survived in captivity until after it had been extinct in the wild (Greenway 1958). There are no known captive populations and none has been reintroduced into the wild. The last known bird was alive in captivity in London in 1851 (Garnett et to the., 2011).

No made extensive studies for this species. However, there have been a series of ornithological studies in the Norfolk Island since the species disappeared from the island (p.ej. Bell 1990, Robinson 1988, Schodde et al., 1983, Smithers y Disney 1969), no signs have been found of the species.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: extinct.

Justification of the red list category

This species was known in the Norfolk Island, but it was Extinguished to mid 1800. It is believed that the elimination of habitat and hunting have been the main drivers.

According to reports, era Manso and, Therefore, hunted strongly convicts and early settlers and easily trapped as a pet.

No information is available on the population size before its decline.

Kaka de Norfolk en cautividad:

They were captured by his meekness and they were common in the Norfolk Island

Alternative names:

Norfolk Island Kaka, Norfolk Island Kea, Norfolk Island Parrot, Norfolk Kaka (English).
Nestor de Norfolk (French).
Dünnschnabelnestor, Norfolkkaka, Norfolk-Kaka (German).
Kākā-de-norfolk (Portuguese).
Kaka de Norfolk (Spanish).

John Gould
John Gould

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Strigopidae
Genus: Nestor
Scientific name: Nestor productus
Citation: (Gould, 1836)
Protonimo: Plyctolophus productus

Norfolk Island Kaka images:

————————————————————————————————

Norfolk Island Kaka (Nestor productus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Australian Government – Department of the Environment and Energy (Nestor productus — Norfolk Island Kaka)

Photos:

(1) – Natural Science Curatorial Trainee – Birmingham’s Norfolk kaka
(2) – Nestor productus Gould, 1836 by Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Nestor productus By Gould, 1836 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Norfolk Island Kaka (Nestor productus). The last bird in captivity died in London in 1851. Specimen from the Zoological Museum in Firenze, Italy by Thomas WesenerFlickr
(5) – Nestor productus By Gould, 1836 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – The Norfolk Island Kākā (Nestor productus) from the plate in the Bulletin of the Liverpool Museum. From the specimen in the Tring Museum by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Pacific Parrotlet
Forpus coelestis


Pacific Parrotlet

Description:

12-13 cm.. height.

The Pacific Parrotlet (Forpus coelestis) It is a small bird, chubby with a tail short and finished in tip. Distinguishable in flight by the blue and Brown on the inside of the wings. It has blue behind the eye and in the middle of the wing at the top. The female does blue stain on the top of the wing and the blue behind the eye is paler. The Immature males they are similar to the adult male, but more pale and with back brownish.

Habitat:

The Pacific Parrotlet they frequent most of the dry wooded habitats, such as scrub thorny, bosque deciduous, dense thickets of Captus with balsa trees, plantations of banana and mango, riparian zone, irrigated fields in Savannah and gardens, Although their preferred areas are those of the humid tropical vegetation such as the coastal mangales.

Older records of this species are from below sea level of 1.000 m, but are to 2.150 meters on the West side of the Andes in Huancabamba, East of Piura, Peru, and a 1.370-1.650 meters in the South of Loja, Ecuador.

Generally gregarious; they form large flocks where abundant food.

Reproduction:

It nests in the cavity of trees, in cactus, fence posts, piping or the nests of the Pale-legged Hornero (Furnarius leucopus), of the Necklaced Spinetail (Synallaxis stictothorax) or Fasciated Wren (Campylorhynchus fasciatus).

The breeding season includes the months of January to may. Sometimes, they breed once again throughout the year. The laying of eggs 4-6.

Food:

The diet of the Pacific Parrotlet includes seeds grass, berries, fruit (example, of Tamarindus, Amaranthus spinosus) and cactus fruits. It forages among the vegetation and land.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 147.000 km2

This species is found in the West of Ecuador, in Manabi Since the latitude of the Valley of the Rio Chone to the South across the South of Pichincha, The rivers and Guayas (including the Isla Puna), until Gold and Loja, entering the Northwest of Peru, in Tumbes, Piura, Lambayeque and South of Cajamarca, until Freedom and Trujillo.

Irregularly-common, sometimes abundant; most numerous in arid areas. The population apparently still has not been affected badly by the trade in live birds or the conversion of natural and semi-natural habitats for the Agriculture. The species is probably Forpus most numerous in captivity.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

Suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

Cotorrita de Piura en cautividad:

Colorful, charming and intelligent. These small birds have become in very popular pets in recent years. Its small size and quiet nature make of the Pacific Parrotlet an ideal choice for people living in apartments. Nicknamed "Pocket parrots" in the pet trade, These parakeets are actually the smallest of the family of parrots, and they are as smart as many larger species. Some learn to speak quite well, Although the species is not particularly known for the ability to speak.
An interesting fact upon the Pacific Parrotlet its closest relative is the the Amazon Parrot. Although the two species differ greatly in size, owners often report striking similarities between them. Despite being small birds, they are not in any way "birds of low maintenance". While it is true that they are, course, easy to clean, in comparison with the larger birds, However require your daily care to keep them docile, socialization at an early age is the key to be in a future good behavior.
They have tendency to obesity. They must be able to get out of their cages, spread your wings, and exercise their muscles to maintain their physical and mental health.

Their metabolism is very high, and they should have food available at all times. They are known for their appetite voracious, and occur in one diet varied that consists in fruits and vegetables fresh, small seeds such as millet, the high-quality commercial pellets, and sources of proteins from boiled egg.

There are many mutations.

Alternative names:

Pacific Parrotlet, Western Parrotlet (English).
Toui céleste, Perruche-moineau céleste (French).
Himmelsperlingspapagei, Himmelspapagei (German).
Tuim-peruano (Portuguese).
Catita Enana Amarilla, Cotorrita de Piura, Cotorrita Celestial (Spanish).
Periquito Esmeralda (Peru).

René Primevère Lesson
René Primevère Lesson

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Forpus
Scientific name: Forpus coelestis
Citation: (Lesson, 1847)
Protonimo: Agapornis coelestis

Pacific Parrotlet images:


Pacific Parrotlet (Forpus coelestis)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife
  • Book parrots, Parrots and macaws.

Photos:

(1) – Male Green Pacific Parrotlet, named Jackson By Susan C. Griffin (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Pacific Parrotlets (also known as Lesson’s Parrotlet and Celestial Parrotlet) at Wilhelma Zoo, Stuttgart, Germany By Undertable [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – A pet Pacific Parrotlet – yellow colour mutation By Becky Wetherington (originally posted to Flickr as 82/365 – Good bird.) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – A pet male Pacific Parrotlet (also known as Lesson’s Parrotlet and Celestial Parrotlet) By Erin Purcell (originally posted to Flickr as [1]) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Pacific Parrotlet (also known as Lesson’s Parrotlet and Celestial Parrotlet) in El Empalme, El Oro Province, coastal SW Ecuador By markaharper1 [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

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