Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers
Eslovaquia FCI 320 . Braque Type

Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers in an obedient and easy to train dog.

Content

History

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers is a relatively new breed. It dates back to the end of the decade of 1950, in Czechoslovakia after World War II and is believed to have been developed using the Weimaraner, the German Wirehaired Pointer and the Český fousek.

At any given time, the Slovaks who developed the breed asked the Club Weimaraner from Germany to recognize this dog under the name of Rough-haired Weimaraner, but the request was rejected.

The resulting dog is a true wonder, that combines the talents of a hunting dog (on the plains, in the woods and in the water), a working dog and a companion dog. Adapts to all climates.

Photo: Slovakian Wire-haired Pointing Dog by Ing. Urban Michal (breeders HP), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it's a tall braco, solidly built and not too heavy. This breed is bred to be a working dog, with nobility in its forms. Tail is cut to half length when permitted by law. It stands rather high, worn at rest and in horizontal action. The eyes are almond-shaped, amber, with a clever expression. In puppies and young dogs, are blue. The floppy ears are placed over the eye, they are rounded and not too long.

Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers
“Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers” during the dog show in Rybnik – Stone, Poland

The undercoat consists of a short, fine down that normally falls off in summer. The top layer is about 4 cm long, hard, straight and well laid. At the bottom of the muzzle, hairs are longer and softer and form a mustache. Above the eyes, are more pronounced and are obliquely erect. The forehead and occiput are covered with short, hard hair. They are short and soft on the ears. The tail is well provided with hair, but it is not brushed. The basic color is “grey”: is a sand shaded with brown. White markings are allowed on the tips of the legs and on the chest. Smaller or larger dark spots can mark gray. There is also a speckled coat.

Character and skills

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers described in the FCI standard as easy to train and compliant. They are selected for their work characteristics such as Pointer dogs. They hunt on the plains, forests and water. They work mainly after the shot, searching and recovering the game.

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it's animated, happy and eager to please. He has a lot of energy and is very intelligent, but gets bored easily. This can sometimes make training a bit difficult, and should work to make training sessions fun, interesting and not very long. They need a firm and consistent hand in discipline with structure and limits. Harsh words or physical punishment should be avoided. They have a strong bond with their families, and may develop separation anxiety without proper conditioning.

the Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers they are the happiest doing things with their owner. This makes the breed a great candidate as a canine companion for owners who love walks., cycling or jogging. It is imperative that they have opportunities to run free, preferably in a fenced area, since his hunting instinct is very strong, and the dog will not be able to resist the urge to chase the prey.

Health

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it is a generally healthy breed, and responsible breeders examine their breeders for health conditions such as elbow and hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy and cataracts.

Grooming

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers requires only minimal grooming to maintain good condition. Cleaning them with a damp cloth is usually sufficient between baths. Using a grooming glove or comb on your coat during fall season can help keep the amount of hair shedding low in your home.. Toenails should be trimmed every four weeks. A dental care regimen should start at an early age to avoid problems later in life.

Characteristics “Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers”

Dog Breed Video: Slovakian Rough Haired Pointer
Slovakian wire haired pointer – training

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 320
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • ​KCgundog
  • AKCGroup: Foundation Stock Service

FCI breed standard “Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers”

FCIFCI – “Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers”
FCI hard hair Slovak arm

Alternative names:

    1. Slovak Rough-haired Pointer, Slovakian Wirehaired Pointer (English).
    2. (Nom d’origine : Slovensky Hrubosrsty Stavac), Griffon d’Arrêt Slovaque à poil dur (French).
    3. SHS, Slovenský hrubosrstý stavač (German).
    4. Braco eslovaco de pêlo duro, (em eslovaco: Slovenský hrubosrsty stavac) (Portuguese).
    5. Grifón de muestra eslovaco de pelo duro (Spanish).

Slovak Cuvac
Eslovaquia FCI 142 - Sheepdogs.

Slovak Cuvac

The Slovak Cuvac it's a good watchdog, faithful and very brave, always ready to fight intruders, even if it's bears or wolves.

Content

History

The white mountain dog breed group is derived from arctic-type wolves, whose survivors remained from the pre-glacial era in the mountainous areas of Europe, as far as freezing limits reached. These areas are the mountainous slopes of the North Caucasus, the balkans, especially the Rodope mountains, the Carpathians, especially the Tatra, the slopes to the north of Abruzzo and finally the Pyrenees. In these cold and humid regions the mountain dog was introduced, also accompanied by ancient flora and fauna, which were still discovered by the Swedish researcher Wahlenberg in Scandinavia.. We can find a similar relationship with Nordic pets, for example, in Tatra regions in the Carpathians where the Huzul horse has as its predecessor the Gudbrandstal horse; in the same way, the Slovak Cuvac has an analogy with the pomeranian sheepdog. Slovak alpine cowboy activity has a very old tradition.

The Slovak Cuvac along with the mountain sheep, the Huzul horse and the typical mountain inhabitants constitute the basic economic conditions to take advantage of the pastures in cattle breeding. The Slovak mountains mostly belonged to the free people who were not subject to the servitudes of the Middle Ages; the people protected the country's borders and their task was only to make sheep cheeses. His institution was called ″ Wallach Alliance ″ (Vallasky belt), based in Kaschau until the abolition of easements. The members of this military and pastoral group carried out their services in the pastures, always accompanied by the typical surveillance dog. Tatra that also appear in many images. The Slovak Cuvac has shown his skills as a good caregiver, guardian and companion, as well as guide the flocks of sheep, to the care of the cattle and also in the pastures of turkeys and other domestic animals, as well as guarding various objects. Also the clients of the thermal stations who visited the alpine cowboys and who came to buy cheeses and other products, they looked with pleasure at these puppies covered in dense hair and bought them, taking this breed to lower places where it was often considered a luxury breed for its unique appearance.

In the Polish Tatra region, where there is a similar breed of mountain dog called goral dog, exceptionally strong specimens were commonly called "Liptauer", indicating its Slovak origin. In this way, It is also limited from the topographical point of view the region of the breeding of the Slovak Cuvac white. The genealogical record of the Slovak Cuvac was started in Czechoslovakia more than 30 years by Professor Anton Hruza of the Veterinary Faculty of Brünn. The initial material came from the Liptovska Luzna region, kokava, Vychodna from Tatrach and the surrounding area of ​​Rachovo in the Carpathians. The first hatchery was named ″ Ze zlaté studny ″ (from the golden well) and it was founded in Svitavy u Brna.

The calf in the Carpathians was called ″ z Hoverly ″ (the Hoverla). Since then, the Breeders Club of Slovak Cuvac is based in Bratislava where exact registrations are made and exhibitions are organized, judgments and powers that extend throughout the country. Other original bloodlines come from the Liptovské Hole regions, Velky Choc, buried, Martin, Jedlova and Jeseniky. The lines that have been extended further are Topas, career, Simba, Hrdos, Ibro, Cuvo, Ass, Dinar, Samko, Bojar, Olaf and others. Genetically the Slovak Cuvac can be characterized as a leuzistic mountain dog with a black muzzle, and to a lesser extent as a flavistico white dog with brown snout and lighter eyes. From the combination of the mentioned genetic types, in which the first is dominant, some variations in color tonality originate, pigmentation of the eyes, of the eyelids, of the muzzle, lips and mucosa. By means of a strict selection in the direction of the first type, judges and breeders achieved the rate required for the current standard and its stabilization within the hatchery area. The number of club members with bred and kennel dogs has reached as many as 200 in the last times. Since then, we have 800 live and registered dogs throughout the Republic. The quality of our upbringing of Slovak Cuvac it reflects, among other things, in the favorable judgment made in international exhibitions (Prague, Brno, Liberec, Bratislava, Leipzig among others) with intense foreign competition.

Physical characteristics

Shows the typical solid and solid appearance of mountain dogs. The bone is solid, the lively and vigilant temperament, fearless and attentive. The eyes are dark brown and oval. Ears are high and very mobile, of moderate length, hanging and almost attached to the head. The tail has a low implant and at rest descends to the hock. When the dog moves, he wears it curled on his back.

  • Hair: except for the head and limbs, where is shorter, the mantle constitutes a dense continuous covering without tufts in the tail and the haunches. The Mache have a marked mane. The subpelo, fine thick, it is completely covered by the hair and is less dense in summer.
  • Color: white. A yellowish blur at the end of the ears is supported but not desirable.
  • Size: males, of 62 - 70 cm.; females, of 59 - 65 cm..

Observations and tips

According to the tradition, only white individuals are selected to distinguish them at night from wild animals.

Character and skills

He is extremely faithful and brave and is always ready to face any harmful animal, still to wolves and bears. In order to differentiate it during the night from the wild beasts of the field, it is only bred in white color, this being an ancient tradition.

He is very affectionate with his owner.

Images of the Slovak Cuvac

Videos of the Slovak Cuvac

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI:Group 1 –> Herding dogs (except Swiss Cattle Dogs). / Section 1 –> Sheepdogs. Without working trial.
  • FCI 142
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs
    • AKC – PASTORAGE
    • UKC – Herding dogs
  • Slovak Cuvac breed FCI standard
  • SLOVAKIAN CHUVACH FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Slovak Cuvac, Slovak Chuvach, Tatransky Cuvac, Slovak tschuvatsch (English).
      2. Slovenský čuvač, cuvac (French).
      3. Slovenský Cuvac (German).
      4. Cuvac (Portuguese).
      5. Cuvac eslovaco (Spanish).

    Source:

    1 – fci

    Photos:

    1 – Cuvac eslovaco by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1323780
    2 – Cuvac eslovaco by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1323780
    3 – Cuvac eslovaco by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1424979
    4 – Cuvac eslovaco by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/898976
    5 – Cuvac eslovaco by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1233682

    Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
    Eslovaquia FCI 332 . Sheepdogs

    Czechoslovakian Wolf Dog

    Not a dog fit for everyone.

    Content

    History

    The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog has its origin in the crossing experiments between the “Carpathian Wolf” and the German Shepherd carried out in the former Czechoslovak Socialist Republic from 1955 under the supervision of the SR. Karel Hartl, a renowned Czech cynologist and breeder. The scientific objective of these experiments was to determine the characteristics of these hybrids (physical appearance, behavior, utility, fertility…), while the military tried to create a breed with the strength of the wolf and the docility of the dog, that could be used as an attack dog.

    The first births took place in 1958 at the border guard kennel in Libejovice, in the south of the country. Brita the wolf and the German Shepherd Cezar z Brezoveho Haje gave birth to 5 Puppies: Brent, Berta, Bono, Betty y Bessy.

    Betty was selected to continue the line at Libejovice kennel, while his sister Berta was sent to the Samorin kennel (now Malacky) with the same goal. Their pups were used as patrol dogs by border guards, confirming that these hybrids were healthy, functional and fertile.

    After this initial success, the Brita Wolf was able to mate again with a new male German Shepherd named Kurt z Vaclavky. Like this, in 1960, Defender, Bigan, Trophy, Bill and Bima were born in the Libejovice kennel. The male Bikar was chosen to be sent to the Pohranicni kennel in Slovakia to continue this second lineage.

    The experiment stopped at 1965, not without some success: hybrids were able to reproduce, socialize with humans and be trained for different tasks. At the end of the experiment, 16 of these dogs remained in the care of the army, While 18 were given to civil breeders.

    Then new lines were created, as..:

    – Astra (female german shepherd dog) and Argo (Carpathian wolf male) in 1968;
    – Lejdy (female Carpathian wolf) y Boyar from Schotterhof (male german shepherd) in 1972;
    – Urta with the Guardian Guard (3rd generation hybrid female) and Sarik (male Carpathian wolf) in 1974;
    – Xela with the Guardian Guard (3rd generation female hybrid) and Sarik (Carpathian wolf male) in 1983.

    The name “Czechoslovakian Wolfdog” seems to have become commonplace to designate these hybrids as early as the 1980s. 1960, but it wasn't until 1982 that the efforts of Mr.. Karel Hartl were finally officially rewarded when this new breed was recognized by the Czechoslovakian Dog Breeders Committee, the country's leading canine organization.

    It developed quite quickly and to 1991 not less than 1552 Czechoslovakian wolfhounds were registered in the national pedigree dog register.

    In 1999, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog was recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI).

    In the news, are mainly found in Central Europe, but its popularity is growing rapidly in several Western European countries like Italy, Germany, Spain and France. In France, for example, little more than 3.000 representatives of the breed have registered with the LOF (Book of French Origins) between 2010 and 2016, and the trend is increasing. His growing renown leads him to the gates of 10 Most popular dog breeds in France.

    On the other hand, the Czechoslovak Wolf dog has not actually crossed the English Channel: it is only one of the breeds recognized by the Kennel Club, the British organization of reference, and the FCI only has one approved kennel in the whole country.

    In United States, the AKC (American Kennel Club) partially recognizes it from 2001: their representatives can participate in competitions organized under the aegis of the organization, but they cannot register in the breed dog registry. On the other hand, the UKC (United Kennel Club) fully recognizes it, and has been doing it since 2006. In addition, in 2011 an official breed club was established (el Czechoslovakian Vlcak Club of America). There are currently some 200 specimens in American territory.

    Physical characteristics

    It is a dog of strong constitution, medium-sized and rectangular in structure. It is similar to the wolf in constitution, movement, colors, cloak and mask. The head, symmetrical and well muscled, is shaped like a truncated wedge. the eyes are small, macaroons, amber, with well-attached eyelids.
    Ears are erect, thin, triangular and short. The tail is implanted high, but it hangs straight. When the dog is excited, lifts it up in a sickle.

    Hair: The coat is straight and adherent. In winter it has a very dense undercoat.
    Color: From yellowish gray to silver gray, with the characteristic white mask.
    Size: Males are at least 65 cm.. the females, minimum 60 cm..

    Character and skills

    The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog he is very devoted to his family, including children. However, their rather dominant nature can be problematic for young people. In any case, it is important to socialize him from an early age and never leave a young child alone with a dog, regardless of race.

    He is also sociable with his companions and other pets who live under the same roof., since he is used to their presence relatively early. On the other hand, Woe to the cats, small dogs and other rodents that are unfamiliar to you and would have the bad idea of ​​venturing into your territory, or that they will meet during a walk: his hunting instincts were then all chances to regain the advantage.

    In addition, He is so affectionate with his entourage as he distrusts strangers: There, an education and socialization of the puppy started from an early age is also necessary to avoid any later problems.

    By having a highly developed sense of hierarchy, must face as soon as possible with his “leader of the pack”, who should show his dog his place in the family hierarchy . The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog he is a dog that cannot stand loneliness, largely preferring to live in the company of their pack, that is, his family. You are very likely to be unhappy if you have to be alone for long periods of time and risk running away to be reunited with your family, or feeling excluded from the “in the sense” and lose trust in his master.

    In addition, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog it is a very durable and active breed of dog, able to accompany his master even over very long distances that can exceed even those of a marathon, and whatever the weather conditions. In fact, being able to exercise daily is necessary for your physical and psychological well-being, and allows to avoid the risk of damage caused by the dog . It is an ideal companion for a sports lover who would like, for example, jogging with your dog , go hiking with your dog or even ride a bike with your dog.. On the other hand, even more than for any other race, your handler should make sure he is always up front to show his dog who is the "leader of the pack" .

    On the other hand, a person who prefers to spend his free time in front of a screen or immersed in a book is exposed to some difficulties if he thinks about adopting a Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

    In addition, by needing space, the latter is not a recommended breed of dog in apartments : it is much better to have a house with a garden. It is not uncommon to see him playing and sleeping there whatever the weather.: It is not very difficult, and is able to perfectly withstand bad weather. On the other hand, it is recommended that said garden be perfectly fenced, to avoid the risk of the dog escaping and wandering on public roads.

    The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog very little, if he barks. But when it does, it is impossible not to notice: similar to his ancestors the wolves , its howl is loud and can be heard over long distances. Daily, when you need to express yourself, opt for other means, like moans and grunts .

    Like this, this loyal and active dog will make a firm human companion happiness, sporty and available, but it is not recommended for people who have never had dogs before or who are often absent. In fact, the majority of failed adoptions are due to the fact that the human has not known how to impose himself as "leader of the pack" and / or has not been sufficiently available and active for his partner.

    Last but not least, It should be remembered that this recent breed of dog is still under construction., so excessively fearful or aggressive subjects may appear.

    Price “Czechoslovakian Wolfdog”

    The price of a puppy Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is of some 1250 - 1500 EUR.

    Characteristics “Czechoslovakian Wolfdog”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Czechoslovakian Wolfdog” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:Group 1 –> Sheepdogs and Cattle Dogs (except Swiss Cattle Dogs). / Section 1 –> Sheepdogs. With working trial.
    • FCI 332
    • Federations: FCI , AKC , ANKC , UKC
    • FCI standard of the breed Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
    • CZECHOSLOVAKIAN WOLFDOG FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Czechoslovak Vlcak (English).
      2. Československý vlčiak (French).
      3. tschechisch československý vlčák, slowakisch československý vlčiak (German).
      4. Československý vlčák (Portuguese).
      5. Československý vlčák, PLC (Spanish).

    Photo:
    Czechoslovakian Wolfdog by UsernameNotInUse / CC BY-SA

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