Hygen Hound
Noruega FCI 266 - Medium-sized Hounds

Hygen Hound

Its diffusion is very limited even in Norway; outside the country is practically unknown.

Content

History

The Hygen Hound originated in Norway in the 19th century. It owes its name to its creator Hans Fredrik Hygen, who wanted a brave and robust dog that could hunt even in harsh northern climates. So he decided to cross Swiss and German dogs with local dogs. The Hygen Hound has had a difficult history as the breed almost disappeared in the decade of 1970 without the intervention of a few passionate breeders. In the Decade of 2000, these breeders made genetic improvements by crossing with the Finnish Hound. Today, the Hygen Hound it is quite rare even in his homeland.

Photo: Norwegian dog breed hygenhound. Tosstjønna’s Nala by Bjørn Konestabo, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics “Hygen Hound”

The Hygen Hound has a robust and solid gait and a body inscribed in a triangle. Medium-sized, measured between 50 and 58 cm if it is a male and between 47 and 55 cm if it is a female for a weight of about 22 kg by sex, size and age.

The Hygen, as it is also nicknamed, stands out for its head of average length and size, that is wedge-shaped and marked width without being excessively heavy. The skull is slightly domed and the stop is accentuated. The eyes express both calm and seriousness. They are medium in size and show dark brown tones. The ears are of medium length and width, taper at the tips and set at a medium height. Fall while spreading and do not stick to the cheeks.

The Hygen Hound they have rough fur, straight, short, bright and dense. The coat is available in three colors: white with yellow-red markings / brown or black and tan, black and tan with white markings or red-yellow or red-brown with or without white markings and charcoal on the back, head and tail attachment.

Character and skills “Hygen Hound”

The Hygen Hound It is a race linked to its social group that is both protective, Gentile, balanced and versatile. Although they specialize in hunting activities, nothing prevents them from being adopted as pets, as long as the exercise is given, the necessary care and education. The worst tolerated punishment is inactivity. He also does not like to be alone despite his slightly independent nature.. To be happy, prefers open spaces over closed ones.

Ratings of the “Hygen Hound”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Hygen Hound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos of the “Hygen Hound”

Video Credits: Rolf The Horse Tree
Hygenhund Dog breed

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 266
  • Group 6: Scent hound and related breeds.
  • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • FCI breed standard “Hygen Hound”

      “Hygen Hound” FCI Hygen FCI Hound

      Alternative names:

        1. Hygenhund (English).
        2. Hygen (French).
        3. Hygenbracke, Hygenlaufhund, Hygenhund (German).
        4. (Em sueco: hygenhund) (Portuguese).
        5. (En sueco: hygenhund) (Spanish).

Halden Hound
Noruega FCI 267 - Medium-sized Hounds

Halden Hound

Its diffusion is limited to its country of origin, where it is also little known.

Content

History

Originally from Norway, the Halden Hound takes its name from Halden, the city where it was created.

Breed selection was initiated by Hans Larsen Bisseberg, an Ostfold County farmer, in 1860. The breed is believed to be the result of various crosses between local hounds and Swedish hounds, Germans and English. The official breed standard was established in the decade of 1950 and it is very rare outside your home country. Most frequently used the Norwegian Hound and the Hygen Hound.

Photo: A female Halden Hound. Colour: tricolor by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics “Halden Hound”

The Halden is similar to the American Foxhound ostensibly, although it is smaller.

It is a dog whose body can fit in a rectangle, proud, strong but not heavy. The head is medium in size, well balanced. The eyes, dark brown, they are medium in size and have a calm expression. The ears, that are neither too high nor too low, they are turned forward and should reach the middle of the muzzle. The tail, that is neither too high nor too low, it is quite thick and is carried low.

  • Hair: rough, very tight and smooth, with thick undercoat.
  • Color: White with black spots, small, less dark spots on the head, limbs and sometimes between black and white. However, black should not dominate.
  • Size: 52 a 60 cm for the male and 50 a 58 cm for female.
  • Weight: 23 a 29 kg for the male and 20 a 25 kg for females.

Character and skills “Halden Hound”

Kind and caring, the Halden Hound can be a great companion dog if you take the time to satisfy its many exercise needs. It is a nice dog to live, but can be unsociable with children, strangers or even other animals if not well socialized. Very exclusive, he does not like to be surrounded, which makes him a very good watchdog. Excellent hunter, fast and resistant. If you are not hunting, it will be the perfect companion for a sports owner.

Independent in nature, education should start very early to prevent this dog from developing too many bad habits. Firmness and consistency will be required to achieve results, but beware, no violence towards this sensitive dog will be tolerated.

Ratings of the “Halden Hound”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Halden Hound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos of the “Halden Hound”

Fox hunting with halden hound and fox terrier in Norway
Foxhunting with halden hound and fox terrier 07.11.20

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 267
  • Group 6: Scent hound and related breeds.
  • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.

FCI breed standard “Halden Hound”

“Halden Hound” FCI Halden Hound FCI

Alternative names:

    1. (Norwegian: Haldenstøver) (English).
    2. Halden (French).
    3. Haldenbracke, Haldenlaufhund, Halden-Stövare (German).
    4. (Norueguês: haldenstøver) (Portuguese).
    5. (Noruego: Haldenstøvare, Haldenstøver) (Spanish).

Norwegian Hound (Dunker)
Noruega FCI 203 - Medium-sized Hounds

Norwegian Hound

It is found only in its country of origin and is practically unknown outside its borders.

Content

History

The Norwegian Hound was originally called Dunker, in honor of the Norwegian captain and breeder Wilhelm Conrad Dunker (1806-1860), who established the first breed standard in 1850. During the first half of the 19th century, there was a large population of hounds in norway, including various types used for hare hunting. Wilhelm Dunker selected those with the sharpest sense of smell and crossed them with a Russian Harlequin Hound to produce a versatile hound, able to hunt rabbits and hares by smell rather than sight, and tough enough to withstand the harsh weather conditions of Norway.

In 1902 was founded the Norsk Harehundklub, a club dedicated to hounds. That same year the hounds were divided into two main groups, known today as Dunker y Hygenhounds. The first was the largest and included local dogs from all over the country, providing a wide and varied breeding base.

Although Norway was less affected by World War II than other European countries, the demand for these dogs dropped dramatically, which made it difficult for the breeders to continue their work properly. As a result, the number of specimens decreased significantly.

After the conflict is over, the Dunker regained some popularity and was officially recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) in 1956.

However, this bounce was only short lived: lost ground again from the decade of 1970, due to competition from foreign breeds of hunting dogs imported into the country.

Things did not improve much in the 80, to the point that inbreeding problems began to appear. In fact, the decline in its population led many breeders to resort to inbreeding to continue breeding. This led to a high rate of congenital deafness.. For this reason, in 1987, the breeding committee of the Norwegian Hound asked the Norsk Kennel Klubb (NKK), the reference canine organization in Norway, permission to cross the Dunker with other races, but they denied it. However, how things did not improve much, the NKK finally gave his approval for some crosses two years later. This resulted in a more varied and healthy genetic makeup, while maintaining the characteristic features of the breed.

The United Kennel Club (UKC) recognized it in 1996. However, the other American reference organization, the American Kennel Club (AKC), has not done the same to this day – nor does the neighboring Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) or the prestigious British Kennel Club (KC). In fact, at the global level, recognition of the breed is still quite partial.

It's the same for broadcast. Even in the other Scandinavian countries, is almost absent, with the exception of Sweden, where the Svenska Kennelklubben records a number of births each year that can be counted on the fingers of one hand, compared to around twenty in the early nineties. In France, not a single inscription was made in the Book of French Origins (LOF) during the first two decades of the 21st century.

In Norway, The number of Dunkers recorded each year in the NKK has been around 150 since the mid-decade 2000. However, this marks a halving of the number compared to the change of the years 90. This limited number is partly explained by the deafness problem present in this breed: almost the 75% of its population suffers from deafness.

Photo: A Norwegian Hound by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

The Norwegian Hound It is a medium-sized dog distinguished by its long, well-proportioned body, his energetic and clear walk and his light weight. They have solid bones, giving an impression of strength and endurance. The back is straight, firm and long enough to give length to the rib cage. Lets on strong, dry front legs. The tail is wide and thick at the base and tapers at the tip. Descends to the hock or slightly protrudes from the hock.

Dunker
Dunker

Quite long, its head is characterized by a slightly domed skull and a marked stop. Located at half height, the ears are flat, without folds, hanging and soft to the touch. Half-width, taper towards its tip, which is rounded. Its mouth has scissor-shaped teeth dominated by a square, well-developed snout., a black nose and wide nostrils.

His eyes are round, large and very penetrating. Although they are usually dark in color, there are also individuals with one or two blue eyes, a characteristic that is associated with an increased risk of deafness. Minnow eyes are allowed in blue individuals (variegated). Regardless of the color of the eyes, the eyes express calm and seriousness.

The coat of the Dunker consists of short hair, hard, tight and dense. Its coloration is a distinctive sign of the breed: they are either black with light fawn and white spots, or blue merle (Variegated?) and mottled with light fawn and white spots. Jet black coats with dark tawny markings are less desirable, and those in which white predominates (to the point of representing at least the 50% Of the surface) are considered undesirable by the norm.

Last but not least, sexual dimorphism is not very marked in this breed: males and females are quite similar in size and weight.

Life expectancy: 12 years of age.

Size of Norwegian Hound

    – Female weight: Of 24 a 25 kg
    – Male weight: Of 24 a 25 kg
    – Female size: Of 47 a 53 cm.
    – Male size: Of 50 a 55 cm.

Character and skills “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

The Norwegian Hound is a fast and tenacious hunter with an above-average olfactory ability. They excel particularly in hunting hare and rabbit.

Being also gentle, loving, cheerful and friendly, they have all the qualities required to be an excellent companion dog. Balanced, patients, tolerant and devoid of aggressiveness, they are very good playmates for children. However, it is important to note that a dog should never be left alone with a small child without adult supervision, and this applies to all races.

His total lack of aggressiveness and his attraction to humans, even for those you don't know, make it totally impossible to use as a guard dog. In effect, not reserved at all, shy, fearful or aggressive with strangers, rather they tend to welcome them positively and trust them. They are more likely to greet a malicious person with curiosity and licking them rather than barking to warn their master or make them understand that they better go their way.

His sociability extends to other dogs too. Therefore, it is quite possible to share a house with a dog companion without fearing that conflict situations will multiply, and is generally friendly with those he meets on his walks.

With cats and other animals, things are a little more complicated. His hunting instinct naturally leads him to chase any small furry animal that is not part of the canine species.. Although he has grown up with him and must consider his little companion as a member of the family and not as a potential prey, risk can never be ruled out, so it is better to avoid such cohabitation. As for those that can be found on your walks, you probably want to chase them. Therefore, it is preferable to keep it on a leash during excursions, to avoid any accident.

Dunker
Dunker

In any case, the fear that it will chase other animals does not mean that you should not take it out enough every day, knowing that you need a lot of activity to expend your great energy. Need at least 45 minutes of exercise per day, but his stamina makes him happy to go further if given the chance. In addition, it is preferable to vary the pleasures to allow you to fully expend your energy: long walks, run through the park, sports with dogs, etc. Sports that require running (like canicross) and those that appeal to your senses (like tracking) they are the most recommended. In fact, this dog is very happy when he has to mobilize his physical and mental capacities. In any case, in addition to allowing you to exercise, all these activities reinforce the relationship with his master, which is especially important if you are hearing impaired.

From the above it follows that the Dunker not suitable for an elderly or very sedentary person, I couldn't give you all the exercise you need. The ideal for him is a master of sport, and willing to take his partner in his various activities. Retirees may be right for him, if they are active enough.

In any case, life in the city is not ideal for him, that needs large spaces to fully develop. A house with a garden in the country is a much more appropriate environment to live. However, it is important to ensure that the garden is well fenced and that the environment is safe, as his instincts and hunting instincts soon lead him to follow leads and flee.

Once your need for exercise is satisfied, the Norwegian Hound has an easy and docile character; is far from being as stubborn as many hunting dog breeds. However, your sense of smell can make training difficult, as he is easily distracted by a scent and not really responsive to his master's commands.

Their propensity to bark can also be quite annoying. He is particularly prone to doing so if his master is away for a long time without having given him any exercises beforehand and without having the means to do it himself.. In fact, inactivity can be a burden and cause those behavior problems, as well as destruction, for example. However, as long as you have something to take care of in the absence of your family, not the type of dog that suffers a lot from separation anxiety.

Education “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

Like all the other hounds, the Norwegian Hound must be socialized from an early age. In other words, so that he becomes a balanced adult and has no trouble finding his place, should be given without delay a maximum of opportunities to meet all kinds of humans (veterinary, neighbors, delivery man, etc.), Other animals, but also to face various noises, smells and situations. This is even more important as you are easily distracted by your sense of smell..

The rules established in your education should also be taught to you from an early age, when your ability to learn and docility are at their best. As with any race, bad habits are quickly acquired while he is still a puppy and become real problems when he grows up.

In any case, the Dunker it is a breed of dog that is easy to train and that listens to its master, as long as he uses a dog-friendly training method. Treatments generally prove to be very effective in positively reinforcing your good deeds and facilitating learning. However, sometimes it is necessary to show firmness and affirm your own authority to prevent this dogged dog from doing what he pleases. It can also be difficult to get their attention, given their tendency to be distracted by their sense of smell.

Since it has a strong inclination to follow its nose and to chase passing small animals, Teaching your dog to call back is especially important to avoid the risk of a frantic tug on the leash or running away if it moves freely.

It can also be helpful to try to teach him to channel his propensity to bark.. However, as it is deeply ingrained in him, should not be expected to be the calmest of dogs. If it is impossible to make him understand that some things do not necessarily require him to bark, at least he can be taught to stop on command.

Last but not least, if the dog is deaf from birth, as is the case with a significant fraction of the representatives of the breed, the master must obviously adapt to this restriction: training a deaf dog is not done in the same way as training another dog that is capable of hearing its master's voice. Trust is then even more crucial in the relationship between the animal and its master., so that you can learn and live in good conditions despite your disability. Of course, communication is then done through non-verbal communication, and it is up to the teacher to adopt explicit body language, based on gestures and precise mimics, specific for each indication you want to give.

Health “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

The Norwegian Hound is very resistant, generally have excellent health and very good longevity.

Used to living in harsh Norwegian weather, can tolerate cold and humidity without difficulty. Their coat is naturally waterproof and offers good protection from the elements. On the other hand, shows some intolerance to high temperatures, even if it is able to adapt to a Mediterranean climate. You simply need to lighten up your activities during hot flashes, or at least privilege those that are carried out inside, to make sure you always have access to a shaded place or even air conditioning and to avoid any excessive physical exercise in the hottest hours.

Its small population and its limited diffusion prevent a very important deterioration of health, but it has been shown that it is predisposed to certain problems:

  • deafness, what is a hereditary disease. According to the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA), almost the 75% of the breed population is today deaf by at least one, if not both ears;
  • hip dysplasia, a joint malformation that may be characterized by a hereditary predisposition. Can cause joint pain as well as difficulty moving;
  • Elbow dysplasia, which can also be favored by a hereditary predisposition. It is painful and leads to difficulty moving and the development of osteoarthritis;
  • progressive retinal atrophy, a hereditary and incurable eye disease. Causes loss of night vision first, then loss of daytime vision, to the point that the dog becomes totally blind;
  • Demodecic scabies, a contagious parasitic disease that causes itching and true discomfort to the dog, gradually losing appetite and sleep;
  • ear infections (otitis, etc.), due to its hanging shape.
  • In addition, individuals used for hunting are exposed to the various risks associated with this activity: wounds, parasites, thorns, etc.

    In addition, the Dunker has a strong appetite. How it is usually active, this is not usually a problem. However, if it is not, soon becomes overweight.

    Given the hereditary conditions to which the breed is predisposed, the breeder's work plays a decisive role in the adoption of a Norwegian Hound that he is in perfect health and that he will probably remain so. In addition to the results of genetic tests performed on the parents and the puppy to reduce the risk of such diseases, every serious and responsible breeder must be able to present a certificate of good health established by a veterinarian, as well as documents related to the vaccines administered.

    In addition, when the dog is small and still growing, your bones and joints are particularly fragile: therefore, any excessive or prolonged physical exercise should be avoided, since I could pay it one day or another, with potentially permanent sequelae (malformations, etc.).

    Last but not least, it is necessary to consult a veterinarian at least once a year to ensure that the dog is in good health or, on the other hand, to be able to detect as soon as possible any problem whose symptoms are not yet visible. This health check is also an opportunity to carry out your immunization reminders, which are another essential lever to keep the dog in good health. Still in the prevention registry, it is the owner's responsibility to renew the antiparasitic treatments whenever necessary throughout the year, so your partner is never unprotected.

    Care and maintenance “Norwegian Hound”

    A tough breed, the Norwegian Hound do not require much maintenance.

    However, they lose a lot of hair, so brushing your hair twice a week is not too much to help remove dead hairs and keep it looking good. During their shedding periods in spring and fall, when it should be done more often (even daily) to prevent hair growth throughout the house.

    Since his hair is not very dirty and therefore does not have a strong odor, bathing him two or three times a year is generally sufficient. In any case, a too frequent bath will make the sebum naturally present on the skin disappear, that insulates and protects it from the elements. Having said that, do not hesitate to give him a bath if he has gotten very dirty, for example during a particularly muddy hunting trip. In any case, you can only use a shampoo specially designed for dogs, at the risk of damaging your skin.

    Dunker
    Dunker

    The ears, on the other hand, require special attention, since its hanging shape implies an increased risk of infections (ear infections, etc.). They should be cleaned every week with a damp cloth or a cleaning product specially designed for this purpose.. They should also be dried after each bath or a long period of time in a humid place.

    Their eyes they should also be examined weekly and cleaned if necessary with a damp cloth.

    It is also necessary to brush the teeth of your dog every week or even every day to avoid the formation of dental plaque and its possible consequences (bad breath, diseases, etc.). A toothpaste specially designed for dogs should always be used.

    In addition, it is important to regularly check your dog's claws to make sure they are not getting too long and to trim them if this is the case. This could not only hinder your gait, it could also be broken and potentially injured at the same time. Having said that, while you're active and spending long hours outdoors, natural wear and tear is usually enough to file them.

    To know how to proceed during maintenance sessions, it is helpful to benefit from the expertise of a vet or groomer the first time. In fact, whether the various procedures for grooming the coat, the ears, the eyes, your pet's teeth or claws are not done properly, not only will satisfactory results not be obtained, but the owner may even injure or injure his pet. In addition, the owner should get used to his pet very soon, so that throughout his life he accepts to be manipulated without being rebellious.

    In addition, when your pet returns from a long time in the wild, it is a good idea to systematically take a little time to inspect it carefully: parasites, spikes or dirt may have gotten into their fur, and may also have been injured.

    What is the price of a “Norwegian Hound”

    In Norway, a puppy Dunker It costs around 7000 Norwegian crowns (a few 650 EUR). The sale price varies from one individual to another depending on the prestige of the offspring, the dog's lineage and its intrinsic characteristics.

    Since the breed does not have a wide international distribution, it is almost impossible to find a breeder of the same outside your country of origin.

    Therefore, whether you are in France, Belgium, Switzerland, Canada or elsewhere, who wants to adopt a Norwegian Hound you must opt ​​for the import solution. In this case, keep in mind that transportation and administrative costs are added to the purchase price and, of course, you must respect the regulations to import a dog from abroad.

    Ratings of the “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos of the “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

    Sabueso Noruego (Dunker) – Raza de Perro
    Dunker 🐶🐾 Everything Dog Breeds 🐾🐶

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 203
    • Group 6: Scent hound and related breeds.
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds

    FCI breed standard “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

    “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)” FCI Norwegian Hound (Dunker) FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Dunker (English).
      2. Dunker (French).
      3. Dunkerbracke, Dunkerlaufhund (German).
      4. Dunker (Portuguese).
      5. Cazador noruego, Dunker, Sabueso de Dunker (Spanish).

    Black Norwegian Elkhound
    Noruega FCI 268 - Nordic Hunting Dogs

    Black Norwegian Elkhound

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound is closely attached to his people and is very loyal

    .

    Content

    History

    Among the three moose hunters of the North (Black Norwegian Elkhound, Gray Norwegian Elkhound and Jämthund), the Black Norwegian is probably the one receiving the least attention. But the agile and friendly hunter is an attractive breed to many dog ​​owners..

    Its origins go back a long way along with those of the Gray Norwegian Elkhound: These self-confident four-legged Spitz-type friends belong to the time-honored breeds, because a similar dog look can be tried up to the stone age in Scandinavia.

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound is a modern variant of Gray Norwegian Elkhound and has been officially recognized as an independent breed since 1877. An advantage of him Black Norwegian Elkhound during hunting is that it is clearly visible in the white snow. However, These clever four-legged friends have always been used as guard dogs or pack protection dogs.

    Physical characteristics

    Despite the similarity of name, the Black Norwegian Elkhound it's a separate breed, but closely related to the Gray Norwegian Elkhound. However, the Black Norwegian Elkhound it is much less common.

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound it is optically a typical Spitz and has a compact, square build with erect ears. He wears his tail rolled up on his back like other dogs Moose hunter from adulthood. It is smaller and more agile than the Gray Norwegian Elkhound and weighs around 18 kg with a height of 47 cm to the cross. As the name already indicates, this dog's short coat is black, but white spots on legs and chest are allowed as per standard. Also the eyes are dark. The pelage is dense, very sticky and consists of a rough top coat with a soft bottom coat.

    Character and skills

    Multifaceted character

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound he is very loyal to his people. This does not mean that this independent partner is subordinate. Abroad, these dogs are lively, curious and open to all common adventures. However, the busy Black Norwegian Elkhound they also enjoy cozy hugs on a quiet afternoon.

    They are playful, brave and very smart. Like many Nordic dogs, are good “alarm systems”, but only limited good watchdogs: They indicate to strangers – loudly and persistently – but it may happen that they then run towards a potential intruder with a wagging tail. These proud four-legged friends don't always get along with other dogs of the same species. Proper conditioning and socialization is important

    Educating the Black Norwegian Elkhound

    Easily educated with knowledge

    His intelligence and humanity contribute to the education of this Black Norwegian Elkhound don't present big obstacles.

    Likes to work with “their” people and do what they say, as long as you also find it useful. Because you always have to take into account the small stubbornness of this independent hunter when training him. Be consistent and pay special attention to recoverability and bark control. Strength and toughness are absolutely out of place in the upbringing of this sensitive four-legged friend.

    Usually reacts very quickly and strongly to harsh words and reproaches, so use them sparingly. The Black Norwegian Elkhound can be better motivated by the principle of positive reinforcement – clicker training can also be of great help here. A visit to the puppy school helps improve this companion's social streak, which is sometimes a bit belligerent compared to other dogs. It can also be very helpful to attend training classes at the dog school – it is better to choose a suitable dog school where you and your companion feel comfortable before the puppy arrives.

    Black Norwegian Elkhound Health

    In general, the breed is considered to be quite robust and, provided he is raised responsibly, is largely free of genetic diseases. Representatives of the breed can reach the 13 years old in good health. This energetic four-legged friend needs a species-appropriate diet, which should consist mainly of meat: Therefore, you must choose a food in which meat is the first element of the declaration and preferably cereals are not included. Your dog's energy needs depend on his constitution and how much he consumes through exercise, so keep an eye on your slim waist and adjust daily servings as needed.

    Important: Just like us humans, small snacks move quickly to the hips too – plan your dog's snacks in the general ration. Healthy snacks include dry dog ​​chews or sugar-free dental care snacks and freeze-dried meat snacks. Water must always be freely available.

    Caring for the Black Norwegian Elkhound

    The coat of the Black Norwegian Elkhound it is very important to the furry four legged friend, because it performs an outstanding protective function in the harsh Nordic climate and protects you from extensive autumn rains as well as freezing winds. Help your partner keep their hair always in a clean condition and brush it every few days to remove dead hair. You can also brush daily during the coat change, so your roommate loses less hair in the apartment. Coat dirt can be brushed off as soon as it has dried.

    You should only bathe your roommate if it can't be helped, use a mild dog shampoo for this purpose. When brushing, routinely check the ears and clean them with a mild shampoo if necessary. Some dog owners have chosen to brush their roommates' teeth with a dog toothbrush and toothpaste.. It is a good way to prevent tartar and its secondary diseases until the dog is old enough. However, you should already accustom your puppy to the ritual. Also check the claws of older dogs from time to time – if they no longer wear enough, you need to shorten them accordingly with a pair of dog claw pliers.

    Activities with the Black Norwegian Elkhound

    Although his original task was to accompany the hunter when hunting moose and bears, but also smaller animals like foxes, the Black Norwegian Elkhound it is a versatile all-rounder: Loves outdoor exercise and is considered very persistent. This is why you can easily take your four-legged adult friend with you to training sessions. jogging.

    Outdoor activities can be relaxed, especially if you have trained your Black Norwegian Elkhound so it doesn't run away with every rabbit. Apart from recovery exercises – that only very few moose hunters enjoy – the docile and energetic dog can get excited about many things: For example, can find great fun in agility sports and quest games. In addition, It is suitable for the work of rescue dogs. Some owners of moose hunters they also report on beautiful experiences with their partner, trained as a visiting dog, with whom they visit, for example, retirement homes or nursing homes and give the residents of those places an animal joy. Try together what you like, The chances are great!

    Is a Black Norwegian Elkhound Right for Me?

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound suits athletes who like to be outside and keep their dog busy. If you can make this possible for your dog, it is also possible to keep it in an apartment, as long as the apartment offers enough space. Education can be mastered by beginners if they are willing to deal with the hunting characteristics of the breed and adjust education accordingly..

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound it can be a wonderful companion for children. This original hunter can live normally with cats, sometimes even in a friendly way, if you have already gotten used to them as a puppy. Otherwise there could be problems, because the dog sees the cat as prey. Small animals like rabbits are not ideal companions, since they can always trigger prey drive.

    A Black Norwegian Elkhound can also sleep outside, what can be a sensible alternative for these heat sensitive animals in summer. However, needs close family connections and does not like to be alone. Before the dog moves, clarify not only the one-time and permanent expenses you will have to pay, but also if you are willing to spend several hours a day actively with your new partner for years to come. You should also take care of your dog in case of illness or during the holidays – many destinations today also offer holidays with a dog.

    Where can I find my desired Black Norwegian Elkhound?

    It doesn't matter which of the two Norwegian Elkhound has won your heart: Outside Scandinavia, big game hunters from the far north are rarely seen. This is even more difficult with the black Norwegian than with the gray. Therefore, if you are interested in this animal rarity, please contact the Nordic dog breed clubs in your country. If required, they can contact breeders at home and abroad. However, you will usually have to take into account waiting times and long distances to travel to the desired puppy. In his native country, Norway, only a few are born 120 puppies every year.

    As a result, becomes difficult or impossible if you look for a Black Norwegian Elkhound outside scandinavia, that is already grown. It is very unlikely that you will find a four-legged dog of this type in the animal shelters of your country; However, a visit there can be helpful if it's open to other breeds.

    Ratings of the Black Norwegian Elkhound

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Black Norwegian Elkhound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images of Black Norwegian Elkhound

    Black Norwegian Elkhound Puppy by Eirik Newth / CC BY

    Black Norwegian Elkhound running through the snow by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/1602973

    Black Norwegian Elkhound Videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 268
    • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
    • Section 2: Nordic Hunting Dogs. Working trial only for the Nordic countries (Sweden, Norway and Finland).
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 2 Nordic Hunting Dogs.

    FCI standard of the breed Black Norwegian Elkhound

    FCI Black Norwegian Elkhound FCI Black Norwegian Elkhound

    Alternative names:

      1. Norsk Elghund Svart, Norsk Elghund Black, Black Elkhound, Norwegian Moose Dog (black) (English).
      2. Chien d’élan norvégien noir (French).
      3. Norsk Elghund Sort (German).
      4. Norsk elghund sort (Portuguese).
      5. Elkhound noruego negro (Spanish).

    Photos:

    1 – Black Norwegian Elkhound About 1 years old by Rvenes / CC BY-SA

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound
    Noruega FCI 242 - Nordic Hunting Dogs

    Cazador de Alces Noruego

    Content

    History

    National dog of Norway

    The roots of this Norwegian national dog go back a long way: already the findings of the Stone Age give evidence of a very similar quadruped. Some cynologists suspect that the current appearance of the breed is very close to that of the first western European domestic dogs. In scandinavia, the Gray Norwegian Elkhound they were used mainly to hunt elk, but also bears, Hence its name.

    For a long time the breed was mainly bred in Sweden, where was he called “gray dog”. But since 1981 Norway has had the sponsorship: The breed got its current name, the “gray dog” was formally removed as a race in this context.

    In total there are three Moose Hunter dogs: Besides of Gray Norwegian Elkhound, are the Black Norwegian Elkhound and the Jämthund Sueco. Norwegian gray is the most common: Although rarely seen outside of Scandinavia, is very popular in its home country and is considered the national dog there.

    Physical characteristics

    The dog Gray Norwegian Elkhound has a very classic look, similar to the first dogs domesticated by humans in Western Europe. The waterproof coat in typical shades of gray, black and white already gives an indication of the Nordic origin of this dog Moose Hunter. But it also has the effect that some laymen at first glance consider it a mixed race with parts of the Huskys. With a maximum height of 52 cm at the withers and a body weight of about 24 kg with compact structure, the Gray Norwegian Elkhound belongs to the medium-sized breeds and is larger than the Black Norwegian Elkhound. The pointy ears are erect and the tail is ideally rolled slightly over the back..

    Character and skills

    The Gray Norwegian Elkhound they are intelligent animal companions with their own personalities. So if you are looking for a four-legged friend who is willing to subordinate himself, you are wrong with this proud fellow. The breed is considered brave, smart and friendly. To the Gray Norwegian Elkhound they usually like to bark, make sure to monitor it since they are puppies. Many Gray Norwegian Elkhound they are therefore very suitable as watchdogs, because they are alerted by strangers – However, it is quite possible that this human-friendly breed will be caressed by a stranger. In an emergency, However, loyal four-legged friends are always ready to defend their loved ones. The Gray Norwegian Elkhound can be well kept as a family dog – whenever I exercise a lot outside. He gets along very well with children and shows his playful side, especially when interacting with them.

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound Training

    Although this breed does not have a submissive nature, is considered easy to create. An advantage is that this friendly and social dog does not tend to dominate or attack. In any case, it is important to have a sufficient workload, because a boring Gray Norwegian Elkhound seek their occupation independently, and this is usually not to the liking of their owners. In addition, make sure that from the age of the puppy you work for a good recovery of the hunting dog. You should also take into account the joy of barking when you train. Attending a dog training school can support you and your quadruped in joint learning and also reinforces their social streak in handling their peers..

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound Health

    These Norwegian hunters they are considered very robust and hardly prone to genetic diseases. There is a slight predisposition to the eye disease Progressive Retinal Atrophy (ARP) and hip dysplasia – before buying a puppy, Please, talk to the breeder in question, who will be happy to inform you about sanitary precautions for your farm animals. Exercising and eating a balanced diet is the best way to keep your puppy's joints in shape during old age.. Make sure this dog always has a cool place to stay in summer – the breed tolerates cold well, but is considered to be heat sensitive. The Gray Norwegian Elkhound can reach an age of up to 16 years, some even more.

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound Nutrition

    Like every dog, the Gray Norwegian Elkhound you need a balanced diet that is high in meat. So make sure to feed a food where meat is at the top of its intake, regardless of whether you choose wet or dry food. The Gray Norwegian Elkhound tend to gain weight quickly, so you should always watch your daily ration and include treats. Manufacturer's instructions are only a rough guide, as metabolism and exercise change your dog's energy needs. So check your partner's weight regularly so that you can counter if he gains or loses weight. If you want to reward your dog, use high-quality sugar-free snacks or cereals. Chunks of freeze-dried meat for dogs are a good example. Dry chews meet your partner's chewing needs. Make sure your four-legged friend always has enough drinking water at his disposal.

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound Care

    This dog's coat consists of a longer top coat and a dense undercoat.. It is very weather resistant and easy to brush. However, the Gray Norwegian Elkhound you also lose a relatively large amount of hair, especially during coat change twice a year. During this time, you should brush him daily to stop the flood of hair in your home and rid the dog of dead hair. Especially with older animals or if your dog walks mainly on the soft forest floor, you may need to trim the claws regularly. This will prevent your Gray Norwegian Elkhound get hurt if you get stuck with them. If you are not sure, ask your vet to show you how to trim them during checkups – you can usually do the pedicure yourself with special pliers. When brushing your dog's ears, also check that they are not dirty and use a special ear cleaner for dogs if necessary. You can effectively prevent tartar and its consequences by brushing your dog's teeth every day along with a dog toothbrush and an animal-friendly toothpaste.. If you are considering this, you should get your puppy used to the ritual around its shiny little teeth.

    Is A Gray Norwegian Elkhound Right For Me?

    The Gray Norwegian Elkhound still well suited to hunters, but he can also be a happy family dog ​​if he has enough outdoor activity. Not a dog for the city. A fenced garden would be an ideal addition to your home. This breed is not made for living in a small apartment.. You should already have experience with dogs, because although the Gray Norwegian Elkhound be smart and like to learn, will not accept instructions that seem crazy. Here you need the right mix of knowledge and sensitivity. Can get along with cats, but he should have already met them as potential companions at puppy age.

    Like any other four legged friend, keeping this dog requires a not inconsiderable amount of time: Are you ready to spend a few hours outside with your partner every day and in any weather? In addition, estimate costs in advance: In addition to the purchase price and, if required, the basic equipment, there are regular expenses for vet visits, high quality food, as well as the tax and insurance of the dog.

    Where can I buy a Gray Norwegian Elkhound?

    If you are looking for a Gray Norwegian Elkhound outside scandinavia, you must have a little patience. So it makes sense to contact Nordic dog clubs directly, that can help you, for example, to make contacts abroad. Because especially in the far north there are naturally more specimens. In scandinavia, a few 2.000 puppies of the breed see the light of day every year.

    The probability of finding a Gray Norwegian Elkhound adult in animal shelters is extremely low outside of Scandinavia. So, even if you prefer to give an old animal a new home, contact the Nordic dog clubs in your country. The hybrids of the protectors are also possibly questioned, that they will be glad of a common coexistence with you.

    We wish you much joy with your friendly companion from the far north!!

    Ratings of the Gray Norwegian Elkhound

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Gray Norwegian Elkhound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images of the Gray Norwegian Elkhound

    Photos:

    1 – Norwegian Elk Hunter gray by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/706371
    2 – Norwegian Elk Hunter gray by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/869691
    3 – Norwegian Elk Hunter gray by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/1336997
    4 – Norvin Son of Storm owned by Nichola Herron. Photo by sannse at the City of Birmingham Championship Dog Show, 29th August 2003 by True / CC BY-SA
    5 – Norwegian Elk Hunter gray by https://pxhere.com/no/photo/1233791
    6 – Norwegian Elk Hunter gray by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/c%C3%A9sped-mam%C3%ADfero-animales-naturaleza-3259673/

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound Videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 242
    • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
    • Section 2: Nordic Hunting Dogs. With working trial only for the Nordic countries (Sweden, Norway, Finland).
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 2 Nordic Hunting Dogs.
    • AKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • ANKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • CKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • ​KC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • NZKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • UKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs

    FCI Gray Norwegian Elkhound breed standard

    FCI Gray Norwegian Elkhound FCI Gray Norwegian Elkhound

    Alternative names:

      1. Norsk elghund, Grå norsk elghund, Gray Norwegian Elkhound, Small, Grey Elk Dog, Norwegian Moose Dog, Harmaa norjanhirvikoira (English).
      2. Norwegian Elkhound (French).
      3. Norwegischer Elchhund grau (German).
      4. Elkhound, Norueguês cinza (Portuguese).
      5. Norsk elghund, Norsk elghund grå, Cazador de alces noruego gris, Gray Norwegian elkhound, Small grey elk dog, Norwegian moose dog (Spanish).

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