Diademed Parrot
Amazona Diadema

amazona autumnalis

Content

Description:

31–35 cm. length and 450-550 g. of weight.

The Diademed Parrot (Amazona Diadema) It is generally green, with black edges to feathers crown, to the mantle and the chest; crown green to nape; the back of the green neck, mauve margin; feathers of the cere and forecrown, red; yellow-green, less yellow in upper cheeks, up to the ear-coverts; secondaries red on the bases, the green rest; tail green; eye ring pale yellow; eyes oranges; bill dark grey.

Note:


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Previously treated as conspecific with the Red-lored Amazon (Amazona autumnalis), It is very similar to the subspecies Amazona autumnalis salvini

  • Sound of the Diademed Parrot.

Habitat:

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Amazona

It is likely to frequent a variety of habitats from lowland forest species, including edges evergreen forest, as well as modified areas containing scattered trees or plantations (Del Hoyo et al., 1997, pit et to the., 2016).

They are in loose flocks or pairs, are gregarious When feed.

Reproduction:

The laying is of 2-3 eggs. Breeding season, It is supposed to be in early: January-March.

Food:

It feeds mainly from fruits and seeds, even some cultivated species (Del Hoyo et al., 1997), although there are no published data (Del Hoyo et al., 2016).

Distribution:

Size of its range (breeding/resident): 71.800 km2

Endemic low Black river and the northern margin of Amazon River, in the states of Amazon and Northwest of For, in Brazil.

Conservation Amazona diadema:

Conservation status ⓘ


Endangered Endangered (UICN)ⓘ

• Current red list category of the UICN: In danger of extinction.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the red list category

    Based on a model of future deforestation on Amazon basin and susceptibility to this new species capture, it is suspected that its population will suffer a very fast along three generations descent from 2002, so it is in danger of extinction.

Justification of trend

    This species is expected to lose between 49 and 55% suitable habitat within its distribution throughout three generations (37 years) starting at 2002, based on a model of Amazon deforestation (Soares-Filho et to the). Given its susceptibility to capture, It is suspected that species decline by 50-79% during this time.
Threats

• The main threat to this species is the accelerating deforestation in the Amazon basin as land is cleared for cattle ranching and soybean production, provided by the expansion of the road network, together with his susceptibility to capture (Soares-Filho et to the. 2011).

• It is assumed that the species undergoes some pressure catch, probably mainly for internal trade, since this species is rare in aviculture (Del Hoyo et al ., 1997, pit et to the ., 2016).

• The proposed changes to Brazilian Forest Code reduce the percentage of land to a private owner is legally obliged to keep as forest (including, critically, a reduction in the width of forest buffers with perennial vapors) and they include an amnesty for owners who deforested before July 2008 (That later they would be absolved of the need to reforest vacant land illegally) (Bird et to the., 2011).

Conservation Actions Underway

• No specific conservation actions for this species are known, Although part of their habitat is protected.

• It is distributed in the Jau National Park where it is rare or uncommon (Borges et al ., 2001, Borges & Almeida 2011).

Conservation Actions Proposed

• Carry out surveys to estimate the size of the population.

Monitor deforestation rates in the range using remote sensing techniques.

• Study level Trapping threat.

• Increase the area of ​​suitable habitat that receive protection effective.

• Boost changes in laws related to deforestation and forest protection.

The Diademed Parrot in captivity:

Rare in aviculture.

Each captive specimen of this species which is capable of reproducing, It is placed in a program well managed captive breeding and not be sold as a pet, in order to ensure its long-term survival.

Alternative names:

Diademed Amazon, Diademed Parrot, Red-lored Parrot (Diademed) (English).
Amazone à diadème, Amazone diadème, Amazone du Brésil (French).
Diademamazone (German).
Papagaio-diadema (Portuguese).
Amazona diadema (Spanish).


Amazona scientific classification diadem:

Johann Baptist von Spix

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Amazon
Scientific name: Diademed Parrot
Citation: (von Spix, 1824)
Protonimo: Psittams diadema


Diademed Parrot images.:



Sources:

Photos:

(1) – diadem parrot. Red lored parrot. 11 November 2015, Tikal, Guatemala by ze_da_binha
(2) – Diademed Parrot – amazon with diadem – Diademed amazon – amazon tiara By Florin Feneru from Orpington, UK (Diademed Parrot) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – A Red-lored Amazon at Loro Parque, Cross port, Tenerife, Spain. This subspecies is also called the Diademed Amazon By Carlos Urdiales [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – A Red-lored Amazon at Xcaret Eco Park, Riviera Maya, Mexico. Photographed as it started to rain By Tomasz Wagner from Burnaby, BC, Canada (Parrot – Amazona autumnalis) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Diademed amazon (Diademed Parrot) Loro Parque, Tenerife by Florin FeneruFlickr
(6) – PL. XXXI I Chrysolis diadema (î^wl By Blanchard, Emile; Bonaparte, Charles Lucian; Bourjot Saint-Hilaire, Alexandre; Le Vaillant, François; Souancé, Charles de. [CC BY 2.0 or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: GABRIEL MILK, XC119110. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/119110

Red-collared Lorikee
Trichoglossus rubritorquis

Red-collared Lorikee

Content

Red-collared Lorikee

Description Red-collared Lorikeet:

26 cm. long and 103-140 grams.

The Red-collared Lorikee (Trichoglossus rubritorquis) they have the head violet / blue with purple / blue streaks on face; throat and sides of the nape blackish; neck orange / red; chest yellow / orange without sweeping; abdomen dark green; the thighs green / yellow until undertail-coverts; upperparts and tail green; underwing-coverts orange; yellow and broadband under the wing . Bill orange / red. Eyes dark orange.
The youth they are similar to adults.

    taxonomy:

Occasionally he treated in Australian literature as a separate species of Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), but this is only appropriate review, as here, the whole complex of Rainbow Lorikeet: differs from Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus moluccanus) in his collar Orange Fire vs. pale green; Blue neck vs. green; vs belly black. blue; and of the Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus forsteni) in his collar Orange Fire vs. yellowish green; nape blue vs. red crab; nape blue vs. dark blue or green; larger size.

Species Monotypic.

  • Sound of the Red-collared Lorikee.

Habitat:

There have been no large-scale seasonal movements are common throughout the year in some places.

It's more common in the lowlands, but it is up 2400 meters above sea level. They can be observed in a wide variety of areas including settlements, forests, coconut plantations, Savanna, eucalyptus forests and mangroves. They are in mixed flocks with other parrots; small and noisy groups. Nomads, since they depend on flowering trees. It perches communally in groups of hundreds of birds.

Reproduction:

very similar reproductive biology to the Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus). May-January season in Northern Territory. The laying Typically two or three eggs.

Food:

Diet very similar to the Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) which feeds on nectar, fruit, flowers and insects, including Pandanus spiralis. It can also be found around artificial feeding stations.

I necked Lori distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 1.100.000 km2

North Autóctono Australia, which they inhabit the lowlands. Integrated or hybridized with Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) on Queensland Peninsula, Australia, in southwest Cape York.

Red-collared Lorikeet Conservation:


    Justification of the red list category


Status

1. Current category Red List UICN: Least Concern..

2. The population trend: Decreasing.

3. Population size : It is unknown.

This species has a extremely large distribution area, and therefore does not approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criterion of size range (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a decreasing area size or fluctuating distribution, extension / habitat quality, or size of the population and a small number of places or severe fragmentation).

While the trend of the population seems to be decreasing, It not believed to be declining fast enough to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion population trend (decrease of more than 30% in ten years or three generations).

The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 mature individuals with an estimated> 10% continuous decline in ten years or three generations, or a specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

    Justification of the population

Global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as abundant (pit et to the. 1997).

    Justification trend

It is suspected that the population is declining due to unsustainable levels of exploitation.

    Threats

The species has been the subject of a intense trade: from 1981, When it was included in the Appendix II of the CITES, they have been 100.388 individuals caught in international trade (UNEP-WCMC CITES Trade Database, January 2005).

In captivity:

In Europe, this species of lori has been largely imported from early last century, and in 1910 it managed to raise in the zoo London (four years later, the first breeding France). Currently it is rare outside Australia. Life expectancy: 20 years in nature, 15-25 years in captivity.

Alternative names

Australian rainbow lory, Rainbow Lorikeet (Red-collared), Red collared Lorikeet, Red-collared Lorikeet (English).
Loriquet à col rouge, Loriquet à collier rouge, Loriquet à tête bleue (à col rouge), Loriquet à tête bleue (rubritorquis) (French).
Australischer Blauwangenallfarblori, Darwin-Allfarblori, Rotnackenlori (German).
Periquito-arco-íris (rubritorquis), Lóris-de-colar-rojo (Portuguese).
Lori cuellirrojo, Lori Arcoiris (rubritorquis) (Spanish).


Thomas Horsfield
Thomas Horsfield

Scientific classification:


Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus rubritorquis
Citation: Vigors & Horsfield, 1827
Protonimo: Trichoglossus Rubritorquis

Images “Red-collared Lorikee”:

Videos "Red-collared Lorikee"


“Red-collared Lorikee” (Trichoglossus rubritorquis)

    Sources:

    1. Avibase
    2. Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    3. Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    4. Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – A Red-collared Lorikeet at Cincinnati Zoo, Ohio, USA by Fr. Ted Bobosh [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (2) – A Red-collared Lorikeet at Cincinnati Zoo, Ohio, USA by Ted [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Red-collared Lorikeet standing on a man’s cap at Lion Country Safari, Florida, USA by derivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)Trichoglossus_haematodus_rubritorquis_-Lion_Country_Safari-6.jpg: Duncan Rawlinson from Vancouver, BC [CC BY 2.0 or CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus rubritorquis) in the Walsrode Bird Park, Germany by Quartl [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons
    (5) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (6) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (7) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus rubritorquis) by Graham WinterfloodFlickr
    (8) – Trichoglossus haematodus rubritorquis Location taken: Lion Country Safari, Loxahatchee, Florida Photo by David J. pole [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (9) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (10) – A painting of a Red-collared Lorikeet (originally captioned “Trichoglossus rubritorquis. Scarlet-collared Parrakeet by Edward Lear [Public domain]

    Sounds: Phil Gregory, XC287820. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/287820

Cuban Macaw †
Ara tricolor

Cuban Macaw

Content

Cuban Macaw

Description of Cuban Macaw:

The Cuban Macaw (Ara tricolor) ave a great era, He is having a length between 45 and 50 centimeters, the “forecrown” It was red and orange and yellow the nape.

Around the eyes He had white areas devoid of feathers. Face, abdomen, chest and the thighs They were also orange and legs and the tip of the bill brown. The upper portion was a brownish red with festooned with feathers in green, while feathers below tail, on top of this and the lower back region they were blue. Also this color combined with purplish red wings were.

The external appearance of both male and the female It was the same. As for the flight, as it described, takeoff opened and displayed in its entirety the splendid tail in a truly magnificent spectacle.

Habitat:

Little is known about the habits Cuban Macaw. Local people reported the Cuban naturalist, born in Germany, Juan Gundlach (1876) What anidaba holes in palm trees and lived in couples and family groups. He said he had a strong similar to that of the macaws in Central vocalization (Gundlach 1893).

apparently small populations bred in scattered locations.

Reproduction:

Little is known about the reproduction of this species, unless they are nesting in holes palm trees and lived in couples and family groups.

Food:

They ate fruits, Palmas, tree seeds cinnamon (Meliá azedarach), tender shoots and buds (Wiley & Kirwan 2013).

Olson & Suarez (2008) skull suggest that the tablet back-ventral, in other macaw is an adaptation for a strong muscle attachment, is an indication that this species feeds on palm nuts extremely hard shell, and distribution of birds may have been closely related to the availability of this food source.

Distribution:

Distributed in the past by the island of Cuba, and probably the Isle of youth. It is said that there were many people in the Cienaga de Zapata to the South of Matanzas. There is no evidence of the historical existence of this guacamayo or another Hispaniola, where it has hinted at the existence of this species (although possibly they were observed on that island, the latest registered individuals 1820.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Extinct.

• Population trend: extinguished.

Justification of the Red List Category

This species is known at the island of Cuba, but hunting led to its population to extinction. The latest reports of the species dating 1885.

Its extinction was caused by his hunting as food and the Deforestation for nesting capture young birds and their use as pet (Forshaw and Cooper 1989).

It said the last known specimen that existed was killed in La Vega, about the Cienaga de Zapata in 1864. Then testimonies of sightings occurred up 1885 which were not confirmed.

"Cuban Macaw †" in captivity:

It is believed that the Cuban Macaw It was quite common in Cuba. First he began to increase his capture in order to give them to the Kings of Spain. As the nineteenth century progressed increased human population and this not only cut down the trees and forests deforested, but also he hunted the bird as Food- despite concerns that his meat tasted bad- ransacked their nests to take pets young birds. Thus they were eliminating their habitats, until he ended up becoming extinct.

Alternative names:

Cuban Macaw, Hispaniolan Macaw, Hispaniolan or Cuban Macaw, Hispaniolan, Cuban or Jamaican Macaw (English).
Ara d’Hispaniola, Ara tricolore, Ara tricolore ou A. de Cuba, Ara tricolore, A. de Cuba ou A. de Gosse (French).
Dreifarbenara (German).
arara-vermelha-de-cuba (Portuguese).
Guacamayo cubano (Spanish).

Johann Matthäus Bechstein
Johann Matthäus Bechstein

Scientific classification:


Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: ARA
Scientific name: Ara tricolor
Citation: (Bechstein, 1811)
Protonimo: Ara tricolor

Cuban Macaw pictures:


Cuban Macaw † (Ara tricolor)


Sources:

Avibase
• Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
• Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
cubaconecta

Photos:

(1) – Ara tricolor, recreación digital By Digitally treated by Rod6807 from the original image of Peter. [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Cuban Macaw. Eleven-Thirteenths Natural Size—from specimen in Liverpool Museum By John Gerrard Keulemans (1842 – 1912) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Now tricolor Bechstein, 1811 by Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Now tricolor Bechstein, 1811 Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis Biodiversity Center [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Ara tricolor By Bechstein, 1811 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Watercolour by Jacques Barraband (circa 1800) of a Cuban Red Macaw (Ara tricolor) by Jacques Barraband [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Norfolk Island Kaka
Nestor productus †

Norfolk Island Kaka

Content

Description:

The Norfolk Island Kaka (Nestor productus) was their large with a bill, wings short and wide, and with legs and feet large.

Norfolk Island Kaka

He had 38 centimeters long. The top of his head era gris pardusca, while its face varied from yellow to orange, sometimes with a reddish tint. It was said that his Hip It was greenish yellow, and upperparts, including the wings, They were mostly gray-brown, slightly darker than the top of the head, with the bottom of the back and rump orange or dark red and the tail brown. Upper chest It was brown and gray bottom bright yellow, with the belly and sides reddish orange (Forshaw & Cooper 1981, 2002; Greenway 1958).

Its social structure and dispersion are not registered, but the Norfolk Island Kaka of New Zealand, he watched alone or in small groups of up 10 individuals (Higgins 1999).

Habitat:

Habit in the native forest in the Norfolk Island and about Phillip Island (Greenway 1958). The species could be observed both in the canopy of tall trees, and soil, the rocks (Gould, 1865, Greenway 1958).

Given its endemism in the Norfolk Island, the Norfolk Island Kaka It was presumably sedentary.

Reproduction:

Little is known of reproductive cycle of the Norfolk Island Kaka; just put on record of four eggs in tree holes (Gould 1865).

Food:

It is known that he fed on nectar Flowers tree white wood (Lagunaria) (Gould 1865). Certainly should be more varied. The captive birds They ate lettuce and other vegetables leaves, and dairy foods and fruit juice (Gould 1865). Presumably he foraged in both the soil and the canopy (Gould, 1865).

Distribution:

Its range was about 15,5 hectares.

It was endemic to the Norfolk island (in Australia) and nearby Phillip Island, Australia. It became extinct in the wild in mid-century 19 on Norfolk Island, and possibly a little later Phillip Island.

It is believed that the species had a very limited ability to move between islands, and probably he spent his whole life on the island of his birth (Gould, 1865).
In the Norfolk Island Kaka occasionally kept in captivity, as the birds were gentle and easy to capture alive (Gould 1865). The species He survived in captivity until after it had been extinct in the wild (Greenway 1958). There are no known captive populations and none has been reintroduced into the wild. The last known bird was alive in captivity in London in 1851 (Garnett et to the., 2011).

No made extensive studies for this species. However, there have been a series of ornithological studies in the Norfolk Island since the species disappeared from the island (p.ej. Bell 1990, Robinson 1988, Schodde et al., 1983, Smithers y Disney 1969), no signs have been found of the species.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: extinct.

Justification of the red list category

This species was known in the Norfolk Island, but it was Extinguished to mid 1800. It is believed that the elimination of habitat and hunting have been the main drivers.

According to reports, was tame and, Therefore, hunted strongly convicts and early settlers and easily trapped as a pet.

No information is available on the population size before its decline.

"Norfolk Island Kaka" in captivity:

They were captured by his meekness and they were common in the Norfolk Island

Alternative names:

Norfolk Island Kaka, Norfolk Island Kea, Norfolk Island Parrot, Norfolk Kaka (English).
Nestor de Norfolk (French).
Dünnschnabelnestor, Norfolkkaka, Norfolk-Kaka (German).
Kākā-de-norfolk (Portuguese).
Kaka de Norfolk (Spanish).

John Gould
John Gould

Scientific classification:


Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Strigopidae
Genus: Nestor
Scientific name: Nestor productus
Citation: (Gould, 1836)
Protonimo: produced Plyctolophus


Images “Norfolk Island Kaka”:

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Norfolk Island Kaka (Nestor productus)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Australian Government – Department of the Environment and Energy (Nestor productus — Norfolk Island Kaka)

Photos:

(1) – Natural Science Curatorial Trainee – Birmingham’s Norfolk kaka
(2) – Nestor productus Gould, 1836 by Huub Veldhuijzen van Zanten / Naturalis [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Nestor productus By Gould, 1836 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Norfolk Island Kaka (Nestor productus). The last bird in captivity died in London in 1851. Specimen from the Zoological Museum in Firenze, Italy by Thomas WesenerFlickr
(5) – Nestor productus By Gould, 1836 [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – The Norfolk Island Kākā (Nestor productus) from the plate in the Bulletin of the Liverpool Museum. From the specimen in the Tring Museum by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Blaze-winged Parakeet
Pyrrhura devillei


Blaze-winged Parakeet

Content

Blaze-winged Parakeet

Description:

It measures 25 - 28 cm. and 70 weight GR.

In flight notorious is the armpit Red with yellow line at the end; Red patch in the belly. The tail is opaque red.

Was formerly considered as a subspecies of the Maroon-bellied Parakeet (Pyrrhura frontalis), of crown brown, darker underparts, and underwing-coverts especially red and yellow.

Bill black; eye ring naked white; irises brown. Tail long.

It has no sexual dimorphism.

Habitat:

It lives in the Woods, on the clear and marshy edges, until the 1000 m.

It is a species tolerant of disturbance of the habitat.

Fly in flocks between 6 - 12 individuals.

Reproduction:

It nests in hollow of trees and is plays between October and December.

Food:

Feed a wide variety of dried fruits and fruit.

Distribution:

Is distributed between the South of Brazil (Mato Grosso from the South), North of Paraguay (Northwest of Conception and Southeast of Alto Paraguay) and Southeast of Bolivia.

In Brazil only it is known in Mato Grosso from the South, where is limited to the mountain ranges of Bodoquena and Maracayu, in the Ecotone between the Planalto and the lowlands of the Pantanal, and along the River Taboco in the municipality of Aquidauana. It has a very limited range in the Paraguay, from where the records of them last is limited to the Gallery of forests along the Apa River.

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Near-threatened

• Population trend: Stable

The size of the world population Blaze-winged Parakeet It has not been quantified, but this species has been described as “rare“.

This species is suspected that they have experienced a moderately rapid decline due to the extensive loss and degradation of its habitat range within. Now survive in a highly fragmented landscape. Its area of distribution in Brazil It has suffered a great loss and degradation of forests through agricultural expansion and coal production. The forests of the North of Conception and those who are in Chaco, in the easternmost area of Paraguay, are being subjected to a pressure increased and have seen a considerable deforestation in the past 10 years (R. Clay in litt., 2009).

There is one hybridization apparent with the Maroon-bellied Parakeet (Pyrrhura frontalis) observed in the Apa River (R. Clay in litt., 2009).

The trade is apparently minimal (pit et to the., 1997).

"Blaze-winged Parakeet" in captivity:

These small parrots are very rare in captivity, Although its potential for pets is excellent. Are birds animated and soon procured confidence with its owner. They often enjoy bath and are not hard chewing. They are mostly calm and they shall only be loud when they are excited. They can be aggressive toward other birds. Playful and curious and generally resistant.

Alternative names:

Black-winged Parakeet, Black-winged Conure, Blaze winged Parakeet, Blaze-winged Conure, Blaze-winged Parakeet, Deville’s Conure (English).
Conure de Deville, Perriche de Deville, Perruche de Deville (French).
Devillesittich, Deville Sittich, Deville-Sittich (German).
tiriba-fogo (Portuguese).
Chiripepé ala anaranjada, Cotorra de Deville, Perico de Alas Naranjas, Periquito alianaranjado (Spanish).
Periquito alianaranjado (Bolivia).
Chiripepé ala anaranjada (Paraguay).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrrhura
Scientific name: Pyrrhura devillei
Citation: (Massena & Souancé, 1854)
Protonimo: Conurus Devillei

————————————————————————————————

Blaze-winged Parakeet (Pyrrhura devillei)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Blaze-winged Parakeet, Pousada Aguape, Mato Grosso Sul, In Brazil Flickr by Wildlife Travel
(2) – Iconographie des perroquets :Paris :P. Bertrand,1857 biodiversitylibrary

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Red-billed Hanging-Parrot
Loriculus exilis

Red-billed Hanging-Parrot

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

10 - 11 cm.. length.

Red-billed Hanging-Parrot

The head of the Red-billed Hanging-Parrot (Loriculus exilis) is green, brighter around the base of the bill and bathed in bluish green at the chin, the throat, the cheeks and the part front of it crown.

The underparts is green, with the rump and uppertail-coverts dark red (very extended below the tail); the sides and the base of the rump are greenish-yellow. Wings green. Under, the wings Turquoise with coverts green. Throat of color red bordered of blue pale and extending is about part superior of the chest; rest of the underparts green, slightly more clear that the upperparts. The tail, at the top, Green with yellowish tips; undertail, the tail is of a pale color green blue.

The bill coral red; irises yellow; legs oranges.

The females lack of the bib red (or have very small bib). Also have a reduced blue diffusion in the chest and irises brown.

The young birds they have a bib Red small, a bill yellowish brown, and a pale brown iris.

Habitat:

Generally little-known. It is distributed by forests, coastal mangroves, around the villages and in the open field, from the lowlands to the wooded hills to some 1.000 m, altitudes and in similar habitats to the of the Sulawesi Hanging-Parrot.

The birds are found in groups of up to five copies, feeding in the canopy of figs or the trees in flower nectar; their power moves have been compared with the movements of crawling in the Pygmy Parrot Micropsitta. Larger flocks have been found in the mangroves during may, Although the species can reproduce twice a year, in February and August; It is not known whether these represent concentrations post-cria or nomadic groups.

Reproduction:

A hole in a Palm tree dead is the only record known of a zone of nesting.

Food:

Feeds of figs or nectar.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 103.000 km2

Endemic of Sulawesi, where is located from the North, on Minahassa peninsula, to the South.

Conservation:


Status


• Current IUCN Red list category: Near threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, Although it is estimated at more than 10.000 specimens. The species is described as rare and rare.

There are no data on trends in the population, but the species is suspected to be decreasing at a moderately fast pace, due to degradation of the habitat.

"Red-billed Hanging-Parrot" in captivity:

Very rare in captivity.

Alternative names:

Red-billed Hanging-Parrot, Celebes Lilliput Hanging-Parrot, Green Hanging Parrot, Green Hanging-Parrot, Lilliput Hanging-Parrot, Pygmy Hanging Parrot, Pygmy Hanging-Parrot, Red billed Hanging Parrot, Red-billed Hanging Parrot, Talabula Hanging-Parrot (English).
Coryllis vert (French).
Däumlingspapageichen, Däumlings-Papageichen (German).
Lorículo Exiguo (Portuguese).
Lorículo Exiguo (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Loriculus
Scientific name: Loriculus exilis
Citation: Schlegel, 1866
Protonimo: Loriculus exilis

Videos "Red-billed Hanging-Parrot"

Videos "Red-billed Hanging-Parrot"

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“Red-billed Hanging-Parrot” (Loriculus exilis)


Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
BirdLife

Photos:

(1) – By Peter Waanders – Caged female has attracted wild male. lynx
(2) – Loriculus exilis by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Mike Nelson (Xeno-canto)

New Caledonian Lorikeet
Charmosyna diadema

New Caledonian Lorikeet

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description

18 - 19 cm.. length.

The females of the New Caledonian Lorikeet (Charmosyna diadema) are green in general, with the crown Violet Blue intense and the thighs Blue dark, a face Beige and it bottom side and anal region red. The tail It is green above and yellowish olive below, with the four lateral feathers with red basal markings followed by a band of black, with yellow tip on the bottom. The bill is red-orange, the irises dark orange, probably, similar to the legs.

The males they have not been registered. On the basis of similar species, they probably have a more red coloration, probably including the face, the bottom of the primaries and the sides of the rump; and it is likely to be slightly larger than. The immature should look like females but paler.

Habitat:

This bird is difficult to track because it is Nomad and is relatively little visible. The species believed that it can live in humid montane forests but (seasonally). Flying in and out of the lowland forests of Melaleuca. Most of the reports come from such lowland forests, but this probably reflected only a better accessibility for observation. Mt. Ignambi It is believed that it is an ideal habitat for the species. The report Yacht Lake was an area of low scrub.

Reproduction:

Data playback of the New Caledonian Lorikeet (Charmosyna diadema) are only available the of the Red-flanked Lorikeet (Charmosyna placentis) and the Red-fronted Lorikeet (Charmosyna rubronotata). The breeding season, probably, is from July to December, and possibly until February, or even all year round. They dig in the arboreal nests of termites or in Epiphytic ferns. Link gives as a result the implementation of two (sometimes three?) White rounded eggs; the incubation period likely to be similar to other species of Loris.

Food:

The bird apparently is fed into the tops of the trees.
Related species eat nectar, pollen, flowers and sometimes delicate fruits, in pairs or small groups feeding (usually less than 10). The Erythrina specifically mentioned as plants that this species feeds.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 1 km2

Possibly extinct. Endemic of New Caledonia known from two female specimens collected in 1859. The species also could have been observed in the forests of the North of the island in the year 1900. and it was identified by the Islanders with the reference of a picture (at Delacour 1966) of Anthony Stokes in December of 1976. One Islander claimed to see a single individual in the Decade of 1920, and another had observed two the 3 in June of 1976 to the West of Monte Panie. This last comment was made by an observer with experience that he noticed the birds by their call, and said it was different to Coconut Lorikeet. The authors are in agreement with Necklace et to the. (1994) in the extension of remaining forests in New Caledonia and the size of the island indicate that well still can exist this species and that the observations and studies must be within a habitat right including the Monte Panie, Mount Humboldt and other forest areas of the Highlands. IN DANGER.

Conservation:


Critically Endangered


• Current IUCN Red list category: Danger critic

• Population trend: Unknown

The population It is estimated between 1 and 49 individuals mature.

This species has not been recorded with certainty since 1913, Despite specific searches in 1998, and it may have decreased as a result of a number of different threats. However, cannot be assumed that they have become extinct, because there were local reports in the Decade of 1950 and in 1976, and parrots of the genus are notoriously difficult to detect, being discreet and nomadic, more studies are needed. Any remaining population is likely to be small, and for these reasons it is in Danger critic.

The humid Montane forest is not under threat, but it is possible that this species has a requirement for other habitats, some of which, forests semi-deciduous in particular, the lowlands, they have almost disappeared from the island (Ekstrom et to the. 2000, Ekstrom et to the . 2002). Several Lori headband have suffered severe population decreases and fluctuations by unknown causes (Forshaw 1989). The introduction of any disease is possible (such as malaria, avian) or more likely the mammals (especially rats) they may have been one of the causes of the decline of this species.(Bregulla 1992, Ekstrom et to the. 2000, Ekstrom et to the ., 2002).

"New Caledonian Lorikeet" in captivity:

Not found in captivity.

Alternative names:

New Caledonian Lorikeet, New Caledonia lorikeet (English).
Lori à diadème, Loriquet à diadème (French).
Diademlori (German).
Lori Diadema (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Charmosyna
Scientific name: Charmosyna diadema
Citation: (Verreaux,J & Des Murs, 1860)
Protonimo: Psitteuteles diadem


“New Caledonian Lorikeet” (Charmosyna diadema)


Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • BirdLife

  • Photos:

1 – Birds-pet-wallpapers – link

  • Sounds:

Red billed Parrot
Pionus sordidus

Tropicbird Parrot

Content


Anatomy-parrots-eng

Description:

The Red billed Parrot (Pionus sordidus), of looking scruffy, has a length of 28 - 31 cm. and a weight between 255 and 275 g..

The subspecies Pionus sordidus corallinus, the most widespread, has the feathers of the forecrown, lores and behind the eyes, Green at the base and with blue edges widths; the cheeks, ear-coverts and the sides of the neck, mainly green with some blue narrow tips; the crown and rear of the neck, Green with edges blue narrow. Mantle and back pretty dull green with paler blue margins; rump and uppertail-coverts, of color green basally, more Brown olive distally. Coverts medium and small with wide olive green tips; the front edge of the wing ; coverts primary and higher and flight feather brightest which the parts superiores and others wing-coverts.

Under, the wings green; chin green; throat and upper breast with band broadband of color blue violet; belly green, Some birds with gray Suffusion; undertail-coverts Crimson. Tail Green by the Center, Blue side; Red at the base.

Bill coral red, pale at the base of the upper mandible; cere dark grey; bare periophthalmic pale grey; Iris dark brown; legs pale grey.

Both sexes are similar. Immature sample undertail-coverts yellowish-green with some red marks; head green.

Subspecies description

Description 6 subspecies
  • Pionus sordidus antelius

    (Todd, 1947) – Similar to the nominal species but the feathers of the throat lack of edges blue and the center of the chest is in color pink.

  • Pionus sordidus corallinus

    (Bonaparte, 1854) – Described above.

  • Pionus sordidus mindoensis

    (Chapman, 1925) – Is as the subspecies Pionus sordidus corallinus, but of color green more beige, those edges blue of the feathers of the head are more narrow and the under wing-coverts not have them edges dark.

  • Pionus sordidus ponsi

    (Aveledo & Gines, 1950) – Throat of color blue violet almost solid. The chest and upperparts they are darker and greener that the of the nominal species, they lack clear margins to the feathers of the back and of the wing-coverts.

  • Pionus sordidus saturatus

    (Todd, 1915) – More dark and more green that it nominal species with the feathers of the upperparts lack of margins of color green olive. Less green in the throat and cheeks.

  • Pionus sordidus sordidus

    (Linnaeus, 1758) – Nominal. Much more Brown that the subspecies Pionus sordidus corallinus, with blue (turquoise) more reduced in the throat. Feathers in them upperparts with most distinctive pale margins.

Habitat:

Red billed Parrot

It is a very rare species. It inhabits in mountains of cloudy humid and semi-humid forests, edges of forest and partially deforested areas, between 200-2850 m, Although they are more frequent at altitudes of 500-1.500 m. They use areas of secondary growth, partially deforested with tall trees scattered and sometimes light forests on coffee plantations, being less frequent in dry areas.

Gregarious outside of the breeding season; formations in flocks of up to 50 birds, sometimes more where the food is abundant. Children sleep in community.

Reproduction:

They nest in the cavity of the trees, sometimes in very degraded habitats. Birds in attitude breeds during the months of February-April in Colombia; Breeding in months of April-June in Venezuela, January-may in Ecuador; Nest occupied in October in Bolivia. Laying three eggs in captivity.

Food:

Feeds of fruit, berries and seeds.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 169.000 km2

This species has a distribution batch through them land high in the North and West of South America, from Venezuela to the North of Bolivia. You can find in the North of Venezuela, in the mountains of Anzoátegui, Sucre, North of Monagas and apparently, of way to discontinuous, in the Highlands of the Federal District through the mountains coastal, to the West, until Lara and Falcon, then in the Sierra de Perija, Zulia and parts adjacent in Colombia, West to the foothills of Santa Marta in Magdalena, also locally in the Eastern Andes of Boyacá and Huila. Extends over the Western side of the Andes in Ecuador, from Pichincha until Gold and for all the East side to the northeast of Peru.

Although there are no records in the Eastern Andean slope, in the central and southern Peru, the range includes the Yungas North of Bolivia in Santa Cruz and Cochabamba.

Common locally; apparently less numerous in the West of Ecuador and North of Bolivia, and probably in decline locally due to the deforestation (for example, in the Ecuador Western, North of Venezuela and Andes of Colombia).

A recent study not localized to the subspecies Pionus sordidus antelius in its area of distribution widely cleared, Although the subspecies can dwell in forests moderately disturbed.

Kept as pets locally although generally scarce in captivity.

Distribution of subspecies

Distribution 6 subspecies

Conservation:


Status


• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

It is suspected that the population is in decline due to ongoing habitat destruction.

"Red billed Parrot" in captivity:

Very rare in captivity. In general, they are not so nervous in temperament as other parrots. They can learn to imitate.

Its diet in captivity It varied: Fruits such as: Apple, orange, banana, Granada, Cactus, they form approximately the 30 percent of the diet; vegetables such as: carrot, celery, Green beans, pea in the pod, fresh corn; Greens such as: Chard, lettuce, Dandelion, Aviary grass; millet; mixture of small seeds, such as: millet, birdseed, and small amounts of oats, buckwheat, safflower and hemp; soaked and sprouted sunflower seeds; beans, cooked vegetables and boiled corn; hard cheese.

Alternative names:

Red-billed Parrot, Dusky parrot, Red billed Parrot, Sordid parrot (English).
Pione à bec rouge, Perroquet sordide (French).
Dunenkopfpapagei, Dunenkopf, Dunenkopf-Papagei (German).
Curica-de-bico-vermelho (Portuguese).
Cotorra Piquirroja, Loro de Pico Rojo, Loro Piquirrojo (Spanish).
Cotorra piquiroja, Cotorra Piquirroja (Colombia).
Loro de Pico Rojo (Peru).
Perico Pico Rojo (Venezuela).

Scientific classification:

Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pionus
Scientific name: Pionus sordidus
Citation: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Protonimo: Psittacus sordidus


Images “Red billed Parrot”:

Videos "Red billed Parrot"

“Red billed Parrot” (Pionus sordidus)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife
  • Book parrots, Parrots and macaws Neotropical

  • Photos:

(1) – Red-billed Parrot, Pionus s. sordidus, Perico Pico Rojo – Our beautiful world
(2) – Red-billed Parrot, Pionus s. sordidus, Perico Pico Rojo – Our beautiful world
(3) – Red-billed Parrot, Pionus s. sordidus, Perico Pico Rojo – Our beautiful world
(4) – Red-billed Parrot (also known ans the Red-billed Pionus); two captive By TJ Lin (originally posted to Flickr as coral-billed pionus) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Red-billed-Parrot (Pionus sordidus), Pajaro Jumbo Reserve, NW Ecuador By Nomdeploom (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – BARRABAND, Jacques (1767/8-1809) Le Perroquet brun [Red-billed Parrot (Pionus sordidus)] – Wikimedia