German Longhaired Pointer
Alemania FCI 117 . Spaniel type

German Longhaired Pointer

The first thing to keep in mind is that the German Longhaired Pointer is a head to toe hunting dog.

Content

History

The German Longhaired Pointer It is one of the oldest German pointing breeds. Long-haired hunting dogs can already be seen in ancient hunting paintings and tapestries from the Middle Ages, which are very similar to the current ones “Pointing Dogs” German. These dogs were used primarily as hunting dogs to stalk, but also for catching small game in nets.

It is purebred since 1879. On the occasion of an exhibition of the association for the refinement of dog breeds in Hannover, the characteristics of the breed were established, the breed standard. The breed was based on five different breeding lines, bearing the names of authorized stallions that already corresponded to the breed standard at that time.

The German Longhaired Pointer has earned the name of “Old forest dog” in particular for its ability to do very good tracking jobs, to warn the hunter with loud barks when searching and to bring lost animals by following their blood trail. Working in the water is also one of its strengths, which is appreciated by hunters.

Photo: A German long hair called Falko by Wikimedia

Physical characteristics

The breed is bred in brown, Brown and white, and brown and white. The best known and most common is the German Longhaired Pointer pure brown, which may also have white markings on the chest or legs. Taupe comes in gradations from light gray to dark gray and the rare trout gray color variant.

The German Longhaired Pointer it is usually a strong dog, muscular, low constitution and with harmonious body shapes. Males usually have a shoulder height of 63 – 66 cm., the females of 60 – 63 cm.. Has brown eyes, long, well-edged hocks and a tail with a beautiful flag. Your coat should be of medium length and not too lush.

Character and skills

The first thing to keep in mind is that the German Longhaired Pointer he's a hunting dog from head to toe. In the hands of a knowledgeable trainer, is a useful helper in hunting and later in a second job, a very good family dog. The breed is very fond of children and family. But this should not be misunderstood at all. Why “family friendly” does not mean “family dog”. It is a fairly pronounced working dog. The German Longhaired Pointer has the strong drive and willingness to work, either on the hunt or, if required, your substitute in the form of dog sports of all kinds. Therefore, It is not a dog for beginners nor a dog for people who do not want or cannot work intensively with it.

German Longhaired Pointer
“German Longhaired Pointer” during the international dog show in Katowice, Poland

In the practice of hunting, the German Longhaired Pointer is especially praised for its pronounced calm. Is a leading dog, resistant to nerves and of a calm and even-tempered nature. At the same time, he is a kind and peaceful friend with a high threshold for irritation.. However, the German Longhaired Pointer needs a consistent education, competent and sensitive to direct his high intelligence, alert senses and their pronounced willingness to act in the right channels. With such an appropriate atmosphere of character, this breed of dog is a great friend of children, a great family companion also outside of hunting or sports work and in any case a wonderful experience of the association of man and dog.

Aptitudes:

If occasionally offered simply as a family and apartment dog, one should approach such sellers with the utmost caution. Such offers certainly come from dubious sources. As a rule, a German Longhaired Pointer belongs to the hands of a hunter who works with him professionally. If you are not kept for the hunt, must keep busy with long walks in nature or challenges in dog sports. In addition, needs a personal connection with caregiver and family. If the hunting dog does not have a physical or mental challenge, in the long run this will lead to serious behavior problems. It does not belong to a multi-story building and not to the big city. In all other respects, he has no problems and his attitude is undemanding.

Education

A German Longhaired Pointer should only be trained by an experienced owner. It must absolutely come from a recognized breeding of the Association of “Pointing Dogs” German, where parents and puppies were already socialized for their tasks from the litter box onwards. In addition, you need to train and work professionally for hunting or suitable sporting purposes. Only dogs that have successfully passed the demanding fall breeding tests are allowed for breeding. “Schorlemer”. Ask at the breeding clubs of the German Longhaired Pointer.

Health

The race German Longhaired Pointer is served in an exemplary manner by its breeding clubs organized in the Deutsch-Langhaar-Verband. As a result, the average health of the dogs has no problem.

Grooming

Caring for a German Longhaired Pointer is undemanding. Regular brushing of the coat is sufficient.

Buy a “German Longhaired Pointer”

If you are thinking of buying a German Longhaired Pointer, you should be wondering if you can meet the requirements for an appropriate character attitude from this hunting dog. And what during 12 years and more will be your companion on a daily basis. Then you should contact the local breeders who are members of the “Deutsch-Langhaar-Verband“. A puppy of this breed costs around 1000 EUR.

Characteristics "German Longhaired Pointer"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "German Longhaired Pointer" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “"German Longhaired Pointer"“

Kennels Obenstaat – Puppies German Longhaired Pointer – Introduction to water

“German Longhaired Pointer”

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 117
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type
  • CKCGrupo 1 – Sporting
  • ​KC – Hunting dog
  • UKCGun Dog

FCI breed standard "German Longhaired Pointer"

FCIFCI – "German Longhaired Pointer"
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Alternative names:

    1. GLP, Pointer (German Longhaired), Langhaar (English).
    2. Langhaar (French).
    3. Deutsch-Langhaar (German).
    4. (em alemão: Deutsch Langhaar Vorstehhund) (Portuguese).
    5. Pointer de pelo largo (Spanish).

Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers
Eslovaquia FCI 320 . Braque Type

Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers in an obedient and easy to train dog.

Content

History

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers is a relatively new breed. It dates back to the end of the decade of 1950, in Czechoslovakia after World War II and is believed to have been developed using the Weimaraner, the German Wirehaired Pointer and the Český fousek.

At any given time, the Slovaks who developed the breed asked the Club Weimaraner from Germany to recognize this dog under the name of Rough-haired Weimaraner, but the request was rejected.

The resulting dog is a true wonder, that combines the talents of a hunting dog (on the plains, in the woods and in the water), a working dog and a companion dog. Adapts to all climates.

Photo: Slovakian Wire-haired Pointing Dog by Ing. Urban Michal (breeders HP), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it's a tall braco, solidly built and not too heavy. This breed is bred to be a working dog, with nobility in its forms. Tail is cut to half length when permitted by law. It stands rather high, worn at rest and in horizontal action. The eyes are almond-shaped, amber, with a clever expression. In puppies and young dogs, are blue. The floppy ears are placed over the eye, they are rounded and not too long.

Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers
“Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers” during the dog show in Rybnik – Stone, Poland

The undercoat consists of a short, fine down that normally falls off in summer. The top layer is about 4 cm long, hard, straight and well laid. At the bottom of the muzzle, hairs are longer and softer and form a mustache. Above the eyes, are more pronounced and are obliquely erect. The forehead and occiput are covered with short, hard hair. They are short and soft on the ears. The tail is well provided with hair, but it is not brushed. The basic color is “grey”: is a sand shaded with brown. White markings are allowed on the tips of the legs and on the chest. Smaller or larger dark spots can mark gray. There is also a speckled coat.

Character and skills

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers described in the FCI standard as easy to train and compliant. They are selected for their work characteristics such as Pointer dogs. They hunt on the plains, forests and water. They work mainly after the shot, searching and recovering the game.

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it's animated, happy and eager to please. He has a lot of energy and is very intelligent, but gets bored easily. This can sometimes make training a bit difficult, and should work to make training sessions fun, interesting and not very long. They need a firm and consistent hand in discipline with structure and limits. Harsh words or physical punishment should be avoided. They have a strong bond with their families, and may develop separation anxiety without proper conditioning.

the Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers they are the happiest doing things with their owner. This makes the breed a great candidate as a canine companion for owners who love walks., cycling or jogging. It is imperative that they have opportunities to run free, preferably in a fenced area, since his hunting instinct is very strong, and the dog will not be able to resist the urge to chase the prey.

Health

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it is a generally healthy breed, and responsible breeders examine their breeders for health conditions such as elbow and hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy and cataracts.

Grooming

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers requires only minimal grooming to maintain good condition. Cleaning them with a damp cloth is usually sufficient between baths. Using a grooming glove or comb on your coat during fall season can help keep the amount of hair shedding low in your home.. Toenails should be trimmed every four weeks. A dental care regimen should start at an early age to avoid problems later in life.

Characteristics "Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “"Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers"“

Dog Breed Video: Slovakian Rough Haired Pointer
Slovakian wire haired pointer – training

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 320
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • ​KCgundog
  • AKCGroup: Foundation Stock Service

FCI breed standard "Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers"

FCIFCI – "Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers"
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Alternative names:

    1. Slovak Rough-haired Pointer, Slovakian Wirehaired Pointer (English).
    2. (Nom d’origine : Slovensky Hrubosrsty Stavac), Griffon d’Arrêt Slovaque à poil dur (French).
    3. SHS, Slovenský hrubosrstý stavač (German).
    4. Braco eslovaco de pêlo duro, (em eslovaco: Slovenský hrubosrsty stavac) (Portuguese).
    5. Grifón de muestra eslovaco de pelo duro (Spanish).

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungría FCI 57 . Braque Type

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer they are very close to their family and are affectionate and playful with their family.

Content

History

Appeared somewhere between the steppes of Russia and the Carpathians, the Hungarian Pointer (commonly known as Vizsla, What does it mean “pointer” in Hungarian) has an ancient history, probably thousands of years. He already accompanied the Magyar tribes before they settled in the Carpathian basin, where is present-day Hungary, in the 9th century.

The first references to this dog date back to the 13th century, and more precisely to the story of one of the scribes of King Adelbert III (1235-1270) that recounts the migrations of the Hungarian people, in which the use of a yellowish dog named Vizsla for hunting. It was also depicted in the 14th century in the illustrations of the chronicles written by the Carmelites. Numerous 16th century Hungarian documents also evoke his role as a faithful companion of kings and aristocracy..

While there is no doubt that the Vizsla current is the result of numerous crossbreeds between hunting dogs over the centuries, these were always carried out in order to preserve the original characteristics, as evidenced by the brown nose which is different from most of the others pointers.

Historically, the Vizsla has always had a short coat. However, early twentieth century, in the Decade of 1930, two breeders came up with the idea of ​​a Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer to the breeders club of the country. His goal was to create a dog with all the qualities of the Vizsla, but with a coat that would protect it more effectively from snow and icy water, as well as scratches and scrapes when hunting in the woods.

Although it was debated, the proposal was accepted under certain conditions, including maintaining the same coat color. Jozsef Vasa, breeder of the Hungarian Pointer, y Laszlo Gresznarik, breeder of the German Shorthaired Pointer, crossed two female Vizsla named Csibi and Zsuzsi with a male of German Shorthaired Pointer called Astor von Potat. Two generations later, Selle Day was the first Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer that was shown at a dog show.

It seems that during World War II, when the population was in decline, crosses were also made with other breeds such as the Setter Irish or the Griffon. However, there is no record of this miscegenation in the records kept by Hungarian organizations.

The breed was recognized in 1963 by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI), nine years after the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer. The first specimens were exported to North America in the decade of 1970. More quickly adopted in Canada, to the point of gaining official recognition from the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) in 1977.

In the United States, was not up 2006 and 2014 respectively than the United Kennel Club (UKC) and the American Kennel Club (AKC) they did the same, while they had already recognized the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer in 1960 (AKC) and 1984 (UKC). Its growing presence in Europe also allowed it to be recognized by the British Kennel Club. (KC) in 1991.

Photo: Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer; MVD belongs to the sample dogs of the group 7 of the FCI with proof of work by Broneder, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it is a medium-sized dog that differs from its short-haired cousin by its slightly squarer appearance on average, but also and above all because of the length and texture of its coat.

Its slightly rectangular body is dry and well developed, no superfluous roundness. He leans on legs of solid bones, well structured and with prominent muscles. The legs are oval in shape and end in brown claws.

The tail is wide at the base and tapers to the tip. For years, as a precaution for hunting parties, the queue was shortened by about a quarter. This practice of cutting the tail of dogs (tail docking) is currently prohibited in many territories, including France, Switzerland, Belgium and Quebec.

Braco-Hungaro-de-pelo-duro-1
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

The head of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it is quite wide, with a slightly domed skull at a moderate stop. Ears are back, going down along the cheeks and are slightly shorter than those of the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer. The eyes are oval, medium-sized, and brown according to the coat. The muzzle is quite short and ends in a broad brown nose as well, but darker in color than fur.

It is the latter that clearly distinguishes him from his cousin. Both have a dense, waterproof underlayer, but the top layer of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is longer (2 - 3 cm.) and it has a completely different texture. They are made of wire hair, hard, dense and very dense. These features give it excellent protection against harsh outdoor conditions.. At face level, hair is slightly shorter, except on the eyebrows and especially the beard. This is not very long (2-3cm.), but it is very pronounced and noticeable.

Like his short haired counterpart, the fur of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it's golden wheat, and the spikes may be darker in the shade. Shades of red, brown or light yellow are accepted, but they are not wanted. A small white spot on the chest is possible, as long as it does not exceed 5 cm..

At last, sexual dimorphism is well marked in this breed, the male being significantly larger and more massive than the female.

Character and skills

The character of Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is comparable to the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer, but with the addition of a wet beard when stroked.

They are very close to their family and are affectionate and playful with their own. However, generally feels closer to a particular person among them, whom he considers as his human reference, and it doesn't stop making you feel clearly.

In any case, he is much less open with humans who are not part of his home. This does not mean that he is aggressive or distrustful towards them., but rather indifferent.

However, if you perceive a threat to your family or territory, whether it comes from an unknown human or another animal, he is very protective, not hesitating to scold or even interfere.

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

He behaves in exactly the same way with children. Like this, is close to the little ones of the family, but he prefers to avoid others. You have to be careful when the first one plays with friends, as you may misinterpret some of the second's actions as aggression, and then react inappropriately. Like any other dog of any breed, should not be left alone with a young child without adult supervision.

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer gets along well with his peers, whether they are those you meet on your walks or those who share your home when necessary. Their relationships with other animals are much more complicated, as they soon fall victim to their strong hunting instinct. The domestic cat is usually protected, especially if you have grown up with him since he was young, but a rodent or a bird cannot say the same if he lives next to him in the house or is on a walk. An unknown cat is also likely to be relentlessly chased.

Used for centuries to succeed on long hunting trips, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer still an active dog today. You need to be able to exercise for at least an hour each day to feel comfortable, and he is even happier if he can spend whole days walking in the woods. Therefore, its level of activity implies that it is not suitable for an elderly or very sedentary person.

Hunting is still his favorite activity, and the one that best allows you to express all your qualities. In all other respects, canine research sports (tracking, cavemen…) they are a perfect outlet, to solicit your extraordinary sense of smell.

Obedience and agility are also disciplines that will do you good. More simply, it is also a great companion for cyclists, runners, hikers, nature lovers, mushroom pickers… This is all the more true since it is robust and capable of evolving on all types of terrain., from dense forests to rocky mountains, passing through snowy plains or swamps.

In the city, it is strongly recommended to keep him on a leash to avoid accidents if he runs after a passing cat or small animal. However, once in the desert, it is much more appropriate to let it run free. Of course, learning withdrawal orders is an essential prerequisite, for obvious security reasons. A GPS dog collar is nevertheless a good investment to help locate you if the deer you are chasing has led you into unfamiliar terrain..

In addition, as it does very well in the aquatic environment. Without being particularly fond, he likes to swim once in a while, especially if the place where you live offers this possibility.

Used to hunting quite independently and, Therefore, make decisions for yourself, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer has acquired a certain intelligence coupled with a strong character. A beginning teacher is probably overwhelmed.

If you are independent in your way of acting, does not mean that he likes to be alone. You can wait patiently at home when your family is at work during the day, but should be able to be as much as possible with the rest of the time. In addition, it is likely to hurt if left alone for a whole weekend because it cannot bear the stress caused by the absence of its masters. In addition, just because I'm physically fit to sleep in the garden, even when it's a little cool, does not mean that this is recommended. In fact, to be well in the head, do not keep him away from his family: it's more of an indoor dog, who prefers to watch television at night with his family than to admire the stars alone outside.

This is all the more true as he is surprisingly calm when his exercise needs are met., to the point of being able to live in an apartment, provided it is large enough to accommodate it in good condition. Discreet and well educated, they are not the type to bark at the top of their lungs or howl when dying, and are not usually noticed by the neighbors. In fact, they rarely bark (generally when they perceive a threat), but then they don't stop making themselves heard, since his voice rises a lot.

However, the ideal environment for him is a house with a garden (perfectly fenced) in the countryside. A walk in the city during the same time does not have the same flavor as an outing for a dog accustomed to nature and the great outdoors.

Education

Like all dogs, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer benefits greatly from socialization that begins in their first few weeks and continues through the months that follow. Usually goes smoothly, since then he is particularly open and curious, quickly getting used to the different environments and situations you encounter. It´s, because, the ideal time to get used to the people you will meet regularly in your life (friends, neighbors, veterinary…), but also to take him to all kinds of places and allow him to meet various humans and similar creatures.

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

The education of Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer can give a slightly timid caregiver a hard time, that he would not know how to be respected by his dog. Strong of character and independent, will soon prevail if left alone. However, perfectly suited to beginners, as long as they know how to assert their authority. For this, it is important to establish clear and consistent rules without delay, so much over time (what is prohibited one day is also prohibited the next day) as between the different members of the family (it is not about one person authorizing what another person prohibits), to establish impeccable discipline and ensure that he respects his master's authority. Once you understand that you cannot decide for yourself, accepts the situation and is not the one to monitor the slightest defect and constantly question the established order – If and when, of course, their masters continue to know how to impose themselves when necessary.

On the other hand, educate a Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it's much simpler, fast and effective with methods based on positive reinforcement. Compliments and caresses are a good source of motivation to make her want to learn, and sweets are also valuable allies to motivate him to do what is asked of him. On the other hand, traditional training techniques are doomed to failure, as they are likely to totally destabilize it, making him fearful and insecure.

Last but not least, withdrawal orders are high on the list of things to teach your dog as a priority. In fact, so that you can let him play freely during field trips, which is particularly beneficial for him, must be perfectly assimilated.

Health

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer they are generally robust, with a life expectancy of around 12-14 years, what is in line with the average for dogs of his size.

Their short coat protects them from both heat and cold, allowing them to live in a wide variety of climates. However, not adapted to extremes, and can't sleep outside when freezing, for example, or run in the sun in the middle of a summer heat wave.

No dog is immune to disease, and the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is no exception. In this case, to which it is most exposed are ..:

  • The Hip Dysplasia, a joint problem often favored by a hereditary predisposition, causing pain and difficulty in movement, as well as osteoarthritis with age;
  • Elbow dysplasia, a malformation of the joint, which is also possibly related to a predisposition inherited from parents, and that also causes pain and lameness;
  • Epilepsy, a nervous system disease of often hereditary origin, responsible for more or less frequent and intense seizures. The disease cannot be cured by itself, but your symptoms can be relieved with the help of medication;
  • Addison's disease, a hormonal deficiency that is usually inherited from the parents and manifests itself in various ways: weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, weightloss… The most severe form of the disease is usually fatal, while the chronic form can be kept under control with lifelong treatment;
  • Hemophilia type A, an inherited disorder that prevents blood from clotting properly, and that affects men more than women. May manifest in heavy bleeding, bruising or blood in the urine;
  • Hyperuricosia, a disease also inherited from the parents. Corresponds to an excess of uric acid, leading to the formation of crystals in the urine, which in turn can cause bleeding and kidney failure;
  • Allergies, that can be caused by factors as different as food, the environment or parasites. Allergies can be caused by factors as different as food, the environment or parasites, and most of the time they manifest as itching and redness of the skin;
  • Ear infections, as in most lop-eared dog breeds.

The Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer it is also particularly susceptible to various diseases of the eyes:

  • Progressive retinal atrophy, a degeneration of eye tissue that causes irreparable loss of sight, first at night and then also during the day;
  • Entropion, a defect in the position of the eyelid that can be inherited and causes irritation of the eyeball. The problem can be treated with surgery;
  • Ectropión, an eyelid curl problem also inherited from parents, which also causes eye irritation. Also in this case, an operation remedies the problem;
  • Glaucoma, often hereditary, which is a painful increase in the pressure inside the eye. This leads to blindness if it is not operated as soon as possible.

In addition, people who are used to hunt are particularly exposed to the risk of injuries that this activity implies.

Since many of the diseases to which the breed is predisposed are or may be hereditary, the adoption of a strict breeder of Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer maximizes the probability of getting a healthy animal, and one that stays that way. In fact, a professional breeder not only ensures that puppies are well socialized from their first weeks of life, but also that they do not inherit a hereditary defect from their parents. To achieve this goal, causes various genetic tests to be systematically performed on the breeding stock in question, and excludes all those who may present a risk. You can also have the resulting puppies examined to confirm the absence of a hereditary condition.. In any case, must be able to present the results of the tests performed, plus a certificate of good health from a veterinarian and the puppy's health or vaccination record, that includes all vaccines that have been administered.

In addition, from the moment he arrives home until the end of his life, it is essential to allow your dog to be regularly examined by a veterinarian for a complete health check. This is necessary at least once a year, and more often as you get older, as it allows early detection of a potential problem and action accordingly. These visits are also an opportunity to have immunizations increased when needed.. At the same time, It is also necessary to ensure that antiparasitic treatments of the “child” are renewed throughout the year, so you are never unprotected at this level.

Grooming

Keep warm Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it's quite simple, weekly brushing is enough to keep it clean and healthy. However, she lets go of her undercoat twice a year, in spring and autumn, and daily brushing is recommended to help remove dead hairs.

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

An occasional bath is also necessary, but the frequency of the bath largely depends on the lifestyle of your dog. For example, it is not useless to bathe several times a month an individual who is used for hunting or who often travels through muddy trails in the forest and sleeps inside the house. On the other hand, two or three a year may be perfectly enough for someone else who walks mostly on rocky trails in the mountains and whose place to sleep is in the garage. In any case, a mild shampoo designed specifically for dogs should always be used, as it can damage their fur or skin.

In addition, special attention should be paid to their ears, as their drooping shape means they are potential nests for infection (ear infections, etc.) as soon as dirt or moisture accumulates on them. Therefore, it is important to check and clean them weekly. At the same time, it is important to get used to drying them after a long time in a humid environment, and even more so after swimming in a swamp, lake or stream…

The weekly maintenance session is also an opportunity to examine and, if required, quickly clean the area around the eyes with a damp cloth, again to avoid infections that would be triggered by a deposit of dirt.

As in any dog, oral hygiene is also important. Therefore, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer you should brush your teeth at least once a week, using a toothpaste intended for canine use. This will reduce the deposit of dental plaque., that can cause bad breath, cavities and other diseases by turning into tartar.

In addition, despite what her fairly active lifestyle might have us believe, this dog needs to have its claws trimmed by hand fairly regularly. This is because they are particularly strong and difficult to wear.. On average, must be trimmed every 2 or 3 weeks, but if they are not cut every 2 or 3 weeks, it is enough to stretch your ear when walking on hard ground: if then you hear a kind of click with each step, it is because they have become too long and it is time to cut them. Otherwise, not only could it be difficult for him to walk, but you could also be injured if they broke.

Last but not least, it is recommended to examine it (fur, ears, pads…) after every hunting session or a long stay in the wild, to detect possible cuts or scratches, parasites, thorns…

As in all races, learn how to care for a Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer from a professional (hairdresser or vet) it is the best way to take care of it without risk of damaging or injuring it. It is advisable to accustom him to these different manipulations from a very young age, so that they become a moment of shared pleasure, and not in a task that I try to avoid.

Utilization and training

From the first references to its subject dating from the 13th century, the Hungarian Pointer was introduced as a hunting dog, more precisely like a pointing dog. Already at that time, as well as in later centuries, including current, his mission was to find the game and point the hunter in the direction of it. Versatile, is capable of hunting in all terrains (forests, plains, mountains…) and is not afraid of cold or water. Therefore, used to remove various game pieces, either nude or feathered, usually working alone or possibly with a partner, but rarely in a group.

Even today, hunting is the main mission of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer, and its qualities are recognized in particular by hunters in Central Europe and Great Britain, where it is present in large numbers.

The qualities it mobilizes for hunting (style, obedience, independence…) they also allow you to shine in various canine sports disciplines, either in the crawl, obedience or agility.

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it is also increasingly present in homes as a simple companion dog. Their attachment and energy can be very beneficial to their owners' morale., and the most athletic find in him a companion of choice for their long excursions in nature. In any case, your need for exercise is quite high, which makes it unsuitable for a very sedentary person, for example.

His protective side also makes him a good watchdog, that spares no effort to put intruders to flight, although not as imposing as other races.

Buy a “Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer”

The price of a puppy Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is generally between 600 and 800 EUR, without any significant price difference between males and females.

Whatever the location, and as for all races, the amount requested depends on the more or less prestigious ancestry from which the animal comes, as well as the reputation of the offspring from which it comes. Its intrinsic characteristics are, However, the main factor to take into account, which explains that prices within the same litter can vary enormously; individuals closest to the standard and with the best character traits are necessarily more expensive than others.

Characteristics "Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

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Dog friendly ⓘ

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Hair loss ⓘ

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3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

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Apartment ⓘ

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4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

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Stranger Friendly ⓘ

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Barking Tendencies ⓘ

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2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

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Territorial ⓘ

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Cat Friendly ⓘ

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intelligence ⓘ

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versatility ⓘ

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Child Friendly ⓘ

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Watchdog Ability ⓘ

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Playfulness ⓘ

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Videos “"Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer"“

Hungarian Wire haired Pointing Dog
Hungarian Pointer “wire-haired” – Julius-K9®

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 57
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • AKC – Group 1 (Sports)
  • CKC – Group 1 (Sports)
  • ​KCGun Dog
  • NZKCGun Dog Group
  • UKCGun Dog Group

FCI breed standard "Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer"

FCIFCI – "Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer"
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Alternative names:

    1. Wirehaired Vizsla, Hungarian Wirehaired Vizsla, Drótszőrű magyar vizsla (English).
    2. (en hongrois : drótszőrű magyar vizsla), Vizsla à Poil Dur (French).
    3. (ungarisch Drótszőrű magyar vizsla), Drahthaar Vizsla (German).
    4. (em húngaro: drótszőrű magyar vizsla) (Portuguese).
    5. Vizsla húngaro de capa alambrada (Spanish).

Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer
Hungría FCI 57 . Braque Type

Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer

The Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer They are very affectionate dogs and very attached to their family.

Content

History

The long history of Hungarian Pointer (often called Vizsla, as in your country of origin) is inseparable from that of the Magyar tribes. In effect, the latter were already accompanied by their ancestors when their migrations through the Russian steppes and the Carpathians ended in the 9th century and they settled in the Carpathian basin, region corresponding to modern Hungary.

Writings dating to the period of King Adelbert III (1235-1270) they already refer to a “yellowish dog named Vizsla“, used by the Hungarian people for hunting. Illustrations that appear in a 14th century Carmelite book, as well as a gothic engraving from the 15th century, are considered the first representations of this dog. In the 16th century, it had become common among the Hungarian aristocracy and nobility, who used it both for hunting and for companion dogs.

Numerous crosses between hunting dogs took place since the 16th century and gave the Vizsla your current appearance. There is no clear information on the different breeds used, but several sources, including the reference book The Hungarian Vizsla, written by Gay Gottlieb and published in 1985, they mention Setter, German Shorthaired Pointer, Serbian hound, English Foxhound, English Greyhound, Sloughi and Romanian dog breeds. In any case, the goal was always to keep an aspect close to their ancestors, as evidenced by his yellow color and brown nose. The latter distinguishes it from most other breeds of pointers., who have a black nose.

In 1924 a breeding club was formed in Hungary and the first individuals were registered at that time. In the Decade of 1930 the development of Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer made fear that the characteristics of the race would be lost, but a rigorous breeding program under the aegis of the breed club made it possible to separate the breeds and prevent their characteristics from being diluted through inappropriate crossings..

Like many other races, the Vizsla suffered severely during World War II, but he quickly regained his health. Already in 1954 was recognized by the International Cynological Federation (FCI), which oversees the national organizations of a hundred countries, including France, Belgium and Switzerland.

It was also in the decade of 1950 when a first specimen was imported into the United States, despite the cold war context. This led to the recognition of the breed by the American Kennel Club (AKC) already in 1960.

The world's leading dog associations followed suit, like the British Kennel Club (KC) in 1971 and the American United Kennel Club (UKC) in 1984. El Canadian Kennel Club (CKC), as well as a great majority of national organizations around the world also recognize it.

Popularity

Known all over the world, the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer enjoys some popularity in general. However, There are, of course, important differences between countries.

In hungary, their country of origin, It's very common. With a total of more than 8.000 individuals registered in the “Magyar Ebtenyészt?k Országos Egyesületeinek Szövetsége“, the reference body of the country, it is even by far the most widespread indigenous breed. Its representatives are three times more numerous than those of the “Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer“.

In France, made significant progress in the last decades of the 20th century. The number of births recorded each year in the French Book of Origins (LOF) in the early decade of 1970 increased from about 40 to more than double at the end of the decade. Exceeded 150 at the end of the Decade of 1980, and then entered the new millennium with more than 200 births per year. The number has been practically stable since then, fluctuando between 200 and 300 annual records, with sometimes significant variations from one year to another. These figures are still relatively modest: to the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer struggles to make a name for himself among the most popular hunting dog breeds, although it is much more popular than its wire-haired counterpart. The “Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer” does not usually have more than 50 births per year.

They are also quite discreet in Switzerland, since the statistics from the Amicus database show that they are not among the 50 largest dog breeds in the country.

The situation is very different in Britain, where is an important and growing success. Has grown from around 1.000 annual registrations at the Kennel Club in the mid-1990s 2000 - 1.500 early in the decade 2010. This digit, already estimated, then doubled over the decade, to the point of approaching 3000 births per year.

It is also a great success in the United States, occupying the position 30 (almost 200) in the most popular breeds according to annual AKC registration statistics. His wire-haired counterpart is far behind, finishing near the bottom of the rankings at around 160th place.

It is also successful in some countries far from its homeland, like Argentina, where there is more than 4.000 specimens.

In any case, el ngo> Hungarian Shorthair Pointer is generally much better established than its descendant the “Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer“. Perhaps the only exception is the Czech Republic, where there are some 5.000 of each race.

Physical characteristics

The Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer it is a medium sized hunting dog. He looks a lot like his descendant the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer, but with a shorter coat and a slightly less voluminous silhouette.

His body is almost square, slightly longer than tall, with lean, well-defined muscles that leave no room for superfluous curves. The legs are made of solid bones, well muscled and ending in slightly oval legs with brown nails.

The tail, set a little low and descending to the hock, is wide at the base and then gradually tapers towards the tip. Using this dog for hunting means that it has long been shortened by a quarter of its length to reduce the risk of injury. This practice of cutting off a dog's tail (tail docking) is still practiced in some countries, but is currently banned in an increasing number of territories, including France, Belgium, Switzerland and Quebec.

The head has a broad skull, moderately domed with a moderate stop. The ears, located on the back, they are quite long (about three-quarters of the length of the head) and hang along the cheeks. The eyes are oval and brown in color, as dark as possible. The snout, pretty short, is truncated (not pointed in any way) and ends in a big brown nose, darker than fur.

The top layer is, of course, short, as the breed name suggests, but also very close and rough to the touch. However, is finer and silkier on the face and ears, a little lighter on the belly and a little longer under the tail. It's important pointing that, unlike in the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer, the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer does not have undercoat.

Whether it is short haired or wire haired, the Vizsla should have a uniform golden wheat color throughout the body except the ears, which are darker in color. Red tones are not desired, brown or discolored. A white mark on the chest or throat is acceptable, but should not exceed 5 cm..

At last, sexual dimorphism is well marked in the Vizsla, the male being significantly larger and larger than the female.

Varieties:

The Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer appeared in the decade of 1930 as a result of a cross between two females of Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer and a male of German Shorthaired Pointer. Although they are very close, They are considered two separate breeds by international and national canine organizations that recognize them, and not two varieties of the same breed.

Aside from her longer hair and signature goatee, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer are very similar, if they are not identical, to their ancestors.

However, specialists have found that on average they are slightly larger and heavier than their short-haired counterparts. This difference is also reflected in the rules of the American Kennel Club, that describes the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer as an average of 1 cm smaller than its descendant. On the other hand, the norm of the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) -which is used by the national canine organizations of reference in France, Belgium and Switzerland- does not mention that difference.

Therefore, if there are some more or less subtle differences in terms of appearance, the same cannot be said in terms of character: in this field, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer hardly differs from his alter ego the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer.

Character and skills

The temperament of Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer does not differ according to the length of the coat. The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer has the same character traits.

They are very affectionate dogs and very attached to their family. However, they always feel closer to a particular member of the household, who then becomes his favorite human, and they don't try to hide their prejudice.

In any case, is much less sociable with people who are not part of the home: he is not aggressive with them, rather, he prefers to ignore them and act as if they are not there… at least as long as they don't represent a danger to him. In fact, his closeness to his family makes him protective of both his family and his territory. Reprimands in a deterrent way when a threat approaches, and does not hesitate to intervene if necessary.

With the kids, his attitude is similar: he is close and tender with those who live with him, for whom it is an excellent playmate, but ignore his friends who come to the house, or those you meet in the park. Even worse, if you mistakenly perceive certain games with the little one of the family as an aggression on their part, your protective instincts can lead you to react violently, mostly because he's always on the prowl. In any case, know it or not, you should never be left alone with a small child, without adult supervision. This is true for any dog, regardless of race.

The Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer he is very sociable with his companions, whether they live under the same roof or with strangers you meet on a walk. Having him share your home with another dog is a good way to avoid boredom if his handlers are regularly absent..

The same cannot be said for a cohabitation with a small animal, that would quickly turn sour. If you have been used to being around the domestic cat from an early age, he has every chance of being considered a full member of your family, and therefore to be left alone. On the other hand, A bird, rodent or reptile is likely to awaken the hunting instinct that has accompanied it for generations. A small animal unknown to him and who would have the bad idea of ​​passing by during his pilgrimages would also have every chance of suffering a sad fate. For the same reason, it is advisable to keep it on a leash in places where the probability of such encounters is quite high.

Bred for centuries to hunt in the wild, the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer they are active dogs that must be able to spend at least an hour a day to feel comfortable in their paws. But their resistance allows them to go much further, if given the opportunity. Daily walks are the best part of the day for him, and long weekend outings that allow you to spend several hours in the desert are probably the highlight of your week. If there is a lake or a river on the way, feel free to make a stop there: without being particularly fond of either, loves water and is a good swimmer. Hunting is undoubtedly the activity that most allows you to mobilize your independent spirit and your remarkable sense of smell. It´s, with much, his favorite, but you can also excel in dog sports that also allow these qualities to be expressed, like crawl or cavity. He is also perfectly capable of learning other disciplines, so much so that it is not uncommon to see representatives of the breed on the podiums of obedience or agility competitions.

Even more, its physical qualities and stamina also make it a great companion for those who want to run with their dog, ride a bike with him and take him for a ride. On the other hand, given your significant need for exercise, not recommended at all for elderly or overly sedentary people.

In any case, best kept on a leash in urban or residential areas to avoid drama if small animals pass by, on the other hand, remove it in the wild, so you can run free and vent. This assumes that the withdrawal orders are perfectly acquired, but even when this is the case, it is difficult to fully trust your propensity to return without delay as soon as you are asked to do so. Therefore, it is advisable to equip your dog with a GPS dog collar, so you can easily find it if you venture a little too far, especially since he might not be able to find his way back.

As long as you are able to exercise enough each day, the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer it is perfectly suitable for apartment living, If and when, of course, is the right size for your build. Having said that, the ideal for him is still a house with a garden. It goes without saying that the garden must be perfectly closed, to prevent any attempt to chase an animal. In addition, although he greatly appreciates being able to go outside at any time to stretch his legs, this dog is not cut out for spending most of his time outdoors: although he can sleep outside, appreciates the comfort of home and the proximity of his family.

However, They are not the type of dog that will follow your wishes with finger and eye. Centuries of hunting with a high degree of autonomy have made it quite independent, which can be problematic if you are faced with an inexperienced owner or one who is not able to be firm enough to command respect for your dog.

Having said that, this independence of mind does not mean that you appreciate being left home alone for long periods of time. You can tolerate your family being normally absent during the day as long as they pay attention to you at night, but risks destructive behavior if left alone for a whole weekend.

Last but not least, the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer has a powerful voice, but rarely heard. Usually, barks only when threatened, or feel that something really important should be reported.

Education

The training of a Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer can be problematic for a caregiver who does not know how to command respect and authority. With his independent character and his intelligence above the average, this dog can quickly turn things around and take control if given the opportunity.

Clear rules that are established at the beginning and that are consistent over time and among family members help establish discipline that is easy to understand and respect.. Establishing and enforcing these rules is crucial to having a dog that knows what is expected of him and follows it.. However, should not be done in one way; in particular, traditional training techniques should not be used, as they can traumatize the dog and cause blockages. On the other hand, educational methods based on positive reinforcement give much better results.

At the end, the training of Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer generally does not present any difficulties, not even for a beginning caregiver, as long as the hierarchy is well established. This is all the more true since he is not one of those who question it systematically afterwards.

Therefore, learning how to call back should be a priority, so that it can be allowed to run freely when the environment is suitable (forest, etc.), instead of having to keep it on a leash at all times. Having said that, it is difficult to expect complete reliability in this matter, given the strength of his hunting instinct.

Like any other race, the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer you should start socializing as soon as you get to your new home. This is generally done without problems, his curious and open nature helps him to quickly get acquainted with different people, animals and situations you may encounter, either occasionally or more regularly. This period should be used to get to know people (friends, neighbors, veterinary, etc.) and the human beings you will meet more or less frequently in your life. It is also the right time to get him used to meeting all kinds of unfamiliar humans and dogs., so you know how to behave in all circumstances.

Health

The Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer they are generally robust, with a life expectancy of around 12-14 years, what is in line with the average for dogs of his size.

Their short coat protects them from both heat and cold, allowing them to live in a wide variety of climates. However, not adapted to extremes, and can't sleep outside when freezing, for example, or run in the sun in the middle of a summer heat wave.

No dog is immune to disease, and the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer is no exception. In this case, to which it is most exposed are ..:

  • The Hip Dysplasia, a joint problem often favored by a hereditary predisposition, causing pain and difficulty in movement, as well as osteoarthritis with age;
  • Elbow dysplasia, a malformation of the joint, which is also possibly related to a predisposition inherited from parents, and that also causes pain and lameness;
  • Epilepsy, a nervous system disease of often hereditary origin, responsible for more or less frequent and intense seizures. The disease cannot be cured by itself, but your symptoms can be relieved with the help of medication;
  • Addison's disease, a hormonal deficiency that is usually inherited from the parents and manifests itself in various ways: weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, weightloss… The most severe form of the disease is usually fatal, while the chronic form can be kept under control with lifelong treatment;
  • Hemophilia type A, an inherited disorder that prevents blood from clotting properly, and that affects men more than women. May manifest in heavy bleeding, bruising or blood in the urine;
  • Hyperuricosia, a disease also inherited from the parents. Corresponds to an excess of uric acid, leading to the formation of crystals in the urine, which in turn can cause bleeding and kidney failure;
  • Allergies, that can be caused by factors as different as food, the environment or parasites. Allergies can be caused by factors as different as food, the environment or parasites, and most of the time they manifest as itching and redness of the skin;
  • Ear infections, as in most lop-eared dog breeds.

The Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer it is also particularly susceptible to various diseases of the eyes:

  • Progressive retinal atrophy, a degeneration of eye tissue that causes irreparable loss of sight, first at night and then also during the day;
  • Entropion, a defect in the position of the eyelid that can be inherited and causes irritation of the eyeball. The problem can be treated with surgery;
  • Ectropión, an eyelid curl problem also inherited from parents, which also causes eye irritation. Also in this case, an operation remedies the problem;
  • Glaucoma, often hereditary, which is a painful increase in the pressure inside the eye. This leads to blindness if it is not operated as soon as possible.

In addition, people who are used to hunt are particularly exposed to the risk of injuries that this activity implies.

Since many of the diseases to which the breed is predisposed are or may be hereditary, the adoption of a strict breeder of Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer maximizes the probability of getting a healthy animal, and one that stays that way. In fact, a professional breeder not only ensures that puppies are well socialized from their first weeks of life, but also that they do not inherit a hereditary defect from their parents. To achieve this goal, causes various genetic tests to be systematically performed on the breeding stock in question, and excludes all those who may present a risk. You can also have the resulting puppies examined to confirm the absence of a hereditary condition.. In any case, must be able to present the results of the tests performed, plus a certificate of good health from a veterinarian and the puppy's health or vaccination record, that includes all vaccines that have been administered.

In addition, from the moment he arrives home until the end of his life, it is essential to allow your dog to be regularly examined by a veterinarian for a complete health check. This is necessary at least once a year, and more often as you get older, as it allows early detection of a potential problem and action accordingly. These visits are also an opportunity to have immunizations increased when needed.. At the same time, It is also necessary to ensure that antiparasitic treatments of the “child” are renewed throughout the year, so you are never unprotected at this level.

Grooming

The Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer it is an easy dog ​​to keep, especially when it comes to fur. A quick weekly brushing is enough to keep the coat clean and healthy. However, the frequency should be increased during the two seasonal moulting periods, in spring and autumn. To help remove dead hairs, daily brushing is recommended.

It is also necessary to bathe from time to time, although the frequency required depends largely on the lifestyle of the animal. If your dog often lives in the woods for long hours and gets very dirty, bathing every month can be helpful. On the other hand, if you spend most of your time in parks and have little exposure to the elements, bathe him 2 or 3 times a year is potentially sufficient. In all cases, it is imperative to always use a shampoo designed specifically for dogs, since the pH of your skin differs from that of humans.

Your ears are the part of your body that requires the most vigilance, since its fallen shape facilitates the accumulation of dirt and humidity, and therefore the development of infections (ear infections, etc.). Therefore, must be checked and cleaned every week, as well as dried every time you have bathed in a lake or river or returned from a long period of time in a humid environment.

The weekly maintenance session of the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer should also include an exam and, if necessary, cleaning the eyes, to prevent dirt from building up and causing infection.

In addition, like all the other dogs, the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer is not immune to tartar and its accompanying problems: bad breath, oral diseases… Brushing the teeth with a toothpaste for canine use is necessary at least once a week, but even more frequent brushing is recommended, even daily.

The claws of the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer they are particularly hard and therefore do not wear out much, even though he is very active. Therefore, they need to be trimmed every month or so to prevent them from getting in your way or even hurting you. In any case, as soon as you hear them rubbing on the ground when you walk, it's time to take care of them.

At last, another good habit to adopt is to check their fur, ears and pads after every long walk in nature, to detect any cuts or scratches, parasites, thorns…

Take care of a Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer not particularly complex, but knowing how to do it well allows you to be more efficient and at the same time minimize the risks of hurting your pet, or even hurt her. Therefore, it may be a good idea to learn them the first time from a professional groomer or vet. In any case, it is advisable not to wait to accustom your pet to these different manipulations, so that you accept them without hesitation throughout your life.

Food

The Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer fits very well with commercially available industrial dog food. Both the choice of products and the definition of the given daily ration must be determined by age, the health status and activity level of the animal.

The latter may vary from one period to another, particularly in the case of individuals used for hunting. Servings must be adjusted accordingly, to ensure that the animal always provides all the energy it needs. However, this applies both up and down: for example, for a hunting dog, it is essential to return to normal portions once the hunting season is over, otherwise, overweight individuals may become overweight.

Obesity is not common in the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer, but no dog is immune, especially if you've been spayed or neutered. A good habit is to weigh it every month. If the weight gain is confirmed or even accentuated by the following measures, it is necessary to visit the vet. In effect, only the vet can reliably determine the cause (it may not be related to your diet or activity level, but it may be caused, for example, due to illness or reaction to drug treatment), and propose a solution based on it.

In addition, it is better to divide your daily ration into at least two meals: this makes digestion easier and reduces your propensity to claim, since then he knows he will be fed again later in the day.

It is also important to avoid giving your pet food intended for humans randomly, although it is very imploring when its owners are at the table, for example. In effect, unless you are sure that this is so, it is likely not meeting your nutritional needs and, therefore, cause more harm than good, especially, of course, if it contains dangerous foods for the canine population.

Last but not least, like any of their races, the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer must be able to quench their thirst at will and have permanent access to fresh water.

Use

Historically, the main function of Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer it was hunting. Can be used as pointers, runners or recuperators and are capable of working on all types of terrain, without hesitation to get into the water if necessary. In addition, can attack both animals and game birds, acting alone or in tandem. However, it's unusual to find her performing in a pack. In any case, its hunting qualities continue to seduce and be used around the world today.

They also allow you to shine in certain canine sports disciplines, starting with the crawl, obedience or agility.

His popularity can also be explained by his attachment and energy, that make it a wonderful companion dog for a sporty family. A caretaker adept at hiking, on horseback riding or mountain biking you will find in him a tireless companion always ready for new adventures. On the other hand, its need for activity makes it much less suitable for the most sedentary or elderly.

Last but not least, the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer it is also an effective watchdog, whose very protective instinct compensates for a less impressive size than that of some of its races also capable of fulfilling this role.

Buy a “Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer”

The price of a puppy Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer is an average of 900 EUR, for both males and females. However, some exceptional individuals fetch much higher prices – until 2.000 euros for those with exceptional characteristics and pedigree.

In any country, and as in all dog breeds, the price charged depends largely on the more or less prestigious ancestry of the animal, as well as the reputation of the kennel that offers it. However, its intrinsic characteristics are still the main determinant of the price of a puppy of Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer. Individuals with the best character traits and physical characteristics closest to the standard are the most sought after, which explains why there can sometimes be significant differences within the same litter.

Characteristics "Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 1 out of 5
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “"Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer"“

Videos “"Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer"“

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 57
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • AKC – Group 1 (Sports)
  • CKC – Group 1 (Sports)
  • ​KCGun Dog
  • NZKCGun Dog Group
  • UKCGun Dog Group

FCI breed standard "Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer"

FCIFCI – "Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer"
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Alternative names:

    1. Vizsla, Vizslak (English).
    2. Vizsla, (en hongrois rövidszőrű magyar vizsla) (French).
    3. Vizsla, Magyar Vizsla Kurzhaar, (ungarisch Rövidszőrű magyar vizsla) (German).
    4. Vizsla, (em húngaro: Rövidszörü magyar vizsla) (Portuguese).
    5. Vizsla, Braco húngaro (Spanish).

Saint Germain Pointer
Francia FCI 115 . Braque Type

Saint Germain Pointer

The Saint Germain Pointer it is little known outside the French borders.

Content

History

A versatile hunting dog that has been used not only for aiming, but also to throw and recover, the Saint Germain Pointer can work with a variety of hunting, including rabbits and pheasants. Unlike most hunting dogs, traditionally, this breed has been popular at shows and has been bred to have a very uniform and specific appearance.

Originally bred in France mixing English Pointer with the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size, This breed is believed to have developed in the early 1830 and claims to have a very elegant heritage. King Charles X of France was given two dogs English Pointer who were very talented hunters. The female, call miss, she was raised with a dog Braque Francais local, and the legacy of Saint Germain Pointer started. Initially, the breed was called Compiegne Pointers due to the location of the kennels in which they were raised, but this name was later altered when the kennels were moved to the region of Saint Germain. Many of the dogs produced were shown at dog shows throughout France and, at that time, they were the race of Pointer most displayed in her native country.

The race Saint Germain Pointer was initially very popular and in 1913 a club was formed that aimed to increase its prevalence in France, as well as improve the breed. Unfortunately, the size of the breed's population Saint Germain Pointer was greatly reduced in every world war. They have never fully recovered from the drastic decline in population size that occurred in the first half of the 20th century., but they are still a breed that has a loyal follower and are not in danger of extinction today.

En los últimos años, the English Pointer enter the genetic pool of Saint Germain Pointer to increase their numbers and add some genetic diversity. Even though few, if there is any, of the breed members have been exported internationally, the UKC granted full recognition to the breed in 2006 within your group of hunting dogs.

Photo: Braque_saint-germain at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

Braco Saint Germain
Braque saint-germain at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

The appearance of Saint Germain Pointer is particularly important for breeders, although it is mainly a hunting dog. Historically, have participated in a large number of French dog shows. Breed members must be of medium build, with good muscles and heavy bones. The dog's skull should be round and the same length as its muzzle.

Your pink nose should have wide open nostrils, while your big golden eyes should show a placid and relaxed expression. Their ears are curved at the tip and should not reach beyond eye level. The shoulders of the Saint Germain Pointer they are impressively long and their limbs must be robust and heavy. They have a broad chest and a straight back, although your rump will bow slightly. The dog's sharp tail is carried at a distinctive horizontal angle when in motion.

The short coat of the Saint Germain Pointer should be faded white with orange markings, and the ears are preferred to be orange everywhere. Unlike in the English Pointer, black hair is not tolerated. The males measure between 56 and 62 height cm, while the smaller females reach heights between 53 and 60 cm.. Most members of the breed will weigh between 18 and 27 kg.

Character and skills

While it is true that Saint Germain Pointer has traditionally excelled on the show floor, is primarily a hunting dog and, as such, has the character expected of a working animal. This breed is easy to train and loves to be kept active and given a task to do. They must have a “soft mouth”, meaning they do not hurt or harm the prey they retrieve. They also tend to work in packs, which means that they normally get along with other dogs. Although it is undeniable that they have a natural instinct to chase small animals, anecdotally they get along well with the small pets in their house that they have been introduced to since childhood.

The Saint Germain Pointer he is truly a family dog ​​and does best when kept indoors with human company. He is particularly affectionate towards those he trusts and will bond closely with each member of his family. They are not typically a breed that displays any aggression, which means they are adapted to children, though they wouldn't be good watchdogs. While it is true that this breed will be willing to befriend any child it meets, Caution is advised with very young children who may not be able to resist brisk greetings and rowdy play!

Education

More than many other dog breeds, the Saint Germain Pointer can be a real treat to train. He is a dog willing to please his master and has the intelligence to complete most of the tasks entrusted to him with relative ease.. Trainers will be most successful when they focus on the breed's most natural behaviors, like recovery.

It is often said that the Saint Germain Pointer it is a hardy dog ​​that is much less sensitive than other closely related breeds. Trainers have the option of using firmer methods than they might expect, However, will continue to achieve the best results with the use of positive reinforcement techniques (instead of negatives).

Exercise

Not far behind when it comes to exercise, the Saint Germain Pointer is a dog that loves to be out of the house. Has great endurance when working and is able to travel long distances for long periods of time without seeming to tire. If kept solely as a companion animal, owners should be able to provide an hour or two of solid exercise each day and should also keep the dog stimulated with various games and training sessions.

Any attempt to keep this breed in a small apartment or house or to exercise it for less time than recommended, will likely lead to a frustrated dog that will become a difficult pet. Anxiety is likely to develop in these situations, hyperactivity and destructive behaviors.

Health

Unfortunately, there is no specific information on the health of the Saint Germain Pointer, and to date there have been no studies on the breed. A working dog, it is generally accepted as a hardy breed. The prudent owner would be aware of these possible health conditions:

Hip Dysplasia

    Hip scoring should be performed by responsible breeders to ensure that the small population of the Saint Germain Pointer stay healthy. A simple x-ray of the hips will allow a vet to assess the quality of the hip joints and inform the breeder if they are good enough to allow breeding.

Ear infections

    When the ear canal becomes clogged with a buildup of smelly debris, an infection is likely present. Ears may also be red, hot and sensitive. Affected dogs tend to shake their heads and rub their faces against the ground. Infections occur mainly due to the proliferation of bacteria and yeast, although they can also be due to a foreign body, like a grass seed inside the ear canal or ear mites.

Grooming

The short coat of the Saint Germain Pointer does not need to be brushed more than once or twice a week. Toenails may need to be trimmed every few months, particularly if you don't walk on hard surfaces. The breed's clear claws make claw clipping easy, since the cut is visible, making it more avoidable than in dogs with dark pigmented claws.

The Most Important Grooming Duty An Owner Should Not Neglect, is the maintenance of good ear hygiene. The ears should be cleaned every one to two weeks with a dog ear cleaner. Owners should also ensure that the ears are dry inside and out after being exposed to water..

Characteristics "Saint Germain Pointer"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Saint Germain Pointer" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 1 out of 5
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “"Saint Germain Pointer"“

Saint Germain Pointer

Saint Germain Pointer Dog Breed – Braque Saint Germain

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 115
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • UKCGundog

FCI breed standard "Saint Germain Pointer"

FCIFCI – "Saint Germain Pointer"
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Alternative names:

    1. St. Germain Pointing Dog (English).
    2. Braque Saint-Germain (French).
    3. Braque Charles bzw. Braque Compiegne (German).
    4. (em francês: Braque Saint-Germain) (Portuguese).
    5. Braco de Saint Germain (Spanish).

French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size
Francia FCI 133 . Braque Type

French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size

Some even say that the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size it is a dog that was born trained.

Content

History

The type French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size grew up in the region of Gascony which bears his name. He is a direct descendant of the oldest known race of pointing dogs already described by Gaston PHEBUS, Count of Foix. This excellent pointing dog has managed to preserve its stamina. In the same way, It has maintained the efficiency of the days when dogs were raised only for the services they provided.

Photo: Pyrenean Pointer at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

Nose and muzzle
Has a big brown nose. Has a wide muzzle, rectangular, sometimes slightly convex.

Eyes
Has a frank look. Your brown or dark yellow eyes are wide.

Ears
The ears of the brave French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size they go well up to the tip of your nose. Slightly bent, turn round at the tip.

Hair
His hair French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size it is very thick. Their head and ears have finer hair.

Their fur can be brown, Brown and white, mottled or spotted brown and white or brown with tawny markings above the eyes, lips and limbs.

Tail
The French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size has a generally docked tail, follows well the prolongation of the convex line of the croup. A long tail is not considered a defect, as long as it is well managed; neither the short tail of
birth

Character and skills

Smart, obedient and very attached to their master, the kind dogs French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size they are soft and calm. Some even say it is a dog that was born trained.

Your training will be smooth and early, since it is a very sensitive dog, even shy, and you have to get used to city noises very quickly. Let's not forget that you are an athlete and that you need “Unburden” regularly. Soft and calm, adapts very well to the city, as long as you get used to it at a young age. The French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size must live with his caregiver and is very affectionate with children.

Education

The reputation of French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size is well established. Like his cousin, the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) , “born trained”, say his followers. Intelligent and very attached to his teacher, he will know how to learn all the tricks of a good education.

It is a sensitive dog with which you must use gentleness. This dog must understand the commandments to assimilate them. One of the reasons why coercive methods should be banned. This is also true for all dog breeds.

The French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size can be perfectly adapted to living in the city. However, will have to be introduced to noise and crowds at a very young age.

Characteristics "French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 1 out of 5
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “"French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size"“

Braque Francais-type Gascogne
Braque Francais-type Gascogne

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 133
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type

FCI breed standard "French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size"

FCIFCI – "French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size"
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Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size)
Francia FCI 134 . Braque Type

Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size)

The Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) he is sensitive and loving, he likes children and feels comfortable both in the city and in the country.

Content

History

The origins of the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) are the same as the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size. They are the best representatives of the old lines of Brachets and “Braques” southerners.

Already in the fifteenth century, the “Braque Francais” can be found on canvases depicting venus scenes. It is scattered throughout French territory during the French Revolution, and the regionalization of breeding allows the appearance of races such as the Ariège Pointer or the Auvergne Pointer.

A breed that was abandoned in favor of British dogs, the breeding of the Braque Francais was revived between the two wars, when the two guys became different. Developed in the Pyrenees, the race descends from the old Spanish Braque and of the now extinct Southern Hound.

A more elegant version than the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size, the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) has legs about 12,5 cm shorter than Gascony.

Photo: Un braque francais, type pyrénées by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) presents the same proportions and gender characteristics of the type French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size, only that its dimensions are smaller and its body structure is lighter. The differences are as follows:

  • It is a rustic dog, not heavy, but muscular enough. His skin is more stretched than the "Gascony" type.
  • The lips are less drooping than those of the "Gascony" type or less convex.
  • The forelimbs are lighter than those of the “French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size”
  • Finer and shorter hair than the Gascony type.
  • Character and skills

    Sensitive and affectionate, He is affectionate with children and feels comfortable both in the city and in the country.

    Your education should be smooth and early, because the Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) he is a very sensitive dog, even shy. Therefore, must get used to city noises very quickly.

    Has a natural gift for hunting and very good stamina.

    He cohabits easily with his companions and can stay alone for a day. Fits well with apartment living, as long as you get used to it from a young age. However, you need to exercise very regularly.

    Some say he was born trained.

    Low maintenance required.

    Characteristics "Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) "

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) " you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos “"Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) "“

    Braque Francais Type Pyrenees NAIBE MIRA MAYA
    Vidéo Braques Francais Du Milobre de Bouisse

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 134
    • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
    • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type

    FCI breed standard "Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) "

    FCIFCI – "Braque français, type Pyrénées (French Pointing Dog - Pyrenean type, smaller size) "
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    Bourbonnais Pointing Dog
    Francia FCI 179 . Braque Type

    Bourbonnais Pointing Dog

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog at birth it is frequently tailless, it is also called “Glue cutter”.

    Content

    History

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog it was already known in 1598 like an expert quail hunting dog. The authors of the time described him as a pleasant companion for the hunter, rustic and healthy looking, born with a short tail, with a white fur, whole and finely speckled with light brown or fawn trout.

    After the first world war, a group of dedicated breeders formed the first Club du Braque du Bourbonnais in 1925 with the goal of reviving the race and restoring its pre-war prominence. The first breed standard was published in the first club newsletter in 1930. Although the organization and these breeders made considerable progress, his efforts were again almost wiped out by World War II. In addition, strict adherence to a natural tailless dog and strict color requirements resulted in a dog based on appearance rather than performance.

    The result of this selection in reverse leads to a total disaffection of the breeders. Of 1963 - 1973, there were no registrations in the L.O.F. (Book of French Origins) . In 1970, under the impulse of Michel Comte, a team of breeders set themselves the mission of ensuring the survival of the Bourbonnais Pointing Dog.

    Today, French breeders strive to produce a Bourbonnais Pointing Dog that conforms to the breed standard, but of equal importance, the Bourbonnais Pointing Dog should now be proficient in the field as pointers, retrievers and trackers. Since the beginning of the 1970, the breeders of Bourbonnais Pointing Dog have substantially and rapidly improved the conformation of the breed and its performance in the field.

    One second Club du Braque du Bourbonnais it was created in 1982 by Michel Comte, with the official recognition of the Central Canine Society (SCC), French affiliate of the FCI, in 1985. The goal of reviving the race had been achieved, the breed standard relaxed, spotting and docked tails were found acceptable and the breed's remarkable hunting instincts were restored. The new breed standard was fully recognized by the SCC and the FCI in 1991. The standard was translated and published on the FCI website at 1998.

    Photo: Braque_du_bourbonnais at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Physical characteristics

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog is a robust, compact and muscular mid-size braque. Gives an impression of robustness and strength. The female has a slimmer and more elegant silhouette. Some dogs are born without a tail (anurus) or with a naturally short tail (brachyura). Tail docking is practiced in countries where it is allowed.

    The head is pear-shaped, namely, rounded in all directions, with rounded side walls, well developed parietals and zygomatic arches. The pear-shaped head is typical of the breed. The axes of the skull and muzzle are parallel or slightly divergent. Neither too light nor too heavy, the head is in proportion to the body. The eyes are large, rather rounded, hazelnut or dark amber, according to coat color. Medium-length drop ears are located at or just above the eye line.

    The coat is fine, dense and short. It is finer on the head and ears, a little thicker and sometimes a little longer on the back. White spots are very invasive, finely speckled with brown (known as “wine lees” or “withered lilac”) the leonado (known as “peach blossom”) in all its variants. White and colored hairs can blend into a roan pattern. The ear generally wears the basic color more or less mottled. Color patches should be few in number and small in size: must not exceed the size of the palm of the hand on the body and must never encompass both eyes at the same time on the face.

    Character and skills

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog is described in the breed standard as gentle and affectionate, but also passionate and intelligent when hunting. Easily adapts to the most varied terrain and games. Naturally seeks high emanation and shows useful and accurate stopping ability.

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog they are mostly a Pointing Dogs versatile.

    Exercise and training

    Options for exercise could include backyard playtime, preferably fenced, or be taken for walks several times a day. Exercise can also be done in the form of indoor activities, like the hideout, chase a ball rolling on the ground or learn new tricks. Certain outdoor activities such as swimming, hiking and retrieving balls or flying discs can provide a good outlet for expending energy. Training for dog sports such as agility, obedience and rallying can also be a great way to give your dog some exercise.

    Health

    The majority of the Bourbonnais Pointing Dog they are healthy dogs. Working with a responsible breeder, those who wish to own a Bourbonnais Pointing Dog they can get the education they need to know about specific health concerns within the breed. Good breeders use health exams and genetic testing of their breeders to reduce the likelihood of disease in their puppies.

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog requires relatively gentle handling. Has the ability to perceive the mood of the manipulator, seeking eye contact at all times.

    Grooming

    The Bourbonnais Pointing Dog has a fine, dense and short coat. It's a little thicker, and sometimes longer, in the back. On the head and ears, the hair is thinner and shorter.

    Beyond periodic brushing, the occasional bath will keep your Bourbonnais Pointing Dog clean and looking its best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog.. The breed's strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or nail polish to prevent overgrowth, breakage and cracking. The ears should be checked regularly to avoid accumulation of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

    Characteristics "Bourbonnais Pointing Dog"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Bourbonnais Pointing Dog" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images “"Bourbonnais Pointing Dog"“

    Photos:

    1 – Braque_du_bourbonnais at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – Braque_du_bourbonnais at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – Braque du Bourbonnais sur fond blanc by Desaix83, from the work of Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – Braque du Bourbonnais – world dog show 2010 by mjk23, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    5 – Braque du Bourbonnais – world dog show 2010 by mjk23, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons
    6 – Braque_du_bourbonnais by The original uploader was Michael Comte at French Wikipedia., CC BY-SA 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons

    Videos “"Bourbonnais Pointing Dog"“

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 179
    • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
    • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type

    FCI breed standard "Bourbonnais Pointing Dog"

    FCIFCI – "Bourbonnais Pointing Dog"
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    Alternative names:

      1. Bourbonnais Pointer, Braque du Bourbonnais (English).
      2. Braque du Bourbonnais (French).
      3. Braque du Bourbonnais (German).
      4. (em francês: Braque du Bourbonnais) (Portuguese).
      5. Braco de Borbón, Braco de Bourbonnais (Spanish).
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