Small swiss hound
Suiza FCI 60 . Small-sized Hounds

Small Bernese hound
Small Bernese hound

The dog Small swiss hound, little stimulated, often becomes an annoying pet that can be difficult to train.

Content

History

In the early 20th century, hunting began to change in Switzerland. Private hunting grounds were introduced and the standard size of the Swiss Hound he was too fast and enthusiastic to hunt properly within these smaller hunting grounds. The hunters decided to develop a different breed of hunting that could hunt efficiently and effectively within the closed private hunting grounds.. Many people think that Small swiss hound it's just a smaller version of the Swiss Hound. While this is partly true, They are a different race that originated from crossing the Swiss Hound with the Basset Hound. The ultimate goal was to develop a breed that was shorter and smaller., but also had the same four color variants as the Swiss Hound. The resulting dogs were expected to have a strong sense of smell for nose work and a melodious voice to sound the alarm when hunting..

The Small swiss hound He is an outstanding hunter and has the ability to track scents for miles over rough terrain. The Small swiss hound became the hunting dog of people hunting on private land.

The United Kennel Club recognized the Small swiss hound in 2006. The Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) accepted them and adopted the official breed standard under the name Schweizer Niederlaufhund in 2015.

The Small swiss hound still a popular hunting companion in his native Switzerland.

Photo: Small Bernese Hound Smooth-coated male by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

In proportion smaller than the Swiss Hound. Its body shape is rectangular, moderately long, and strong conformation. Medium size head, thin, elegant, with friendly facial expression
and attentive. His ears are very long, low insertion, and he wears them folded. Thin and strong limbs. When walking calmly, he has his tail hanging, in activity bends it slightly upwards.

The Small swiss hound comes in four different varieties. The only difference between the varieties is the color, but each variety has its own name.

Variants Small swiss hound

Small Jura houndSmall Bernese houndSmall Schwyz houndSmall Lucerne hound
Small hound of Juraequeño de Jura
Small Jura hound
Small Bernese hound
Small Bernese hound
Small Schwyz hound
Small Schwyz hound
Small Lucerne hound
Small Lucerne hound
  • The Small Jura hound has a smooth coat that is black with tan markings found over the eyes.
    The Small Jura hound has only one coat and may only have a small amount of white on its body.
  • The Small Bernese hound has two types of fur:
    the smooth coat and the rough coat.
    The rough coat has a single hard coat and a small beard.
    The Small Bernese hound it's black and white with fiery marks over its eyes; many call it tricolor.
  • The Small Schwyz hound has a smooth, unique coat that is predominantly white with yellow-red spots; orange-red spots are also acceptable.
  • The Small Lucerne hound has a smooth and unique coat that is predominantly white but speckled with black or gray giving the illusion of a blue body. They have black spots with tan markings over their eyes.
  • Photos:

    1 – Small Bernese Hound Smooth-coated male by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – Jura low-run dog by Bhv The Max
    3 – This dog is a small Schwyz Hound by pets.ch
    4 – Little Lucerne Hound by carlosh catalog

    Character and skills

    When he's hunting, the Small swiss hound is tireless and relentless, exhibiting impressive endurance and strength of character. They tend to be lively and excitable, eager to do their job. The majority of the Small swiss hound they are happy to hunt regardless, without any royal order from his master.

    Despite being bred to hunt, most breed members can transition from working hound to family pet easily and are generally affectionate and demonstrative of their owners. They are good friends with children and other dogs, but they cannot be trusted with small animals, including cats and rabbits.

    Individual temperaments vary, and while some may be quiet and peaceful guests of the house, others may be excitable and jumpy. Dogs with more energy can often be taught to settle indoors once they have been properly exercised.. Ideally, the exercise should be done in the form of hunting, as this not only burns excess energy but also occupies your inquisitive mind. The dog Small swiss hound, little stimulated, often becomes an annoying pet that can be difficult to train.

    Not being an aggressive dog, the Small swiss hound should not be used as a guard dog as it does not tend to scare off intruders and does not usually feel the need to guard your property.

    Training “Small swiss hound”

    The phrase “the small dog syndrome” can be mentioned when talking about Small swiss hound, as they have a reputation for acting like large dogs in small dog bodies. Full of confidence, lively and independent, this is not a breed for the novice trainer. Obedience work can be a particular challenge, as they have a free-spirited character and a mind of their own.

    Coaches must be firm and inflexible, keeping your training sessions short and interesting to keep the dog's interest. How this breed likes to assume a dominant position in the home, he should be taught his place from an early age, to avoid any bad behavior.

    Most dogs Small swiss hound are still used as hunting dogs in Switzerland today, meaning your exercise requirements are easily met during hunting season. In the case of non-working dogs, or when the hunting season is over, owners should take time to meet the needs of this active hound.

    A rural setting is the ideal place for Small swiss hound, who needs wide terrain to explore and does not enjoy being confined. It is essential that your property is securely fenced to avoid solo adventures.

    Health “Small swiss hound”

    There are not many diseases that affect the Small swiss hound more than other races, but there are a handful of conditions that should be watched in individuals:

    Ear infections

    Hanging ears are prone to developing ear infections, particularly if a dog spends a lot of time outside wet and muddy. Keeping your ears clean can prevent this from becoming a problem.

    Hip Dysplasia

    Malformed hip joints can lead to lifelong discomfort and reduced mobility. X-rays of the hips (a process called “hip score”) should be performed when a breeding dog is over one year of age to ensure that its hips are of good enough quality to be passed on.

    Grooming “Small swiss hound”

    Although there are a number of different hair types within the breed, all are easy to maintain and need little in the way of grooming. Weekly brushing will suffice. The Small swiss hound you will only need to be bathed a few times a year. If owners feel the need to disguise their “odor to dog” they can use dry shampoo, avoiding the risk of drying out their skin and coat.

    Ears of the Small swiss hound should be cleaned weekly and ideally should be checked daily for signs of infection. They must be completely dried after getting wet.

    Characteristics “Small swiss hound”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Small swiss hound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

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    Dog friendly ⓘ

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    Hair loss ⓘ

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    Affection Level ⓘ

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    Need to exercise ⓘ

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    Social Needs ⓘ

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    Apartment ⓘ

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    Grooming ⓘ

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    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

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    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

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    Health Issues ⓘ

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    Territorial ⓘ

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    Cat Friendly ⓘ

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    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
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    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
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    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
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    Playfulness ⓘ

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    Videos “Small swiss hound”

    Swiss low-legged dog + Schweizer Laufhund + Orange hound
    Schweizer Laufhund CERVA

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 60
    • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.3: Small-sized Hounds. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.3: Small-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds

    FCI breed standard “Small swiss hound”

    FCIFCI – “Small swiss hound”
    Small Swiss Hound FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Schweizerischer Niederlaufhund (English).
      2. Schweizerischer Niederlaufhund (French).
      3. Schweizer Niederlaufhund (German).
      4. Schweizerischer Niederlaufhund (Portuguese).
      5. (en suizo, Schweizerischer Niederlaufhund) (Spanish).

    Swiss Hound
    Suiza FCI 59 . Medium-sized Hounds

    Schwyz Hound
    Schwyz Hound

    In the breed standard, the temperament of Swiss hound is described as “Vivacious and passionate about hunting, sensitive, docile and very attached to his master”.

    Content

    History

    It is said that the Swiss Hound is among the oldest members of the Group of Hounds. According to a 15th century letter to Ernst, Elector of Saxony (1441-86), Swiss working dogs were among the best. 17th century images show packs of hounds “with the same color and the same size, large heads and very long ears”.

    Three centuries later, the german dog writer Richard Strebel wrote in “Die Deutschen Hunde” (German dog breeds, 1903-05) that hounds that lived separately in a restricted area of ​​Switzerland therefore developed separately.

    In the decade of 1890, it seemed that purebred hounds were marked for death in Switzerland, despite the breeding of the Schwyz Hound, Bernese Hound and Lucerne Hound. Some hounds were exported to Scandinavia and, thanks to the crossing with native hounds, the Stövares (scandinavian hounds) they were blooming. But at the same time, the Thurgauer Laufhund quietly disappeared in Switzerland, and the Aargauer Laufhund gave way to Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound).

    In 1903, J. Dust del Swiss Kennel Club founded the Schweizerische Laufhunde-Club (Swiss Hound Club) and in 1907 an appeal was made to save the Swiss hound of extinction. Then something remarkable happened: the breed club bought good quality Swiss hounds and gave them to prudent breeders and hunters. Test rules and regulations were developed and a series of obligations were established: -) only one dog at a time when hunting; b) the dog had to be under control when hunting; c) a dog that disappeared while hunting had to return to its master within half an hour; y d) the dog was to return as soon as the horn sounded, regardless of whether the dog was looking. Using these rules, the breed club tried to exclude disobedient dogs and forced owners to properly breed and train their dogs.

    Four varieties

    The development of Swiss Hound started in the decade of 1930, but it took time and effort. In 1937, only five hounds were entered in the Swiss herd book. The Dr. O. Vollenweider managed to gather 11 hound collectors in the city of Soleura, in northwestern Switzerland. Suitable dogs were selected for breeding and, in 1933, a breed standard was published. In the standard, the varieties were distinguished by coat color and pattern.

    In 1944, 150 Swiss hounds were entered in a hound exhibition. (As a neutral country, Switzerland did not participate in WWII) It was no longer forbidden to work with dogs that gave tongue, and bloodhounds of more than 20 inches (50 centimeters) to the cross.

    Attempts to save or restore the Laufhund de Argovia they were unsuccessful; in 1933, the breed standard was canceled. Four varieties remained: the Bernese Hound, the Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound), the Lucerne Hound and the Schwyz Hound. Their names connect them with cities and areas of Switzerland (Berne, Lucerne, Jura), or with Switzerland.

    It is said that between 1902 and 1922, a few 1.200 swiss hounds, mainly Schwyz Hound white-yellow, they were raised in Norway. Some years, there were more Swiss hounds outside of Switzerland than in their home country. In 1993, about 1.000 copies of Lucerne Hound they lived in sweden.

    France is another importer. Seventy-five Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound) enrolled in an exhibition in Lyon in 1976. It is not surprising that the Jura is predominantly found in France and Switzerland, and that it extends to Germany. Since the 15th century, Swiss hounds were also exported to Italy. According to Räber, they frequently crossed paths with his Italian cousin, the Italian short-haired Segugio.

    Photo: XXXVIII Wystawa krajowa psów rasowych w Częstochowie. Gończy ze Schwyz: Ella Haniccina Zahradka z hodowli Z Pastorowej Sfory należąca do Mariusza i Wioletty Antoszczuk by chained, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Swiss Hound varieties:

    1 Bernese Hound

    Bernese Hound

    The Bernese Hound It is mainly used for hunting hare.

    The Swiss Hound has a very ancient origin. Its existence in

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    2 Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound)

    Bruno Jura Hound

    The Jura Hound It is very distant with strangers and needs firm handling if kept as pets.

    In the year

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    3 Lucerne Hound

    Lucerne Hound

    The Lucerne Hound is a lively dog, but gentle and docile. Very attached to his master.

    The breed was originally bred in the

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    4 Schwyz Hound

    Schwyz Hound

    The Schwyz Hound they are a very lively and energetic breed that requires a significant amount of daily exercise.

    The Schwyz Hound has

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    Schwyz Hound
    Suiza FCI 59 . Medium-sized Hounds

    Schwyz Hound

    The Schwyz Hound they are a very lively and energetic breed that requires a significant amount of daily exercise.

    Content

    History

    The Schwyz Hound has ancient origins, the details are a bit confusing though. Dogs of this type are represented in mosaics dating from the Roman Helvetian era and the first specimens of the breed were highly sought after in Italy during the 15th century and then by the French during the 18th century..

    It is believed that the Schwyz Hound was influenced by the French Hounds brought to Switzerland by traveling mercenaries and eventually became one of the five varieties of “Swiss Hound”. More specifically, the Schwyz Hound it is one of the four breeds sometimes referred to – the other varieties are:

    The first breed standard for the Schwyz Hound was established in 1882 and reviewed in 1909. The breed was accepted by the FCI under the name of Schweizer Laufhund in 2001.

    Physical characteristics

    It is a dog with medium height at the withers. Your body structure indicates strength and tenacity. Its slim head with long snout and long ears give it an expression of nobility.

    Size: Males: 49-59 cm.. Females: 47-57 cm..

    Color: White with orange spots or orange "saddle" shape, sometimes with orange splashes; an orange coat is allowed.

    Character and skills

    The Schwyz Hound it is a friendly breed that can do well in a family environment as long as its exercise requirements are consistent. These dogs get along well with other dogs and can also be gentle with children. Just be careful around cats and other household pets because these dogs have strong hunting instincts – raising pets together and working on early socialization will help. You should also make sure your dog gets plenty of mental and physical exercise to avoid the kind of boredom that can lead to destructive behavior.

    The Schwyz Hound they are a very lively and energetic breed that requires a significant amount of daily exercise. These dogs need at least an hour of moderate to vigorous exercise each day and will also appreciate having time to run around in a fenced yard. This breed can also be a good candidate for dog sports, if you are looking for opportunities to get you some additional exercise.

    Training

    The Schwyz Hound has strong hunting instincts that can be developed and controlled through training. These dogs are trained to hunt in packs, so they are a bit independent by nature and can be stubborn at times. Keeping your training sessions short and offering plenty of food rewards will help ensure training success., in addition you must maintain a firm and consistent hand in leadership with this breed. Early socialization is also important for this breed.

    Characteristics “Schwyz Hound”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Schwyz Hound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

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    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
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    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
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    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

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    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
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    Apartment ⓘ

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    Grooming ⓘ

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    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
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    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
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    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
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    Territorial ⓘ

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    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
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    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos “Schwyz Hound”

    Willie de Schwyzer Laufhund 2
    Willie de Schwyzer Laufhund

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 59
    • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds

    FCI breed standard “Schwyz Hound”

    “Schwyz Hound” FCI Schwyz Hound FCI

    Varieties of “Swiss hounds”

    The four varieties of Swiss Hounds have their own specific hunting characteristics:

    – The Bernese Hound, with her beautiful throat (“the howler of the Jura”), demanding, mainly used for hares;
    – The “Jura Hound“, an excellent recuperator
    – The Lucerne Hound, reminiscent of Small Blue Gascony, he is an active and passionate dog that hunts deer very well;
    – The “Schwyz Hound”, less widespread outside of Switzerland, is reserved for rabbits and hares.

    Lucerne Hound
    Suiza FCI 59 . Medium-sized Hounds

    Lucerne Hound

    The Lucerne Hound is a lively dog, but gentle and docile. Very attached to his master.

    Content

    History

    The breed was originally bred in the Lucerne area, Switzerland. Already in appearance it is closely related to the dog Bloodhound. It can be assumed that the Small Blue Gascony may also have played a role in the development of the breed: Striking colored coat with speckled pattern suggests this. It is one of the four Swiss Hounds, that have been combined by the FCI under a single breed standard, but they are judged separately in the exhibitions. The other varieties of the breed are:

    Physical characteristics

    Height at the withers up to 59 cm..
    The ears are far back, very large, heavy, bent and turned.
    Hair: Short, thick and thick, Fox fur
    color: blue, of a combination of black and white hairs, very mottled, with black spots or a black chair.

    Character and skills

    The Lucerne Hound is a lively dog, but gentle and docile. Very attached to his master.

    Like all dogs Swiss hounds, this breed is also relatively small. This is partly due to the fact that environmental conditions in the mountains, where were these dogs born, they are extremely hard, so animals with low energy requirements survived better than larger dogs. The Lucerne Hound used for a wide variety of hunting, from wild boars to deer and hares. Although the dense coat protects the dog from the cold and likes to live outdoors, look for comfort; therefore he feels comfortable in the city, but needs a lot of activity and enough exercise. There is an almost identical breed with shorter legs – the Small Lucerne Hound, one of the varieties of Small swiss hound. It is suitable as a working dog, hunting and company.

    Characteristics “Lucerne Hound”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Lucerne Hound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
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    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

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    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
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    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
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    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos “Lucerne Hound”

    chiens courant lucernois entrainement 2
    chiens courant lucernois entrainement 1

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 59
    • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds

    FCI breed standard “Lucerne Hound”

    “Lucerne Hound” FCI Lucerne Hound FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Lucerne Hound (English).
      2. Courant lucernois (French).
      3. Blausprenkel (German).
      4. Sabujo Lucerna (Portuguese).
      5. Perro sabueso suizo de Lucerna (Spanish).

    Varieties of “Swiss hounds”

    The four varieties of Swiss Hounds have their own specific hunting characteristics:

    – The Bernese Hound, with her beautiful throat (“the howler of the Jura”), demanding, mainly used for hares;
    – The “Jura Hound“, an excellent recuperator
    – The “Lucerne Hound”, reminiscent of Small Blue Gascony, he is an active and passionate dog that hunts deer very well;
    – The “Schwyz Hound”, less widespread outside of Switzerland, is reserved for rabbits and hares.

    Bernese Hound
    Suiza FCI 59 . Medium-sized Hounds

    Bernese Hound

    The Bernese Hound It is mainly used for hunting hare.

    Content

    History

    The Swiss Hound has a very ancient origin. Its existence in Switzerland since Roman times is confirmed by a mosaic discovered in Avanches that represents hunting dogs whose characteristics coincide with the varieties of Swiss Hound. In the 15th century it was appreciated by Italian fans and in the 18th century by the French for its extraordinary ability to hunt hare.. Its original local breeding was surely influenced by French small game dogs brought to Switzerland by mercenaries.. In the year 1882 a standard was established for each of the five existing varieties of Swiss Hound. In 1909 These standards were revised, confirming the total disappearance of the Thurgau Hound. The 22 in January of 1933 established a uniform standard for the 4 Swiss Hound varieties. The original variety of Jura Hound type St. Hubert has disappeared today.

    There are four varieties of Swiss Hound:

    Photo: Bernese Hound during dogs show in Katowice, Poland by Lilly M, CC BY-SA 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons

    Physical characteristics

    In the Bernese Hound the coat is white with black spots or saddle, sometimes slightly mottled. Light to dark beige marks the upper part of the eyes, cheeks, the inner side of the ears and around the anus.

    ▷ Male weight: 15 - 20 kg
    ▷ Female weight: 15 - 20 kg
    ▷ The size of the male: 49 - 59 cm.
    ▷ Female size: 49 - 59 cm.

    Character and skills

    The Bernese Hound he is alive and passionate. Its sensitivity is valued as positively as its ease of use and its attachment to the dog handler. When you follow a clue, expansive and fluid movements are noticeable, as well as the good push of the hindquarters. You can feel strength, stamina and temperament, so her fine nose is closely tied to the track.

    Acute smell is atypical for Bernese Hound, whose passion for hunting is so tireless that the dog handler must prevent the dog from overdoing it beforehand. Otherwise, the dog chases the prey until he catches it himself. Diligent search is desirable, but the dog, except when used in the pack, must always remain in the hand of your guide.

    While the Bernese Hound he was used in his homeland mainly as a lone deer hunter, foxes and hares; Wild boar hunts with bloodhounds are also carried out in western Switzerland. In France and Italy they are more likely to continue to be used for herd hunting of hare, wild boar and deer.

    In Switzerland, the Bernese Hound They are mainly used for patent and district hunting. In patent hunting, three to six hunters usually form a hunting party. They are distributed among the different posts and the dogs are tied simultaneously at a previously agreed time. This promotes the independent search of each dog and also the pursuit of hares or deer as a solitary hunter.. For the hunt to be successful, the hunter must know which path the game will take to be able to shoot it with a shotgun at a maximum distance of 30 m.
    During a hunt in hunting ground there are large groups of up to 30 hunters. The hunt leader distributes the hunters in different positions, while a hunter goes on the hunt with all the dogs, and finally hold all the dogs at once. Here the leader of the hunt must know how the hunt flees and, therefore, distribute hunters' positions. While hunting in the hunting ground, the hare, the deer and sometimes also the fox are shot from a maximum distance of 30 m.

    Off the hunt, the Bernese Hound he is a nice and quiet family member. with whom you are closely linked.

    Characteristics “Bernese Hound”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Bernese Hound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos “Bernese Hound”

    Berner Laufhund
    Berner Laufhund

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 59
    • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds

    FCI breed standard “Bernese Hound”

    “Bernese Hound” FCI Bernese Hound FCI

    Varieties of “Swiss hounds”

    The four varieties of Swiss Hounds have their own specific hunting characteristics:

    – The Bernese Hound, with her beautiful throat (“the howler of the Jura”), demanding, mainly used for hares;
    – The “Jura Hound“, an excellent recuperator
    – The Lucerne Hound, reminiscent of Small Blue Gascony, he is an active and passionate dog that hunts deer very well;
    – The “Schwyz Hound”, less widespread outside of Switzerland, is reserved for rabbits and hares.

    Entelbucher Cattle Dog
    Suiza FCI 47 - Swiss Cattle Dogs

    Boyero de Entlebuch

    The Entelbucher Cattle Dog they are kind and dedicated to people close to him

    Content

    History

    The Entelbucher Cattle Dog is the smallest of the four Sennenhund, a type of dog that includes four races in the region. The name Sennenhund refers to the population Senn, dairy and livestock farmers in the Swiss Alps.

    The distinctive of this variety of Sennenhund name responds to the District of Entlebuch (in German Amt Entlebuch) It is one of five districts of the Canton of Lucerne (Switzerland), Located southwest of Canton.

    All races Sennenhund are believed to be descendants of large molossians brought to Switzerland by the Romans in the 1st century to. C. However, Entlebuch's Boyero was described as a separate breed in 1889. After the first world war, the breed declined greatly in number of copies.

    The first breed club was not formed until 1926, only sixteen examples of this type of dog were recorded in 1927, and so was, the race was gradually restored. Although initially the race stayed for custody of goods and grazing, Today the race generally reserves as a cheerful companion family.

    The Entelbucher Cattle Dog is recognized by the International Cynological Federation, and it uses the standard written in the native country of the race, Switzerland.

    Other national canine clubs not affiliated to the Federation Cynologique Internationale, They also recognize the race, but they often write their own versions of the standard of the breed.

    The breed is recognized by numerous small clubs and registries on the Internet, where is promoted as a rare species for purchasers of puppies that are seeking a unique pet.

    Physical characteristics

    Entelbucher Cattle Dog is a square dog, robust, but medium-sized. It has small ears, triangular and rather small brown eyes. The head is well-proportioned to the body, with a flat and strong skull. His long jaw is well formed and powerful. Toes are compact and provide cushioning and support his muscular body.

    The layer of hair is smooth is thin and hard, with symmetrical markings of tricolor. White on their toes, the tip of the tail, the chest, the Tan always lies between the black and white. It has muscular broad hips. The tail is sometimes cut, a practice which is prohibited by law in many countries.

    A Entelbucher Cattle Dog It has a height at the withers between 44 and 52 cm in males and between 42 and 50 cm in females. Weight is between 20 and 30 kg.

    Character and skills

    Like all large working dogs, very active, which is why, This race should be socialized at an early age with other dogs and people, and always with normal activity and training that can live safely as a pet (given its size, It may be a problem if you do not receive adequate education).

    According to the standard of the breed, they are dedicated to people close to him and kind dogs, a little distrustful with strangers, and he loves children. But we must always bear in mind that the temperament of the dogs is individual, namely, may variar…

    Entelbucher Cattle Dog Education

    The Entelbucher Cattle Dog feel more comfortable in the field. He wants to move and be busy. Not a sofa dog. Not suitable for comfortable people and not for life in the middle of the city, but for challenges at work and dog sports. However, you don't necessarily need a house with a big garden, what would be ideal, because it also settles for an apartment. He has no special demands on his attitude, except the fact that we work with him and that on a daily basis. The nucleus and end of their close participation is the human family. The Entelbucher Cattle Dog can be well trained. Loves to learn and learns with enthusiasm. It is strongly oriented towards its humans, which can be put to good use. The Entlebucher can read the mood and desires of your humans on their faces. This in turn means that one must approach one's education with feeling and of course with consequence.. You have a clear sense of justice and, therefore, questions fair treatment of him.

    Entelbucher Cattle Dog Images

    Entelbucher Cattle Dog videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:Group 2 –> Pinscher and Schnauzer - Molossian - Mountain Dogs and Swiss type Boyeros. / Section 3 –> Dogs type mountain and Swiss Cattle. Without working trial.
    • FCI 47
    • Federations: FCI , AKC , ANKC , CKC , ​KC , UKC
    • Entelbucher Cattle Dog breed FCI nomenclature
    • ENTLEBUCH CATTLE DOG FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Entelbuch Mountain Dog, Entelbucher Cattle Dog, Entlebucher (English).
      2. Bouvier de l’Entlebuch (French).
      3. Entlebucher Sennenhund (German).
      4. Entlebucher Sennenhund (Portuguese).
      5. Entlebucher Sennenhund (Spanish).

    Appenzell Cattle Dog
    Suiza FCI 46 - Swiss Cattle Dogs

    Boyero de Appenzell

    The Appenzell Cattle Dog kept in a principle in general as a farm dog.

    Content

    History

    The Appenzell Cattle Dog (Appenzeller Sennenhund) It is a breed of dog of medium size, one of the four regional breeds of Sennenhund (Type of dogs from the Swiss Alps). The name Sennenhund refers to people Senn, dairy and livestock farmers in the Swiss Alps. Appenzell It is an Alpine region of northeast of Switzerland.

    There are two theories about the origin of the Appenzell Cattle Dog. A, It is a native breed dating back to the bronze age, and the other, It descends from the molossians and he was taken to Switzerland by the Romans. In any case, It is one of the four Swiss Sennenhund. The Appenzell is the rarest of the four. It is an excellent dog of herd. Tireless and great firmness in the mountains. It also adapts to pull a cart and is used to bring the milk and cheese among traders of the Swiss valleys.

    The first Club and the book of origins of the breed were initiated in 1906 by Albert Heim and other, who wrote the first breed standard in 1916. One of the earliest references to the predecessors of the race was embodied in a book of 1853, “Tierleben der Alpenwelt” (Animal life in the Alps), referring to the dogs in the Appenzell region. Appenzell Cattle Dog was recognized - internationally- as a separate breed in 1989.

    Physical characteristics

    The Appenzell Cattle Dog is a great mountain dog, has a height of 47 - 58 cm to the cross and a weight of 22 - 32 kg. Like the other Sennenhund, It is a large dog and has a layer of tricolor hair that distinguishes.

    It is a dog of large muscles but not very full-bodied, with wide and flat skull, and a snout that tapers towards the truffle. Eyes small and dark; and ears, Earrings. It is the only Swiss boyeros that bears the tail rolled on back. The hair is cut, bright and bushy. Color: It supports the black and Tan with white markings on the chest, the head and feet

    Character and skills

    The Appenzell Cattle Dog was initially kept as herd guardian, dog shooting, and in general, as a farm dog.

    The race was also used for grazing and as a guard dog. Today the breed is maintained mainly as a companion, and excels in obedience competitions and Schutzhund.

    Like all large working dogs, very active, which is why, This race should be socialized at an early age with other dogs and people, and always with normal activity and training that can live safely as a pet (given its size, It may be a problem if you do not receive adequate education). According to the standard of the breed, dogs are joyful spirit, playful, and distrustful to strangers.

    Despite its fairly strong character, tends to be always quiet, nice. If not go to custody, behave amicably with everyone. It is the most docile of Swiss boyeros and, therefore, the easiest of train, but it is also the most barking.

    Appenzell Cattle Dog Education

    The Appenzell Cattle Dog can be well trained. He loves to learn and he does it with enthusiasm. It is strongly oriented towards its humans, which can be put to good use. The Appenzell Cattle Dog you can read the mood and wishes of your people on their faces. That in turn means that you have to approach your education with feeling., and of course with consistency. He has a pronounced sense of justice and, therefore, challenge people to treat it fairly. It is important that at the puppy stage you begin to control your joy of barking, who once characterized him as a good cut dog.

    Appenzell Cattle Dog care and health

    The Appenzell Cattle Dog it is very easy to care for, brushing here and there is enough.

    Regarding your health, tend to have trouble with their hips (HD) or knees (ED), up to falls. In old age you can see a tendency to skin tumors. Partially strong inbreeding has a negative effect on physical fitness and life expectancy.

    Nutrition / Food

    The Appenzell Cattle Dog you have no special requirements in your diet. Have a healthy appetite and tend to be overweight, especially in old age.

    The life expectancy Appenzell Cattle Dog

    The Appenzell Cattle Dog it is relatively strongly affected by inbreeding and a breeding selection that is unilaterally oriented towards external appearances, such as fur color details. Therefore, their life expectancy has decreased in part enormously. It's between eight and -healthily- twelve years.

    Buy Appenzell Cattle Dog

    When buying a puppy care must be taken that the pedigree ancestor of the puppies does not appear twice (endogamia). Otherwise, You should be looking for a breeder affiliated with the Swiss Mountain Dog Club. You can also find the dog of your dreams at the animal shelter or in an emergency initiative. You can get a puppy in a serious kennel from 1200 EUR.

    Images Appenzell Cattle Dog

    Appenzell Cattle Dog Videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI :Group 2 –> Pinscher and Schnauzer-Molossoid. Swiss Mountain and Cattle Dogs. / Section 3 –> Swiss Mountain and Cattle Dogs. Without working trial.
    • FCI 46
    • Federations: FCI , AKC , ANKC , UKC
    • FCI nomenclature of Appenzell Cattle Dog race
    • APPENZELL CATTLE DOG FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Appenzeller, Appenzeller Cattle Dog, Appenzeller Mountain Dog (English).
      2. Bouvier d’Appenzell (French).
      3. Appenzeller (German).
      4. Appenzeller Sennenhund (Portuguese).
      5. Appenzeller (Spanish).

    Greater Swiss Mountain Dog
    Suiza FCI 58 - Swiss Cattle Dogs

    Gran Boyero Suizo

    Despite its impressive size and weight, The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is strong and agile.

    Content

    History

    The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is an old Swiss farm dog. It is the largest of the family of mountain dogs. These served in the mountains and valleys of the Swiss Alps as a complete tool for farmers. They watched the house and the farm. If a herd of cows had to be brought from one meadow to another, they made sure everyone stayed on the road and no cow was left behind.

    The great mountain dogs, from which the current one emerged Greater Swiss Mountain Dog, harnessed in front of the larger wagons and served as all-terrain and mountain tractors, more or less like the old one Unimog. It was not unusual for them to be harnessed in pairs in front of a cart full of valuable cheese, so they could independently find their way from the alpine pasture to the village, to the merchant and back. Swiss Mountain Dogs and Cattle Dogs used to be one family of dogs. What they have in common is a strong bond with the family and their farm, a sure self-awareness, a widely lost hunting instinct, a high degree of vigilance, a loving attitude towards his own people and a reserved attitude towards strangers.

    A few ago 100 years, mountain dogs were divided into four breeds: Entlebucher, Appenzeller, Berne, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog – in order of size. This and the artificial fixation in a tricolorism conceived by the breeding have not been good for the health of these great dogs. So the statistics of the British Kennel Club 2014 document a life expectancy of only 8 years for Mountain Dogs and Bovine Dogs. Healthy servants could live easily 4 more years. More about this in the portrait of the respective mountain and cattle dogs.

    The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog became a valuable companion dog, but he still has the skills of a working dog. In 1912 the Swiss was founded on “Large Swiss Mountain and Cattle Dogs Club”.

    Physical characteristics

    The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is a big dog, robust, strong-boned and well-muscled. Radiate sovereign calm and self-assured composure, and this is how it is. The difference between the sexes should be quite large.
    The males must have a height at the withers of 65 - 72 centimeters, the females of 60 - 68. The weight is between 35 and 50 kg.

    The standard establishes numerous regulations on the details of coloring, texture and pattern of its coat. Should have brush hair and be tricolor. We see detailed regulations, where white marks are allowed and where they are not. In the interest of dogs, these external characteristics should not be taken so seriously, that are only devised by your breeder. Converting these details into breeding selection criteria is not in the interest of the welfare of the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog, they only have an extremely small gene pool anyway. What matters is the character and physical condition of the dogs. This last, Unfortunately, not too rare a problem. The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog it has better qualities than the color of its coat.

    Character and skills

    The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog feel more comfortable in the field. He wants to be moved and you can experience wonderful stress-free walks in nature with him. As he has little hunting instinct and usually has a good ear, you can enjoy relaxed and stress-free hours outdoors with it, even without a strap. However, not a companion dog for athletes.

    A Greater Swiss Mountain Dog not suitable for life in the middle of the big city. You don't need a house with a big garden, what would be ideal. He likes to have a land or a yard where he can take care of things. In all other respects, does not have any special requirement regarding its maintenance. Most important is their close integration into the human family. For a permanent or even partial stay in a kennel these dogs are completely unsuitable.

    Educating the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

    A Greater Swiss Mountain Dog can be trained very well. He likes to learn. It is strongly oriented towards its people, what you can use well. The Great swiss you can read the mood and wishes of your people on their faces. This in turn means that one must approach one's education with feeling and of course with consequence.. He has a pronounced sense of justice and, the other way, expect an equally fair deal. One must not only accept their occasional stubbornness, but you must like it. They challenge an intimate and mutually respectful relationship between the dog and the owner. The reward is a happy coexistence for both parties.

    Care and health of the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

    The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog it is very easy to care for, just brush it occasionally.

    Like many large dog breeds, tends to have hip problems (HD) or elbows (ED). La endogamia, unfortunately partly strong, has a negative effect on physical fitness and life expectancy.

    Nutrition / Food

    The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog has no special demands on their diet. Like many dogs of his size, tends to churn your stomach. Therefore you should not eat too fast and let it rest after eating.. Veterinarians often recommend an elevated feeding bowl, that can be purchased in specialized stores. During the breeding season, special attention must be paid to adapted nutrition.

    The life expectancy of the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

    A Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is relatively strongly affected by inbreeding and a breeding stock that is one-sidedly oriented to outward appearances, such as fur color details. Therefore, their life expectancy has decreased in part enormously. It's between eight and -healthily- twelve years.

    Buy a Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

    When buying a puppy you must be careful that no ancestor appears twice in the pedigree (endogamia). Otherwise, You should look for a breeder affiliated with the Swiss Mountain Dog and Cattle Club. You can also find the dog of your dreams at the animal shelter or in an emergency initiative.

    Evaluations of the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Greater Swiss Mountain Dog” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Images

    Photos:

    1 – Greater Swiss Mountain Dog, tricolour by Canarian / CC BY-SA
    2 – Greater Swiss Mountain Dog by jude / CC BY
    3 – Big Swiss Mountain Dog and Entlebucher Mountain Dog during International show of dogs in Katowice – Saucer, Poland by Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA
    4 – All Mountain Dogs: Greater Swiss Mountain Dog, the Bernese Mountain Dog, the Appenzeller Mountain Dog an the Entlebucher Mountain Dog by Shining dog / CC BY-SA

    Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 58
    • Group 2: Pinscher and Schnauzer- Molossoid breeds – Swiss Mountain and Cattle Dogs.
    • Section 2.2: Molossian, Mountain type. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Pinscher and Schnauzer-Molossoid type dogs – Swiss Mountain Dogs and Cattledogs. Section 2.2 Molossoid, mountain type.
    • AKC – Working dogs
    • CKC – Working dogs
    • ​KC – Working dogs
    • UKC – Guard dog

    FCI Standard Greater Swiss Mountain Dog breed

    GREAT SWISS MOUNTAIN DOG FCI GREAT SWISS MOUNTAIN DOG FCI
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