Red-rumped Parrot
Psephotus haematonotus

Red-rumped Parrot

Description

27 to 30 cm. length between 55 and 85 g. of weight.

The Red-rumped Parrot (Psephotus haematonotus) It has a bright pale green head, slightly iridescent, with the front of the crown Blue pale and diffusion in the throat. Mantle Green grey with stripes dark fine; floor area of the back and Hip, Scarlet pale; uppertail-coverts bright green. Curve of the wing blue-violet shiny; carpal edge dark blue; small coverts bluish green, the external medium yellow, the inner of a pale blue-green; greater coverts, bluish green, clearer internal; primary coverts dark blue. Flight feather Blackish with vane external edges and dark blue yellowish; tertiarys grey-green with vane Dark internal. Wing feathers dark blue. Green light the chest with a broadcasting slightly yellow, belly bright yellow, feathers of the chest and belly with stripes more dark very fine; the thighs, vent and undertail- coverts off-white, sometimes blur of yellowish-green. Upper, the tail Green feathered side of greenish-blue with white tips; by down whitish appearance when it is closed.

Bill black; irises brown; legs grey.

The female It is much more off than the male, usually greyish green. With white spots on the ear-coverts, the upper part of the chest is grey olive clear with fringed slightly more dark and the belly whitish with a blue-green light diffusion. The wing-coverts are of a gray olive more uniform that it's the male (medium-sized coverts pale blue). The vane outside of the flight feather they are more muted and more greenish, with the tail green. The bill and the irises are more pale, with some brands shaped pale wing bar.

The immature They also have a pale bar on the wings. Males are darker, with more olive than females and a rump with a narrow margin of Red; The feathers greenish blue begin to show in the head, the chest and wing-coverts first.

The adult plumage was purchased in two or three months, the male young retain the bar of wing and have it rump more off for another year.

  • Sound of the Red-rumped Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Perico Dorsirrojo.mp3]

Description 2 subspecies

  • Psephotus haematonotus caeruleus

    (Condom 1941) – Adults of both sexes are more pale in color, the male is a shade more blue, the Central undertail feathers they have more nuances blue and red of the rump is more pale; the nape and the the mantle of the female are more grayish Green

  • Psephotus haematonotus haematonotus

    (Gould 1838) – The nominal.

Habitat:

The Red-rumped Parrot usually sedentary, but some movements of flocks with farming jobs have been recorded at the edges of its range.

They prefer open terrain and trees of ribera, grasslands and croplands until 1.000 meters above sea level, where the annual precipitation is inferior to 800 mm. They are also found in suburban areas, having canevale for golf courses, roadsides and parks, and locally in the mangroves.

Are usually replaced by the Bluebonnet and Mulga Parrot in more humid areas.

They are usually in pairs or small groups, but they are not uncommon flocks of 100 copies or more during the subsequent breeding season. These groups maintain the partner link and mutual grooming is common. The Red-rumped Parrot are sociable, and to retire to the roosts are constantly called.

Reproduction:

The breeding season of the Red-rumped Parrot extends from July to January, Although you can rely more on the rains in the North than elsewhere. The courtship the male consists of head and tail Wiggles, as well as the pose of alas-caidas.

The nesting they tend to occur in small colonies, often resulting in disputes between couples. The nest usually in a hollow tree, in different heights, often in a eucalyptus, also you can place in a tree stump or even the eaves of a building can provide a suitable place. Between two and eight eggs (usually four to five) they form the laying. The female incubates alone for around 20 days, regularly fed by the male.

The pricipio, males remain in small groups, but as the chicks grow, These groups begin to disperse and males joined young people directly in the moments of eating. Young people take to abandon the nest between four to six weeks.

Food:

The Red-rumped Parrot they tend to feed on the ground, but it is also common to see them feeding in trees and shrubs.

The diet includes a mix of grasses and herbs, also seed sprouts, leaves, flowers and grain. They rest during the heat of the day and they can remain hidden, unless you disturb them.

Distribution:


Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 1.930.000 km2

The Red-rumped Parrot are confined to the southeast of Australia, from the North of the Peninsula of Eyre and Yorke, in the South of Australia, until the Montes Flinders, the basin of the Lake Eyre and Innamincka in the Northeast. The species expands eastward through Victoria, having come up to Melbourne in the middle of the Decade of 1970.

In the news, the species is still scarce in the eastern end of the State. However, in New South Wales can be found around Sydney and along the coast towards the North, extending inward across the fullest part of New South Wales (largely absent in the Northwest of the Darling river,).

In Queensland reaches Windorah, in the West and the surrounding area of Charleville, Chinchilla and Brisbane, in the East.

Its population is common and growing in the North and to the South coast of Queensland, to the South of New South Wales, benefiting from the expansion of agriculture.

The world population is more of 200.000 specimens and the species is protected by law.

Distribution 2 subspecies

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Crecent

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, It is estimated over the 200.000 specimens.

Considered as a bird common to abundant in some parts of its area of distribution, do not believe that the Red-rumped Parrot is in danger of extinction, Although there is some evidence that the numbers they may be decreasing slightly. The reasons for this are not clear.

As the Red-rumped Parrot It is immersed in the pet trade, This species is included in the Appendix II the Convention on international trade in endangered species (CITES), which means that all international trade in this species should be carefully controlled.

Red-backed parrot in captivity:

You have a nice voice. It is active and not particularly shy. It can be kept with other parrots outside the breeding season.

The Red-rumped Parrot (Psephotus h. Psephotus) It is one of the species of breeding parakeets more common in captivity. The first imports of Australia they arrived in the middle of the 19TH century. In 1857, the Zoo's London announced the first reproduction successful with this species. Other reproductive success would continue in Germany and Netherlands, already in 1860.

It's a tough species recommended for novice breeders. The Red-rumped Parrot It is very tolerant of our climate and prefers an Aviary in the open air all year round.

You can play from the age of one year; being two years total maturity age. Playing at the end of the winter, early spring. It usually has two to three broods.

The El Perico shrike is also used as a foster parent. Breeders have used their good reproductive provisions for more delicate species such as the Australian King-Parrot (Alisterus scapuleris), the Red-winged Parrot (Apromictus erytropterus) or other species of Polytelis.

The first mutation mentioned back in the middle of the Decade of 1930. This mutation of Australian origin was named as Yellow before later being renamed as Green cake. Currently known as cinnamon.

Other mutations emerged later as the panache, blue, lutino, opaline, etc … In the news, This species is very common in aviaries. Observations show a unrecognized majority of mutated subjects and a worrisome decline in wild phenotypes. Reasonably, It is likely that the wild phenotypes genetically pure are extremely rare nowadays.

According to sources, a sample lived 12,2 years in captivity.

Alternative names:

Red-rumped Parrot, Grass Parrot, Grassie, Green Leek, Ground Parrot, Red rumped Parrot, Red-backed Parakeet, Red-backed Parrot, Redrump, Red-rumped Grass Parakeet, Red-rumped Parakeet (English).
Perruche à croupion rouge (French).
Singsittich (German).
Periquito-dorso-vermelho (Portuguese).
Perico de Dorso Rojo, Perico Dorsirrojo, Periquito de Rabadilla Roja, Cotorra de rabadilla roja, Espalda roja, Periquito cantor (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Psephotus
Scientific name: Psephotus haematonotus
Citation: (Gould, 1838)
Protonimo: Platycercus haematonotus

Images Red-rumped Parrot:

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Red-rumped Parrot (Psephotus haematonotus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– Anage: The Animal Ageing and Longevity Database – Anagé entry for Psephotus haematonotus
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A male Red-rumped Parrot by Yarra River, Victoria, Australia By Andrea (originally posted to Flickr as rainbow parrot) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – A male Red-rumped Parrot near Lake Ginninderra, Canberra, Australia By Duncan McCaskill (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Red-rumped Parrot in Capertee Valley, Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia. The red rump is seen only in male By Lip Kee Yap from Singapore, Republic of Singapore [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Red-rumped Parrot male (Psephotus haematonotus) – Flickr by Patrick_K59
(5) – Red-rumped Parrot (Psephotus haematonotus) Photographed @ Yarra Bend Park, Melbourne, Australia – Flickr

Sounds: Peter Woodall (Xeno-canto)

Red-capped Parrot
Purpureicephalus spurius

Red-capped Parrot

Description

36 cm.. length and a weight between 105 and 156 g..

Red-capped Parrot

The Red-capped Parrot (Psittacus erithacus) has the top of the crown and nape dark carmine red. The throat and cheeks are yellowish-green, merging slightly yellow on the sides of neck. The the mantle shows a dark green. The rump is bright yellow, which contrasts with the uppertail-coverts green. The wings covers are green, although large coberteras stain blue in the outer feathers.

The flight feather They are blackish with a large dark blue border around the outside edges of the primaries. The underparts is blue, with the exception of the flight feather that are black. The feathers of the chest and the abdomen They are blue-purple, becoming paler in area anal.

The the thighs and lower area of the tail They have a beautiful red. The undersides They have infiltrated some green feathers. Large central feathers tail They are green at the base, and bluish to the tip. side feathers tail They are dark at the base but gradually diluted colors light blue in the middle and then to white at the tips. The bottom of the tail It is pale blue with a white termination.

The bill, formed by a upper mandible more elongated, is bluish grey. The irises is of color Brown dark and the legs brown.

The female is more off than your partner. It has a crown green and chest brown. It shows a clear cross bar at the bottom of the wings, the level of flight feather. This motif is also present in the immature.

The immature they have the upperparts dark green and yellow rump duller than in adults. The the thighs They are less bright red colo. The chest It is browner. The forecrown It is covered with red feathers that are part, in small scattered groups, red feathers crown. The adult plumage It is acquired largely during the first molt and subsequently completed in the first spring.

  • Sound of the Red-capped Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Perico Capelo.mp3]

Habitat:

Paired adults are sedentary, Although noisy flocks of up to 20 young birds are often seen wandering in search of food.

The Red-capped Parrot they have a preference for the eucalyptus forest and specialized to feed on seeds MARRI their elongated upper jaw is adapted for eating plant big seeds. The Fruit Marri they are available throughout the year and provide the source of staple food. The Red-capped Parrot they can also be observed in gardens (where sometimes cause serious damage), peoples, wooded pastures and forest of mallee (Eucalyptus Gracilis), also feeding on grass strips covering roads.

Couples remain inconspicuous, While quietly feeding in the canopy, during the greater part of the day, Although they sometimes perch on Earth, in the clear, to feed on fallen fruit.

Reproduction:

The nesting season is between between August and December.

During the courtship, the male raises its crest, the tail, It tilts its wings and emits loud calls. The ritual offerings of food are also common, feeding the male partner during the incubation period.

The spawning usually includes 5 eggs, but may vary from 3 to 9. These are white. The eggs are deposited on a layer of sawdust covering the bottom of a natural cavity of a eucalyptus marri, to a great height above the ground.

The incubation lasts a few 20 days. The male does not participate in feeding youngsters until they reach the age of 15 days. The flight of hatchlings produced approximately 5 weeks after hatching. The young remain in the family group for a short time after leaving the nest.

Food:

Apart from MARRI, These birds also feed on other eucalyptus, for example, Jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata), casuarinas, (Grevillea, Hakea), and they have also been feeding on flowers and insects.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 126.000 km2

Confined to the southwest corner of Western Australia. The species is distributed around the Moore River to the North of Perth (occasionally in Dandaragan), through the leafy South-West corner, usually within 100 km from the coast, reaching the inside of Lake Grace in the East and Esperance on the South Coast. The Red-capped Parrot they are regularly observed in the outskirts of Perth, and are reproduced in the King ’ of Park in the center of the city. The species is common, especially in the forests of MARRI (eucalyptus calphylla).

The world's population is believed to be above 20.000.

Moderate in captivity numbers. It can be fired like a plague in a small number of areas.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Growing

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, Although the world's population is estimated at more of 20 000 specimens.
The species is described as quite common (pit et to the. 1997).

The number of captive birds It seems to be quite modest. In some areas, This bird has no protection and can be shot down if it enters an area of intensive growth. Even so, the population It is suspected that You may be increasing.

As the degradation of the habitat is permanent, new areas of suitable habitat are being created.

Perico Capelo in captivity:

It is a bird shy and nervous. They should not be housed with aggressive species. They can be noisy especially early, in the morning.
It is not common in captivity.

Una muestra vivió 15,3 years in captivity. In captivity, these animals have been able to play to the 2 years of age approximately.

Alternative names:

Red-capped Parrot, Hookbill, King Parrot, Pileated Parakeet, Pileated Parrot, Purple-crowned Parrot, Red capped Parrot, Red-capped Parakeet, Western Australian King Parrot, Western Gray Parrot, Western Grey Parrot, Western King Parrot (English).
Perruche à tête pourpre (French).
Kappensittich, Rotkappensittich (German).
Periquito-cabeça-púrpura (Portuguese).
Perico Capelo, Periquito de Birrete Rojo (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Purpureicephalus
Scientific name: Purpureicephalus spurius
Citation: (Kuhl, 1820)
Protonimo: parrot champion

Red-capped Parrot Images:

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Red-capped Parrot (Purpureicephalus spurius)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Anage: The Animal Ageing and Longevity Database – Anagé entry for Purpureicephalus spurius

Photos:

(1) – “Red-Capped-Parrot 0004 flat web“. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons.
(2) – A juvenile Red-capped Parrot at Earls Golf Club, Perth, Western Australia, Australia By Michael MK Khor [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – By Bill & Mark Bell – Flickr
(4) – By Bill & Mark Bell – Flickr
(5) – By Ralph Green – Red-capped Parrot juvenile – Flickr
(6) – Edward Lear [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Randy Moore (Xeno-canto)

Regent Parrot
Polytelis anthopeplus

Regent Parrot

Description

37 to 42 cm.. length and around 114 g. of weight.

Regent Parrot

The Regent Parrot (Polytelis anthopeplus) has the yellow head, tending to yellow olive in it crown and nape. Green olive the the mantle; scapulars of color Brown olive dark; floor area of the back and tail showy yellow, tending to yellow olive in uppertail-coverts. Smalls and medium corbeteras, Yellow; greater coverts of color black blue in them pens external, Red with yellow tips on the innermost feathers; tertiary black grey in vane inner; reddish pink, with yellow tip in the vane outer; primary coverts bluish-black; primaries and secondaries bluish-black, with black inner tubes. Wing feathers yellow; underside of flight feather brown, almost black. The underparts Yellow, more off the yellow olive in undertail-coverts with some brands Orange indistinct around it area anal.

The tail is of color black with infiltrations of color blue dark in the part superior of their feathers Central and of the threads internal of their feathers side.

The bill is pinkish-Red. The irises are of color brown orange; legs grey.

The female has the underparts grey and of color green it top. Lords and ear-coverts are of colour more greenish. The strip of color blue dark of the feathers is more broad and it extends to the under wing-coverts that are more than color yellow-green that in the male. The rump is green olive opaque, not yellow. The red dot of the wing is less developed and has less brightness. Tail of color green blue by over. It has a pink tip below.

The youth they resemble females, However, young males have more yellow in the head.

  • Sound of the Regent Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Perico Regente.mp3]

Description 2 subspecies.

  • Polytelis anthopeplus anthopeplus

    : (Lear 1831) – The nominal.

  • Polytelis anthopeplus monarchoides

    : (Schodde 1993) – The male has much more brightness that it nominal species, particularly, the yellow of the underparts.

Habitat and habits:

The Regent Parrot they reside mainly in the East, Although the birds disperse after breeding season.

More regular movements have been recorded in the Western population, with spread towards the South during the summer, and a concentration below the 32 ° S in the autumn.

The birds move to the northeast in winter; movements of up to 320 km have been recorded. Oriental birds are linked to the banks of the rivers, where is the red rubber (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) trees with mallee Shrublands partners (Eucalyptus gracilis). They are also distributed in forests of eucalyptus, areas with thin Cypress pine (Callitris preissii), orchards and vineyards.

In the West, the species is less dependent from the Mallee and they reside in mixed plots of acacia and eucalyptus (wandoo, salmonophloia) and within agricultural land.

The Regent Parrot they are not in the forests of the South-western area, Although there have been in the forest clearings.

Outside the breeding season, the birds can be found in noisy flocks of a hundred or more individuals, being in general cautious. They feed primarily on Earth.

Reproduction:

The nesting season takes place between January and August. These birds nest either in single pairs or in small colonies composed of a maximum of 18 couples. Before the mating, There are ritual offerings of food.

The site selected for reproduction is usually a great tree of the gum dead or dying, to 20 metres above the ground and near a permanent water course. These nests are often reused.

The spawning includes of 3 to 6 white eggs You settle on a layer of decaying wood shavings. The female incubates alone during 21 days. His companion, he defected from the nest tree and joined a group consisting only of males, it comes to collaborate with food tasks. The chicks have white down. Usually, leave the nest after 5 to 6 weeks, but after feather, they remain in the family group for a few weeks yet.

Food:

The diet usually comprises seeds of grasses, herbs, fruit, berries, sprouts and flowers. They also take crops of cereals and dried fruits from orchards, as well as the grain spilled on roads.

In the East, males tend to feed in the mallee scrub (for example White Mallee Eucalyptus dumosto and Red Mallee Eucalyptus socialis) during the breeding season.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 1.520.000 km2

Confined to Australia, where in two very distant populations. In Western Australia are distributed mainly in the wheat belt, extending north to Ajana, on the inside of Laverton and Karonie, and down in Israelite Bay, on the South Coast; is also located to the South of Perth, but they have not fully colonized the wooded area Southwest.

In the southeast of Australia the range has shrunk in recent years. In the South of Australia, the species occurs along of the Murray River, around Morgan at the border of New South Wales, Victoria (seven colonies).

In Victoria are distributed in the Wyperfeld National Park and along the Wimmera River to the South of the Lake Hindmarsh, but the reproduction, probably, ceased to occur in the Lake Albacutya as recently as 1988.

In New South Wales is isolated along foci of the Murray River, and around the mouth of the Murrumbidgee River.

Along the border of New South Wales, Victoria, they are now grouped into four areas, and is absent 100 kilometres on both sides of Mildura; There are some couples throughout the North of the Darling river in Pooncarie, and along the Wakool River East.

There is a certain dispersion post-cria, but the birds is unlikely it lies to the northeast of Balranald or to the South of Castenaso, except perhaps during periods of drought.

Locally common in areas of riparian forest and Mallee (Eucalyptus gracilis).

The world's population is believed to be superior to the 15.000 individuals, but the subspecies of the East is by far the smaller of the two.

Completely protected by law in all but a few regions of the South-West.

A moderate number of captivity.

Distribution 2 subspecies:

  • Polytelis anthopeplus anthopeplus

    : (Lear 1831) – The nominal. Southwest of Australia.

  • Polytelis anthopeplus monarchoides

    : (Schodde 1993) – Interior West of the part of Southeast of Australia (Southeast of the South of Australia, Southwest of New South Wales and Northwest of Victoria).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

The species has an estimated world population in 21.500 individuals (Garnett and Crowley 2000).
The population of the subspecies anthopeplusis It is estimated in 20.000 individuals.
The population of the subspecies monarchoides It is estimated in 1.500 individuals (Garnett and Crowley 2000).

The population of the subspecies anthopeplusis is probably stable as a whole, While the subspecies monarchoides It may be waning (Garnett and Crowley 2000).

Areas of degradation Mallee (eucalyptus), accidents on the road, occupation natural cavities of swarms of bees and persecution due to farmers, they are the threats more recurrent. Despite its original development in areas of the southwest through the development of agriculture, even in these areas, It is considered a slight decline. The hope comes from the fact that can go to colonizing New Territories in forest areas in the South-western end. By now, the species is considered not presenting no important problem. However, in nearly all regions, except in areas of intensive agriculture, benefits from the protection.

Regent parakeet in captivity:

It is a bird very quiet. It is customary to his carer quickly enough. Friendly, It will also tolerate other non-aggressive species. Very active in the morning and afternoon. They may be prone to infections in the eyes and feet.

A sample was still alive after 13,8 years in captivity. It has been reported that these animals can live up to 27,5 years in captivity but it has not been able to be verified; the same study reported that these animals can reproduce from around the first year of age in captivity.

It is not very common in captivity.

Alternative names:

Regent Parrot, Black-tailed Parakeet, Black-tailed Parrot, Black-throated Parrot, Blossom-feathered Parakeet, Mallee Smoker, Marlock Parakeet, Marlock Parrot, Mountain Parrot, Plaide-wing Parrot, Regal Parrot, Rock Pebbler, Royal Parrot, Smoker, Smoker Parrot, Yellow King-Parrot (English).
Perruche mélanure, Perruche à queue noire (French).
Bergsittich (German).
Periquito-regente (Portuguese).
Perico Regente, Periquito de Rock Pebbler (Spanish).

Edward Lear
Edward Lear

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Polytelis
Scientific name: Polytelis anthopeplus
Citation: (Lear, 1831)
Protonimo: Palaeornis anthopeplus

Regent Parrot Images:

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Regent Parrot (Polytelis anthopeplus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Anage: The Animal Ageing and Longevity Database – Anage entry for Polytelis anthopeplus

Photos:

(1) – A juvenile Regent Parrot (Polytelis anthopeplus) at the Bird Walk (Walk-in Aviary), Canberra, Australian National Territory, Australia By Polytelis_anthopeplus_2. jpg: JJ Harrison ([email protected])derivative work: Diliff (Polytelis_anthopeplus_2. jpg) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – An adult male perched by Josep del Hoyo – Lynx
(3) – A juvenile Regent Parrot (Polytelis anthopeplus) also known as the Rock Pebbler, Black-tailed Parakeet, Smoker, Marlock Parakeet and sometimes Regent Parakeet By Rainey06au at en.wikipedia [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Two Regent Parrots in an aviary in Australia. It is also known as the Rock Pebbler, Black-tailed Parakeet, Smoker, Marlock Parakeet and sometimes Regent Parakeet By Kristina (originally posted to Flickr as Parrots) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A Regent Parrot in Flying High Bird Sanctuary, Australia. The parrot is feeding on seeds from the left hand of small boy’ s outstretched arm By paulgear (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – The Cape Parrot (Polytelis anthopeplus) Started by Dallas – Gros-becs.net

Sounds: Scott Connop (Xeno-canto)

Superb Parrot
Polytelis swainsonii

Superb Parrot

Description

40 cm.. length between 132 and 157 g. of weight.

Superb Parrot

The Superb Parrot (Polytelis swainsonii) has the front, crown, throat and chin bright yellow; back of the bright green Crown with turquoise blue wash: headphones coverts and Lords, green. Bright green upper parts. Upper, the wings, bright green, with dark diffusion in the inner margins of the vane internal and blue diffusion in vane outer (fine yellow rear margin for flight feathers); bluish carpal edge: light blue primary coverts; primary elongated.

Wing of bright green feathers; bottom of blackish brown flight feathers. Underparts pale bright green, with thin bright red Ruff between throat yellow and green at the top of the chest. Upper, bright green tail, with dark elongated Central feathers Slightly bulbous tips. outer feathers with bluish edges vane outer. The lower part of the tail is black.

Bill, coral red; yellow-orange irises; Blackish legs.

The female is completely Green, with a bath pink Brown throat and with the headphones cinnamon and the Crown of blue-grey. The mantle is more off, more greenish Brown, contrasting with the Green rump and dark flight feathers. The underparts are paler, orange-red legs. She also has distinctive pink trim and pink tips to yellow vane internal bottom of the queue.

Yellow IRIS.

Immature as females but with Brown iris. Males attain adult plumage in about 12 months.

  • Sound of the Superb Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Perico Soberbio.mp3]

Habitat:

A part of the population of the superb Parrot is migratory, wintering in the North of the breeding areas.

The habitat preferences of the breeding populations varies slightly from East to West within the slopes of the Great dividing range and open areas in forests of eucalyptus, It is the dominant vegetation type. Here the species nests away from water courses, and it uses a variety of tree species.
In the region of Riverina, to the West, the birds are bred almost exclusively on the banks of the rivers, in forests of Eucalyptus camaldulensis, feeding on nearby forests of Eucalyptus bicolor, Eucalyptus melliodora and White Pino-CIPRES (Callitris columellaris).

They sometimes also found in farmland and villages.

The size of the flocks are usually small, but groups of up to 100 individuals have been recorded after the breeding season.

The superb Parrot feed in the trees, in the understory, and also in land, where can be accessible, feeding on grain spilled at the edges of roads and maintenance of the company of the Yellow Rosella and cockatoos.

Reproduction:

The breeding season of the Superb Parrot is from September to November.
Male parade making small greetings and nodding his head. Both members of the couple make ritual exchanges of food.

The nest is usually a hollow, full of scrap wood, at the top of a tree dead or alive and a considerable height that is usually between 11 and 51 meters above the ground. The individual sites tend to be reused.

The Superb Parrot, they often nest in colonies ranging up to six couples. Spawning contains 4 or 6 eggs which are incubated for at least 20 days. The chicks are altricial and leave the nest after 30 days.

Food:

The diet includes fruits and flowers of Acacia and eucalyptus, fruit shrubs (for example Exocarpos); seeds of crops, pastures, weeds and grasses

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 95.300 km2

The Superb Parrot they are endemic in Australia, where are distributed only in New South Wales and the north end of Victoria.

The species are concentrated in two main areas: on the South-West slope of the Great dividing range (regions of Cowra, Boorowa, Cootamundra and Yass), and in the area of Riverina, New Wales of the itsr. In this latter range extends along of the Murrumbidgee River, from There is a to Darlington Point, Narrandera and Wagga Wagga.

Also found in the North of Goolgowi and the Lachlan River, and in South, in the rivers Edward and Murray (Barham. Deniliquin, Tocumwal, Cobram, Getafe and Albury).

In the North of Victoria, It concentrated along the Rivers Goulburn and Ovens, and in the area of Barmah Forest.

Wandering birds occasionally appear more to the West, along the border of Victoria and New South Wales.

The Superb Parrot, normally they are not reproduced above 33 ° S, but at least part of the population disperses northward to 33° S at the end of the breeding season.

These birds are found from April to August in the northeast of New South Wales from Gunnedah to Narrabri, Gilgandra and Coonamble, and between river systems to the West (Barwon, Namoi, Macquarie, Castlereagh, Marthaguy Creek).

Occasionally, alleged migratory birds, They fly to the West, about Tottenham and Hermidale.

Escapes have been recorded around Sydney and Melbourne.

A moderate number of captivity.

Protected by law.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

Its population, apparently, fell in 1920 as an accidental effect of a poisoning by the crop protection.

A panel of experts considered that it was very likely that the population in 2010 exceeds the 10.000 mature individuals. The current estimate ranges in the Strip between 10.000 and 20.000 specimens.

The general trend of the population of the Superb Parrot (Polytelis swainsonii) is uncertain, but there is no evidence of a continuous decline.

In Australia is also classified as vulnerable species the law of protection of the environment and conservation of the biodiversidadad of 1999. Their conservation status also varies between States, for example in the law of Victoria (1988) is considered to be threatened species.

Perico Soberbio in captivity:

Take it easy, relatively little aggressive with other birds, and very social.

Una muestra vivió 15,1 years in captivity. According to sources, these animals can live up to 24,2 years in captivity, It is possible to, but the source is not verified; the same study reported that these animals can reproduce in approximately 2 years of age in captivity.

Pretty common in captivity, above all in Australia.

Alternative names:

Superb Parrot, Barraband, Barraband Parakeet, Barraband Parrot, Green Leek, Scarlet-breasted Parrot (English).
Perruche de Barraband, Perruche Barraband, Perruche superbe (French).
Schildsittich (German).
Periquito-soberbo (Portuguese).
Perico Soberbio, Periquito de Barraband (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Polytelis
Scientific name: Polytelis swainsonii
Citation: (Desmarest, 1826)
Protonimo: Psittacus Swainsonii

Superb Parrot images:

————————————————————————————————

Superb Parrot (Polytelis swainsonii)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– The Animal Ageing and Longevity Database – Polytelis swainsonii

Photos:

(1) – By paulgear (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Image Credit: Stuart Harris – Canberra Birds
(3) – Image Credit: Julian Robinson – Canberra Birds
(4) – Image Credit: Stuart Harris – Canberra Birds
(5) – Image Credit: Julian Robinson – Canberra Birds

Sounds: Ding Li Yong (Xeno-canto)

Red-winged Parrot
Aprosmictus erythropterus

Red-winged Parrot

Description

30 to 33 cm.. length between 120 and 210 g. of weight.

The Red-winged Parrot (Aprosmictus erythropterus) has the head of color green bright with brightness blue green in the crown and nape. Mantle, back and scapulars black. Area low of it back and rump brilliant blue, more clear towards the tail; uppertail-coverts of color green yellowish with broadcasting yellowish at the base. Curve of the wing yellow-green light. Carpal edge blackish. Upper, the wing-coverts, bright Scarlet. Tertiary and primaries marked in black on vane inner, Green on vane outer; secondaries also bathed in black in vane outer; primary coverts of color green dark bathed in black. Under, the wing-coverts green. The underparts bright, pale and slightly yellowish-green. Upper, the tail Green dark with tips of color yellow and lateral feathers Blackish in vane internal with yellow tips; undertail, the tail Blackish with tips pale.

Bill coral red; irises reddish brown; legs grey-black.

Female It is predominantly green with a small red spot in the wings (only a point apical on coverts major interiors, but the increase in the external; restricted to the outer feathers of the median) that of the male, and do not have any black in the the mantle; vane outside of outer secondaries black. The Green is also more off, and a bit more yellowish in them underparts. The rump is of a blue more off, and the glitter blue in it crown and nape of the male, is absent in the female. Under, the tail has tips yellowish and touches of color pink.

The immature they are similar to the females, but with a irises more Brown and bill yellow from the beginning. Young males attain adult plumage in the third annual moult, but black can show the mantle feathers before this.

  • Sound of the Red-winged Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Papagayo Alirrojo.mp3]

Description 3 subspecies

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus coccineopterus

    (Gould) 1865 – Male with more blue in it crown and nape. Both sexes slightly paler, and the female also more off the Green that it nominal species.

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus erythropterus

    (Gmelin) 1788 – The nominal.

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus papua

    (Mayr & Rand) 1936

Habitat:

Resident, Although nomads in the edges of the range. Is semiarid and subtropical forests of eucalyptus and Casuarina, boedes of the Woods, riparian forests, thickets of acacia, mangroves, agricultural fields, scrub Cypress pine (Callitris), and the lowlands of the Savannah.

On the inside of Australia are mainly linked to the extension of wooded of the systems fluvial.

They are usually found in small groups of up to fifteen birds, rarely reach more of 50 individuals in a single flock. The largest groups are likely to form at the end of the breeding season when family groups gather in places of power.

The species is common and visible, but not particularly accessible; When resent, birds can fly some distance, often making strong sounds.

Sometimes associated with the Pale-headed Rosella and Mallee Ringneck, and they feed under the trees, Although it is more usual to see them on Earth to drink.

Reproduction:

The nesting You can start early, in the months of April or may in the North, but the southern main breeding season is from August to February. During the courtship, the male perches near the female, exposing your blue rump, and making sounds.

The nest normally found in a eucalyptus, and the eggs are put into a deep hole covered with scrap wood. Three to six white eggs are They incubated for around 20 days by the female, which is fed by the male until the eggs hatch. The young are cared for by both parents and they leave the nest in a five weeks.

Food:

The diet It includes seeds, fruit, flowers and insects; in the mangroves, the mistletoe (Loranthus) is your favorite diet.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 5.230.000 km2

The Red-winged Parrot (Aprosmictus erythropterus) are confined in Australia, in the coastal districts of the southeast of Irian Jaya (Indonesia) and in the Western Province (Papua New Guinea).

In New Guinea, the species is restricted to the region between the rivers Digul and Fly.

In Australia extends from about Broome, in Western Australia (registered West of Anna Plains, and southwest of the Cordillera de Edgar) through the Kimberley region, including some islands on the coast (Buccaneer and Bonaparte archipelago, Islands Osborne and Sir Graham Moore, and Admiralty Gulf Islands) in the Northern Territory, about Nicholson.

Extends northward up to the Cobourg peninsula and to the South, at the turn of the Cordillera Camfield and Dunmarra Roadhouse, reaching some coastal islands, including Melville and Groote Eylandt.

Extends to the East in Queensland, in the Nicholson River, are distributed in the Cape York Peninsula, with records by the coast, about Rockhampton (occasional southernmost), and reaching inside, about Dajarra, to the South of Mount Isa and Southeast, through the lower part of the Diamantina River, Windorah, Quilpie, Mitchell and San Jorge.

On the inside of New South Wales the end points of the range are in Inverell in the East, Gunnedah, Dubbo and Mudgee in the South and There is a, Menindee and Broken Hill, near the southern border of Australia.

They are also in the North, in the basin of the Darling river, and have been recorded in the South-East of Australia, around the Lake Eyre and North of Cooper Creek.

Wandering individuals have been recorded in Renmark and Victory Downs, in the latter, possibly from some exhaust.

Leaks have also been observed in Sydney and Melbourne.

The species is common in appropriate habitats, except in their range limits.

The world's population is above the 100.000individuals and the species is considered secure.

A moderate number of captivity.

Protected by law.

Distribution 3 subspecies:

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus coccineopterus

    (Gould) 1865 – South of New Guinea and Western Australia, to the East through the northern territory of the Cape York Peninsula, Queensland

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus erythropterus

    (Gmelin) 1788 – The nominal

  • Aprosmictus erythropterus papua

    (Mayr & Rand) 1936 – South of New Guinea

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Growing

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, Although it is estimated very above the 100.000 specimens.

The species, According to sources, is usually common and locally abundant (pit et to the. 1997).

The population is suspected that it may be in decline due to ongoing habitat destruction.

Redwing in captivity Papagayo:

Fairly common in Australia, not so much in other places.

Active, Acrobat; they require a large birdhouse with plenty of hangers. The male can become aggressive with the female.
Fairly quiet and shy.

Una muestra vivió 24,4 years in captivity.

Alternative names:

Red-winged Parrot, Red winged Parrot (English).
Perruche érythroptère, Perruche erythroptère (French).
Rotflügelsittich, Rotflügel-Sittich (German).
Periquito-de-encontro-vermelho (Portuguese).
Papagayo Alirrojo, Papagayo de Alas Rojas (Spanish).

Gmelin Johann Friedrich
Gmelin Johann Friedrich

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Aprosmictus
Scientific name: Aprosmictus erythropterus
Citation: (Gmelin, JF, 1788)
Protonimo: Psittacus erythropterus

Red-winged Parrot images:

————————————————————————————————

Red-winged Parrot (Aprosmictus erythropterus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
– World Parrot Trust – parrots.org
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – By David Cook Wildlife Photography from Wamboin, NSW, Australia [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – By Jan Harenburg (Own work) [CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Aprosmictus erythropterus erythropterus – Orde Psittaciformes – Papegaaiachtigen
(4) – Red-Winged Parrot (Aprosmictus erythropterus) Male – Pine Creek, M. 7. – encimages
(5) – “Aprosmictus erythropterus-Australia-pair-8” di Kitykat79 – originally posted to Flickr as King Parrots!. With license CC BY 2.0 Transact Wikimedia Commons.
(6) – A painting of two Red-winged Parrots (originally captioned “Platycercus erythropterus. Crimson-winged parraket. 1. Male. 2.Female.”) by Edward Lear 1812-1888. The painting shows a female behind young male by Edward Lear [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Peter Woodall (Xeno-canto)

Singing Parrot
Geoffroyus heteroclitus

Parrot Heteroclito

Description

25 cm.. length and a weight between 160 and 195 g..

The Singing Parrot (Geoffroyus heteroclitus) they have the head bright pale yellow.

A band Large blue-gray adorns the back of neck and gradually it fades in green on the the mantle. The throat is bluish grey. All the upperparts are light green. The median stained reddish brown. You can see the pale yellow stripes on the innerwebs of the flight feather. The underparts is bright blue. Upper chest is blue-gray, which contrasts with the rest of the underparts, that are of a much lighter green back. The upper part of the tail is green. The bottom of the tail is grey, but with a slight yellow color in the outerweb external feathers tail.

The upper mandible is of color yellow pale, the dark gray lower mandible. The irises are yellow, the legs gray-green.

The sexes are dimorphic. The female has a bill totally dark. Yellow beginning of the head and neck greenish blue are away. In its place, the top It is gray and cheeks They are brownish green.

Immature show greener on the head than females. Its bill is paler and its irises Dark.

  • Sound of the Singing Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lorito Heteroclito.mp3]

Description 2 subspecies

  • Geoffroyus heteroclitus heteroclitus

    (Hombron & Jacquinot, 1841) – The nominal.

  • Geoffroyus heteroclitus hyacinthinus

    (Mayr, 1931) – Males have neck gray violáceo.

Habitat:

The Singing Parrot they frequent humid lowlands, undisturbed, Hills generally below and of the 600 meters up to a maximum of 1.760 meters in the South of New Ireland . They are also partially cleared areas, at the edge of forests, in stands of trees in regeneration and in gardens.

Birds, often, they are heard when they make calls from the exposed or isolated trees, or view flying rapidly above the canopy.

They are alone, in pairs, or having relationships in small groups. There have been next to the Cardinal Lory and Duchess Lorikeet in Bougainville. They are often quiet and difficult to detect when they remain perched among the dense foliage.

Reproduction:

The nest is a hole dug by the female in a dead tree stump or rotten, but nothing more is known about the breeding ecology of the species.

Food:

The diet It includes seeds, fruit, flowers and buds.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 576.000 km2

The Singing Parrot They are endemic Bismarck Archipelago and Solomon Islands. These birds are found in the following Islands: Umboi, New Britain, Lolobau, Duke of York, New Ireland, New Hanover, Tabar, Lihir, Buka, Bougainville (Papua New Guinea). It can also be seen in Choiseul, Santa Isabel, San Jorge, Malaita, New Georgia, Guadalcanal and all the little Islands Rennell (Solomon Islands).

Distribution 2 subspecies:

  • Geoffroyus heteroclitus heteroclitus

    (Hombron & Jacquinot, 1841) – The nominal.

  • Geoffroyus heteroclitus hyacinthinus

    (Mayr, 1931) – Present only in the Rennell island.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

The world population it is generally estimated at just less than 100.000 specimens.

The subspecies that lives in Rennell Island is between 5.000 and 20.000 birds.

The Singing Parrot It suffers from the degradation of habitat throughout its area of distribution, but is not in danger.

Lorito Heteroclito in captivity:

Extremely shy and susceptible; they may die suddenly without discernible cause, possibly due to stress and improper diet.

Not commonly found in poultry.

Alternative names:

Singing Parrot, Song Parrot (English).
Perruche hétéroclite, Eclectus hétéroclite, Éclectus hétéroclite (French).
Bismarckpapagei (German).
Geoffroyus heteroclitus (Portuguese).
Lorito Cantor, Lorito Heteróclito (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Geoffroyus
Scientific name: Geoffroyus heteroclitus
Citation: (Hombron & Jacquinot, 1841)
Protonimo: Psittacus Geoffroyi heteroclitus

Images:

————————————————————————————————

Singing Parrot (Geoffroyus heteroclitus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Wikipedia

Photos:

(1) – Birds-pet-wallpapers

Sounds: Mark Todd (Xeno-canto)

Red-checked Parrot
Geoffroyus geoffroyi

Red-checked Parrot

Description

21 to 27 cm. length and a weight between 130 and 180 g..

Red-checked Parrot

The face of the Red-checked Parrot (Geoffroyus geoffroyi) is of color rojo-rosaceo up to just above the eyes, more pink in the ear-coverts; front of the crown of color rojo-rosaceo. Half of the crown to the nape mauve-blue. Upperparts green. Wings with patch red in them Middle coverts interiors.

Flight feather with vane Dark internal and external Green. Edge of yellow to vane internal of greater coverts and secondaries. Wing feathers and axillary, bright blue; below, the rest of the wings, blackish. The underparts green, more yellowish in them lower flanks. Upper, the feathers of the tail of color green, drenched sides of yellow; below, brighter yellowish green.
The bill red orange in upper mandible, the lower mandible in color black; irises yellow; legs grey.

Female with head Brown and upper mandible black.

Youth they have the head green, irises dark and bill pale. Juvenile males undergo a plumage “female stage” until they begin to acquire male characters (bird takes over one year to mature). The birds young also lack of the brand red on them small coverts.

  • Sound of the Red-checked Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lorito Carirrojo.mp3]
Description of the 16 subspecies
Subspecies
  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi cyanicollis

    (Müller, 1841) – The darker male in general that the nominal; blue purple of the crown comes to the part back from the neck; neck light blue; Marron-bronce washing variable on the mantle and top of the back; Green bluish in the part superior of the chest and zone inferior of the abdomen ; brown reddish of them coats internal of the wings absent; Blue more dark in them Underwing coverts. Larger in size.
    The female with the head more dark that the nominal; broadcasting purple in it crown; nape blue, reaching the neck with color blue light.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi obiensis

    (Finsch, 1868) – Adults as the subspecies Blue but collar Blue in the part back from the neck more comprehensive, reaching almost up to the eyes; blue-purple in the male or brown in the female not arrive until the part low of the occiput; reddish brown in the bottom of the back to rear.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi rhodops

    (Schlegel), 1864) – Similar to the subspecies males floresianus, but darker in general; marks of the coats internal of the wings of color brown reddish dark; crown Blue separate with red in the face; Underwing coverts Blue more dark. Larger in size.
    The female with the crown castano-oscuro color.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi Explorer

    (Hartert, 1901) – Synonymous with Geoffroyus geoffroyi rhodops

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi keyensis (Finsch, 1868) – The male resembles the subspecies floresianus, but in general more greenish-yellow, in particular in the tail; cheeks Pink and ear-coverts washed with Blue Lilac; Yellow greenish pale in the neck through the part back from the neck and a strip Green, darker, in the early part of the neck; Underwing coverts Blue pale. Larger in size.
    The female chestnut brown on the head.
  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi floresianus

    (Salvadori, 1891) – The male is like the nominal, but darker in general; the blue purple of the crown It's darker and reached to the nape; coats internal of the wings dark reddish brown; Blue more dark them Underwing coverts. Larger in size. Largest peak.
    Female with the crown Brown dark, coming up to the nape.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi geoffroyi

    (Bechstein, 1811) the subspecies nominal

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi timorlaoensis

    (Meyer, 1884) – The subspecies resemble adults Kei, but smaller.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi pucherani

    (Souancé, 1856) – Adults and juveniles with bronze-colored marking of the parts internal of the wings, minimal or absent; the mantle have less marron-bronce washing; Brown more pale in the part low of it back; the buttocks with less red; coats dark blue low the wings.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi minor

    (Neumann, 1922) – Male adults are as the subspecies aruensis, but with reddish brown under the back to rear; face darker red; washing Marron-bronce in the the mantle; brands in the coats internal of the wings minimal or absent.
    The female as the subspecies aruensis, but with the head of brown slightly more dark.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi jobiensis

    (Meyer, 1874) – Adults and juveniles but with Underwing coverts pale blue; bright red in the lower part of the back to the rear; in males, the red in the forecrown back to the front of the crown.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi mysoriensis

    (Meyer, 1874) – Males as juveniles, but with the crown blue-purple color, down on the back of the neck, and red in the face, coming up to the throat; washing marron-bronce absent in the the mantle; extensive reddish brown marks in inner median coverts; Underwing coverts dark blue; dark brown in the bottom of the back to rear.
    The female as juveniles, but the color brown in the crown comes to the part back from the neck.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi orientalis

    (Meyer, 1891) – Hardly differs from the subspecies aruensis; Crown of the male is slightly more pale.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi sudestiensis

    (Dream, 1890) – The adult male is similar to the subspecies aruensis, but with the underparts darker; the trademark brown reddish of them coats internal, absent.
    The crown and nape of the female, is dark green.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi cyanicarpus

    (Hartert, 1899) – The adult male is similar to the subspecies aruensis, but with azul-lila wash in them cheeks and ear-coverts; bend of wing has edge blue.
    The female is as the subspecies aruensis, but the crown and nape Brown, with light green dye; edge blue in the part outside of the wing as in the male.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi aruensis

    (Gray, 1858) – Similar to the species males nominal, but blue purple darker from the crown up to the nape; inner coverts a reddish brown marked darker; Blue more dark in them Underwing coverts.
    The female Brown darker from the crown even the nape.

  • Geoffroyus geoffroyi maclennani

    (W. D. K. Macgillivray, 1913) – The male is similar to the subspecies aruensis, but darker in general; the Red of the face is darker and more uniform; Underwing coverts Blue pale.
    Female similar to the female of subspecies aruensis, but darker in general; head dark brown; Underwing coverts Blue pale.

* The varieties sumbavensis and tjindanae proposed as subspecies are synonymous of floresianus; rhodops stresemanni; explorator It is also synonymous of rhodops.

Habitat:

Distributed by primary and secondary forests, tree savannas, plantations, Open forests, mangrove forests and farmland, a altitude of 1.400 m. Usually replaced by the Blue-collared Parrot at higher altitudes. Exclusive tropical jungle in the North of Australia. View the birds, generally, flying high above the trees, making calls to cries.

Groups of birds in the North of Australia, many even in family units, they have been observed leaving their roosts early, to feed into the dense jungle; in their flights to areas of foraging, We have seen some of these birds perched in the upper branches of the trees, by calling aloud for a few minutes and dithered wings before continuing. The reason for this unknown behavior can be a way of requesting food due to early maturation.

During the day, the birds are less visible, they can draw attention by discarded food falling from their food trees.

They are usually in couples, in small groups or assembled in groups in fruit trees.

Reproduction:

The nest It is a hole that the birds excavate in a rotten limb of a tree from the forest, sometimes in a knot in the trunk; probably only the female excavates. The entrance to the nest is of 80 to 90 mm. wide, and the tunnel, that it can twist in order to hide the eggs, You can have a length of 42 cm.. Includes the implementation of 2 to 4 eggs. The female alone incubates and is fed by the male during this time. In the West, the breeding season It takes place between April and September at least, month in which a live nest was found in Seram.
In New Guinea, the nesting is been registered during several months more, including February in the North and between the months of April to December in other places.
In Australia, in where the season seems to extend is from August to December, little information about the cycle reproductive is available.

It is known that the species It has never been raised successfully in captivity.

Food:

The diet It includes seeds, fruits and flowers. The birds tend to hang acrobaticamente to reach their food.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 793.000 km2

Generalized from the West of Lombok, through the Moluccas, the lowlands of New Guinea, and observed in the groups of associated Islands, to the East of Rossel in the Louisiade archipelago.

The species can also be observed in the northeast of the Cape York Peninsula, Australia, at its southern end, and North ranges up to Morotai in the northern Moluccas. In many areas, throughout its distribution area, is the most abundant Parrot (rarer over the 800 meters above sea level), even around inhabited areas. Despite this, It may be extinct in Ambon.

Distribution of the 16 subspecies
Subspecies

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, Although it is estimated above 1.000.000 of copies. The species according to sources, is of common to abundant much of its area of distribution (pit et to the. 1997).

The population suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence of any reduction or substantial threats, Although you can that its population is affected by the capture in various parts of its area of distribution.

Lorito Carirrojo in captivity:

Very rare or impossible to see in poultry.

Passive Parrot. Extremely susceptible to stress and disease; they may die suddenly without apparent reason. Few times you live long in captivity

Alternative names:

Red-checked Parrot, Red cheeked Parrot, Red-cheeked Parrot (ingles).
Perruche de Geoffroy, Eclectus de Geoffroy, Éclectus de Geoffroy (francés).
Rotkopfpapagei (alemán).
Papagaio de bochechas vermelhas (portugués).
Lorito Carirrojo, Lorito de Mejillas Rojas (español).

Johann Matthäus Bechstein
Johann Matthäus Bechstein

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Geoffroyus
Scientific name: Geoffroyus geoffroyi
Citation: (Bechstein, 1811)
Protonimo: Psittacus Geoffroyi

Red-checked Parrot images:

————————————————————————————————

Red-checked Parrot (Geoffroyus geoffroyi)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Wikipedia
Birdlife
parrots.org

Photos:

(1) – By Ron Knight (Flickr: Red-cheeked Parrot) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – By Nick Athanas/Tropical Birding – Birds-pet-wallpapers
(3) – A male perched in a tree by Josep del Hoyo – Lynx
(4) – A male and a female looking for a suitable nest by mehdhalaouate – Lynx
(5) – By markharper1 [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Marc Thibault (Xeno canto)

Salvadori's Fig-Parrot
Psittaculirostris salvadorii

Salvadori's Fig-Parrot

Description

19 cm.. length and a weight of environment to the 118 g..

The forecrown and crown of the Salvadori's Fig-Parrot (Psittaculirostris salvadorii) is bright green with a little blue diffusion; cheeks and ear-coverts elongated yellow gold; area behind the eyes, pale blue: yellow the nape.

Upperparts green; internal parts of flight feather, orange-red at their ends. Under, the wings opaque green. Top of the chest with bright red band, rest of the underparts bright yellowish green, brighter and clearer than the upperparts. Upper, the tail green; Yellow below.

Bill black; irises red-brown; legs grey,

Female lacks the band scarlet chest, evident in the male, which it is substituted by a band It is showing some green opaque red feathers on the sides.

Youth equal to the adult female but duller overall; band pale blue chest, weak or invisible. Iris reddish brown.

  • Sound of the Salvadori's Fig-Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Lorito de Salvadori.MP3]

Habitat:

The Salvadori's Fig-Parrot is distributed in the forests, along their edges, partially cleared areas and close to human settlements. Birds subsist mainly on the seeds of figs, and groups are fed into the cup of fruit trees, sometimes mixed with other species. Hang it upside down to feed, and they can make brief forays above the canopy. The species is found more often in pairs or in small groups, and nests colonies.

Reproduction:

Little is known of its ecology

Food:

Their diet consists mainly of figs and other fruit.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 81.500 km2

THE Salvadori's Fig-Parrot (Psittaculirostris salvadorii) is endemic to the North of Irian Jaya, Indonesia. You can see in the forests of lowlands from the eastern edge of the Cenderawasih Bay to the Humboldt Bay (approximately 137 ° to 141 ° East), reaching inside through the northern slopes of the Van Rees mountains to 700 meters above sea level. Not rare within its small range.

Conservation:

• Current IUCN Red list category: Least concern

• Population trend: Decreasing

This species is suspected of slow to moderate decline due to loss of habitat, limited degradation and some pressure for his capture.

Its population is estimated around the 10,000 specimens.

In the past, This species has been caught in a relatively large number for the cage bird trade, both for the domestic and foreign markets, with a total of 1.582 birds exported from Indonesia between 1985 and 1990 (Beehler 1985, Nash 1990b , KD Bishop in litt., 1996, 1997to collar), and 1.791 between 1990 and 2001, When the species registered trade ceased (UNEP-WCMC 2007). However, the true extent of trade is unknown and is likely to be overlooked by many hunters in the preference of the most coveted and abundant species (B. Beehler in litt. 2012).

Lorito of Salvadori in captivity:

Susceptible to stress and disease.

Very rare in captivity.

Alternative names:

Salvadori’s Fig-Parrot, Salvadori’s Fig Parrot, Whiskered Fig-Parrot, Yellow-cheeked Fig Parrot (English).
Psittacule de Salvadori (French).
Salvadorizwergpapagei, Salvadori Zwergpapagei, Salvadori-Zwergpapagei (German).
Papagaio-dos-figos-de-salvador (Portuguese).
Lorito de Salvadori (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Psittaculirostris
Scientific name: Psittaculirostris salvadorii
Citation: (Oustalet, 1880)
Protonimo: Cyclopsittacus Salvadorii

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Salvadori's Fig-Parrot (Psittaculirostris salvadorii)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Album parrots – parrots

Sounds: Hans Matheve (Xeno-canto)

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