Tres Marias Parrot
Amazona tresmariae

Tres Marias Parrot

Content

Description:

38-40 cm.. length and 580-650 g. of weight.

The Tres Marias Parrot (Amazona tresmariae) has head and throat yellow.

The upperparts are green. The underparts They are green but more yellowed than upperparts. Thighs yellow. Primaries and secondaries green, violet-blue becoming the tip. should carpal yellow. Speculum red on the basis of the five outer secondaries. The curve wings, pale red, with some yellow.

The tail is green, with yellowish green tip and lateral feathers basically marked with red on the inner band; outermost feathers fringed blue. The legs They are pale gray. The irises It is orange. The bill is horn-colored, gray towards the base of the upper mandible. Cere dark gray.

Anatomy-parrots-eng
Both sexes are similar. The immature They are completely green head, except the yellow patch in forecrown. The curve wings, green. should carpal yellowish green.

Taxonomic note:

It is granted status species by the International Ornithological Congress.

Habitat:

Video Tres Marias Parrot

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Amazona

They have preference by deciduous forests or evergreen, clear, Savanna Woods, pine forests, dense gallery forests; less commonly in dry thorn forest, mangroves or coastal marshes and cultivated areas with scattered trees.

Resident throughout its area of distribution.

Reproduction:

Nest in holes in tree trunks or fallen branches.

Food:

consume outbreaks, leaves news, fruits palm, seeds of Acacia, fruits of Macuna, figs and some fruits of cultivated land.

Distribution:

Endemic to the Islas Marias, on the west coast of Mexico.

Amazon tresmariae Conservation :

Conservation status ⓘ

Status
Least Concern ⓘ (UICN)ⓘ

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

The Tres Marias Parrot It has an extremely large range and, therefore, it does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable at the discretion of the distribution area size (Extension <20,000 km2 combined with a size decreasing or fluctuating range, extent or quality of habitat or population size and a small number of places or severe fragmentation).

Although the population trend appears to be declining, It not believed to be declining fast enough to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criteria of population trend (> 30% decline over ten years or three generations).

The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed that approximates Vulnerable thresholds under the criterion of population size (<10.000 mature individuals with an estimated continuing decline> 10% in ten years or three generations or a population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Usually it regarded as a subspecies of the Yellow-crowned Parrot (Amazona ochrocephala).

Tres Marias Parrot in captivity:

These birds belong to Appendix I of the CITES, with special protection because they are highly sought.

Alternative names:

Panama yellow-crowned amazon, Tres Maria Yellow-headed Parrot, Tres Marias Amazon, Tres Marias Parrot, Yellow-headed Parrot (Tres Marias Is.) (English).
Amazone à tête jaune (forme des Tres Marias), Amazone de Três Marias, Amazone des Tres Marias (French).
Gelbkopfamazone-tresmariae, Tres-Marias-Amazone (German).
Tres Marias Parrot (Portuguese).
Tres Marias Parrot, Tres Marias Amazon, amazona de Tres Marias, Amazona cabeciamarilla de tres marias, Loro de las islas María (Spanish).

Scientific classification Amazon tresmariae:

Edward William Nelson
Edward William Nelson

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Amazona
Scientific name: Amazona tresmariae
Citation: Nelson, 1900<

Tres Marias Parrot images:


Tres Marias Parrot (Amazona tresmariae)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr

Photos:

(1) – Amazona tresmariae at Cougar Mountain Zoological Park, USA perching on a zoo keepers left hand By Derrick CoetzeeCamera location47° 33′ 11.72″ N, 122° 04′ 50.26″ W View this and other nearby images on: Openstreetmap – Google Earth 47.553255; -122.080628 [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Amazona tresmariae in a cage at Cougar Mountain Zoological Park By Derrick Coetzee from Seattle, USA (Tres Marias Amazon in cage 2) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Amazona tresmariae at Cougar Mountain Zoological Park, USA. There are two with a woman zoo keeper By Derrick Coetzee [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Tres Marias Amazon in cage by D CoetzeeFlickr
(5) – Yellow-headed parrot Tres Marias Islands by (c) Juan Cruzado Cortés – naturalista.mx

St. Lucia Parrot
Amazona versicolor

St. Lucia Parrot

Content

Description:

43 cm.. length and 700-800 g. of weight.

St. Lucia Parrot

The St. Lucia Parrot (Amazona versicolor) has the lores, cheeks and forecrown, bright blue; crown, ear-coverts and lower cheeks, paler blue with iridescent emerald suffusion from some angles; dark tips to feathers on head.

Hindneck neck, nape and upperparts, yellowish-olive, many feathers with visible black tips, giving the whole a barred effect strong, especially in the upper region. Wing coverts yellowish green olive. Primary coverts dyed blue, rest with black tips to some feathers. Primaries blue; bases of external secondarys forman speculum red, blue tips; secondary internal green and blue at the base to the tips. Underwing, yellowish green with blackish tips to some feathers; flight feather bluish green. Chin and throat, bright blue with blackish tips to feathers; tips of feathers on lower throat and top of the chest, bright red forming a patch distinct red patch or mottled red area; chest and belly rather yellowish-green, blackish tips and brick red in the subterminal area of some feathers, giving scalloped appearance with scattered rusty patches; the thighs and undertail-coverts, green-yellow. Tail bluish green in the center, outer feathers green with large yellowish green tips and hidden red bases. Bill grey; irises orange; legs grey.

Anatomy-parrots-eng
Probably no sexual dimorphism.

Immature has irises brown.

  • Sound of the St. Lucia Parrot.

Habitat:

Video St. Lucia Parrot

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Amazona

Mainly they inhabit the canopy montana primary rainforest, but they make inroads into areas of secondary growth to feed. Reported flocks of up 20 birds. living forms community.

Reproduction:

They nest in tree hollows. Nests observed in trees Dacryodes excelsa, Pouleria and Tetracera caribaeum. Breeding season in February-August. Clutch usually two eggs, Although, usually, only one young per nest thrives.

Food:

Its diet includes flowers and fruits of Clusia, Fruits of Talauma dodecapetala, Acrocomia irenensis, Pouleria, Dacryodes excelsa, Sloanea massoni, Byrsonima martinicensis, Miconia mirabilis, Pterocarpus officinalis and Euterpe globosa; also they have been seen feeding on bananas after the hurricane and presumably due to the depletion of natural food sources. Absence of common areas from August to November possibly linked to the lack of fruitfulness of Clusia.

Distribution and status:

Size of the area of distribution (raising / resident): 230 km2

Confined to St. lucia in the Lesser Antilles, now in the central and southern mountains, although you were formerly widespread everywhere where the rainforest grew. The species has suffered a contraction of the range since the nineteenth century and now It occupies an area of ​​only 65-70 km2 from Millet and Mont Lacombe in the North, until Mont Beucop and Calfourc in the East, Piton Pig, St Piton, St Desrache and Big store in the south to Morne Gimie in the west and Mont Houlemon in the Northwest. The results of studies on the species suggest that the southwestern part of this area is the most densely populated of parrots, while relatively few live in the northeast.

Plentiful mid-nineteenth century, but decreasing rapidly to very little in the early twentieth century. Subsequently they recovered, with an estimated population of 1.000 birds in 1950. They declined again sixties, mostly due to hunting; observations in 1977 They estimated that there were more than 100 birds. steady increase since then with an estimated population of 300-350 birds in 1990.

The threats main arise from habitat loss and its hunting for food and pet trade as. Forestry practices that lead to the removal of mature trees (favorite breeding sites) could pose additional pressure. They seem to be less susceptible to hurricanes than their counterparts in Dominica, but this may be due to conservation efforts rather than any intrinsic ability to withstand the effects of severe storms.

Can compete for nesting sites with Pearly-eyed Thrasher (Margarops fuscatus), which it has increased considerably since 1950.

Amazona versicolor Conservation:

Conservation status ⓘ


Vulnerable
Vulnerable (UICN)ⓘ

• Current red list category of the UICN: Vulnerable.

• Population trend: In increased.

• Population size : 230-330

Justification of the red list category

Conservation action may have saved this species from extinction. The numbers are now increasing and there is some evidence of a small extension of the range. However, the habitat area apparently adequate (but vacated) It may be waning. If this begins to affect the habitat occupied, the species can be described as danger of extinction. In the news, its small population size and small size on one island are calling it Vulnerable.

Justification of the population

The population is estimated at 350-500 individuals, approximately equal to 230-330 mature individuals.

Justification of trend

No new data on population trends, so it is assumed that the species continues increasing.

Threats

The human population St. lucia It is growing at a considerable rate, increasing the pressure on the forest and resulting in habitat loss (Copsey 1995). The selective logging of mature trees You can significantly reduce breeding sites (Juniper and Parr 1998), and hurricanes, the hunting and the trade pose new threats. There have been recent efforts to raise the moratorium on hunting within forest reserves, which seriously threaten this species (J. D. Gilardi in litt., 1999).

Conservation Actions Underway
Coat of arms of Saint Lucia

Appendices I and II of CITES. This protected by national legislation (J. D. Gilardi in litt., 1999).

Education programs and awareness have made this bird in a National symbol.

This has eliminated successfully hunting (Juniper and Parr 1998), helped by a moratorium on hunting within forest reserves (J. D. Gilardi in litt., 1999).

In 1975 program was established captive breeding, and in 1995 He had developed a total of 19 young birds (Copsey, 1995).

Conservation Actions Proposed

Maintain the moratorium on hunting within all forest reserves. Conduct a studyor basic food and breeding ecology. Designate the remaining habitat protected areas. Reassess the objectives of the program captive breeding.

St. Lucia Parrot in captivity:

Extremely rare; currently only it found in the Jersey Zoo

Appendices I and II CITES. This protected by national legislation.

Each captive specimen of this species which is capable of reproducing, It is placed in a well-managed program captive breeding and not be sold as a pet, with the objective of ensure their survival long-term.

Alternative names:

Blue-masked Amazon, Blue-masked Parrot, St Lucia Amazon, St Lucia Parrot, St. Lucia Amazon, St. Lucia Parrot, St.Lucia amazon, Versicolored Parrot, Versicoloured Parrot (English).
Amazone de Sainte-Lucie, Amazone versicolore, Amazone versicolore de Sainte-Lucie (French).
Blaumaskenamazone, Blaustirnamazone (German).
Papagaio-de-santa-lúcia (Portuguese).
Amazona de Santa Lucia, Amazona de Santa Lucía, Amazona de Sta. Lucia (Spanish).

Amazona versicolor Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Amazona
Scientific name: Amazona versicolor
Citation: (Statius Müller, 1776)
Protonimo: Psittacus versicolor

Images St. Lucia Parrot:


St. Lucia Parrot (Amazona versicolor)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Saint Lucia Parrot(Amazona versicolor) by Josh MoreFlickr
(2) – Chrysotis bouqueti (a.k.a. Amazona versicolor, the St. Lucia amazon, or the St. Lucia parrot) by Joseph Smit [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Allen T. Chartier, XC9438. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/9438

St. Vincent Parrot
Amazona guildingii

St. Vincent Parrot

Content

Description:

40 cm.. length and 580 – 700 weight g.

The plumage of the St. Vincent Parrot (Amazona guildingii) It is very variable, virtually no two similar birds.

Its forecrown, lores, supercilii area and upper cheeks are blanquecinas; crown yellow; Feathers back neck and its sides, pale blue dark blue tips; fusion green feathers on the neck show black points. Upperparts dark brown with dark black tips to some feathers. Scapulars gold; coverts outer primaries with pale blue in outerweb.

St. Vincent Parrot

Wing coverts brown with a green band subterminal and dark extremes some feathers; carpal edge yellow-orange with scattered green feathers. Primaries blue with bases yellow-orange; the Outer secondaries They are equal with green subterminal bands, the inner secondary green with blue tips; tertiary interior dark green tinted golden brown on outerweb, Outside tertiary green at the base becoming dark blue at the tips.

Under the wings, with lesser coverts brown with green tips, greater coverts Yellow; flight feathers blackish with yellow at the base. Throat orange with blue tips or blue-green; upper chest golden brown with dark brown tips giving a barred effect; belly yellower than gold chest green blackish subterminal band and pointed to some feathers; undertail-coverts green-yellow. Tail Orange at the base with blue broadband and wide ends central bright yellow. Bill pale gray-horn; irises orange; legs grey.

Anatomy-parrots-eng
Both sexes are similar. The immature They have softer colors.

Geographic variation

Parrots eastern side of San Vicente They are possibly genetically isolated from the western side: the small bird population East (perhaps only about 80 in 1982) show a high proportion of green and have their high-pitched voices.

  • Sound of the St. Vincent Parrot.

Habitat:

Video St. Vincent Parrot

Parrots in the world

Species of the genus Amazona

The St. Vincent Parrot mainly they inhabit mature forests humid altitudes of 125 some 1000 m, although they prefer lowland forests, where they spend most time. Occasionally they leave the forest to visit cultivated areas and even gardens. Gregarious and usually in groups 20-30 individuals or in pairs. They forage in flocks and roost use Community. They defend the area around the nest while raising although also kept in groups while feeding and sleeping.

Reproduction:

Nests in hollow mature forest trees such as Dacryodes or Sloanea large. Couples begin breeding activity around February with eggs laid between April-May. In dry years, eggs can be deposited as soon as in January-February or as late as in July. If conditions are particularly wet, birds can not be played at all. Clutch two eggs, rarely three. low productivity with 50% Natural suffering nest failure and successful nests with only two young people in the best years.

Food:

Its diet includes plants of Cordia sulcata, Clusia, Sloanea, Dacryodes excelsa, Ficus, Cecropia peltata, Mangifera indica, Melisoma virescens, Euterpe, Ixora ferrea, Micropholis chrysophylloides, Acrocomia aculeata, Simarouba amara, iron Krugiodendron, Dussia martinicensis, Andira inermis, No Ingoides, Byrsonima coriacea, Talauma dodecapetala, see venosa, Psidium guajava and Aiphanes erosa. The Pouteria multiflora It is your favorite.

Distribution and status:

Size of its range (breeding/resident): 100 km2

Endemic of the San Vicente Island in the Lesser Antilles. The distribution is closely related to the presence of native rain forests that during most of the twentieth century have been confined to the east and west sides of the central foothills of the island.

Currently the largest flocks of St. Vincent Parrot inhabit the headwaters of Buccament, Cumberland, Colonaire, Congo-Jennings-Perseverance and Richmond Valley’s, where much of the remaining native forest concentrated; elsewhere in fewer.

Some estimates of its population between 1870 and 1920 They are contradictory, but the species evidently decreased substantially 1950. Estimates of the population in the early seventies suggested that between several hundred to 1.000 then birds inhabited the island. Survey 1982 involved a total of 421 ± 52 birds while estimating 1988 He suggested 440-500. Perhaps they increased to 800 birds in 1994. The declining population and shrinking range, is linked to the loss of forest cover wet once (at least in the western side) almost reached sea level. Deforestation seems to have stopped in at least some valleys, but habitat remains at risk due to forestry, expansion of banana, charcoal production and loss of nests for collectors looking young birds for trade. Survey 1984 He suggested that only survived in 16 km2 of primary forest. His capture for pets and international trade It remains a threat, but this and hunting, that was probably the main threat from late 1950 a 1970, They have declined in importance following an education campaign. The remaining population is also at risk because of hurricanes that can cause loss of plants that consume and nesting sites, and direct mortality. In 1902 much of the favorite habitat of this species was destroyed by the eruption of Monte Soufrière and these parrots are clearly vulnerable to future volcanic eruptions. Parts of the remaining forest habitat are now protected areas and the species is protected under domestic law. CITES Appendix I.

Conservation:

Conservation status ⓘ


Vulnerable
Vulnerable (UICN)ⓘ

• Current red list category of the UICN: Vulnerable.

• Population trend: In increased.

• Population size: 250-999

Justification of the red list category

Habitat conservation, the law enforcement and public awareness campaigns have halted the slide of this species to extinction and have even reversed some of the earlier reductions. However, still qualifies as Vulnerable because it has a very small population and range on one island.

Justification of the population

The species has a wild population of about 730 birds (Loro Parque Foundation 2008), which is equivalent to 487 mature individuals, placed here in the band 250-999 individuals.

Justification of trend

The number of this species continues steadily (Culzac-Wilson 2005).

Threats

It hunting for food, capture for trade in birds in cages and habitat loss were the main causes of the decline of this species. Deforestation has been a result of forestry activities, expansion of banana, production of charcoal, loss of nesting trees felled by hunters looking young birds for trade, as well as natural disasters such as hurricanes and volcanic eruptions (Snyder et to the., 2000).

The nine-banded armadillo o negro tattoo (Salmo salar), introduced on the island, undermines the large trees causing his fall, reducing the number of appropriate nests for St. Vincent Parrot (Culzac-Wilson 2005). a highway is planned through the island, funded by the Taiwanese government, that would destroy large areas of suitable habitat and increase deforestation rates (Culzac-Wilson et al., 2003). Genetic isolation of separate subpopulations may be of greater concern.

Conservation Actions Underway

Appendices I and II CITES. national legislation protecting the species applies. The Reserve Pargo de San Vicente It was established to protect the entire habitat occupied (Juniper and Parr 1998). Successful public education campaigns have apparently improved the public perception of the species and, combined with the above measures, They have reversed some of the earlier reductions. There captive populations San Vicente and Barbados (Woolcock 2000, Sweeney 2001). In 2005 a large species conservation plan published (Culzac-Wilson 2005) .

Conservation Actions Proposed

Continue to monitor the population. Continue and enhance existing security measures, including the development of captive breeding program. Study the reproductive success, movement patterns and habitat requirements of this species (Snyder et to the., 2000) . Oppose plans for cross-country road and propose a better option. Implement species conservation plan.

St. Vincent Parrot in captivity:

Each captive specimen of this species which is capable of reproducing, It is placed in a well-managed program captive breeding and not be sold as a pet, in order to ensure its long-term survival.

Alternative names:

Guilding’s Amazon, Guilding’s Parrot, St Vincent Amazon, St Vincent Parrot, St. Vincent Amazon, St. Vincent Parrot, St.Vincent amazon (English).
Amazone de Guilding, Amazone de Saint-Vincent (French).
Königsamazon, Königsamazone (German).
Papagaio-de-são-vicente (Portuguese).
Amazona de San Vicente, Amazona de St. Vicente (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Amazona
Scientific name: Amazona guildingii
Citation: (Vigors, 1837)
Protonimo: Psittacus Guildingii

St. Vincent Parrot images:


St. Vincent Parrot (Amazona guildingii)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A St Vincent Amazon in the rehabilitation and breeding centre in the Botanical Gardens, Kingstown, on the island of Saint VincenBy Amazona_guildingii_-Botanical_Gardens_-Kingstown_-Saint_Vincent-8a.jpg: Chennettederivative work: Snowmanradio [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – A St. Vincent Amazon at World Parrot Refuge, Coombs, British Columbia, Canada By Herb Neufeld (World Parrot Refuge – Coombs, BC) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – St. Vincent Amazon (Amazona guildingii) also known as St. Vincent Parrot By Beralpo at ru.wikipedia [CC BY 2.5], from Wikimedia Commons
(4) – St. Vincent Parrot – Source: own work – Location: Bronx Zoo, New York – Author: self, User:Stavenn By No machine-readable author provided. Stavenn assumed (based on copyright claims). [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – St. Vincent Amazon at Houston Zoo, USA By Kent Wang (originally posted to Flickr as Parrot) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – St Vincent Parrot (1) by Mark MorganFlickr

Sounds: Jesse Fagan, XC48891. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/48891

Red-collared Lorikee
Trichoglossus rubritorquis

Red-collared Lorikee

Description Red-collared Lorikeet:

26 cm. long and 103-140 grams.

Red-collared Lorikee

The Red-collared Lorikee (Trichoglossus rubritorquis) they have the head violet / blue with purple / blue streaks on face; throat and sides of the nape blackish; neck orange / red; chest yellow / orange without sweeping; abdomen dark green; the thighs green / yellow until undertail-coverts; upperparts and tail green; underwing-coverts orange; yellow and broadband under the wing . Bill orange / red. Eyes dark orange.
The youth they are similar to adults.

    taxonomy:

Occasionally he treated in Australian literature as a separate species of Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), but this is only appropriate review, as here, the whole complex of Rainbow Lorikeet: differs from Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus moluccanus) in his collar Orange Fire vs. pale green; Blue neck vs. green; vs belly black. blue; and of the Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus forsteni) in his collar Orange Fire vs. yellowish green; nape blue vs. red crab; nape blue vs. dark blue or green; larger size.

Species Monotypic.

  • Sound of the Red-collared Lorikee.

Habitat:

There have been no large-scale seasonal movements are common throughout the year in some places.

It's more common in the lowlands, but it is up 2400 meters above sea level. They can be observed in a wide variety of areas including settlements, forests, coconut plantations, Savanna, eucalyptus forests and mangroves. They are in mixed flocks with other parrots; small and noisy groups. Nomads, since they depend on flowering trees. It perches communally in groups of hundreds of birds.

Reproduction:

very similar reproductive biology to the Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus). May-January season in Northern Territory. The laying Typically two or three eggs.

Food:

Diet very similar to the Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) which feeds on nectar, fruit, flowers and insects, including Pandanus spiralis. It can also be found around artificial feeding stations.

I necked Lori distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 1.100.000 km2

North Autóctono Australia, which they inhabit the lowlands. Integrated or hybridized with Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) on Queensland Peninsula, Australia, in southwest Cape York.

Red-collared Lorikeet Conservation:

    Justification of the red list category

1. Current category Red List UICN: Least Concern..

2. The population trend: Decreasing.

3. Population size : It is unknown.

This species has a extremely large distribution area, and therefore does not approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criterion of size range (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a decreasing area size or fluctuating distribution, extension / habitat quality, or size of the population and a small number of places or severe fragmentation).

While the trend of the population seems to be decreasing, It not believed to be declining fast enough to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion population trend (decrease of more than 30% in ten years or three generations).

The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 mature individuals with an estimated> 10% continuous decline in ten years or three generations, or a specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

    Justification of the population

Global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as abundant (pit et to the. 1997).

    Justification trend

It is suspected that the population is declining due to unsustainable levels of exploitation.

    Threats

The species has been the subject of a intense trade: from 1981, When it was included in the Appendix II of the CITES, they have been 100.388 individuals caught in international trade (UNEP-WCMC CITES Trade Database, January 2005).

In captivity:

In Europe, this species of lori has been largely imported from early last century, and in 1910 it managed to raise in the zoo London (four years later, the first breeding France). Currently it is rare outside Australia. Life expectancy: 20 years in nature, 15-25 years in captivity.

Alternative names

Australian rainbow lory, Rainbow Lorikeet (Red-collared), Red collared Lorikeet, Red-collared Lorikeet (English).
Loriquet à col rouge, Loriquet à collier rouge, Loriquet à tête bleue (à col rouge), Loriquet à tête bleue (rubritorquis) (French).
Australischer Blauwangenallfarblori, Darwin-Allfarblori, Rotnackenlori (German).
Periquito-arco-íris (rubritorquis), Lóris-de-colar-rojo (Portuguese).
Lori cuellirrojo, Lori Arcoiris (rubritorquis) (Spanish).

Thomas Horsfield
Thomas Horsfield

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus rubritorquis
Citation: Vigors & Horsfield, 1827
Protonimo: Trichoglossus Rubritorquis

Lori I necked images:


Red-collared Lorikee (Trichoglossus rubritorquis)

    Sources:

    1. Avibase
    2. Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    3. Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    4. Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – A Red-collared Lorikeet at Cincinnati Zoo, Ohio, USA by Fr. Ted Bobosh [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (2) – A Red-collared Lorikeet at Cincinnati Zoo, Ohio, USA by Ted [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Red-collared Lorikeet standing on a man’s cap at Lion Country Safari, Florida, USA by derivative work: Snowmanradio (talk)Trichoglossus_haematodus_rubritorquis_-Lion_Country_Safari-6.jpg: Duncan Rawlinson from Vancouver, BC [CC BY 2.0 or CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus rubritorquis) in the Walsrode Bird Park, Germany by Quartl [CC BY-SA 3.0], from Wikimedia Commons
    (5) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (6) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (7) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus rubritorquis) by Graham WinterfloodFlickr
    (8) – Trichoglossus haematodus rubritorquis Location taken: Lion Country Safari, Loxahatchee, Florida Photo by David J. pole [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (9) – Red-collared Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haemotodius rubritorquis) by Geoff WhalanFlickr
    (10) – A painting of a Red-collared Lorikeet (originally captioned “Trichoglossus rubritorquis. Scarlet-collared Parrakeet by Edward Lear [Public domain]

    Sounds: Phil Gregory, XC287820. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/287820

Rainbow Lorikeet
Trichoglossus moluccanus

Rainbow Lorikeet


Rainbow Lorikeet

Content

Description Rainbow Lorikeet:

Of 25-30 cm. length; 70-169 grams and a wingspan of 46 cm..

Rainbow Lorikeet

The plumage of the Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus moluccanus) is very bright. The head is deep blue with a neck greenish-yellow and the rest of the upperparts (wings, back and tail) are deep green. The chest is red with blue-black barring.. The belly is deep green, and the thighs and rump are yellow with deep green barring.. In flight, a yellow wing-bar contrasts clearly with the red underwing-coverts.

There is little to visually distinguish between the sexes; However, for an acute observer, their dimorphism is readily apparent.

The youth has bill black, which gradually brightens to orange in the adults..

The markings of Trichoglossus moluccanus resemble of the Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), but with a belly blue and breast with little or no blue-black barring..

Rainbow Lorikeet Taxonomy

With one exception, the species have been treated so far as a group of subspecies within the extended group Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), but they differ from the Trichoglossus haematodus her pale red breast without bars ; its blue belly against green or blackish; its pale blue hood without black edge and its larger size.

The subspecies Trichoglossus moluccanus eyrei (South of Australia) It is included within the species nominal. Small hybrid population of species paired with Musk Lorikeet (Glossopsitta concinna) in SE Southern Australia (Yorke Peninsula).

  • Sound of the Rainbow Lorikeet. (1)

(1) Some species are under extreme pressure because of traps and harassment. Therefore, open availability of high-quality recordings of these species may further worsen problems, this being the reason why downloading these recordings is off. In conclusion, recorders themselves are free to share these files on xeno-canto, but they will have to approve access to these recordings.

We do not take this action lightly, and we wish it were not necessary, but we are convinced that the negative impacts of offering easy access to these recordings outweigh the benefits. To access these recordings, You can contact directly with the recorder.

Subspecies description:

  • Trichoglossus moluccanus moluccanus

    (Gmelin, 1788) – Nominal.

  • Trichoglossus moluccanus septentrionalis

    (Robinson, 1900) – As the species nominal but with brighter stripes purple / blue in the head and tail shorter.

Habitat:

The Rainbow Lorikeet often they travel together in pairs and occasionally respond to calls to fly like a flock, then they disperse again in pairs. Couples aggressively defend their feeding and nesting against other lstallion arcoiris and other bird species. Not only they scare off smaller birds, as the Noisy Miner (Manorina melanocephala) and the Brush Wattlebird (Anthochaera chrysoptera), but also to larger, as the Australian Magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen).

Reproduction:

In Australia, Reproduction usually takes place during spring (from September to December), but it may vary from one region to another with changes in food availability and climate. Sites nesting They are variable and may include gaps as tall trees eucalyptus, trunks of palm trees or overhanging rocks.

Couples sometimes nest in the same tree with other couples Rainbow Lorikeet or other species of birds. The clutch size is between one and three eggs, which are incubated for about 25 days. Incubation tasks are performed by the female alone.

The Rainbow Lorikeet they are mostly monogamous They matched and remain for long periods, if not for life.

Food:

Nectar and pollen of native trees and shrubs, especially eucalyptus (for example, Eucalyptus gummifera, Eucalyptus maculata).

Rainbow Lorikeet distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 3,810,000 km2

Endemic East and Southeast Australia (of Cape York to the Eyre Peninsula, South of Australia)

They were recorded for the first time in Perth in 1968 and it is believed that the population came from less than ten birds were deliberately released or had escaped from aviaries.

Since the beginning of the decade 1960, the population has grown exponentially and has spread rapidly throughout 174 km2 metropolitan area. The current population is estimated at 8.400 birds and their range is expanding at a rate of 0,7 km per year.

wanderer Tasmania.

Distribution of subspecies:

  • Trichoglossus moluccanus moluccanus

    (Gmelin, 1788) – Nominal.

  • Trichoglossus moluccanus septentrionalis

    (Robinson, 1900) – North of Queensland (Cape York Peninsula), in northwestern Australia; also the Torres Strait Islands (Boigu and Saibai except, at the north end) and it was introduced in the district of Perth, in southwest Australia..

Rainbow Lorikeet conservation:

1. Current category Red List UICN: Least concern.

2. The population trend: Decreasing.

3. Population size : Unknown.

Justification of the red list category

This species has a extremely large distribution area, and therefore does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criteria of size range (Extent of Occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a decreasing area size or fluctuating distribution, extension / habitat quality, or size of the population and a small number of places or severe fragmentation). While the trend of the population seems to be decreasing, It not believed to be declining fast enough to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under criterion population trend (decrease of more than 30% in ten years or three generations).

The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 mature individuals with an estimated> 10% continuous decline in ten years or three generations, or a specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification of the population

Global population size has not been quantified, but the species is described as abundant in northern Australia and rare Tasmania (pit et to the. 1997).

Justification trend

They suspected that the population is declining due to unsustainable levels of exploitation.

Rainbow Lori Threats

The species has been the subject of a intense trade: from 1981, When it was included in the Appendix II of the CITES, they have been 100.388 individuals caught in international trade (UNEP-WCMC CITES Trade Database, January 2005).

In captivity:

It is not very common. Its longevity It 20 years en libertad, 15-25 years in captivity and its market price is around wild birds 250 EUR.

Alternative names:

Rainbow Lorikeet, Rainbow Lorikeet (Rainbow) (English).
Loriquet à tête bleue (de Swainson), Loriquet à tête bleue (moluccanus), Loriquet arc-en-ciel, Loriquet de Swainson (French).
Regenbogenlori (German).
Lóris-molucano, Periquito-arco-íris (moluccanus) (Portuguese).
Lori arcoiris, Lori de Arco Iris (Spanish).

Gmelin Johann Friedrich
Gmelin Johann Friedrich

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus moluccanus
Citation: (Gmelin, JF, 1788)
Protonimo: Psittacus moluccanus

Rainbow Lorikeet images:


Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus moluccanus)

Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet
Trichoglossus forsteni

Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet


Description:

25 a 30 centimeters length and 100-157 g. of weight.

The distinctive and colorful Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus forsteni) has the head dark blue, neck pale green, chest smooth red, and belly dark blue. The remaining plumage It is a bright pale green, and the bill typically red.

In flight the species shows a flash of bright yellow on the inside of all flight feather, and coverts bright red at the bottom of the wings.

  • Sound of the Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet.

taxonomy:

This taxon is considered a subspecies of Trichoglossus [haematodus, rosenbergii, moluccana, forsteni, capistratus, weberi] (sensu lato) by some authors.

The specific epithet forsteni commemorates the Dutch naturalist Eltio Alegondas Forestry.

Subspecies description
  • Trichoglossus forsteni djampeanus

    (Hartert 1897) – They differ from the species nominal by the fact that their head It is darker and more evidently streaked with bright purple / blue.

  • Trichoglossus forsteni forsteni

    (Bonaparte 1850) – Nominal.

  • Trichoglossus forsteni mitchellii

    (Gray,GR 1859) – Both adults have head black / brown with gray / green streaks in crown up to the cheeks; red / brown in occiput; chest Red with minimal or no Barred; neck yellow green; purple / black belly; smaller.

  • Trichoglossus forsteni stresemanni

    (Meise 1929) – As the species nominal but with paler chest orange / red; green washing occiput; feathers the mantle yellow / orange basis.

Habitat:

The Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet is located in lowlands and lower montane forests, including secondary growth and plantations, tending to be observed at the edges and around perturbed vegetation instead of inside the closed canopy forest (pit et to the. 1997). In Sumbawa the Trichoglossus forsteni It ranges from sea level to 800-1200 meters and up 2150 metres in Lombok (pit et to the. 1997); at least in Sumbawa, the variation in altitudinal range is attributed to the movements in monitoring trees in bloom in a large area (White y Bruce 1986).

Reproduction:

Birds have been reported in breeding conditions in May Sumbawa (White y Bruce 1986). It nests in a deep hole in a large tree (pit et to the. 1997).

Food:

No specific data, but presumably similar to Coconut Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)

Distribution:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 101.000 km2

The Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (incorporating subspecies mitchelli, djampeanus and stresemanni) It is located on the islands of Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa, Tanahjampea and Kalaotowa, Indonesia.

An assessment of the state of the taxa that make up the species indicates that the species may no longer be present in Bali, It is extinct in Tanahjampea after capture, mainly before 1990, and it is not clear if he persists in kalatom (Eaton et al. 2015). In Lombok the species is still present, with a recent observation of a flock of 18 individuals above 1.500 metres in 2015 (F. Rheindt per Eaton et al. 2015), although given the lack of other records for many decades, it can be assumed that the population is likely to be small. Sumbawa now it may be the stronghold of the species, and it was suggested that the species is “secure(Eaton et al. 2015), and there is a large area of ​​potentially suitable habitat remaining on the island.

Distribution of subspecies

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Vulnerable.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

• Population size : 1600-7000 individuals.

Justification of the red list category

It is estimated that this newly divided species has a small population that is experiencing suspected moderately rapid population decline due to the pressure of the traps for wild bird trade. Therefore, is classified as Vulnerable.

Justification of the population

It is estimated that the population size is lower to 10.000 mature individuals, on the basis of an interim evaluation of the places where it is likely that any number is retained species. In addition, it is considered possible that the population supposedly higher in Sumbawa does not exceed 1.000 mature individuals.

Justification trend

It is suspected that the population is experiencing descent moderately fast because of unsustainable levels of exploitation.

Conservation actions and research in progress

Appendix II of the CITES, where they include species that are not necessarily threatened with extinction, but in which trade must be controlled in order to avoid utilization incompatible with their survival. CMS Appendix II (Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals).

Conservation actions and research proposals

– Estimate the population and assess population trends and scale of capture pressure.
– Carry out a specific study of the species to identify important sites, in order to provide protection.
– Conduct research on their status and habitat use (with special attention to food ecology and forest fragmentation).
– Initiate awareness campaigns to enlist the support of local people in protecting forests and preventing illegal trade.

Lori pechiescarlata in captivity:

Rare in captivity. Each captive specimen of this species which is capable of reproducing, It is placed in a well-run program of captive breeding and not be sold as a pet, in order to ensure its long-term survival. However it copies sold from the Loroparque Foundation at a price of around 400 EUR.

In captivity, It appeared in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, for example, in 1896 It was imported by the London Zoo. The first offspring of the world recorded in 1990 on India.

The Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet It has a longevity 20 years in nature, 15-25 years in captivity.

Alternative names:

Rainbow Lorikeet (Sunset), Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet, Scarley-breasted Lorikeet, Sunset Lorikeet (English).
Loriquet à face bleue, Loriquet à tête bleue (de Forsten), Loriquet à tête bleue [forsteni], Loriquet de Forsten (French).
Bali-Allfarblori, Forstenlori (German).
Lóris-de-forstein (Portuguese).
Lori de Puesta del Sol, Lori pechiescarlata (Spanish).

Charles Lucien Bonaparte
Charles Lucien Bonaparte

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Trichoglossus
Scientific name: Trichoglossus forsteni
Citation: Bonaparte, 1850
Protonimo: Psittacus forsteni

Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet images:


Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet (Trichoglossus forsteni)

    Sources:

    Avibase
    • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – Sunset Lorikeet (also known as the Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet and Forsten’s Lorikeet) at Cincinnati Zoo, USA by Ted [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (2) – A Sunset Lorikeet (also known as the Scarlet-breasted Lorikeet and Forsten’s Lorikeet) at Cincinnati Zoo, Ohio, USA by Ted [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Two Rainbow Lorikeets at Newport Aquarium. This subspecies of the Rainbow Lorikeet is also called Forsten’s Lorikeet by Trichoglossus_haematodus_-Newport_Aquarium-8a.jpg: Jeff Kubinaderivative work: Snowmanradio [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – Two Rainbow Lorikeets at Newport Aquarium. This subspecies of the Rainbow Lorikeet is also called Forsten’s Lorikeet
    Date 22 April 2009, 15:31 (UTC)_haematodus_-Newport_Aquarium-8a.jpg: Jeff Kubinaderivative work: Snowmanradio [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (5) – Lories at the Jurong BirdPark, Singapore. Taken by Terence Ong in November 2006. Trichoglossus haematodus forsteni by rk, Singapore. Taken by Terence Ong in November 2006. Trichoglossus haematodus forsteniNo machine-readable author provided. Terence assumed (based on copyright claims). [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0 or CC BY 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons

    Sounds: Patrik Aberg, XC40063. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/40063

Red-flanked Lorikeet
Charmosyna placentis

Red-flanked Lorikeet


Description:

15 a 18 cms. length and 38 a 48 g. of weight.

The Red-flanked Lorikeet (Charmosyna placentis) has the forecrown and yellowish-green crown; nape green; chin, throat and lores red; ear-coverts dark blue striped strongly light blue. Top green with rump matte blue: uppertail-coverts green. The part superior of the wings It is green with innerwebs and ends the blackish flight feather. Underwing-coverts red; intense yellow band across the innerwebs of the flight feather blackish. Underparts lighter green than yellow upperparts; Strong red marks on the sides of chest and in the flanks below the sides of belly.

The upper part of the tail It is duller green than upperparts, tipped bright yellow, with lateral feathers red in the center of the innerwebs and slightly in outerweb, with a subterminal black mark; lower tail is basal yellow, with black and red marks.

Bill red; irises yellow to orange; legs opaque red.

The female no yellow-green spots on the top of the forecrown, Red in the face, in the chest, in the flanks and at the bottom of the wings (the underwing-coverts are green-yellow). Blue of the ear-coverts It is replaced by a dark patch badly scratched yellow.

Immature as the female, but duller green, and less extensive yellow streaks in ear-coverts (the young male can present a red stain on the face and greenish yellow in forecrown). Iris pale yellow, legs orange-brown.

  • Sound of the Red-flanked Lorikeet.

Subspecies description
  • Charmosyna placentis intensior

    (Kinnear, 1928) – Greener than the species nominal, including the forecrown. Headphones coverts and patch on the rump duller blue-violet.

  • Charmosyna placentis ornata

    (Mayr, 1940) – Mantle green slightly darker than the species nominal, a patch on rump largest darker blue and crown yellower. The Red throat larger in males.

  • Charmosyna placentis pallidior

    (Rothschild & Hartert, 1905) – As the subspecies subplacens, but with upperparts pale green. Headphones coverts light blue in the male.

  • Charmosyna placentis placentis

    (Temminck, 1835) – Nominal.

  • Charmosyna placentis subplacens

    (Sclater,PL, 1876) – It differs from the species nominal by having green, nonblue the rump.

Habitat:

The Red-flanked Lorikeet It, mainly, a kind of lowlands It found in the humid primary forest, in the forest edge, in Savannah, the secondary high growth, in the monsoon forest, in the swamps of Sagun (when they are in bloom), in the gallery forest, in eucalypts, in the coastal forest and, occasionally, in the mangroves and coconut palms. It is also found in flowering trees in cultivated areas.

Can be Quiet and discreet and, even when feeding active and noisy, It can be difficult to see through thick foliage. They are mostly in pairs, but occasionally in groups 25 or more, looking for food with others Loris with flowers and trees epiphytes or flying through or above the tree tops in small compact and noisy flocks.

Reproduction:

In New Guinea, Several observations of couples investigating arboreal termite mounds They indicate that it is likely that they are preferred for nest. The bases of ferns and moss cultures have also been identified as potential sites nesting. Activity on these sites has been observed between February and October, and found that the specimens found in eastern Papua New Guinea by Diamond in July and August 1965 They were able to play. In the Vit Islandu, Coates He watched a couple with chicks in mid-August and is likely to play occurring during much of the year.

Food:

Feeds of pollen, nectar, flowers and seeds, mainly in the upper canopy.

Distribution and status:

Extension of the distribution (breeding / resident): 2.800.000 km2

originating Indonesia Oriental, New Guinea and the northern Solomon Islands.

They can be observed from the Moluccan Islands and West Papua New, through lowland West Papua New and Papua New Guinea to Bismarck Archipelago and Bougainville.

Although mostly they found in lowlands, there have been up to 1.600 metres above sea level in Komo, in the highlands of southern Papua New Guinea; They are also common in high altitudes (about 1.150 meters to 1.450 m) in the zone of Karimui, East, and they do not seem to be anywhere else in the region. reaches 300 metres in New Britain, above which is replaced by the Red-chinned Lory (Charmosyna rubrigularis). In the North of New Guinea It is replaced by the higher altitude Red-fronted Lorikeet (Charmosyna rubronotata).

Widespread and common to locally abundant. It is believed that the world population is at a level of caresses 500.000 individuals and it is stable. Small numbers in captivity.

Translation made with the translator www.DeepL.com/Translator

Distribution of subspecies

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern

• Population trend: Stable.

• Population size : Unknown.

Justification of the red list category

This species has a very extens distribution areaa, and therefore does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criteria of size range (Scope of the presence <20.000 km2 combined with a decreasing area size or fluctuating distribution, extension / habitat quality, or size of the population and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation).

The population trend appears to be stable, and therefore the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criteria of population trend (decrease> 30% in ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 mature individuals with an estimated> 10% continuous decline in ten years or three generations, or a specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

Justification of the population

Global population size has not been quantified, but it has been reported that the species is usually common and sometimes abundant (pit et to the. 1997). Some sources estimate the current population of this Lori in about half a million individuals.

Justification trend

They suspected that the population is stable the absence of evidence of decline or substantial threats.

Lori Flanquirrojo in captivity:

Rare in captivity.

Alternative names:

Blue-eared Lorikeet, Lowland Lorikeet, Red flanked Lorikeet, Red-flanked Lorikeet, Yellow-fronted Blue-eared Lorikeet, Yellow-fronted Blue-eared Lory (English).
Lori coquet, Loriquet à croupion bleu, Loriquet joli (French).
Schönlori (German).
Loris Charmosyna Placentis (Portuguese).
Lori de Dorso Rojo, Lori Flanquirrojo (Spanish).

Temminck Coenraad Jacob
Temminck Coenraad Jacob

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Charmosyna
Scientific name: Charmosyna placentis
Citation: (Temminck, 1835)
Protonimo: Psittacus placentis

Red-flanked Lorikeet images:


Sources:

Avibase
• Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
• Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A male Red-flanked Lorikeet at Cincinnati Zoo, USA by Ltshears [CC BY 3.0]

(2) – Female Red-flanked Lorikeet at the Louisville Zoo, USA by Ltshears [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], from Wikimedia Commons
(3) – A pair of Red-flanked Lorikeets at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore by Peter Tan [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – The image is free from copyright under Creative Commons CC0
(5) – Red-flanked Lorikeet, Male (Charmosyna placentis) at the Louisville Zoo by Ltshears [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], from Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Ross Gallardy, XC410521. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/410521.

Reischek's Parakeet
Cyanoramphus hochstetteri

Reischek's Parakeet


Description:

28 cms. length and 140 g. of weight.

The Reischek's Parakeet (Cyanoramphus hochstetteri). Named after the Austrian ornithologist and taxidermist Andreas Reischek, the first scientist who visited the Antipodes Islands. He was a passenger of Stella and reached the Antipodes Islands in February 1888.

It is one of two species of parakeets Cyanoramphus who live in remote Antipodes Islands. It is a medium-sized green parrot, brightly colored, the outer flight feathers are light blue with a crown red, which closely it resembles other parakeets “red crown” (for example, Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae). But appearances are deceptive. Genetic studies revealed that the color of the crown can not be a good indicator of taxonomy parakeet, and the tiny Malherbe's Parakeet (Cyanoramphus malherbi) It may be the closest relative of Reischek's Parakeet. It is common in all Antipodes Islands, particularly in more open areas and nearby coastal areas to the penguin colonies.

Habitat:

The Reischek's Parakeet They are more abundant than Antipodes Parakeet (Cyanoramphus unicolor) in most habitats. Significant differences were observed in diet between the two species of parakeets. are also evident strong seasonal and annual differences in diet related food availability. The Reischek's Parakeet They are strong fliers and have been observed flying between islands within the group Antipodean.

Social behavior is similar to other species of parakeets Cyanoramphus, but it has been observed that spend considerable periods sunbathing and primping in protected areas. Like other species Cyanoramphus, are strongly territorial around nests, and they call loudly and chase intruders from nearby.

They are usually found in pairs or, most commonly, in small groups that feed on or near the ground. You can often see them in meetings springs and wells isolated. Occasionally they flock fly to neighboring islands in search of food.

Reproduction:

We know relatively little about the breeding of the Reischek's Parakeet. Apparently nest October to March in modified or constructed within the base groups tunnels tussocks or ferns. The nest is lined with small pieces of wood, feathers, moss, herbs and other dry materials. They can reuse nests each year.

clutch size is unknown in nature. Is likely to ecology and reproductive behavior are similar to those of other parakeets Cyanoramphus.

Food:

It has been recorded feeding on leaves, flowers, berries and seeds 14 plant species. Invertebrates are a minor component of the diet. The Reischek's Parakeet occasionally feed carcasses petreles and albatrosses, but not as often as Antipodes Parakeet (Cyanoramphus unicolor). They feed on the floor often, including mud and feces accumulated within colonies Penguin Antipodean (Eudyptes sclateri) unoccupied, When Penguins are away at their winter migration.

Distribution:

The parakeet is endemic to the Reischek Antipodes Islands. It is common in all Antipodes Islands, particularly in more open areas and nearby coastal areas to the penguin colonies.

Conservation:

• Under Threat Classification System New Zealand 2008: Vulnerable.

• Population trend: Stable.

• Population size : 4000-6000 individuals.

The Reischek's Parakeet apparently they have a stable population, and are common within their distribution area of 2,000 has. They are protected by the isolated situation of the islands and their status Natural reserve strict. The greatest threat to long-term survival Reischek's Parakeet is the arrival of mammalian predators. In the winter of 2016 we attempted to eradicate the mice Antipodes Islands.

The species is also affected negatively by forestry operations: logging and burning have drastically reduced the available habitat, and selective logging can reduce the number of trees with holes suitable nesting and foraging opportunities.

It was hunted by Maori for food, and previously it was persecuted because birds were damaging crops and orchards.

Captive parakeet Reischek:

Are confident from the beginning and not at all shy. Usually they are ready to breed in captivity. Although they are ripe (about five months), It is best not to allow them to play in the first year.

Alternative names:

Antipodes Island Parakeet, Antipodes Red-crowned (English).
Perruche de Reischek, Perruche des Antipodes (French).
Antipoden-Ziegensittich (German).
Periquito de Reischek (Portuguese).
Perico de Reischek, Perico Frentirrojo de las Antípodas (Spanish).

Andreas Reischek
Andreas Reischek

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittaculidae
Genus: Cyanoramphus
Scientific name: Cyanoramphus hochstetteri
Citation: (Reischek, 1889)
Protonimo: Platycercus hochstetteri

Images:

New Zealand Birds Online – Photos


Sources:

Avibase
• Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
• Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
• Greene, T.C. 2013 [updated 2017]. Reischek’s parakeet. In Miskelly, C.M. (ed.) New Zealand Birds Online. www.nzbirdsonline.org.nz

Photos:

(1) – Cyanoramphus hochstetteri by Auckland Museum [CC BY 4.0]

Sounds: Captive birds calling, Mount Bruce National Wildlife Centre, April 1973, 1215, Les McPherson, McPherson Natural History Unit Sound Archive, www.archivebirdsnz.com

Use of cookies

This web site uses cookies so that you have the best user experience. If you continue browsing you are giving your consent for the acceptance of the aforementioned cookies and the acceptance of our cookies policy, Click the link for more information.plugin cookies

TO ACCEPT
Notice of cookies