Norrbottenspets
Suecia FCI 276 - Nordic Hunting Dogs

Norrbottenspets

The Norrbottenspets is also used as a draft dog.

Content

History

The Norrbottenspets (Spitz from the North Bothnia country) probably originates from the small spitz-type Laika that was known to live with hunters in the North Cape area, already in prehistoric times. Little hunting spitz have survived for thousands of years through natural selection - survival of the fittest. In the very harsh and difficult areas of the northern part of the Scandinavian Peninsula, hunting for food and skins was a necessity in order to survive. Precious skins like saber, Sable fur and ermine were the only valid currency for centuries. When fur prices fell drastically after WWII, so did the interest in him Norrbottenspets.

The breed disappeared and there were no records for many years, hence the Kennel Club of Sweden (SKK) declared it extinct. But only a decade later news came that true-type specimens had been found living as pets and watchdogs in small inland homes in North Bothnia.. Due to the very dedicated work of a few men, this ancient hunting spitz was saved.
In 1967 the Norrbottenspets was introduced to the Registries and a new standard was drawn up.

Source: http://www.fci.be/en/nomenclature/NORRBOTTENSPITZ-276.html

Physical characteristics

It is a small spitz-type dog with a rather square appearance, compact and plump, with a lean and strong musculature. The bearing is handsome, with head and tail high. The breed has a strong sexual dimorphism, although the ideal specimen for both sexes is a well-characterized small spitz, attentive, good guardian, of harmonious construction and good character.

The skull is sharp, with the ears set high and relatively small, eyes are dark and bright, and express calmness and predisposition towards work.

Ears are slightly below average size with sparse hair and erect bearing. The tail is set relatively high, fairly tall in a semicircle, with the tip touching the sides of the thighs. When it stretches, must not exceed the tip of the hock.

Hair: hard, short, straight and quite bushy, with fine and dense undercoat. The length varies depending on the body area: longer around the neck and on the thighs and shorter on the skull and front of the extremities.

Color: all colors are allowed. The ideal is white with yellow or brownish red spots.

Size: males 45 cm.; females, 42 cm.

Character and skills

Norrbottenspets

The pretty white colored Spitz, medium size and short hair is very rare in his native country and practically unknown outside of Sweden.

He is an excellent guard with a lot of drive, temperament and stubbornness. With proper physical and mental tension, it is also a nice and friendly companion dog.

As a born hunter, the Norrbottenspets He is very Brave, fearless and alert. He is extremely lively and has a lot of temperament and self-confidence. The Norrbottenspets it is very suitable as a guard dog, because it reports everything I miss immediately without being aggressive. In the family he is very sociable, friendly and gentle. But the intelligent and self-confident dog can also be stubborn and needs a sensitive education and clear guidance..

The Norrbottenspets he is very docile, but it needs a lot of movement and a lot of demanding and varied activity. The ideal are, for example, tests with companion dogs, sports tournaments with dogs or rescue dog training. Only with appropriate mental and physical activity will Norrbottenspets it is also a nice and friendly family companion dog. As a pure house dog or for a life in the city it is not the right dog.

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 276
  • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
  • Section 2: Nordic Hunting Dogs. With working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 2 Nordic Hunting Dogs.

    FCI standard of the Norrbottenspets

    Norrbottenspets FCI Norrbottenspets FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Nordic Spitz, Norrbottenspitz, Pohjanpystykorva (English).
      2. Spitz nordique (French).
      3. Norrbottenspets, Pohjanpystykorvat (German).
      4. Spitz nórdico (Portuguese).
      5. Spitz nórdico (Spanish).

    Black Norwegian Elkhound
    Noruega FCI 268 - Nordic Hunting Dogs

    Black Norwegian Elkhound

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound is closely attached to his people and is very loyal

    .

    Content

    History

    Among the three moose hunters of the North (Black Norwegian Elkhound, Gray Norwegian Elkhound and Jämthund), the Black Norwegian is probably the one receiving the least attention. But the agile and friendly hunter is an attractive breed to many dog ​​owners..

    Its origins go back a long way along with those of the Gray Norwegian Elkhound: These self-confident four-legged Spitz-type friends belong to the time-honored breeds, because a similar dog look can be tried up to the stone age in Scandinavia.

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound is a modern variant of Gray Norwegian Elkhound and has been officially recognized as an independent breed since 1877. An advantage of him Black Norwegian Elkhound during hunting is that it is clearly visible in the white snow. However, These clever four-legged friends have always been used as guard dogs or pack protection dogs.

    Physical characteristics

    Despite the similarity of name, the Black Norwegian Elkhound it's a separate breed, but closely related to the Gray Norwegian Elkhound. However, the Black Norwegian Elkhound it is much less common.

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound it is optically a typical Spitz and has a compact, square build with erect ears. He wears his tail rolled up on his back like other dogs Moose hunter from adulthood. It is smaller and more agile than the Gray Norwegian Elkhound and weighs around 18 kg with a height of 47 cm to the cross. As the name already indicates, this dog's short coat is black, but white spots on legs and chest are allowed as per standard. Also the eyes are dark. The pelage is dense, very sticky and consists of a rough top coat with a soft bottom coat.

    Character and skills

    Multifaceted character

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound he is very loyal to his people. This does not mean that this independent partner is subordinate. Abroad, these dogs are lively, curious and open to all common adventures. However, the busy Black Norwegian Elkhound they also enjoy cozy hugs on a quiet afternoon.

    They are playful, brave and very smart. Like many Nordic dogs, are good “alarm systems”, but only limited good watchdogs: They indicate to strangers – loudly and persistently – but it may happen that they then run towards a potential intruder with a wagging tail. These proud four-legged friends don't always get along with other dogs of the same species. Proper conditioning and socialization is important

    Educating the Black Norwegian Elkhound

    Easily educated with knowledge

    His intelligence and humanity contribute to the education of this Black Norwegian Elkhound don't present big obstacles.

    Likes to work with “their” people and do what they say, as long as you also find it useful. Because you always have to take into account the small stubbornness of this independent hunter when training him. Be consistent and pay special attention to recoverability and bark control. Strength and toughness are absolutely out of place in the upbringing of this sensitive four-legged friend.

    Usually reacts very quickly and strongly to harsh words and reproaches, so use them sparingly. The Black Norwegian Elkhound can be better motivated by the principle of positive reinforcement – clicker training can also be of great help here. A visit to the puppy school helps improve this companion's social streak, which is sometimes a bit belligerent compared to other dogs. It can also be very helpful to attend training classes at the dog school – it is better to choose a suitable dog school where you and your companion feel comfortable before the puppy arrives.

    Black Norwegian Elkhound Health

    In general, the breed is considered to be quite robust and, provided he is raised responsibly, is largely free of genetic diseases. Representatives of the breed can reach the 13 years old in good health. This energetic four-legged friend needs a species-appropriate diet, which should consist mainly of meat: Therefore, you must choose a food in which meat is the first element of the declaration and preferably cereals are not included. Your dog's energy needs depend on his constitution and how much he consumes through exercise, so keep an eye on your slim waist and adjust daily servings as needed.

    Important: Just like us humans, small snacks move quickly to the hips too – plan your dog's snacks in the general ration. Healthy snacks include dry dog ​​chews or sugar-free dental care snacks and freeze-dried meat snacks. Water must always be freely available.

    Caring for the Black Norwegian Elkhound

    The coat of the Black Norwegian Elkhound it is very important to the furry four legged friend, because it performs an outstanding protective function in the harsh Nordic climate and protects you from extensive autumn rains as well as freezing winds. Help your partner keep their hair always in a clean condition and brush it every few days to remove dead hair. You can also brush daily during the coat change, so your roommate loses less hair in the apartment. Coat dirt can be brushed off as soon as it has dried.

    You should only bathe your roommate if it can't be helped, use a mild dog shampoo for this purpose. When brushing, routinely check the ears and clean them with a mild shampoo if necessary. Some dog owners have chosen to brush their roommates' teeth with a dog toothbrush and toothpaste.. It is a good way to prevent tartar and its secondary diseases until the dog is old enough. However, you should already accustom your puppy to the ritual. Also check the claws of older dogs from time to time – if they no longer wear enough, you need to shorten them accordingly with a pair of dog claw pliers.

    Activities with the Black Norwegian Elkhound

    Although his original task was to accompany the hunter when hunting moose and bears, but also smaller animals like foxes, the Black Norwegian Elkhound it is a versatile all-rounder: Loves outdoor exercise and is considered very persistent. This is why you can easily take your four-legged adult friend with you to training sessions. jogging.

    Outdoor activities can be relaxed, especially if you have trained your Black Norwegian Elkhound so it doesn't run away with every rabbit. Apart from recovery exercises – that only very few moose hunters enjoy – the docile and energetic dog can get excited about many things: For example, can find great fun in agility sports and quest games. In addition, It is suitable for the work of rescue dogs. Some owners of moose hunters they also report on beautiful experiences with their partner, trained as a visiting dog, with whom they visit, for example, retirement homes or nursing homes and give the residents of those places an animal joy. Try together what you like, The chances are great!

    Is a Black Norwegian Elkhound Right for Me?

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound suits athletes who like to be outside and keep their dog busy. If you can make this possible for your dog, it is also possible to keep it in an apartment, as long as the apartment offers enough space. Education can be mastered by beginners if they are willing to deal with the hunting characteristics of the breed and adjust education accordingly..

    The Black Norwegian Elkhound it can be a wonderful companion for children. This original hunter can live normally with cats, sometimes even in a friendly way, if you have already gotten used to them as a puppy. Otherwise there could be problems, because the dog sees the cat as prey. Small animals like rabbits are not ideal companions, since they can always trigger prey drive.

    A Black Norwegian Elkhound can also sleep outside, what can be a sensible alternative for these heat sensitive animals in summer. However, needs close family connections and does not like to be alone. Before the dog moves, clarify not only the one-time and permanent expenses you will have to pay, but also if you are willing to spend several hours a day actively with your new partner for years to come. You should also take care of your dog in case of illness or during the holidays – many destinations today also offer holidays with a dog.

    Where can I find my desired Black Norwegian Elkhound?

    It doesn't matter which of the two Norwegian Elkhound has won your heart: Outside Scandinavia, big game hunters from the far north are rarely seen. This is even more difficult with the black Norwegian than with the gray. Therefore, if you are interested in this animal rarity, please contact the Nordic dog breed clubs in your country. If required, they can contact breeders at home and abroad. However, you will usually have to take into account waiting times and long distances to travel to the desired puppy. In his native country, Norway, only a few are born 120 puppies every year.

    As a result, becomes difficult or impossible if you look for a Black Norwegian Elkhound outside scandinavia, that is already grown. It is very unlikely that you will find a four-legged dog of this type in the animal shelters of your country; However, a visit there can be helpful if it's open to other breeds.

    Ratings of the Black Norwegian Elkhound

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Black Norwegian Elkhound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

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    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

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    Images of Black Norwegian Elkhound

    Black Norwegian Elkhound Puppy by Eirik Newth / CC BY

    Black Norwegian Elkhound running through the snow by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/1602973

    Black Norwegian Elkhound Videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 268
    • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
    • Section 2: Nordic Hunting Dogs. Working trial only for the Nordic countries (Sweden, Norway and Finland).
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 2 Nordic Hunting Dogs.

    FCI standard of the breed Black Norwegian Elkhound

    FCI Black Norwegian Elkhound FCI Black Norwegian Elkhound

    Alternative names:

      1. Norsk Elghund Svart, Norsk Elghund Black, Black Elkhound, Norwegian Moose Dog (black) (English).
      2. Chien d’élan norvégien noir (French).
      3. Norsk Elghund Sort (German).
      4. Norsk elghund sort (Portuguese).
      5. Elkhound noruego negro (Spanish).

    Photos:

    1 – Black Norwegian Elkhound About 1 years old by Rvenes / CC BY-SA

    Norwegian Buhund
    Noruega FCI 237 . Nordic Watchdogs and Herders.

    The Norwegian Buhund It is usually excellent obedience and dog agility competitions.

    Content

    History

    The Norwegian Buhund (Norsk Buhund, Nordiske Spitz-Hunde, Norwegian Sheepdog or Pastor Noruego) is a breed of dog Spitz type of Norwegian origin which is closely related to the races Icelandic Sheepdog (Icelandic Sheepdog) and Swedish Elkhound.

    The name Buhund "derived from the Norwegian word"BU”, meaning farm, farm or mountain refuge, place where he lived the pastor while tending his flock in the summer. The Norwegian Buhund used as a grazing dog and as a watchdog.

    As we said, the Norwegian Buhund belongs to a class of dogs called the type Spitz. All of them have in common the pointed ears and curled tail. Within the races Spitz, There is much variation in terms of size, to the coat and the color.

    The Norwegian Buhund is a very ancient race, "part of the existing documentation on the excavation of the"Gokstad ship"buried on the farm in Sandar Gokstad", Sandefjord, Vestfold (Norway) in 1880, contains in addition to the great discovery, they found a Viking grave (that it dated back to the year 900) in which lay the skeleton of a man between 50 and 70 years of age, and its about the skeletons of six dogs of different sizes, similar to Norwegian Buhund of our times.

    Norwegian Buhund Videos
    Norwegian Buhund in Bath Aftermath (MP4 Version)
    Norwegian Buhund Kahsha Eating Peanut Butter

    This famous archaeological research was directed by Nicolay Nicolaysen (1817-1911) a well-known antiquarian and Norwegian archaeologist. He was a founding member of the Society for the preservation of Norwegian ancient monuments, which presided in 1851. The findings of this research are exhibited today in the In Oslo Viking Ship Museum.

    Returning to the skeletons of found dogs along with the Tomb Viking, scholars of the subject, pose that these dogs were the ancestors of modern Buhund. And they were there, because in those days when the Vikings of dying, necessary and precious possessions were buried with them. It was believed that they would need them in their future life.

    In those days dogs Buhund farms and livestock farms were currently protecting, pastoreaba ovejas… according to their beliefs, They hoped that dogs continue carrying out their work in the more than. It has been documented that these dogs were with the Vikings on many of his travels, by sea and land.

    Photo: Vali.org

    Physical characteristics

    Returning to the present day the Norwegian Buhund has a rather square profile, are medium-sized and long legs, well takes a tail wrapped around the center of the back. The head is wedge-shaped, with well erect ears and nose of black.

    According to the standard of the Norwegian Buhund the height at the cross goes from 43,2 a 45,8 cm., the females are slightly smaller than males. The weight of the males is of 15 a 18 Kg and females of 12 a 16 Kg.

    The colors of the coat may be:

    • Wheat: It includes any shade of colour ranging from pale cream to cream darker, with or without dark markings on the tip of the hair, It is possible to display the color white, but will have to be tiny, the black mask is acceptable.
    • Solid black: with areas where the color white is allowed, for example, a narrow white ring around the neck, a narrow white tuft in the face, a small spot of white hairs on the chest (by way of tie), at the end of the legs and the tail. In United Kingdom the "Wolf Sable" colour (Wolf Sable)”, also permitted, According to the Kennel Club's breed standard.

    The Norway Buhund is prone to suffer from hereditary eye problems and hip dysplasia.

    The hair coat of the Norwegian Buhund has an average length, the coat is easy to care for, post that is not entangled, a weekly brushing is enough.

    Perhaps the hair when moved, need brushing more often, but is only a seasonal matter.

    Character and skills

    The Norwegian Buhund it's a very cheerful and active race. They never tire easily and require exercise daily and generous. The Norwegian Buhund is need to expel their energy because if it is not possible to appear destructive tendencies (break furniture, Objetos…).

    Beyond its high level of activity and energy, they are also very affectionate and famous for his love for unconditional towards children.

    Is a race of hyper loving, they love to give and receive affection of his family, that will form strong bonds. You will have a distant and distrustful behavior with strangers, but it is very smart so you will notice who is well received and will go in search of love. They are very sociable and somewhat ladradores, but he will never throw to bite if there is no provocation.

    The Norwegian Buhund, also, He is very stubborn and shows a strong desire to learn new things, But if the stimulus is not the appropriate, It is safer to resort to destructive or inappropriate behavior. This is because they get bored easily and are restless. That is why it is necessary that they have ongoing activity.

    This breed is ideal for homeowners that they can devote time and desire to exercise and training of your pet.

    With this appetite for learning combined with its high level of energy and activity, the Norwegian Buhund he is usually an excellent dog in obedience and dog agility competitions.

    This breed is an excellent companion for a lover of sports.

    Norwegian Buhund Education

    The Norwegian Buhund is smart and cooperative and likes to serve its people, learns quickly. Therefore, this dog's education is not a challenge for already experienced dog owners. Before moving in with a dog of this breed, beginners must deal intensively with their characteristics, as well as the training of dogs in general and especially as far as grazing dogs are concerned.

    In addition to basic obedience, it is important that the Norwegian Buhund pay special attention to the control of barking and the training of loneliness from the age of the puppy: Of course you shouldn't leave your dog alone for long, but you must get used to the fact that he has to endure without his beloved human herd from a very young age. A game lesson for puppies, as well as visiting a canine school, are a good help for the Norwegian Buhund, who doesn't always get along with his congeners, familiarize yourself with other different canine characters and to socialize it more in this regard. With this vivacious four-legged friend, always remember that only a physically and mentally exhausted dog can be successfully trained – otherwise he'll look for a way out for his boredom.

    Norwegian Buhund Health

    The Norwegian Buhund are considered robust and weatherproof. The breed has largely been freed from hereditary diseases to this day. Occasionally there is an increased risk of painful dysplasia of the hip joint, as well as hereditary eye diseases. You can be sure if you only buy from a breeder who performs the proper preliminary exams with the parents' animals. Responsible breeding with technical knowledge is the best way to minimize the risk of inherited diseases.

    Especially in summer, make sure your pet doesn't get too hot and changes sports activities in the early hours of the morning or late afternoon – After all, the Norwegian Buhund is designed for cooler climates.

    The optimal diet of Norwegian Buhund

    This active four-legged friend needs a proper workload for the species, as well as proper nutrition, to provide you with high-quality energy. Give your partner a grainless meal, but with a high meat content. This means that the meat must be at the top of the ingredients list. This applies to both dry and wet foods.

    The manufacturer's feeding recommendations regarding daily rations can only be guidelines that you should adapt depending on your dog's constitution and actual activities. Snacks or treats can be both tasty and healthy. For example, opt for sugar-free dental care snacks or dried meat snacks to reward your dog. With dry chewables like cow's ears, you can meet their chewing needs. Weigh your adult dog regularly to counteract any possible weight gain or loss in time. Its Norwegian Buhund should always have enough fresh water available.

    Norwegian Buhund Care

    The dense fur of the Norwegian Buhund it's weatherproof and easy to care for, but loses it relatively in abundance, so it's best to leave the corduroy pants in the closet during the weeks of change of coat. The change of fur in spring and autumn can be shortened to a few days combing daily. Out of this “hairy period”, it's enough to comb your hair once a week.

    Get your puppy used to the grooming ritual:

    This not only prepares him to be combed in adulthood, but also reinforces the link. Dirt can be brushed from dry coat, in difficult cases helps clean the area with a damp cloth. Just give your Norwegian quadruped a bath every few months to protect the dog's skin. In this case, use a mild dog shampoo. Check your pet's eyes and ears regularly and clean them with an eye or ear cleaner if necessary. Older dogs, in particular, or those who walk almost exclusively on soft soils, may need help with claw care: Dedicate yourself to the pedicure if the claws become too long to prevent them from hooking painfully.

    Where can I find a Norwegian Buhund?

    You won't find a Norwegian Buhund in all cities – you often have to travel hundreds of miles or abroad to find a representative of this breed as a new family member. However, should remain selective and only buy from breeders who belong to a club and can give information on parental animal health care openly and with appropriate evidence. Ideally, you can visit the breeders at home before making a decision, despite being away, to exchange information about their upbringing, puppies, but also his personal experience with dogs. Because a serious breeder makes sure he only puts his protégés in an environment suitable for them.

    Adult dogs are very difficult to find outside Scandinavia and the countries mentioned above. So if you're interested in an erro of this breed, you're looking for a new home, you should search the Internet on the Nordic dog club pages or contact these clubs. If required, can help you or have knowledge about dogs that are very similar to Norwegian Buhund or mixed races that could be considered. Some Nordic grazing dogs are similar in their character and exterior appearance, for example the Finnish Lapphund or the Icelandic Sheepdog. Keep your eyes open when you're looking for your partner, but also find out the history of your possible new partner to see if it is a good match for you and your environment.

    Ratings of the Norwegian Buhund

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Norwegian Buhund” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

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    Images of the Norwegian Buhund

    Videos of the Norwegian Buhund

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 237
    • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
    • Section 3: Nordic Watchdogs and Herders. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 3 Nordic Watchdogs and Herders..
    • AKC – Nordic Watchdogs and Herders.
    • ANKC – Nordic Watchdogs and Herders.
    • CKC – Nordic Watchdogs and Herders.
    • ​KC – Nordic Watchdogs and Herders.
    • NZKC – Nordic Watchdogs and Herders.
    • UKC – Nordic Watchdogs and Herders.

    Norwegian Buhund FCI Standard

    Norwegian Buhund FCI Norwegian Buhund FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Norsk Buhund, Norwegian Sheepdog (English).
      2. Berger norvégien (French).
      3. Norsk Buhund (German).
      4. Pastor norueguês (Portuguese).
      5. Buhund, Pastor de Noruega (Spanish).

    Norwegian Lundehund
    Noruega FCI 265 - Nordic Hunting Dogs

    Lundehund

    Most of these dogs live in Norway and Finland, it is believed that there are some 2000 copies around the world.

    Content

    History

    The Lundehund (Norsk Lundehund or Norwegian Puffin Dog) It is a small breed of dog of Spitz type, originally from Norway. Its name is composed of the prefix Lunde, Norwegian lundefugl (puffins), and the suffix hund, What dog. The breed was developed to hunt these birds and their eggs.

    The Norwegian Lundehund is a small, rectangular Spitz, with a wide variety of mobility in the joints of your bones, What makes him able to enter through small and intricate passages.

    They remain able to rotate the head back on the backbone and bend the hind legs to the side at an angle of 90 degrees such as the arms of humans, In addition to six toes on the feet.

    The breed has a long history. Already in 1600 It was used for hunting puffins along the Norwegian coast. Its flexibility and extra toes were ideal for hunting of birds in their places of nesting in the inaccessible cliffs and caves.

    The Lundehund video


    My lundehund

    Interest in the breed declined as new hunting methods for puffins, as for example, the use of networks…, and this ex officio contortionist, was no longer needed. Puffins were a precious object of hunting, the meat was horse and kept and feathers were used to make quilts.

    The breed was nearly extinct around World War II, when the canine distemper hit Værøy and the islands surrounding. In 1963, the population was decimated… Only six copies of Lundehund (one Værøy and 5 in Soon, to the South of Norway), These five puppies was of the same litter.

    Due to the care of the breeding with strict guidelines, currently there are approximately 1500 or 2000 copies of Lundehund around the world, of this population around 1.100 are in Norway and almost 350 in the United States.

    The official record of the Lundehund was approved by the American Kennel Club's in the miscellaneous class 1 in July of 2008, After a unanimous vote of the Board the 13 in November of 2007. The race debuted at the AKC National Championship / Eukanuba in Long Beach, California (United States), the 13 and 14 in December of 2008, being one of the most important events of the American canine world.

    The 12 in February of 2010, The American Kennel Club Board of Directors voted to accept the Lundehund in the AKC Source Book and became part of it on 1 in December of 2010. The 1 in January of 2011, It became a part of the "non-Sports Group".

    For the American Kennel Club and Canadian Kennel Club, the non-sports group is a diverse classification that comprises a variety of robust dogs with different personalities and appearances as the Chow Chow , and the Keeshond, among others. Covered by the non-sporting group breeds, It is very diverse in terms of appearance, size, layer, personality and, in general.

    According to the classification of the CRF is located in the Group 5 Dogs type Spitz and primitive type. Section 2 Nordic Hunting Dogs.

    Physical characteristics

    The Lundehund medium in size looks a bit like a fox and is, also because it is one of the rare races, sometimes mistaken for a mestizo, a Nordic mongrel. On the contrary, is very specialized: The Lundehund has been bred for hunting puffins, a kind of bird that breeds in burrows. This brings with it some unique physical characteristics: your shoulder joints are more flexible, allowing you to rotate your front legs 90 ° to the side. In addition, this dog can close his pointed, upright ears, allowing you to dive better.

    The most striking features are undoubtedly the six toes of each foot and the up to eight pads, which give the ancient cliff hunter immense security. Some of these dogs also lack molars, which facilitated the transport of the captured birds without damaging them.

    The Norwegian Lundehund It has a height at the withers of up to 38 cm and weighs 7 kg. sporty and light. The dense coat is short and red to fawn, with black hair tips in places. have a smooth undercoat, very fine and a rough top coat.

    Character and skills

    The Norwegian Lundehund is a four legged friend, simple and skillful, but he has a lot of energy and wants to live it. Due to its independent nature – the Lundehund was left to fend during the hunt – always kept his own head and thus will never fully subordinate himself. Who respects this, win with him Lundehund an easy to train and loyal friend for life.

    Basically the breed is considered quite shy, so a close relationship with its owner is especially important – this is how your Lundehund gain security. Towards strangers he is usually reserved – it is also considered to be alert. He usually gets along well with other dogs. The Lundehund not a typical hunting dog, but it is also wonderfully suitable as a companion dog.

    The education of the Norwegian Lundehund

    This is a breed of dog with a stubborn and stubborn character, they are still easy to train and learn the basic commands with great motivation.

    Although the breed belongs to hunting dogs, the Lundehund can accompany you, with some effort in their education, on your nature walks without the need for a leash, since it is not an elusive dog, nor a traditional prey tracker. A bigger challenge is getting our dogs to stop barking: Lundehund, like all nordic dogs, announce aloud all the supposedly interesting things in their environment – and that in part is quite persistent. So patience is absolutely necessary when training a Lundehund. Already in puppyhood, be sure to keep this in mind when training your dog. Play lessons for puppies, as well as attending a dog school, have a positive effect on Lundehund – here you can not only socialize it more with other four legged friends, but you will surely also get some tips and tricks for the education of this dog.

    Health: lundehund syndrome

    Since the population dates back to only five dogs, Controlled breeding of the breed made a fresh start in the decade of 1960, with what the Lundehund has a very small gene pool. One of the five founding dogs developed stomach and intestinal symptoms at the age of about three years, that have spread even further among the descendants. Today, this is known as the Lundehund syndrome: a chronic and inflammatory bowel disease that is associated with increased loss of protein through the intestines. About half of the population is affected by it, although to varying degrees. A genetic test can be used to determine if a dog intended for breeding is a carrier, so that the risk of Lundehund syndrome can be reduced. There is no cure for this disease, only symptoms can be relieved. While some dogs are barely limited by the disease and have long symptom-free phases, other affected quadrupeds have a more severe course and eventually lead to death.

    Before deciding to acquire a representative of this breed, must be informed in detail about the Lundehund syndrome and the corresponding genetic test and its meaning. The Nordic Dog Clubs can also provide you with more information on this.. The healthy ones Norwegian Lundehund are, for the rest, very robust and can reach an age of about 14 years.

    Norwegian Lundehund care

    The coat of this Norwegian Coastal Dog is insensitive to weather conditions and requires little grooming. However, the more you brush, less hair is distributed in your home – especially during coat change a daily brushing may make sense, because the Lundehund then lose a lot of hair. In all other respects, care is quite simple: dirt brushes better when dry. By the way, the Norwegian Lundehund It is one of the few dogs that really enjoys grooming. If you support them with the brush, you are also doing something for their bonding.

    Check the ears and eyes regularly and clean them with special ear and eye cleaners if necessary. If the eyes get wet, what happens in many dogs due to narrow tear ducts, just clean and dry them gently once a day with clear water. Some dog owners opt for daily dental care in the form of toothbrushing with dog toothpaste and toothbrush.. If you already introduce your puppy to this ritual, is an optimal prevention against tartar and associated secondary diseases.

    Activities with the Norwegian Lundehund

    Long walks in nature, enjoying the wind and the weather are the base of activity of this Norwegian breed. In addition, most of these dogs love to swim. Make your partner happy and give him the opportunity to do it! But you should also encourage and challenge their brain and skills. There is a wide range of joint activity possibilities at your disposal: Dog lovers can enjoy almost all types of sports with dogs, with the exception of sports with training dogs. Due to his great independence you should not expect unconditional obedience from him, but a relaxed approach to the respective human-animal hobby jointly. Try together with your animal companion which sport you like the most!

    Does a Norwegian Lundehund suit me?

    A Norwegian Lundehund fits well in a sporty family, where at least one family member already has experience with dogs. Learn easily and with pleasure, but for education you still need a certain knowledge and consistency. In addition, it is important to use the dog to its full potential – the small Lundehund not a couch dog, needs a lot of outdoor exercise and a lot of time.

    He is usually very fond of children and can also make friends with cats, especially if you met them as a puppy. This dog can also live in a medium-sized apartment, but of course also enjoy a garden (leak proof). It is important to direct the joy of the breed's barking in a controlled manner.

    Before moving, make sure no one in your household has an allergy to animal hair and consider whether you can and want to take the dog on vacation – many hotels today host four-legged friends – or how you organize care. Although the Lundehund it's more like a small dog, can be quite expensive in terms of regular costs: Apart from a high quality diet with a high content of fish, this includes taxes and dog insurance, as well as visits to the vet. In addition, is, of course, the not inconsiderable purchase price of this rare four-legged friend – with possible travel expenses – and if necessary the basic equipment.

    Where can I find my Norwegian Lundehund?

    First of all: A Norwegian Lundehund It's very weird. In total, there are some 1.300 specimens around the world. Therefore, you may very well have to wait a long time and travel many miles to get hold of such a rare dog. The majority of the Lundehunds they live in norway. Check with a Norwegian dog club in your country to find out how to contact the breeders of the Norwegian Lundehund. Ask your potential dog breeder about the Lundehund syndrome and the diet of the breed.

    His young Lundehund will move in with you at the earliest at the age of eight weeks – if you come from a European country, you will normally need a valid rabies vaccine for the trip in addition to the necessary papers. It is essential that you remember booster shots and also talk to your vet about regular deworming of your four-legged friend.

    It is extremely unlikely to find an adult dog, especially outside of norway. So if you are looking for a four legged adult friend, it is advisable to contact a Nordic dog club. There are also often wonderful mongrel dogs looking for a new home., value the adoption of one of them.

    We wish you much joy with your extraordinary Norwegian Lundehund!

    Ratings of the Norwegian Lundehund

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Norwegian Lundehund” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    adaptation ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images of the Norwegian Lundehund

    photos:

    1 – Lundehund noruego by http://www.petsadviser.com/
    2 – Lundehund noruego by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/754827
    3 – Lundehund noruego by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/880994
    4 – Norwegian puffin town Andrva / CC BY-SA
    5 – Lundehund noruego by https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lundehund.jpg
    6 – The Norwegian Lundehund “With” looking out at the ocean on the north side of the island Værøy in Northern Norway. The island on the top, in the middle, is “The mosque”, the island in the top left is “Mosques” by ZorroIII / CC BY-SA

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 265
    • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
    • Section 2: Nordic Hunting Dogs. With working trial only for the Nordic countries (Sweden, Norway,
      Finland).
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 2 Nordic Hunting Dogs.
    • AKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs.
    • CKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs.
    • UKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs.

    Norwegian Lundehund breed FCI standard

    Norwegian Lundehund FCI Norwegian Lundehund FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Norsk Lundehund, lundehund, Norwegian Puffin Dog (English).
      2. lundehund (French).
      3. Norsk Lundehund (German).
      4. Cão de papagaio-do-mar (Portuguese).
      5. Perro frailecillo, Lundehund (Spanish).

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound
    Noruega FCI 242 - Nordic Hunting Dogs

    Cazador de Alces Noruego

    Content

    History

    National dog of Norway

    The roots of this Norwegian national dog go back a long way: already the findings of the Stone Age give evidence of a very similar quadruped. Some cynologists suspect that the current appearance of the breed is very close to that of the first western European domestic dogs. In scandinavia, the Gray Norwegian Elkhound they were used mainly to hunt elk, but also bears, Hence its name.

    For a long time the breed was mainly bred in Sweden, where was he called “gray dog”. But since 1981 Norway has had the sponsorship: The breed got its current name, the “gray dog” was formally removed as a race in this context.

    In total there are three Moose Hunter dogs: Besides of Gray Norwegian Elkhound, are the Black Norwegian Elkhound and the Jämthund Sueco. Norwegian gray is the most common: Although rarely seen outside of Scandinavia, is very popular in its home country and is considered the national dog there.

    Physical characteristics

    The dog Gray Norwegian Elkhound has a very classic look, similar to the first dogs domesticated by humans in Western Europe. The waterproof coat in typical shades of gray, black and white already gives an indication of the Nordic origin of this dog Moose Hunter. But it also has the effect that some laymen at first glance consider it a mixed race with parts of the Huskys. With a maximum height of 52 cm at the withers and a body weight of about 24 kg with compact structure, the Gray Norwegian Elkhound belongs to the medium-sized breeds and is larger than the Black Norwegian Elkhound. The pointy ears are erect and the tail is ideally rolled slightly over the back..

    Character and skills

    The Gray Norwegian Elkhound they are intelligent animal companions with their own personalities. So if you are looking for a four-legged friend who is willing to subordinate himself, you are wrong with this proud fellow. The breed is considered brave, smart and friendly. To the Gray Norwegian Elkhound they usually like to bark, make sure to monitor it since they are puppies. Many Gray Norwegian Elkhound they are therefore very suitable as watchdogs, because they are alerted by strangers – However, it is quite possible that this human-friendly breed will be caressed by a stranger. In an emergency, However, loyal four-legged friends are always ready to defend their loved ones. The Gray Norwegian Elkhound can be well kept as a family dog – whenever I exercise a lot outside. He gets along very well with children and shows his playful side, especially when interacting with them.

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound Training

    Although this breed does not have a submissive nature, is considered easy to create. An advantage is that this friendly and social dog does not tend to dominate or attack. In any case, it is important to have a sufficient workload, because a boring Gray Norwegian Elkhound seek their occupation independently, and this is usually not to the liking of their owners. In addition, make sure that from the age of the puppy you work for a good recovery of the hunting dog. You should also take into account the joy of barking when you train. Attending a dog training school can support you and your quadruped in joint learning and also reinforces their social streak in handling their peers..

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound Health

    These Norwegian hunters they are considered very robust and hardly prone to genetic diseases. There is a slight predisposition to the eye disease Progressive Retinal Atrophy (ARP) and hip dysplasia – before buying a puppy, Please, talk to the breeder in question, who will be happy to inform you about sanitary precautions for your farm animals. Exercising and eating a balanced diet is the best way to keep your puppy's joints in shape during old age.. Make sure this dog always has a cool place to stay in summer – the breed tolerates cold well, but is considered to be heat sensitive. The Gray Norwegian Elkhound can reach an age of up to 16 years, some even more.

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound Nutrition

    Like every dog, the Gray Norwegian Elkhound you need a balanced diet that is high in meat. So make sure to feed a food where meat is at the top of its intake, regardless of whether you choose wet or dry food. The Gray Norwegian Elkhound tend to gain weight quickly, so you should always watch your daily ration and include treats. Manufacturer's instructions are only a rough guide, as metabolism and exercise change your dog's energy needs. So check your partner's weight regularly so that you can counter if he gains or loses weight. If you want to reward your dog, use high-quality sugar-free snacks or cereals. Chunks of freeze-dried meat for dogs are a good example. Dry chews meet your partner's chewing needs. Make sure your four-legged friend always has enough drinking water at his disposal.

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound Care

    This dog's coat consists of a longer top coat and a dense undercoat.. It is very weather resistant and easy to brush. However, the Gray Norwegian Elkhound you also lose a relatively large amount of hair, especially during coat change twice a year. During this time, you should brush him daily to stop the flood of hair in your home and rid the dog of dead hair. Especially with older animals or if your dog walks mainly on the soft forest floor, you may need to trim the claws regularly. This will prevent your Gray Norwegian Elkhound get hurt if you get stuck with them. If you are not sure, ask your vet to show you how to trim them during checkups – you can usually do the pedicure yourself with special pliers. When brushing your dog's ears, also check that they are not dirty and use a special ear cleaner for dogs if necessary. You can effectively prevent tartar and its consequences by brushing your dog's teeth every day along with a dog toothbrush and an animal-friendly toothpaste.. If you are considering this, you should get your puppy used to the ritual around its shiny little teeth.

    Is A Gray Norwegian Elkhound Right For Me?

    The Gray Norwegian Elkhound still well suited to hunters, but he can also be a happy family dog ​​if he has enough outdoor activity. Not a dog for the city. A fenced garden would be an ideal addition to your home. This breed is not made for living in a small apartment.. You should already have experience with dogs, because although the Gray Norwegian Elkhound be smart and like to learn, will not accept instructions that seem crazy. Here you need the right mix of knowledge and sensitivity. Can get along with cats, but he should have already met them as potential companions at puppy age.

    Like any other four legged friend, keeping this dog requires a not inconsiderable amount of time: Are you ready to spend a few hours outside with your partner every day and in any weather? In addition, estimate costs in advance: In addition to the purchase price and, if required, the basic equipment, there are regular expenses for vet visits, high quality food, as well as the tax and insurance of the dog.

    Where can I buy a Gray Norwegian Elkhound?

    If you are looking for a Gray Norwegian Elkhound outside scandinavia, you must have a little patience. So it makes sense to contact Nordic dog clubs directly, that can help you, for example, to make contacts abroad. Because especially in the far north there are naturally more specimens. In scandinavia, a few 2.000 puppies of the breed see the light of day every year.

    The probability of finding a Gray Norwegian Elkhound adult in animal shelters is extremely low outside of Scandinavia. So, even if you prefer to give an old animal a new home, contact the Nordic dog clubs in your country. The hybrids of the protectors are also possibly questioned, that they will be glad of a common coexistence with you.

    We wish you much joy with your friendly companion from the far north!!

    Ratings of the Gray Norwegian Elkhound

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Gray Norwegian Elkhound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    adaptation ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images of the Gray Norwegian Elkhound

    Photos:

    1 – Norwegian Elk Hunter gray by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/706371
    2 – Norwegian Elk Hunter gray by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/869691
    3 – Norwegian Elk Hunter gray by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/1336997
    4 – Norvin Son of Storm owned by Nichola Herron. Photo by sannse at the City of Birmingham Championship Dog Show, 29th August 2003 by True / CC BY-SA
    5 – Norwegian Elk Hunter gray by https://pxhere.com/no/photo/1233791
    6 – Norwegian Elk Hunter gray by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/c%C3%A9sped-mam%C3%ADfero-animales-naturaleza-3259673/

    Gray Norwegian Elkhound Videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 242
    • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
    • Section 2: Nordic Hunting Dogs. With working trial only for the Nordic countries (Sweden, Norway, Finland).
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 2 Nordic Hunting Dogs.
    • AKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • ANKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • CKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • ​KC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • NZKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • UKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs

    FCI Gray Norwegian Elkhound breed standard

    FCI Gray Norwegian Elkhound FCI Gray Norwegian Elkhound

    Alternative names:

      1. Norsk elghund, Grå norsk elghund, Gray Norwegian Elkhound, Small, Grey Elk Dog, Norwegian Moose Dog, Harmaa norjanhirvikoira (English).
      2. Norwegian Elkhound (French).
      3. Norwegischer Elchhund grau (German).
      4. Elkhound, Norueguês cinza (Portuguese).
      5. Norsk elghund, Norsk elghund grå, Cazador de alces noruego gris, Gray Norwegian elkhound, Small grey elk dog, Norwegian moose dog (Spanish).

    Newfoundland
    Canadá FCI 50 - Molossoid - Mountain

    Terranova

    The Newfoundland radiates majestic serenity.

    Content

    The Newfoundland was born on the east coast of Canada. The great island of Newfoundland, which is in front of Canada, gave him his name. The fact that it descends from the dogs of the Vikings of pre-Columbian times or from the dogs of the Indians is a legend that has not been proven until now.. Its relationship with the molossi can be seen but also proved in the genetic map of the Heidi G dog breeds. Parker.

    Probably the ancestors of the Newfoundlands came with the first settlers as molossi from Europe. He proved to be an assistant to seal fishers and hunters and was occasionally helpful when hunting bears and big game on land. Carried loads and served as a sled dog with dead game. Working with fishermen in the rough North Atlantic was extremely demanding. The Newfoundland had to think, had to do heavy work on the networks. The Newfoundland saved the lives of the castaways over and over again. In this way he developed the peculiarities of his character and physique that allowed him to face the harsh weather conditions on land and the dangers of the sea as a water dog and rescue.

    With the cod ships he came to England over and over again as early as the 18th century. Here he became famous from the start due to his impressive achievements. Was not up 1886 that the Club of Newfoundland in England, and soon after, in 1893, The club of Newfoundland for the Continent, now called the “German Club of Newfoundland“. Even today, Newfoundland keep working as a water rescue dog.

    Did You Know?

    A Newfoundland named Rigel sank with the Titanic and swam alongside a lifeboat for three hours in the icy water, apparently looking for its owner, that had sunk with the ship. People in the lifeboat were almost run over by the steamship Carpathia because the crew could not hear their faint screams, but Rigel's bark was noticed and the people and the dog were saved.

    Physical characteristics

    The Newfoundland is a big dog. According to the standard, adult males must weigh an average of 68 kg and females 54 kg. It is a very strong dog, very muscular and with long dense hair. Her coat is water repellent. It has a strong and soft undercoat, which makes it seem even more bulky. This shouldn't tempt you to raise him like a teddy bear. Because the real Newfoundland combines enormous power with agility, sportiness and impressive skills in the water. Its exterior does not deceive its interior. Master the challenges with committed calm. The hair on your head, muzzle and ears is short and thin. The front and rear legs are covered in fur. The tail is completely covered in long thick hair. The black, brown and black and white are allowed as coat colors.

    Character and skills

    Even the mere appearance of Newfoundland has a relaxing and calming effect, at least for people who are not usually afraid of dogs. The Newfoundland radiates majestic serenity. Its character is as stable as it appears on the outside. It has a friendly and kind nature. But that must not be misleading: He knows very well how to distinguish between friend and enemy, which can be unequivocally underlined by his calm but more determined appearance. If required, defends his family with all his might without hesitation. Barking is not necessary for it to be heard.

    He is extremely friendly with his friends. The Newfoundland he is very close to his family and loves children more than anything. He wants education and he absolutely needs it. Because like a powerful big dog it is always stronger than the other end of the leash.. Sometimes he has a hard head, but after a friendly request from his master or caretaker he does everything, as long as it's well connected. The Newfoundland impresses by the unity of two apparently irreconcilable poles: on the one hand it radiates calm and tranquility, on the other hand it can save people from drowning in a short time in the most difficult conditions. Usually, the Newfoundlands are real water rats. They are excellent swimmers, which they are happy to proudly demonstrate.

    The Newfoundland not a dog for the city or a flat. He likes long walks, but water is the best for him. Due to its strength and the high technical demands of its maintenance, not suitable for beginners, although it can be trained and managed well. It is a great family dog. But he also likes to sleep outside, even with wind and rain. What you don't need is running or doing activities in the heat.

    The Newfoundland It is a natural lifeguard and can be a good helper for parents who have a pool or enjoy taking children to the lake or ocean, although you should never be solely responsible for your safety.

    Newfoundland Education

    The Newfoundland can be educated very well. It is intelligent, interested and quickly understand what you are allowed to do and what you are not. Sometimes it's a little slow, but a little motivated, he is very cooperative and strives to make his master and lady happy. The puppy should already show itself clearly and without exception where the hammer hangs. There should be no doubt about the orientation of your humans, as well as about the intimate relationship and respect for him.

    Always keep in mind that this dog is physically the strongest and that leadership only works through unquestioning recognition of the role of human leadership.. With praise and results, basically you can achieve everything with it. On the basis of a good education you can train him very well Newfoundland. Many terranovas they are used successfully as guide dogs for the blind and especially as rescue dogs in the water, but also on land. For this you can do work tests with water in the clubs.

    Caring for a Newfoundland

    Maintain and care for the Newfoundland it is very expensive. The dense and weather resistant coat should be brushed every day with a special brush. Should not be sheared or trimmed. Due to its constitution and dense coat, do not tolerate heat well.

    Nutrition / Food

    Like all large dogs, Newfoundland need a lot of food. Especially in the growth phase you need professional nutritional planning.

    Newfoundland life expectancy

    Life expectancy is between 8 and 12 years. That depends a lot on the upbringing. Thin and light dogs tend to age more than heavy, plump dogs.

    Newfoundland Health

    How could it be predicted, given its large size, the Newfoundland can suffer a series of joint and structural problems. It is important that young and growing dogs are kept lean and are not allowed to exercise too hard or eat too much, since this will cause injuries and problems that can be paralyzing in the future. In fact, all the Newfoundland they need to stay slim, since obesity increases the chances of them developing structural problems and makes them more painful when they occur.

    One such structural problem is genetic hip deformation known as hip dysplasia.. The head of the femur does not fit well into the hip socket; with the time, the joint cartilage wears out and the underlying bone is damaged. Serious arthritis occurs that usually affects very young dogs. In some cases, expensive surgery is required, including total hip replacement surgery. If not treated, the dog will suffer pain and a poor quality of life. Elbow dysplasia is another inherited joint problem, resulting from abnormal elbow formation.

    The possibility that a Newfoundland develop dysplasia of the hip or elbow just because the parents are free of the disease, although it reduces the possibilities. And while a puppy's bones keep growing, sometimes it can be difficult to confirm a diagnosis, depending on the tests performed and the severity of the condition.

    To each Newfoundland X-rays should be taken of your dog's hips and elbows at two years of age, regardless of whether or not it shows symptoms of lameness or stiffness. For dogs that show lameness before that age (namely, during the puppy stage), diagnostic tests should be performed promptly.

    The Newfoundlands are at risk of heart disease, including dilated cardiomyopathy and subaortic stenosis (SAS). There is currently no genetic test for SAS, who has a complex inheritance, making it difficult to develop a test. Breeders must not breed Newfoundland with no SAS sign and puppies should be examined by a certified veterinary cardiologist.

    Cystinuria is a genetic kidney defect that leads to the formation of stones in the bladder that are very difficult to manage with diet or medication, and which often requires surgery both to remove the stones from the bladder and to repair urinary obstructions.. There may be no early signs that the dog is forming cystine stones, which can create a life-threatening emergency if they cause an obstruction. Fortunately, there is a genetic test for cystinuria. Given the availability of the genetic test, no need for a breeder to produce a dog with the disorder

    Not all of these conditions are detectable on a growing puppy, and it can be difficult to predict whether an animal will be free from these diseases, so a reputable breeder must be found who is committed to raising the healthiest animals possible. Must be able to produce an independent certification that the parents of the dog (and grandparents, etc.) They have been examined to detect these defects and considered healthy for breeding. That's where they enter medical records.

    Not all visits by Newfoundland to the vet they are due to a genetic problem. It is known that the Newfoundland experience cruciate ligament rupture. They are also among the deep-breasted breeds predisposed to bloating., a condition in which the stomach dilates with gas and can twist on itself (called gastric torsion), cutting off blood flow. Swelling and torsion appear very suddenly, and a dog that was fine a minute can die a few hours later. Watch for symptoms like restlessness and rhythm, la baba, the paleness of the gums, lip licking, unsuccessful attempt to vomit and signs of pain. Swelling requires immediate veterinary intervention, and surgery is necessary in many cases. Unfortunately, dogs that have swollen can do it again, so most vets offer a procedure known as gastropexy or “turn of the stomach”, which anchors the stomach to the body wall to help prevent future twisting. This procedure can also be done as a preventive measure.

    Buy a Newfoundland

    You should only purchase a puppy locally from a breeder who is affiliated with the FCI. It should come from a baby, where dogs are rather sporty, thin and not too fat and “beary”. A puppy in the kennel is usually sold at a price between 1500 and 2000 EUR.

    Newfoundland Assessments

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Newfoundland” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    adaptation ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Newfoundland images

    Photos:

    1 – Terranova by Maria Amaro Jiménez / CC BY-SA
    2 – Terranova by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/terranova-perro-negro-609531/
    3 – Terranova by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/112392
    4 – Terranova by https://www.publicdomainpictures.net/es/view-image.php?image=197196&picture=terranova-perro-lindo-del-perrito
    5 – Terranova by https://www.pxfuel.com/es/free-photo-obraa
    6 – Terranova by https://www.pxfuel.com/es/free-photo-jttkx

    Newfoundland Videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 50
    • Group 2: Pinscher and Schnauzer- Molossoid breeds – Swiss Mountain and Cattle Dogs.
    • Section 2.2: Molossian, Mountain type. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Pinscher and Schnauzer-Molossoid type dogs – Swiss Mountain Dogs and Cattledogs. Section 2.2 Molossoid, mountain type.
    • AKC – Dogs working
    • ANKC – Group 6 (utility dogs)
    • CKC – Group 3
    • ​KC – Working dogs
    • NZKC – Utility dog
    • UKC – Guard dog

    Newfoundland breed FCI standard

     NEWFOUNDLAND FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Newfs, Newfies (English).
      2. Retriever de Terre-Neuve, Chien de Terre-neuve (French).
      3. Newfoundland (German).
      4. Cão terra-nova (Portuguese).
      5. Perro de Terranova (Spanish).

    Norfolk Terrier
    Inglaterra FCI 272 . Small sized Terriers.

    Norfolk Terrier

    The Norfolk Terrier is lively, cheerful and adapts both the countryside and the city.

    Content

    History

    The Norfolk Terrier he is a very small terrier, low rise. Until 1964 formed a dog breed along with the Norwich Terrier. Both differ only in the shape of their ears. While the Norfolk Terrier has slanted ears, the Norwich Terrier has standing ears. In the past these dogs were raised together and it was always a surprise that puppies had ears. Because the judges at the shows at least felt they preferred the dogs with droopy ears, they wanted to have their ears drooping or leaning in a class of their own. However, either standing or with ears hanging, they are wonderful terriers, vivacious little ones you can enjoy. They come from the Middle East of England. There these little terriers served the people for many years as watchdogs and hunters at home and at court..

    Keeping rats and mice, chasing away a marten or fox that wanted to feed on chickens or pigeons at night, proved helpful helpers at home and in court. However, the small Norfolk Terrier was not, like many other somewhat larger terriers, used for active fox hunting, the marten and the otter. Didn't have to go in pursuit of these predators. It would not have lacked courage and determination. The Terriers de Norwich and Norfolk they were useful as a cat, but much more defensive and effective, especially when it came to fighting rats. They also had the added value of being watchdogs and danger alarms and were better able to cope with harsh, wet and cold weather conditions of central england.

    So these little terriers were already widespread in the cities centuries ago. As a result, were raised solely for their suitability for their tasks. Either with upturned or drooping ears, it did not matter. As their tasks drifted away from rats to accompany the human psyche, the subtleties of his outward appearance also came into play. One separated the terrier into two breeds. In 1954, both were officially recognized by the FCI under the name of Norwich Terrier. The tipped-ear variant was recognized as a separate breed in 1962.

    Physical characteristics

    It is a small dog, clever, short limb, Compact and robust; It has short back and its structure and strong bones.

    Norfolk Terrier has a hair double layer: a hard top layer, ribbed and a warm and soft layer.

    Ideally, is due comb the hair once a week to remove the loose hairs, dead and prevent mat.

    It´s one of the smaller Terrier dogs, a “Demon” for its size. Affectionate but not quarrelsome, robust Constitution.

    The tail amputation is optional. Medium amputation, implemented on a level with the dorsal and carried erect line. Tail of moderate size to give the dog an overall balance, thick at the base and is tuned toward the tip, as straight as possible, happily held, but not in an excessive manner.

    Its movement is natural, low and high thrust. Previous members directed straight forward from the shoulders. A good angulation of the hindlimbs provides you with a great driving force.

    The Member subsequent move in line with the previous, with free movements from the hips, and they must bend well at the knees and hocks. Level topline.

    The hair It hard, rough texture (wire), straight and well attached to the body. Long and rough in the neck and shoulders.

    The hair is short and smooth on the head and ears, with the exception of a few light eyebrows and mustache.

    With regard to the color, We find all the shades of reddish, wheat, black and Tan or grey. Stains or white markings are undesirable, but allowed.

    The height ideal to the cross is between 25 and 26 cm..

    Character and skills

    Norfolk Terrier should not be aggressive despite being able to defend itself if necessary. Them, along with Norwich Terrier and the Border Terrier, has the softer temperament of the Terrier group.

    Like fellow, they love people and children and they are good pets. His level of activity is generally a reflection that the pace of its environment.

    This breed should not stay or live outside, that thrive with human contact. In general, Norfolk Terrier does not generally dig, but, like any dog, It cavará by boredom when stays alone for too long.

    Usually, living well with other pets when introduced as a dog. In the open air, they are natural hunters and have a strong instinct for prey to small bugs.

    The Norfolk Terrier is a dog self-confident, they are elegant, they are erect tail and head. A Norfolk Terrier who is shy or to carry the tail between the legs is atypical.

    The typical temperament of Norfolk Terrier is happy, cheerful and confident. The greater punishment would be ignored by the family.

    Norfolk Terrier were bred as barn dogs to rid the stables of animal pests. Today, they are household companions and must have a pleasant willingness to live with the people.

    The life expectancy of a Norfolk Terrier is of 12 a 15 years.

    Comments

    Today, the demand for Norfolk Terrier is much more to offer

    They are dogs that tend to have small litters and responsible breeders developed the breed, they only breed healthy dogs who are good temperament, lineage, good pedigree and that better reflect the standard of the breed.

    Norfolk Terrier Education

    The education of this breed is an often underrated chapter.. Although the already little dog looks so cute, especially in his first months of life, he is a true terrier very sure of himself. And such a terrier wants to be educated and guided. Therefore, the Norfolk Terrier requires consequences in education from puppy age. Although small, dreams like most terriers in some corner of his brain of assuming leadership of the herd. Deep down he feels loose like a mastiff or great dane. So you just have to take your education seriously. In all other respects, there is no problem. He wants and needs the guidance of his master or mistress and is a docile companion, friendly and sociable, that always brings a smile to our faces.

    Norfolk Terrier Health and Care

    The coat should be regularly groomed. The Norfolk does not know a change of coat. Two or three times a year dead hair should be trimmed, namely, ripped – but with moderation.

    The small Norfolk Terrier it is a fairly robust breed of dog.

    Nutrition / Food

    Norfolk Terrier nutrition has no problems.

    Norfolk Terrier life expectancy

    The Norfolk Terrier they tend to have robust health and an average life expectancy of 15 years and more.

    Buy a Norfolk Terrier

    The best way to buy your puppy Norfolk is to buy it locally from an FCI member breeder or take a look at the shelter. A dog of this breed costs around 1.000 EUR.

    Norfolk Terrier Reviews

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Norfolk Terrier” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    adaptation ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    1.0 rating
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Norfolk Terrier pictures

    Norfolk Terrier Videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 272
    • Group 3: Terriers.
    • Section 2: Small-sized Terriers. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Terriers 2 Small sized Terriers.
    • AKC – Terriers
    • ANKC – Terriers
    • CKC – Terriers
    • ​KC – Terriers
    • NZKC – Terriers
    • UKC – Terriers

    Norfolk Terrier breed FCI standard

    NORFOLK TERRIER FCI NORFOLK TERRIER FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Norfolk (English).
      2. Norfolk (French).
      3. Norfolk (German).
      4. Norfolk (Portuguese).
      5. Terrier de Norfolk (Spanish).

    Norwich Terrier
    Inglaterra FCI 72 . Small sized Terriers.

    Norwich Terrier

    The Norwich Terrier, has lively character, joyful, affectionate and is curious by nature.

    Content

    History

    One of the reasons there are so many Terrier breeds is because many were created to measure for a given area or population.. The Norwich comes from the East Anglia of England, Cambridge University Headquarters. Like college students of any age, Cambridge students of the decade 1880 they thought it was a lot of fun betting on sporting events, including your dogs' mouseing skills. Los terrier, including those in yorkshire and ireland, were bred to develop small red or black and tan dogs with a playful spirit. They were known as Terriers Trumpington.

    A Trumpington named Rags, he was a stable dog near the city of Norwich, He had such a reputation as a buzzard that he had a profound influence on what would become known as Norwich Terrier. Rags and their descendants were crossed with other Terriers, including a small Staffordshire Terrier, and became known for a new skill: get foxes out of their burrows.

    From the 19th century there are documented sources that confirm the breeding of the Norwich Terrier. However, at that time there was also the Norfolk Terrier, which is closely related to the Norwich Terrier. Back then it was considered the same race, today they differ in insignificant points. Since the decade of 1960 the two races have been handled differently.

    A particularly different trait is the ears, in the Norwich Terrier tend to be more upright, While in the Norfolk Terrier they are slightly bent. After many years of upbringing, you can see some character differences. The Norwich Terrier, for example, is considered more affectionate than the Norfolk Terrier. At that time animals were especially used as rat catchers and were often used on farms.

    Physical characteristics

    It is one the smaller Terrier its height is maximum 25 cm the cross and his weight is between 5 and 5.5 kg.

    Recently on United States, There has been a great fraud with these dogs, they sold fake Norwich Terrier with pedigree, by Internet.

    Are difficult to raise because their births tend to be by caesarean section. His cloak is twofold and can be red, Red wheat, Black fire or salt and pepper (grey).

    Norwich Terrier has a fur two layers, a foreign finish hard, rough and a warm and soft layer, attached to the skin.

    Ideally, styling it once a week to remove the loose hairs killed.

    As a minimum, the hair should be stripped once in the fall and once in the spring.

    Comments

    The cut or Court it adversely affects the appearance of the natural colors of the layer and texture.

    Character and skills

    The Norwich Terrier, they have a character lively, joyful, loving and they are curious by nature.

    One advantage is that they are not anti-social dogs or they tend to show aggressiveness.

    They were originally bred to hunt animals burrow but today they have become excellent pets.

    These small but sturdy dog, brave, Smart and very loving. They were bred for chasing varmints and accompanied their owners farmers on horseback. A good daily walk is therefore, the minimum necessary to meet the requirements of Office, and give a healthy lifestyle.

    They are sensitive to the scolding, as the 100% Terrier. Much like family life, and very little loneliness. It is not meaningless ladrador, But if you notice something strange, It will be.

    It is a dog that She loves children. They adapt perfectly to other pets.

    The life expectancy the Norwich Terrier is 12 a 16 years.

    Norwich Terrier Evaluations

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Norwich Terrier” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    adaptation ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Norwich Terrier Images

    Norwich Terrier Videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group 3: Terriers.
    • Section 2: Small-sized Terriers. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Terriers 2 Small sized Terriers.
    • AKC – Terriers
    • ANKC – Terriers
    • CKC – Terriers
    • ​KC – Terriers
    • NZKC – Terriers
    • UKC – Terriers

    Norwich Terrier breed FCI standard

    NORWICH TERRIER FCI NORWICH TERRIER FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Norwich (English).
      2. Norwich (French).
      3. Norwich (German).
      4. Norwich (Portuguese).
      5. Terrier de Norwich (Spanish).

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