Emma's Parakeet
Pyrrhura emma

Emma's Parakeet

Description:

23 cm.. length.

Emma's Parakeet

The Emma's Parakeet (Pyrrhura emma) is a bird, in its most, green, with blue in the wings, reddish-brown in rump, on tail and in the back; Scaled plumage chest yellowish color on a gray background olive; wings with red shoulder, inconspicuous.

The face red plum, while the pileum It is brown and gray forecrown blue. Abdomen with dark red stain, tail with green base, edge red and below all red.

Eye ring grey, cheeks red with white spot on ears. Bill Dark. It has no sexual dimorphism.

  • Sound of the Emma's Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Cotorra of Emma.mp3]
Habitat:

They can be seen in hill forests in the coastal mountain range in Venezuela, in moist forests and edges as well as in adjacent clear with scattered trees and groves (pit et to the., 1997).

Usually it moves in flocks, on quick flights up 25 specimens, before landing in the canopy.

Reproduction:

There is insufficient information regarding reproduction and food. Probably the breeding season between May and July. Period of incubation: 24-25 days.

Food:

They have been observed eating flowers of Ochroma and nectar (Hilty 2003).

Distribution:

Tamaño de su área de distribución (reproducción/residente): 88.300 km2

The Emma's Parakeet inhabits forested areas of the northern coastal range Venezuela, from Yacacuy and Carabobo until Miranda, and disjuntamente from Anzoátegui to Sucre and northern part of Monagas (Del Hoyo et al., 1997, Juniper and Parr 1998, Hilty 2003, Forshaw 2006).

It is mainly found at altitudes 250-1.700 m, but you can see at sea level in eastern Sucre (Hilty 2003), where it is quite common (Hilty 2003, P. Boesman in a bit., 2006). Its distribution within this range is complex and disjoint, found especially in mountainous terrain at lower elevations (Hilty 2003).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the population

Apparently, the population size of this species has not been quantified.

Justification of trend

The capture for trade and changes in land use may be causing a decrease in population of this species, although the trend has not been quantified, and none of these is considered serious threats to this species today(CJ Sharpe a slightly. 2014).

Conservation Actions Underway

They live in several national parks (P. Boesman in a bit., 2006), with a population “substantial” in the Guatopo National Park, Miranda (Juniper and Parr 1998, Hilty 2003).

Conservation Actions Proposed

Continue to monitor this species in the field and in trade.

Strengthen the network of protected areas within the range of this species.

In captivity:

Very rare in captivity. Very intelligent, active and playful. They are very aggressive with other species. Price per couple: 400 EUR.

Alternative names:


- Emma's Parakeet, Emma's Parakeet (incl. auricularis), Painted Parakeet (Venezuelan), Venezuelan Parakeet (inglés).
- Conure d'Emma, Conure emma, Conure emma (incl. auricularis) (francés).
- Emmasittich (alemán).
- Emma's Parakeet (portugués).
- Cotorra de Emma (español).

Salvadori Tommaso

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Pyrrhura
- Nombre científico: Pyrrhura emma
- Citation: Salvadori, 1891
- Protónimo: Pyrrhura emma

Images Emma's Parakeet:

————————————————————————————————

Emma's Parakeet (Pyrrhura emma)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Venezuelan Parakeet | Perico Pintado ( Pyrrhura emma)By Fernando Flores from Caracas, Venezuela [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Venezuelan Parakeet | Perico Pintado ( Pyrrhura picta emma) By Fernando Flores from Caracas, Venezuela [CC BY-SA 2.0 or CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Venezuelan Parakeet | Perico Pintado (Pyrrhura emma) by Fernando FloresFlickr
(4) – Venezuelan Parakeet | Perico Pintado (Pyrrhura emma) by Fernando FloresFlickr
(5) – Venezuelan Parakeet | Perico Pintado (Pyrrhura emma) By Fernando Flores from Caracas, Venezuela [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Pyrrhura emma = Pyrrhura picta, Painted Parakeet by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds:

Grey-hooded Parakeet
Psilopsiagon aymara

Grey-hooded Parakeet

Description:

19-20 cm.. height.

Grey-hooded Parakeet

The Grey-hooded Parakeet (Psilopsiagon aymara) has the body mostly green, elongated and with a very long and pointed tail; the forecrown and lores, until the area back from the neck (including the ear-coverts), grayish brown, forming a kind of CAP that comes, slightly, to below the eyes.

Mantle green, lightly olive dyeing; Back and scapulars green; rump and uppertail-coverts, green, slightly brighter; upperwing-coverts green; flight feather green with blackish tips; underwing-coverts of color greenish-yellow. Chin and throat pale-whitish grey; chest grey silver pale, sometimes with dye bluish on the feathers on both sides of the chest; flanks of color yellow pale greenish; the belly and undertail-coverts, green, with faint bluish tint.

Upper, the tail green; undertail, gray. The bill pale flesh-colored; irises dark brown; legs grey-brown.

Both sexes similar, though the male may have brighter grey in the chest.

Immature they have the tail shorter.

NOTE This species was treated as Bolborhynchus aymara.

[audio:]
Habitat:

You prefer arid habitats shrubs or Woody hills and ravines, dense bushes and trees around settlements and agricultural areas, also distributed in high Andean steppes and sometimes in the Highlands, at altitudes of 1.800 to 3.400 m, sometimes more low (1,200 m in winter) and supposedly until the 4.000 m in Tucumán, Argentina.

The Grey-hooded Parakeet is a bird gregarious, usually seen in small flocks, at least outside of the breeding season; large gatherings near areas with water.

Reproduction:

Nest sometimes in colonies, in holes dug in sand banks or in hollows and cactus in desert area. Egg laying in the month of November in Tucumán. Clutch 4-5 eggs. Up to seven in captivity.

Food:

The Grey-hooded Parakeet they tend to consume berries and other fruit, In addition to seeds herbaceous and grasses (by example Viguera and other compounds); tend to descend to the floor to collect fruits fallen and seeds from the grass.

Distribution:

Tamaño del área de distribución (reproducción/residente): 383.000 km2

Is it can be found in the Andes from the South of Bolivia until Argentina and possibly North of Chile.

In West Bolivia It is known from Peace and Cochabamba to the South of Tarija and Potosi, and in the Northwest of Argentina on the slopes Andean of Jujuy to the South of Mendoza and to the hills of the South East of Córdoba. In the North of Chile (for example, Tarapacá) is reported as resident, visitor or absent.

Some movements at altitude seasonal; the Grey-hooded Parakeet move higher in summer. Generally common and apparently without pressure; Small numbers are caught and exported as cage birds.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

It is suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial, Although it is exported as bird cage in small quantities.

In captivity:

Rare in poultry.

Alternative names:


- Gray-hooded Parakeet, Andean Parakeet, Aymara Parakeet, Gray hooded Parakeet, Gray-headed Parakeet, Grey hooded Parakeet, Grey-headed Parakeet, Grey-hooded Parakeet, Sierra Parakeet (inglés).
- Toui aymara, Perruche d'Aymara (francés).
- Aymarasittich, Aymara Sittich (alemán).
- Periquito-da-serra (portugués).
- Periquito-da-serra (español).
- Periquito-da-serra (Argentina).
- Periquito-da-serra (Bolivia).

Alcide Dessalines to Orbigny
Alcide Dessalines d ’ Orbigny

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Psilopsiagon
- Nombre científico: Psilopsiagon aymara
- Citation: (d'Orbigny, 1839)
- Protónimo: Arara aymara

————————————————————————————————

Grey-hooded Parakeet (Psilopsiagon aymara)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Book parrots, Parrots and macaws Neotropical

Photos:

(1) – Grey-hooded Parakeets (also known as the Aymara Parakeet and the Sierra Parakeet) in Capilla del Monte, Córdoba, Argentina By Nes (originally posted to Flickr as Periquitos) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) -Psilopsiagon aymara by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Green-cheeked Parakeet
Pyrrhura molinae


Green-cheeked Parakeet

Description:

25 cm.. in length and 62-81 grams of weight.

cotorra-de-molina-6

The Green-cheeked Parakeet (Pyrrhura molinae) has a close frontal band and lores, you are reddish brown to blackish; crown, of color brown or brown grayish marked laterally in shades blue and green; rear area of the crown and nape with blue tips; cheeks and sometimes the supercilii area (area of the front), of color green with dye olive; ear-coverts of color grey clear to pale.

Upperparts green. The primary coverts are bluish green and the remaining are mainly green, except for some feathers scattered of color blue, yellow or orange in the leading edge of wing. Primaries blue, secondaries Green with blue near the axis; both grey below. Underwing-coverts green. Feathers in the chest, the throat and the sides of the neck, of color Brown at the base with purple pale, light grey, or yellowish opaque in the tips, giving effect squamous; central belly with brown patches of varying size (only scattered feathers some birds); sides of the belly, the thighs and bottom of the chest, green; undertail-coverts bluish green.

Upper, the tail brown, with green at the base of the center of the tail feathers (hidden under the coverts); below, the tail brown.

The bill, grey; the cere white; bare periophthalmic whitish; irises brown; legs grey.

Both sexes are similar.

Immature paler. with the irises darker and less a defendant patch brown of the belly.

  • Sound of the Green-cheeked Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Green-cheeked Conure .mp3]
Subspecies description
  • Pyrrhura molinae australis

    (Todd, 1915) – Slightly smaller the species nominal, pale margin to the throat and to the close down of the chest; Brown-colored area in the chest more extensive; less blue in the undertail-coverts.

  • Pyrrhura molinae flavoptera

    (Maijer, Herzog, Kessler, Friggens & Fjeldsa, 1998) – Similar to the nominal species, but with the bend of wing and the carpal edge, orange-red; Alula with feather blue and yellow / white mixed.

  • Pyrrhura molinae hypoxantha

    (Salvadori & Festa, 1899) – Previously listed as Pyrrhura molinae sordida. The cheeks more pale that the of the nominal species; the color red in the belly less prominent and the skirting of feathers in the throat and the chest less distinctive.

  • Pyrrhura molinae molinae

    (Massena & Souancé, 1854) – The nominal.

  • Pyrrhura molinae phoenicura

    (Schlegel, 1864) – It differs from the species nominal and of the subspecies Pyrrhura molinae australis, by having the basal half of feathers of the Centre of the tail, green. Some birds are yellow in the leading edge of wing.

  • Pyrrhura molinae restricta

    (Todd, 1947) – More blue that other subspecies, with stain blue in them lower cheeks and strong blue subfusion in the undertail-coverts. The blue tips on the feathers of the nape and zone back in the neck they form a most distinctive collar which in the nominal species.

Habitat:

The species Green-cheeked Parakeet inhabits dense forests, often low and forests with clear primary and secondary , including stripes of Chaco, Savannah, deciduous forest and Gallery in pantanal, as well as moist forests MOSS-covered in the Eastern Andes where is reported to 2.900 meters above sea level.

In Brazil the subspecies Pyrrhura molinae hypoxantha are located mainly in deciduous forest above the 500 m.

Gregarious (at least outside of breeding season), usually in flocks of 10-20, sometimes many more.

Very often seen in rapid flight, under, fairly erratic and slightly wavy. Difficult to detect as it feeds calmly in the treetops.

Reproduction:

It nests in hollow natural of trees. The laying is of 4 to 6 eggs during the month of February in the northeast of Argentina. Period of incubation: 20-24 days.

Food:

There is no information about the diet of the Green-cheeked Parakeet, but probably similar to nearby conspecifics; Forages in the treetops.

Distribution:

Tamaño del área de distribución (reproducción/residente): 675.000 km2

Its distribution runs from the southwest of Brazil and Northwest of Argentina to the East of Bolivia and probably South of Peru.

To this species is it can be observed in Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso from the South, in the southwest of Brazil, and in Beni, Peace, Cochabamba, Chuquisaca, Tarija and Santa Cruz, to the East of Bolivia, to the fringes of the Chaco. They can be distributed through the North of Bolivia up to the end South of Peru, in where is captured an individual hybrid with the Black-capped Parakeet (Pyrrhura rupicola).

Apparently absent from the land low of the pantanal and restricted in the basin of the Río Paraguay isolated plots of forests of chaco in the Highlands on the right bank of the river.

In the Northwest of Argentina is distributed in Salta, Jujuy and with less frequency in Tucumán (a record in Catamarca is probably wrong).

They can live on the fringes of the Northwest of Paraguay but not is tested. Some local seasonal movements they can occur, birds in the higher elevations down to altitudes lower in winter (Mar-Aug).

Generally common (very common in Salta and Jujuy); Highest densities in deciduous forest; It is the most common parrot in the forested valleys of Bolivia East but probably declining there due to the rapid clearance of its habitat.

Is sold during those years eighty and was extended in captive outside of its area of distribution.

Distribution of subspecies
Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

Suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

In captivity:

Unknown in those birds up to the Decade of 1970, currently it is quite common. They have become one of the favorite birds in the pet trade, due to his sweet personality and at your disposal for fun. Are playful, loving and Smart.

Are not considered the best talkers. However, some Green-cheeked Parakeet, especially smart, they learned to speak very well, according their owners. Even so, most say only a couple of things, and there is no guarantee that you ever learn to speak. They also have low and serious voice, so even if managed to talk, It would not be easy for you to say something understandable.

Price per couple (ancestral): 120-200 EUR. Hypoxantha: 150-300 EUR.

Alternative names:


- Green-cheeked Parakeet, Green cheeked Parakeet, Green-cheeked Conure, Yellow-sided Conure (inglés).
- Conure de Molina, Perriche de Molina, Perruche de Molina (francés).
- Molinasittich, Molina Sittich, Molina-Sittich (alemán).
- cara-suja, tiriba-de-cara-suja (portugués).
- Chiripepé cabeza parda, Chiripepé de cabeza gris, Cotorra de Molina, Perico Amarillo, Perico Verde, Cotorra de mejillas verdes (español).
- Chiripepé cabeza parda (Argentina).
- Chiripepé cabeza parda (Paraguay).
- Chiripepe cabeza parda (Bolivia).
- Kirki (Aymara).
- Sira (Guaraní).

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Pyrrhura
- Nombre científico: Pyrrhura molinae
- Citation: (Massena & Souancé, 1854)
- Protónimo: Conurus molinae

Images Green-cheeked Parakeet:

————————————————————————————————

Green-cheeked Parakeet (Pyrrhura molinae)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
-Book parrots, Parrots and macaws
avianweb

Photos:

(1) – A Green-cheeked Parakeet perching on the index finger of a left hand By Eric Sonstroem from California, USA (Green-Cheeked ConureUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Green-cheeked Conure perching in an aviary at Kuala Lumpur Bird Park, Malaysia By Brandon Lim (Rainbow LorakeetUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Green-cheeked Conure perching in an aviary By Brandon Lim (Rainbow LorakeetUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – A juvenile pet Yellow-sided Green-cheeked Conure (also Sordid Conure and the Yellow-sided Conure). It is a naturally occurring subspecies of the Green-cheeked Conure. The photograph shows a wing-clipped pet parrot in a bird cage. By therouxdown (Reese closeupUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A juvenile pet Yellow-sided Green-cheeked Conure (also Sordid Conure and the Yellow-sided Conure). It is a naturally occurring subspecies of the Green-cheeked Conure. The photograph shows a wing-clipped pet parrot perching on a food bowel By therouxdown (originally posted to Flickr as Reese profile) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Molina’s Parrot from Philip Lutley Sclater and W. H. Hudson, Argentine Ornithology: A Descriptive Catalogue of the Birds of the Argentine Republic (1888-89) in Wikimedia

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Indigo-winged Parrot
Hapalopsittaca fuertesi


Indigo-winged Parrot

Description:

23-24 cm.. height.

In 2002 It was the rediscovery of the the Indigo-winged Parrot (Hapalopsittaca fuertesi), an enigmatic parrot that it had lost in the world during more than 90 years and continues being one of the birds more rare of the Earth. It has a plumage mainly yellowish-green and is highlighted by the blue of the crown and olive yellow tone of the forecrown (except a strip), cheeks and sides of the eyes, narrow strip in the forecrown, under abdomen and shoulders red. End of the wing blue violet dark, tail Blue with red base.

The bill Horn colored with blue color, Grey at the base of the upper mandible. Iris Green-yellow.

The immature It has less yellow streaks and more off face.

  • Sound of the Indigo-winged Parrot.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Loro Coroniazul.mp3]
Habitat:

Is a kind of range restricted, very rare and difficult to observe. It inhabits high Andean forests and frequent cloud subparamos, between 2600 and 3800 m on the level of the sea, being the majority of the records between 2.900 and 3.150 m. With guavas, encenillo and laurels "where consumed fruits of the"matapalo”, and with Oak (Quercus humboldtii).

Observed in fairly open forests, and possibly disturbed, with small Palm trees and tree ferns.

Fly in flocks of 6 to 25 individuals.

Reproduction:

It believes that the nests they make them in cavities of tall, mature trees.

The nesting period takes place from January to may. The average size clutch is three eggs. The incubation be carried out only by the female, Although the attention back to the hatching is biparental (Diaz 2006).

Food:

The ecology of the breeds and the power of the Indigo-winged Parrot is practically unknown, but it has been observed the birds feeding of berries, and is likely to show a preference for the berries of mistletoe.

Distribution:

Distribución de tamaño (reproducción/residente): 100 km2

Restricted to a small strip on the western slope of the Andes Central of Colombia, near the border of the Quindio, Risaralda and Tolima.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Critically endangered.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

In accordance with the categories of the UICN is considered in Danger critic (CR), due to the accelerated process of deforestation in the Andean forests.

Since ago 90 years it was thought that the bird was extinct until it was rediscovered in 2002, When a few biologists of the Fundación ProAves in the montane forest of the municipality of Genoa, Department of Quindío, where the group more large observed consisted of 25 birds and the total population was of approximately 60 individuals.

Currently there are some 300 mature free individuals.
Thanks to the efforts made by different project is have retrieved data of them fluctuations in the abundances of them individuals during the year associated to its reproduction. Is very likely that the offer of the artificial nests This already having a positive impact that the length of the project It has observed an increase in the size population.

In captivity:

They do not exist in captivity.

Alternative names:


- Indigo-winged Parrot, Fuerte's Parrot, Fuertes's Parrot, Indigo winged Parrot (inglés).
- Caïque de Fuertes, Caïque de Colombie (francés).
- Fuertespapagei, Chapmans Zwergamazone, Zwergamazone (alemán).
- Indigo-winged Parrot (portugués).
- Cotorra Aliazul, Lorito de Fuertes (español).
- Cotorra Aliazul, Loro coroniazul (Colombia).

Frank Chapman
Frank Chapman

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Hapalopsittaca
- Nombre científico: Hapalopsittaca fuertesi
- Citation: (Chapman, 1912)
- Protónimo: Pionopsitta fuertes
in

————————————————————————————————

Indigo-winged Parrot (Hapalopsittaca fuertesi)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
proaves.org
– Book parrots, Parrots and macaws Neotropical

Photos:

(1) – Conservationbirding.org

Sounds: controles-canto.org

Fiery shouldered Parakeet
Pyrrhura egregia


Fiery shouldered Parakeet

Description:

25 cm.. height.

Fiery shouldered Parakeet

The Fiery shouldered Parakeet (Pyrrhura egregia) has a close frontal band brown; crown, lores, rear area of the neck and upper cheeks, brownish; ear-coverts reddish brown; feathers on the sides of the neck basically green with subterminal band of color beige, narrow dark tips giving a scaly appearance to the whole.

The upperparts Green with dark and narrow edges to some feathers. Carpal area and front edge of the wing , Orange with yellow marks; primary coverts usually blue but sometimes colored yellow shiny; upperwing-coverts green. Outerwebs of flight feather, blue. Underwing-coverts marked with yellow orange; Bottom of the flight feather gray. Feathers in the throat and the chest basically green with the subterminal band Hazelnut color and dark tips, giving a scaly appearance; underparts green, with the majority of the feathers of the belly Brown at the base and green-tipped, sometimes forming a brown patch. Upper, the tail Brown very dark, green at the base; by down gray.

The bill color horn; skin peri-oftalmica naked white; Brown the irises; legs Brown-Black.

Both sexes are similar.

The immature It has much less yellow and orange in the upperwing-coverts and infra-alares; the crown Green and flakes in the chest and on the sides of the neck less pronounced.

Subspecies description:
  • Pyrrhura egregia egregia

    (Sclater,PL, 1881) – The nominal.

  • Pyrrhura egregia obscura

    (Zimmer & Phelps,WH 1946) – Similar to the species nominal but with the upperparts darker green and the underparts also slightly more dark. Patch Brown in the belly less frequent and less prominent.

  • Sound of the Fiery shouldered Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Fiery-shouldered Conure.mp3]
Habitat:

The species inhabits in forests humid premontane and forest secondary dense on them Tepuis, between 700 to 1800 m. Generally flocks of 7-25 birds.

Reproduction:

Little information on the breeding; is reproduce between March and April with fledged young people between May-June. Period of incubation: 23 Dias.

Food:

There is no information about the diet, except that birds visit Amerindian villages from July to August to feed of fruit of, for example, guavas mature.

Distribution:


Distribución de tamaño (reproducción/residente): 49.400 km2

Distribution restricted to the Tepui region in the north-eastern interior of South America. The species is known from Venezuela on Gran Sabana to the southeast of Bolivar, in the Mount Roraima and Arabopo and from the Mount Auyan-tepui and the Mt. Ptari-tepui.

Can be found in adjacent areas of the West of Guyana, for example, in the surroundings of the River Chamber and top of the Mazaruni River, the Merume mountains and Pacaraima mountains to the South of Annai.

The reports of Suriname still no confirmed. Probably are distributed in the northeast of Roraima, Brazil.

Inaccessible range and few details about his status, but apparently fairly common. Large part of the range Venezuelan included in the Canaima National Park.

Small quantities exported from Guyana to end of the years eighty and subsequently bred in captivity.

Distribution of subspecies:
Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the population

The population size World has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

It is suspected that this species has lost 3.3-10.5% of habitat suitable within their distribution during three generations (18 years), based on a model of Amazon deforestation (Soares-Filho et to the., 2006, Bird et to the., 2011). Given the susceptibility of the species to hunt or capture, It is suspected that will decrease in <25% durante tres generaciones.

In captivity:

Intelligent, relatively calm and playful. Young birds are very timid.
They are aggressive with other birds and it is very rare in captivity, with small quantities exported from Guyana at the end of the 1980s and subsequently raised in captivity.

Price per couple: 300-400 EUR.

Alternative names:


- Fiery-shouldered Parakeet, Fiery shouldered Parakeet, Fiery-shoulderd Conure, Fiery-shouldered Conure (inglés).
- Conure aile-de-feu, Perriche aile-de-feu, Perruche aile-de-feu (francés).
- Feuerbugsittich, Feuerbug-Sittich (alemán).
- tiriba-de-cauda-roxa (portugués).
- Cotorra Egregia, Perico de Cola Morada, Perico colimorado (español).
- Perico de Pantepui (Venezuela).

Philip Sclater
Philip Sclater

Scientific classification:

Orden: Psittaciformes
Familia: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrrhura
Nombre científico: Pyrrhura egregia
Citation: (Sclater, PL, 1881)
Protónimo: Conurus egregius

Fiery shouldered Parakeet images:

————————————————————————————————

Fiery shouldered Parakeet (Pyrrhura egregia)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Demerara Conure By Gazelle74 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Demerara female “at work”. These little parrots love to gnaw at wood, paper and many other things By Gazelle74 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Fiery-shouldered Parakeet (Pyrrhura egregia) by Margareta Wieser. A pair perching on a branch – HBW
(4) – Fiery-shouldered Parakeet (Pyrrhura egregia) by Andrew Emmerson. An adult bird – HBW
(5) – Fiery-shouldered Parakeet (Pyrrhura egregia) by Andrew Emmerson. An adult preening – HBW
(6) – Conurus egregius » = Pyrrhura egregia (Fiery-shouldered parakeet) by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

El Oro Parakeet
Pyrrhura orcesi


Cotorra de El Oro

Description:

22 cm. of long and 73 g. of weight.

The El Oro Parakeet (Pyrrhura orcesi) is a bird relatively striking, with plumage mostly green. Has the forecrown red; feathers on the sides of the neck with the white base; Red patch from the shoulder up to the half of the wing , end of the wing blue (more visible in flight), tail above with a reddish tint and below completely red except the base.

Beak and legs blackish.

The females It is thought that less red have around the face.

the youth they are generally paler and lack much of the red marks that are seen in adults.

Habitat:

It inhabits in the very wet tropical forest between 800-1.200 m (occasionally at altitudes as low as 300 m). It has been reported that he tolerates some habitat fragmentation (Schaefer and Schmidt 2003). Performs seasonal movements. Are usually distributed in groups of 4-15, Although it has been observed in flocks of up to 60 birds. They may be closely related with the Maroon-tailed Parakeet (Pacific) (Pyrrhura melanura pacifica) and the Maroon-tailed Parakeet (Pyrrhura melanura)

The rest sites They seem to change frequently and are generally located between 2 and 24 meters above the ground, in natural cavities in trees or open branches.

It is extremely noisy and conspicuous when flying.

Reproduction:

As is a species discovered recently, very little is known about its ecology.

Seems to prefer the Dacryodes peruviana family Burseraceae for nest (Garzon 2007), and communal, sharing the tasks of incubation between several birds, Although a couple exhibited a behavior of pre-anidamiento in the cavity of a small tree Meliaceae in 1997 (Snyder et to the. 2000), and reported nests in natural cavities of 1,8-24 m above the ground in a variety of tree species (Schaefer and Schmidt 2003).

The time of incubation is of approximately 31 days.

The main breeding station seems to be between November and March (Garzon 2007), Although it is difficult to realize because the effects of 'El Niño' breeding between December and January.

Movements seasonal altitudinal down to forests have been reported in the Buenaventura reserve (T. Schaefer in litt., 2007).

Food:

Discreetly feeding in the canopy, composing your diet of various fruits (including fig Ficus spp.), Fruits and flowers Cecropia (Snyder et to the., 2000).

Distribution:

Distribución de tamaño (reproducción/residente) 750 km2

The El Oro Parakeet is an endemic bird. They inhabit in the western slope of the Andes, in the southwest of Ecuador (in Cañar, Azuay, Gold and Loja), where was discovered in 1980.

Apparently, its population is limited to an area of only 100 km from North to South, and a maximum of 5-10 km wide (Juniper and Parr 1998), with its highly fragmented Habitat and with a population estimated in less than 1.000 individuals (Garzon 2007).

Its population in the town of Buenaventura has remained stable since 2002-2007 (Juniper and Parr 1998), estimated in 171 birds in the period 2005-2006 (2007 Garzon, HM Schaefer in litt. 2012).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: In danger of extinction

• Population trend: In decline.

The El Oro Parakeet is in danger of extinction due to deforestation and the extreme fragmentation of the forest for cattle breeding, What causes the habitat degradation. This degradation destroy sites of nesting and feeding that these birds need to survive and reproduce at a healthy pace.

Population estimated in less than 1.000 individuals.

The Habitat limited only to the Andes, to the West of Ecuador and because of this, sensitivity to the destruction of the Habitat is very heavy. Protection for some of the habitat of this species has been established in the Book ecological Buenaventura. In reserves, bird houses have been built in trees to help promote reproduction and has had some success. Other projects have been proposed to evaluate the size of the population.

In captivity:

Don't usually see in the poultry farming.

Alternative names:


- El Oro Parakeet, El Oro Conure (inglés).
- Conure d'Orcés, Conure d'Orcès, Perruche d'El Oro (francés).
- Orcessittich, Orces Sittich, Orces-Sittich (alemán).
- Tiriba-do-el-oro (portugués).
- Cotorra de El Oro, Perico de orcés (español).

Scientific classification:


- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Pyrrhura
- Nombre científico: Pyrrhura orcesi
- Citation: Ridgely & Robbins, 1988
- Protónimo: Pyrrhura orcesi


El Oro Parakeet (Pyrrhura orcesi)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – fjocotoco.org

Golden-capped Parakeet
Aratinga auricapillus

Aratinga Testadorada

Description:

Of 30 cm.. of length and a weight of 130 g..

The Golden-capped Parakeet (Aratinga auricapillus) It is often treated as the same species as the Sun Parakeet (Aratinga solstitialis) and Jandaya Parakeet (Aratinga jandaya).

The lores, frontal band and ocular region of this kind are of color red glossy; the crown is bright golden yellow; ear-coverts, cheeks and both sides of the neck, green. The area of the nape and the the mantle are pale green: the back and the top of the rump with different hues of green and tips of red or orange; floor area of the rump and uppertail-coverts, green; the small and medium-sized upperwing-coverts, green; the large coverts and primaries, secondaries, vane outer and tips from them primaries, blue.

Underwing-coverts, orange-red; underside of flight feather grey. The chin and throat yellowish green with orange discoloration on the top of the chest and deep color red pale in the belly; vent, the thighs and undertail-coverts, green. Upper, the tail, of colour brownish with them tips blue, sometimes with the vane external foreign blue feathers; undertail, the tail, grey.

The bill, grey-black; grey, the bare skin of the bare periophthalmic; irises yellowish; legs grey.

Both sexes similar.

Immature It has little or nothing red in the rump, more off the yellow colour of the crown; the top of the chest is greener and less extensive red on the belly.

  • Sound of the Golden-capped Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Aratinga testadorada.mp3]
Subspecies description:
  • Aratinga auricapillus auricapillus

    (Kuhl, 1820) – The species nominal.

  • Aratinga auricapillus aurifrons

    (Spix, 1824) – The upperparts totally green (without red margins on the feathers of the back and Hip top). More green in the upper zone of the chest, lacking Orange dye of the nominal species.

Habitat:

They live in forests, as well as in the clearings and edges of the same, including coastal forests moist Atlantic of Evergreen and deciduous forests closed type of inside. They prefer primary formations.

Scarce or absent grassland with trees or secondary vegetation, even in the vicinity of the remaining original forests. Observed to 2.180 m (Parque nacional do Caparaó, to the South of Espírito Santo). Gregarious, usually observed in flocks of 12-20 individuals, more rarely in groups of up to 40.

Reproduction:

There are few details about the reproductive ecology of this species, Although probably nest in the months of November-December.

Implementation size in captivity is of 3-5 eggs.

Food:

Diet Golden-capped Parakeet includes various seeds and fruits. Reported foods include the maize, okra and fruits red sweet unspecified.

Considered one pest of crops in some areas before its abrupt population decline.

Distribution:

The Golden-capped Parakeet (Aratinga auricapillus) are distributed in the area South-East of Brazil; from the North of Bay, Eastern part of Goiás and Minas Gerais, Brazil, to the East and South, on the East coast of Brazil (Espírito Santo, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Paraná and possibly, Santa Catarina).

The observations in Rio Grande do Sul, apparently they are wrong, Although the species still can be found at the East end of Mato Grosso from the South.

A single record in 1918 in Paraguay, near the border with Paraná, expected from any exhaust.

Generally rare and irregular distribution, residents, extinct in many places with their current range defined by the remaining forests.

He greater stronghold population of the species is located in Minas Gerais, Brazil, where the species was considered common in 1987 in several areas. They are very rare or they have become extinct in Santa Catarina, Paraná, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Espirito Santo, and scarce in Goiás and Bay.

The decrease in the population is must to the continuous logging of forests and to their captures for the trade of birds.

There are several protected areas with populations of the Golden-capped Parakeet, such as the Monte Pascoal National Park (Bahia) and Parque Estadual do Rio Doce (Minas Gerais, Brazil).

Rare in captivity, mostly out of Brazil.

Distribution of subspecies:
Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Near-threatened

• Population trend: Decreasing

The size of the population of the Golden-capped Parakeet It has not estimated formally and in the absence of sufficient data, it is estimated that you there are more than 10.000 specimens, more or less equivalent to 6.700 mature individuals; However, detailed research is required.

The population the species is suspected that it may be in decline due to the continuous loss of habitat and to his capture to the pet trade.

• There has been a broad and continuous clearing and fragmentation of the suitable habitat for this species, for use as coffee plantations, soy and sugar cane in São Paulo, and livestock in Goiás and Minas Gerais, Brazil (Snyder et to the., 2000).

• The capture for trade, He has probably had a significant impact, Since it was relatively common in illegal Brazilian markets in the middle of the Decade of 1980, importing hundreds of birds to Western Germany in the Decade of 1980. However, the precise effect obfuscates a great number of birds bred in captivity, that presumably see reduced pressure on wild populations remaining (LF Silveira in litt., 1999).

• Despite their tendency to nest, times, near human settlements, It is apparently not the most favoured species for the pet trade (VT Lombardi in litt. 2011).

• There are records of persecution in response to the degradation of crops.

Conservation Actions Underway:

Conservation Actions Proposed:

    • Survey to locate new populations important and define the limits of its current range.

    • Study to determine their population dynamics and dispersal ability, as well as providing a detailed analysis of their requirements of habitats in different sites.

    •Guarantee protection of key reserves.

    • Protect species under Brazilian law.

In captivity:

Rare in captivity, mostly out of Brazil.

Their life expectancy is about 30 years.

Alternative names:

- Golden-capped Parakeet, Flame-capped Conure, Flame-capped Parakeet, Gold-capped Conure, Golden capped Parakeet, Golden-capped Conure (inglés).
- Conure à tête d'or, Conure à tête dorée, Perriche à tête d'or, Perruche à tête d'or (francés).
- Goldkopfsittich, Goldkappensittich (alemán).
- jandaia-de-testa-vermelha, cara-suja, jandaia, periquito-de-cabeça-vermelha (portugués).
- Aratinga Testadorada, Maracaná corona dorada, Periquito de Cabeza Dorada (español).
- Maracaná corona dorada (Paraguay).

Kuhl, Heinrich
Heinrich Kuhl

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Aratinga
- Nombre científico: Aratinga auricapillus
- Citation: (Kuhl, 1820)
- Protónimo: Psittacus auricapillus

Golden-capped Parakeet images:

————————————————————————————————

Golden-capped Parakeet (Aratinga auricapillus)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – A Golden-capped Parakeet at Jurong Bird Park, Singapore By Peter so (Golden-capped ParakeetUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

(2) – Picture of a Golden-capped Parakeet in the zoo of Wrocław (Poland) By Nicolas Guérin (messages) (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – A Golden-capped Parakeet (also known as Golden-capped Conure) in Seattle, Washington, USA By Matthew Wilson (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Two Golden-capped Parakeets (also known as Golden-capped Conures) in Seattle, Washington By Matthew Wilson (Picasa Web Albums) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A Golden-capped Parakeet (also known as Golden-capped Conure) in captivity By Patrick Hawks from Sint Maarten (Bird is the wordUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Douglas Meyer (Xeno-canto)

Hispaniolan Parakeet
Psittacara chloropterus

Aratinga de la Española

Description:

32 cm. of length and a weight of 150 g..

Ilustración de Psittacara euops y Psittacara chloropterus

The Hispaniolan Parakeet (Psittacara chloropterus) has the head whole and both sides of the neck green grass with some scattered red feathers; the upperparts and upperwing-coverts Green with external ends of the Middle coverts red. Primary and secondary dark green with bluish-green tips on margins vane inner. The underwing-coverts yellowish brown in the flight feather, more grayish towards the tip; coverts Green except smaller and medium-sized external coverts, they are red and the primarys which are green and Red.

The underparts brighter yellowish green, usually with scattered red feathers.

Upper, the tail dark green and below, grayish brown.

The bill color horn; bare periophthalmic whitish: irises yellowish; legs grayish brown.

Both sexes similar.

The immature has less red and more green in underwing-coverts, No red on the upper surface of the bend of wing and grey at the base of the bill and on the cutting edge.

Subspecies description:
Psittacara chloropterus maugei
Psittacara chloropterus maugei
  • Psittacara chloropterus chloropterus
  • (Souance, 1856) – The species nominal.

  • Psittacara chloropterus maugei †
  • (Souance, 1856) – Similar to the species nominal, but with a duller green in the underparts; more red in the large underwing-coverts.

Habitat:

This species covers all types of natural habitats from arid lowland forests, to sheets of palmas, but obviously prefers upland forest (including the dominated by Pinus), to 3.000 meters above sea level, scarce, Perhaps because of the persecution, in the adjacent cultivated areas.

In general, observed in pairs or in small flocks, but sometimes in meetings of more than one hundred, at least in the past, When were most abundant. Discernible couples even within large flocks.

Reproduction:

Wild baby Hispaniolan Parakeet (Aratinga chloroptera) that the second hole

They build their nests in tree cavities, including old holes made by woodpeckers, as well as in arboreal termite.

The laying compose it between 3 and 5 eggs, exceptionally 7.

Food:

There are few details about the diet of the Hispaniolan Parakeet, but it is apparently similar to the fellow and and depends on local availability of fruits, seeds, nuts, outbreaks, flowers and beads; Some reported foods include Ficus figs and maize.

Distribution:

Confined in Haiti and Dominican Republic, la Española, Greater Antilles. Previously in the Mona Island (Psittacara chloropterus maugei), extinct between 1892 and 1901, probably as a result of the pressure due to the hunting and, possibly, the perturbations by the explosions in the guano mine; possibly, also distributed in Puerto Rico, and its, probably, at the end of the century 19, due to loss of habitat and hunting.

In Hispaniola It is subject to a significant and continuous decrease, due to destruction of habitat, trade and persecution, especially in Haiti, where possibly is extinct.

In Dominican Republic they are still distributed in a few areas of Highland, for example, Cordillera Central.

Possibly small wild populations in Puerto Rico and Florida. A small number in captivity; the international trade small volume, probably, continues.

Distribution of subspecies:
  • Psittacara chloropterus chloropterus
  • (Souance, 1856) – The species nominal.

  • Psittacara chloropterus maugei †
  • (Souance, 1856) – Times distributed by the Mona Island and, possibly, Puerto Rico, but the last copy was registered in 1892. Currently extinct.

Conservation:

• Red list category of the UICN current: Vulnerable

• Population trend: Decreasing

There is no new data on the evolution of the population; However, the species is suspected that it may be in decline, slow to moderate due to the hunting, capture and habitat loss.

Habitat loss and persecution as crop pest they are the greatest threats to this species. Is exploited for the local and international trade, Although only reported 12 individuals for international trade between 1991 and 1995 (Snyder et to the., 2000).

The number of copies of Hispaniolan Parakeet ranges between 1500 and 7000.

Conservation Actions Underway

Appendix II of CITES.

• In the Dominican Republic, is legally protected against the hunt, but this legislation is not applied properly (Snyder et to the., 2000).

• A education strategy with community participation has been launched for the protection of this species (Vasquez et to the., 1995).

• The interactions between this species and the Olive-throated Parakeet (Eupsittula nana), due to the recent increase in the number of the latter in the Sierra de Bahoruco [S. Latta in litt., 1998] ), they are being investigated (Anon. 2007).

• A group of volunteers for the protection of the Parrot will work to reform the damaged nests. (Anon. 2007)

Conservation Actions Proposed.

• Clarify the situation of the species in Haiti.

Ecology study and breeding success to determine the natural limiting factors.

• Comply with the legislation in force in the Dominican Republic.

In captivity:

Rare in captivity and legally protected in Dominican Republic against the hunt and capture.

Alternative names:

- Hispaniolan Parakeet, Haitian Paroquet, Hispaniolan Conure, San Domingo Conure (inglés).
- Conure maîtresse, Perruche maîtresse (francés).
- Haitisittich (alemán).
- Periquito-de-hispaniola (portugués).
- Aratinga de la Española, Perico , Periquito Antillano, Periquito de la Española (español).
- Perico, Xaxavi (República Dominicana).

Scientific classification:

- Orden: Psittaciformes
- Familia: Psittacidae
- Genus: Psittacara
- Nombre científico: Psittacara chloropterus
- Citation: (Souancé, 1856)
- Protónimo: Psittacara chloroptera

Images Hispaniolan Parakeet:

Hispaniolan Parakeet (Psittacara chloropterus)

 

Sources:

Avibase
Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Haitisittich Psittacara chloropterus Aufnahme in La Romana By Martingloor (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Haitisittich Psittacara chloropterus By Martingloor (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Haitisittich Psittacara chloropterus Aufnahme in La Romana By Martingloor (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – Perico de la Hispaniola / Aratinga chloroptera by Carlos De Soto MolinariFlickr
(5) – Perico de la Hispaniola / Aratinga chloroptera by Carlos De Soto MolinariFlickr
(6) – Evopsitta maugei. Illustrations from Iconographie des perroquets non figurs dans les publications de Levaillante et de M. Bourjot Evopsitta maugei = Aratinga chloroptera maugei == Psittacara chloropterus maugei By 48 hand-coloured lithographic plates by E. Blanchard and J. Daverne (pl. I-XV) or Juliot of Tours (XVI-XLVII, ‘LXXIX). [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
(7) – Psittacara euops Syn: Evopsitta euops & Psittacara chloropterus Syn: Psittacara chloropter bzw. Psittacara euops St. Domingue By Charles Émile Blanchard (1819–1900) (biodiversitylibrary.org) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: Lance A. M. Benner (Xeno-canto)

Use of cookies

This web site uses cookies so that you have the best user experience. If you continue browsing you are giving your consent for the acceptance of the aforementioned cookies and the acceptance of our cookies policy, Click the link for more information.plugin cookies

TO ACCEPT
Notice of cookies