Italian Spinone
Italia FCI 165 . Griffon type.

Italian Spinone

In some countries, the Italian Spinone does not enjoy the dissemination it deserves, because faster breeds of dogs with more olfactory capacity are preferred.

Content

History

As the name suggests, the Italian Spinone -or “Italian Griffon” – is originally from Italy, more specifically from the Piedmont region, in the north of the country. It is a very old breed of dog, and whoever looks for its exact origins will find more questions than answers. However, it is generally accepted that it is the result of various crosses over the centuries between Italian Setters, Griffons from France, White Mastiffs and Dogs of Greece.

There is evidence that their ancestors already hunted in the Alps and Apennines more than 2000 years. However, the first clear reference to the breed dates back to the Middle Ages, more specifically to the fifteenth century, in the form of a fresco by Andrea Montegna (1431-1506) inside the Ducal Palace of Mantua (Italy), which represents an Italian Spinone. Two centuries later, Jacques Espée of Sélincourt, evoca en su manual The Perfect Hunter (1683) an Italian Griffon from Piedmont.

Popular for centuries in Italy, the Spinone suffered greatly during WWII. The end of hostilities did not mean a notable improvement in their situation, as Italian hunters began to prefer breeds imported from abroad.

In 1949, Dr. Paolo Branzi and Dr.. Ezio Caraffini founded La Famiglia dello Spinone -which has since become the Italian Spinoni Club- and they had 59 representatives of the breed throughout Italy. They chose 10 of them to start a breeding program aimed at rebuilding the population and stabilizing its characteristics. They drew up a first standard and contacted the Ente Nazionale della Cinofilia Italiana (ENCI), reference body of the country, to initiate the necessary procedures for the recognition of the breed.

His work paid off, so that in 1955 the Spinone Italiano was recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI). Then it began to spread internationally, although it took a while, especially in North America. For this reason, until 1995 el United Kennel Club (UKC) American did not grant him his recognition. The other reference organization in the United States, the American Kennel Club (AKC), did the same in 2000. The Canadian Kennel Club did the same in 2006.

In fact, although it is quite common in its country of origin and is the second most popular hunting dog in that country, its international distribution remains limited. However, is quite successful in Britain, where the Kennel Club registers between 400 and 500 births every year. This is far from the case in France.: with less than ten annual entries in the French Book of Origins (LOF), it is clear that he is far from having conquered the hearts of French hunters.

In United States, AKC statistics put her around the position 110 (of 195) in the ranking of the most popular breeds in the country.

Photo: I came across this adorable dog while walking around Dorset. Took a photo and then got really scared of the camera. by Caroline Granycome, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Italian Spinone it's well built, with well developed muscles and strong bones.

Her body, as high as long, is square in shape and ends in a thick bushy tail. The tail hangs at rest and is horizontal when in action. The legs are solid and end in compact round legs.

The head is egg-shaped, with a curved skull and a muzzle the same length as the skull. The color of the nose varies between the pink of the white dogs and the brown of the roan dogs. The eyes are round, big and far apart. They are of a more or less dark ocher color. Triangular shape, the ears are rather long and fall along the cheeks.

The body of the Spinone is entirely covered in stiff, dense fur, about 4 to 6 cm long, that protects it when it slides through the undergrowth, but also when thrown into cold water. It is shorter at the top of the head and at the front of the legs. In the face, a dense coat of thick eyebrows and a full beard, typical of the breed, which also protects it from brambles and bushes. Beneath this top layer is the dog's fur, which has the peculiarity of not having undercoat.

The coat can be plain white, white with orange spots, chestnut or brown, or roan with orange spots, chestnut or brown. Tricolor or black-haired dogs are not accepted by the breed standard.

Last but not least, sexual dimorphism is marked: the male is larger and above all significantly more massive than the female.

Size and weight

    Male size: Of 60 to 70 cm.
    Female size: Of 58 to 65 cm.
    Male weight: Of 32 to 37 kg
    Female weight: Of 28 to 30 kg

Character and skills

Generally easier to live with than other pointers, the Spinone Italianos they are affectionate and close to their family, they love to play and spend most of the time with them. Although they are hunters, They are not the kind that jump into the open sea and disappear as soon as potential prey catches their eye: they never stray too far from their master, preferring to always have it in sight.

Your affection, patience and playful character make them an ideal breed for a child. He loves children and is an excellent playmate for those old enough to have learned to behave in the presence of a dog. Less recommended for younger children, as it is large enough to inadvertently push them down. In any case, regardless of race, interactions between a dog and a young child should always take place in the presence of an adult.

The Italian griffon also it is sociable with other dogs Griffon, those who are often willingly adopted as playmates. Small animals, as cats, rabbits and other rodents, have more to worry about and are more likely to be hunted as potential prey. However, they may live with a cat if they have been raised with them, but the latter is likely to still be haunted in the garden from time to time.

As for humans who are unknown to him, the Spinone is generally cozy with them, especially if he's been well socialized from his early months. In fact, used to living with humans for centuries, is more of the type that actively seeks your company. Also easily suffers from loneliness: although you can spend a few hours alone at home without difficulty, it is not advisable to leave it all for a weekend. Adopting one more dog can be a good way of offering companionship to help you avoid loneliness when your family is away..

He is as active in the early years as he is calm and collected afterward.. This can be seen in his hunting style, that is calm and methodical.

Having said that, if you like to rest on the living room rug, this does not mean that you do not need to exercise. So that you feel comfortable and calm when you get home, your daily walks should total at least one hour. Although they are slower than other signaling breeds, they are very resistant and can adapt to many types of terrain. For this reason, if the opportunity arises to take a long walk of several hours, he is delighted. During the latter, does not tend to stray far from his master, so it can be walked without a leash. You can live in an apartment as long as you go out two or three times a day, but its size makes it unsuitable for a small studio.

He prefers a house with a garden that he can frolic in and gladly dispose of any unwanted critters.. However, it is not convenient for you to live abroad: you need to be in contact with your family and should be able to spend as much time as possible with them.

On the other hand, It is an intelligent breed of dog that likes to be mentally stimulated. Rather stubborn and showing little interest in activities that seem useless, you need a leader who offers motivational exercises. Obedience exercises, agility or hunting are a great way to get his attention and stimulate him. The rapport is also something instinctive in him, and you will not be asked to carry the ball or bat thrown by your master. He does not hesitate to do the same with the toys scattered around the house when he wants to show him that he wants to have fun.

It is also important to know that your beautiful beard gets wet every time you drink. He tends to pour water all over the house whenever he quenches his thirst, so it may be a good idea to put your bowl outside and not inside the house.

Last but not least, although don't hesitate to bark when you see fit, the Italian Spinone it's not overly vocal.

Education

The Italian Spinone, like all dogs, must be socialized from an early age. It is important that you can meet all the people who are part of your close or distant environment (friends, neighbors, family…). You must also face all kinds of situations (walk through different places, meet other dogs or other animals, travel in different means of transport) not to be scared once an adult.

It shouldn't be long before they start to learn to tame, which can be longer and more complicated than for most other breeds.

Given its size once adult, It is also helpful to get him used to being handled without flinching from an early age, so that the grooming sessions are a moment of shared pleasure and not torture for both protagonists.

The Italian griffon he's smart and has a strong personality. You need a firm master who knows how to earn your respect, but even if I do, does not like to do tasks that seem trivial. It's a working dog, who likes to be useful and prefers to learn, for example, to recover the game before turning around. In fact, if your master knows how to do it and has all the necessary patience, this dog can do wonders, even in obedience and agility competitions. The trick is to motivate you, above all making him understand the interest of the command.

Not surprisingly, it responds much better to positive reinforcement-based dog training methods than traditional dog training.. Know that the fulfillment of what is asked allows you to receive caresses, encouragement and treats is in his eyes a legitimate reason to excel and give the best of himself.

Health

The Italian Spinone is generally quite robust. Apart from the health problems common to all large dogs and a serious genetic disease, but fortunately in the process of disappearance thanks to the work of the breeders, the risks are low.

Like this, the conditions to which you are especially exposed are :

  • La ataxia cerebelosa, a genetic disease that attacks the cerebellum and is the most critical health problem in this breed. Puppies that have received a carrier gene from both parents die before their first birthday. However, nowadays it is extremely rare, since carrier individuals are eliminated from breeding programs. A breeder of Spinone worthy of the name must be able to show that parents are not carriers, based on test results;
  • Hip and elbow dysplasia, joint problems that make movement difficult;
    gastric dilation-torsion, often related to too fast a food intake, which can be fatal without prompt veterinary intervention;
  • Entropion and ectropion, malformations of the eyelid that can be surgically corrected if problematic;
    Hypothyroidism, a hormonal deficiency that causes a slowdown in bodily functions;
  • Cancer (bone, liver, base…), which according to a joint study by the British Kennel Club and the British Small Animal Veterinary Association is, with difference, the main cause of mortality in this breed, with a 45% of deaths.

In addition, the floppy, hairy ears of the Spinone they get dirty easily. They can become infected quickly if they are not cleaned every week and after each bath.

Despite its lack of undercoat and its Italian origins, adapts quite well to different climates and is resistant to both heat and cold, but extreme temperatures are hard to bear. A shelter is necessary so that it can be in the shade when the thermometer exceeds 30 °, and doesn't particularly appreciate spending the night outside when it's -10 °.

Last but not least, the Italian griffon not very prone to obesity, especially if you have enough opportunity to exercise. However, a responsible handler should regularly make sure that everything is in order by taking the time to weigh your dog.

Life expectancy

Of 12 to 13 years

Grooming

The maintenance of Italian Spinone is simple, but it requires some discipline, as it can be difficult and time consuming if not done regularly.

The absence of undercoat means that you only lose a small amount of hair. A weekly brushing is enough to remove dirt, remove dead hairs and untangle knots from their fur. The most frequent molt is not necessarily necessary during the fall and spring, since the lack of undercoat makes the shedding not very pronounced. On the other hand, if “forget” one or two grooming sessions, the situation is complicated: debris accumulates and knots form that can no longer be untangled with the brush. Then there is no choice but to undo them manually or even cut them with a chisel. Depending on the state of the coat, this can sometimes take more than an hour.

In any case, rarely need a bath, unless it is especially dirty or smelly after a trip. Except for exceptions, two or three bathrooms a year are more than enough, and every time a mild dog shampoo should be used.

Weekly grooming sessions are also an opportunity to clean your dog's eyes and brush his teeth.. Neither should you neglect the care of the ears: hanging and furry ears tend to catch dirt, so the risk of infection is high. Can be cleaned with a damp cloth.

In addition, beard tends to trap moisture and becomes smelly. For this reason, should be towel dried often and cleaned from time to time.

Last but not least, if you spend a lot of time outdoors, wear and tear is usually enough to file the claws of the Italian Spinone, that grow faster than most other dogs. If they become too long and may bother or hurt you, must be trimmed with a special nail clipper.

Use

The Italian Spinone it is above all a hunting dog, a mission that has been fulfilling for centuries and in which it stands out. Your ability to point methodically, making game disappear and recover makes them very versatile hunting dogs. This is all the more true since, how your name illustrates, derived from the Italian word for bramble, are able to sneak into the thorniest thickets in search of small game. It is also very resistant.

When not used for hunting, can be used to show off their qualities in various dog sports, like agility or obedience. They are also good watchdogs, but their lack of aggressiveness and the fact that they bark very little disqualifies them as guardians. Having said that, it's awesome enough that most malicious people get past it.

Last but not least, the Italian griffon he is also a wonderful companion dog, loving and totally devoted to his family. It can be the ideal companion for an active owner who wants to always have his dog by his side when going for a walk or hiking.

Price

The price of a puppy Italian Spinone is of some 800 to 1000 euros in Europe. In Canada and the United States, is usually between 1500 and 1800 $.

In all cases, there is no noticeable price difference between males and females.

Characteristics “Italian Spinone”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Italian Spinone” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “Italian Spinone”

Photos:

1 – Solid white Spinone italiano. by Alephalpha, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
2 – A brown roan Spinone Italiano by Alephalpha, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – Spinoni italiani by francesco napoli
4 – Spinoni italiani by francesco napoli
5 – Brown roan spinone italiano. Risky Business Oliver Di La Ros by Timberdoodle Kennels, Ron & Pat Rosinski (User:Rrosinski), CC BY-SA 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons
6 – This is a Spinone, an italian pointing dog. Coatcolor is white-orange by Alephalpha, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Videos “Italian Spinone”

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 107
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.3: Griffon type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.3: Griffon type
  • AKCHound
  • CKCMiscellaneous
  • ​KC – Hunting dog
  • UKCGun Dog

FCI breed standard “Italian Spinone”

FCIFCI – “Italian Spinone”
Italian Spinone FCI

Alternative names:

    1. Spinone, Bracco Spinoso, Italian Spinone, Italian Griffon, Italian Wire-haired Pointer, Italian Coarse-haired Pointer (English).
    2. Spinone italien (French).
    3. Italienischer Griffon, Spinone, Rauhaariger italienischer Vorstehhund, Italian Griffon, italienischer Spinone (German).
    4. Spinone (Portuguese).
    5. Espinone, Grifón italiano, Italiano de pelo duro (Spanish).

Italian short-haired Segugio
Italia FCI 337 - Medium-sized Hounds

Italian short-haired Segugio

The Italian short-haired Segugio it is a dog with a stable temperament, of a soft but not very outgoing expression.

Content

History

The Italian hound It, according to the vast majority of authors, a dog with very ancient origins. It is believed, in fact, descended from hunting dogs that lived from ancient Egypt, they reached the shores of the Mediterranean Sea, and therefore also to Italy, thanks to the Phoenician merchants. Many Egyptian drawings dating from the time of the pharaohs show the presence of dogs very similar to the current one Italian hound.

His best period is the Renaissance, when its level was improved and its great diffusion began. The race then underwent a slow and inexorable decline until, from the beginning of the 20th century, the Italian hound it became very popular again.

The modern history of Italian hound started on 1920, year in which the Technical Committee of the Society of Hound Hobbyists drew up the first breed standard that a few years later, in 1929 to be exact, was approved by the Italian Kennel Club. At that time there was a single standard that unified the Italian Rough-Haired Hound and to the “Italian short-haired Segugio“; in 1976 came the prohibition of mating between the two varieties; then, in 1989, the ENCI (Ente Nazionale della Cinofilia Italiana) passed two different standards, standards that were later also recognized by the FCI which classified them in the group 6, among hound-type dogs, and related breeds.

The Italian short-haired Segugio probably has the same origins as the “Italian Rough-Haired Hound“; in fact, in almost the entire peninsula both varieties of hounds have always coexisted.

Physical characteristics “Italian short-haired Segugio”

Italian Hound, Short-haired
A female Italian Hound, Short-haired. Colour: black & tan by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

The Italian short-haired Segugio represents perfection for those who care about physical appearance: in fact, has no fat and is very muscular. This physical characteristic, combined with a regular body, makes it particularly fast and suitable for running. It's not a coincidence, in fact, get tired only after vigorous physical activity.

Hair is shaved all over the body, dense, dense and smooth.

The allowed colors are:

– Fawn unicolor in all its gradations.
– Black and Tan.

Fawn dogs may have a white muzzle and skull, a white star on the chest, white on the neck, metacarpos, metatarsos, feet and tip of tail.

The height of the males ranges from 52 and 58 cm., that of the females between 48 and 56 cm.. The weight can vary between 18 and 28 kg.

Character and skills “Italian short-haired Segugio”

Alive and bold. Never aggressive towards humans; rarely towards other dogs. It does not bite. Suits austere food and country kennels. Not conspicuously affectionate, but constantly needs the presence and consideration of the owner, who often identifies with the one who accompanies him during the hunt.

If he is well-maintained and has a breed-appropriate lifestyle, the Italian short-haired Segugio You can live up 12 or 13 years. This is because this type of dog is not predisposed to particular diseases derived from its breed.

Those who love them say that…

“I did not choose to live with a “Hound”, I mean it was not a choice out of passion for this breed… it happened to me! It turns out that I share my life with a “Hound”. It was and still is the most amazing experience of my life. Live with a “Hound” means learning to have time, a lot of time to walk “only” exploring life, silent. It is learning that you can stay in the forest for hours without doing anything other than living and discovering the forest. And that's it. The “Hound” teaches you not to pay attention to appearances, to pursue your passions tenaciously while those who look at you think you are just sniffing. He is an extremely sensitive partner but at the same time proud and independent. Living with Chloe is an adventure, made of constant and subtle balances between sharing and the search for individuality, the desire for freedom and the need to feel close to each other, is to learn every day to discover and respect yourself”.

Silvia De Cristofaro

Videos “Italian short-haired Segugio”

segugio italiano sofiko evros 2/7/2017 Εκπαιδευτικό
Segugio Italiano fulvo a pelo raso (Alexia)-1/1

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 337
  • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
  • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
  • ​KCHoundy

FCI breed standard “Italian short-haired Segugio”

“Italian short-haired Segugio” FCI Italian shaggy hound FCI

Italian Rough-Haired Hound
Italia FCI 198 - Medium-sized Hounds

Italian Rough-Haired Hound

The Italian Rough-Haired Hound is reserved, wise, calm and thoughtful in his work.

Content

History

The Italian hound It, according to the vast majority of authors, a dog with very ancient origins. It is believed, in fact, descended from hunting dogs that lived from ancient Egypt, they reached the shores of the Mediterranean Sea, and therefore also to Italy, thanks to the Phoenician merchants. Many Egyptian drawings dating from the time of the pharaohs show the presence of dogs very similar to the current one Italian hound.

His best period is the Renaissance, when its level was improved and its great diffusion began. The race then underwent a slow and inexorable decline until, from the beginning of the 20th century, the Italian hound it became very popular again.

The modern history of Italian hound started on 1920, year in which the Technical Committee of the Society of Hound Hobbyists drew up the first breed standard that a few years later, in 1929 to be exact, was approved by the Italian Kennel Club. At that time there was a single standard that unified the Italian Rough-Haired Hound and to the “Italian short-haired Segugio“; in 1976 came the prohibition of mating between the two varieties; then, in 1989, the ENCI (Ente Nazionale della Cinofilia Italiana) passed two different standards, standards that were later also recognized by the FCI which classified them in the group 6, among hound-type dogs, and related breeds.

The Italian Rough-Haired Hound probably has the same origins as the “Italian short-haired Segugio“; in fact, in almost the entire peninsula both varieties of hounds have always coexisted.

Photo: myanimallife

Physical characteristics “Italian Rough-Haired Hound”

Italian Wirehaired Hound

Is similar to the “Italian short-haired Segugio”. It differs mainly by the coat, made up of coarse hair no more than two inches long, but thinner and shorter on the tail, ears and head; the coat colors are fawn and fiery black (both with white spots allowed, if they are well located).

For the standard it has minimum and maximum cross heights greater than two centimeters compared to the “Italian short-haired Segugio”: therefore it is slightly larger. She is also believed to have a calmer and more thoughtful temperament than her satin-haired variant., and that this is reflected in a slightly different approach to hunting.

Height at withers varies in male from 52 to 60 cm and in the female of 50 to 58 cm.. In the case of an excellent subject there is a tolerance of two centimeters more or less. Weight may vary in males of 20 to 28 kg and females in 18 to 26 kg. The length of the trunk is identical to the height at the withers.

Character and skills “Italian Rough-Haired Hound”

Great hunter and secret companion. It is used and fits perfectly both in the mountains and on the flat and in the most rugged terrain. It is equipped with resistance, as well as with good speed and works with commitment and passion both in isolation and in the diving suit.

In comparison with the “Italian short-haired Segugio”, the Italian Rough-Haired Hound is more reserved, less exuberant, wise, calm and thoughtful in his work. A gentle look, friendly, but proud and wrapped in a halo of melancholy. A strong and very nice voice.

This dog is first and foremost a working dog, and is rarely kept as a pet.

Videos “Italian Rough-Haired Hound”

SEGUGIO ITALIANO No10 Con sottotitoli in Italiano. Guarda ora a http://www.tstv.gr/it.html
ITALIAN SEGUGIO documentary trailer

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 198
  • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
  • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
  • ​KCHoundy

FCI breed standard “Italian Rough-Haired Hound”

“Italian Rough-Haired Hound” FCI Italian Wirehaired Hound FCI

Istrian Coarse-haired Hound
Croacia FCI 152 . Medium-sized Hounds

Istrian Coarse-haired Hound

The Istrian Coarse-haired Hound it is an excellent hound for hunting hare and fox.

Content

History

His story matches that of Istrian Shorthaired Hound, but the iconography in words and images is much more limited, as long-haired dogs are generally less attractive for renderings due to their outward appearance. However, the Istrian Coarse-haired Hound was described in detail by B. Laska in 1896 and 1905: under the name of “barbini” these hard elo hound dogs were put up for sale in the Pazin and Buzet area in Istria. During World War I the breed was almost extinct. From 1924 these dogs were registered in the Croatian Stallion Book. The FCI recognized the breed in 1948. The first standard dates back to 1969.

Photos:

1 – Istrian Wire-haired Hound by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1583815

Physical characteristics

The Istrian Coarse-haired Hound has strong and robust bones. With a stern expression, gives the deceptive impression of being a dark and taciturn animal. His somewhat hairy appearance was the cause of his near disappearance, as it is physically repulsive to some due to its coarse fur. However, its deceptive appearance hides a wonderful character and very beautiful qualities.

HEIGHT
Between 45 and 58 cm. (17,72 to 22,83 inches) for the male
Between 45 and 58 cm. (17,72 to 22,83 inches) for the female

WEIGHT
Between 16 and 24 kg (35,27 to 52,91 pounds) for the male
Between 16 and 24 kg (35,27 to 52,91 pounds) for the female

COLOR
Its fur is white with orange spots, more or less big, on the body and often at the beginning of the tail. Their ears are generally orange.

HAIR
Her hair is straight, hard and pointed. It usually measures between 5 and 10 cm long.

MORPHOLOGY
Its head has a domed skull and a slightly pointed cap. His big eyes are dark. Its slender ears are well set on the cheeks and tend to flare towards the middle. His nose is black. Its tail is quite long and reaches the hock.

Character and skills

His character is that of a gentle dog, obedient and calm at home, while hunting is active, independent and passionate. His temperament is moderately lively, expression indicative of a calm and balanced nature, the look is gloomy. His bark is loud, moderate to deep.

He stands out for his immense diligence, it is resistant and persistent. Can perform excellently even in the toughest terrain and weather conditions. The track never leaves. It is mainly used for hunting wild boar, Deer, foxes and hares.

Training / Education:

Education is not that simple. Because when hunting he always depends on himself and cannot wait for the hunter's instructions, is suitable for a wide autonomy, the owner cannot avoid the servile obedience of this breed. You need in this direction a little understanding from the owner or coach.

No harsh training methods, it would only interrupt her relationship with the man, what would be a double shame. Requires a certain amount of patience and empathy, benign and yet a totally consistent approach to both education and training. More than punishment it will help stimulate the positive voice (compliment, stimulus) and the material (a treat).

Care and health

This robust and resistant dog does not suffer from any genetic disease or any particular pathology associated with the breed. His health is excellent and he rarely gets sick.

WATCH OUT

Its rough appearance requires regular brushing to maintain its coat and ensure good health.

Images Istrian Coarse-haired Hound

Photos:

1 – A female Istrian Hound, Coarse-haired. Colour: white & orange by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
2 – Istrian Wire-haired Hound by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/1583811
3 – Istrian Wire-haired Hound by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1583803
4 – Istrian Wire-haired Hound by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Istrian_hound2.jpg
5 – Istrian Coarse-haired Hound at a dog show in Zadar, Croatia (CACIB 2006.) by Mirta12, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
6 – ISTARSKI OSTRODLAKI GONIC by www.youtube.com

Videos Istrian Coarse-haired Hound

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 152
  • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
  • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.1: Large-sized Hounds.
  • UKCScenthound Group

FCI standard Istrian Coarse-haired Hound

Istrian Coarse-haired Hound FCI Istrian Coarse-haired Hound FCI

Alternative names:

    1. Istrian Rough-coated Hound, Istrian Wire-haired Hound (English).
    2. Chien courant d’Istrie à poil dur (French).
    3. Rauhhaarige Istrische Bracke (German).
    4. Em croata: istarski ostrodlaki gonic (Portuguese).
    5. En croata, istarski oštrodlaki gonič (Spanish).

Istrian Shorthaired Hound
Croacia FCI 151 . Medium-sized Hounds

Istrian Shorthaired Hound

There is also a “Istrian Coarse-haired Hound” and slightly larger.

Content

History

The Istrian Shorthaired Hound is an ancient breed of hound dog originating from Istria, whose origins are lost in dark prehistory. The frescoes (1474, Chapel of the Virgin Mary in Beram, near Pazin), the paintings (including Titian, first half of the 18th century), and the chronicles (1719, Bishop Bakic of Djakovo) bear witness to it.

The Istrian Shorthaired Hound, highly appreciated for its excellent hunting qualities, it was sold from Istria to neighboring countries. The first inscriptions in the herd book date from 1924, the breed was recognized by the FCI already in 1949, but the standard wasn't published until 1973.

Today, the Istrian Shorthaired Hound it is quite common in and around Istria and is still very popular with hunters due to its excellent characteristics.

Photos:

1 – Istrian Shorthaired Hound at a dog show in Zadar, Croatia (CACIB 2006.) by Mirta12, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics Istrian Shorthaired Hound

The Istrian Shorthaired Hound he is a medium sized running dog, who appears elegant and distinguished in his build and movements. The height at the withers in both males and females is between 44 and 56 cm., the weight of the dogs is 14 to 20 kg, the optimum is 18 kg.

The coat of these dogs is thin, dense and, as its name suggests, short. This short-haired variant is somewhat smaller than the wire-haired version of the Istrian Hound.. The basic color of the coat is white with orange yellow tints. As a whole, the coat is shiny.

The life expectancy of dogs is 12 – 14 years.

Character and skills Istrian Shorthaired Hound

The characteristic of Istrian Shorthaired Hound it's his distinctive hunting instinct. Dogs have always been used as hunting dogs and even today they show the corresponding characteristics. This includes her liveliness and her passion for hunting itself.. Like most hunting dogs, these dogs have little instinct for protection and are therefore quite unsuitable for guarding and protection tasks.

While the Istrian Shorthaired Hound be able to live your hunting instinct and feel fully occupied, has a gentle and friendly disposition. It is obedient and loyal to its owner. Your posture is nice.
In addition, these dogs are smart and insightful, so they must be challenged in this regard as well. If the dogs are not kept according to their nature, they often get stubborn and sometimes even start poaching.

Keeping an Istrian Shorthaired Hound

The Istrian Shorthaired Hound It, by its nature, first of all a tracking dog. It is especially suitable for hunting foxes and hares and is used almost exclusively for this purpose in its native country.. It is important that the dogs of this breed are kept by a hunter and encourage them to go hunting and take the trail., so it should be considered as an example for animals. Despite your gentle nature, they are not suitable as pure family dogs, since his pronounced hunting instinct would be neglected too.

Istrian Shorthaired Hound images

Photos:

2 – Luri the Istrian Shorthaired Hound in a dog shelter in Zadar, Croatia by Mirta12, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – Luri the Istrian Shorthaired Hound in a dog shelter in Zadar, Croatia. He was underweight when the photo was taken by Mirta12, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – Luri the Istrian Shorthaired Hound in a dog shelter in Zadar, Croatia. He was underweight when the photo was taken by Mirta12, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
5 – Istrian Shorthaired Hound Luri in a dog shelter in Zadar. When the photo was taken, he was underweight by Mirta12, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
6 – Istrian Shorthaired Hound puppies at a dog show in Zadar, Croatia (CACIB 2006.) by Mirta12, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Istrian Shorthaired Hound Videos

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 151
  • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
  • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.1: Large-sized Hounds.
  • UKCScenthound Group

FCI standard for the Istrian Shorthaired Hound

FCI Istrian Shorthaired Hound FCI Istrian Shorthaired Hound

Alternative names:

    1. Original name – Istarski Kratkodlaki Gonič (English).
    2. Chien courant d’Istrie à poil ras (French).
    3. Istarski Kratkodlaki Gonič (German).
    4. Istarski kratkodlaki gonic (Nome original) (Portuguese).
    5. Nombre original – Istarski Kratkodlaki (Spanish).

Icelandic Sheepdog
Islandia FCI 289 - Nordic Watchdogs and Herders.

Icelandic Sheepdog

The muzzle expression of the Icelandic Sheepdog recalls a smile that highlights your cheerful temperament.

Content

History

Where does the Icelandic Shepherd Dog come from?

For many centuries the Icelandic Sheepdog was the “Swiss knife” of the lonely farms and workshops of the great North Atlantic island. In the extremely harsh weather they had to herd sheep, keep small vermin, help in hunting, as well as taking care of the house and the farm and especially the children. On the one hand they are considered as shepherd dogs and on the other hand as Nordic Spitz. In any case, they're extremely smart, Agile, flexible and robust man's aides.

Its existence was in grave danger only recently. Due to the diseases introduced and the mixing with pedigree dogs imported legally and illegally to the island, seemed already extinct. Then the Icelanders recognized the danger surrounding their only native dog and took specific measures against him.

Today, this unique breed of dog seems to be above the hill in its population. The Icelandic Sheepdog enjoys increasing popularity outside Iceland. Genetically speaking, has been able to maintain his Nordic identity. This is confirmed by at least a thorough genetic analysis from 2017 of more than 100 breeds of dogs by a team of geneticists led by Heidi Parker.

The Icelandic dog has become very popular outside of his original home as a friendly, exciting and fascinating companion and family dog. It still retains much of its original acting ability, expressed in his desire to move, to work with friends and to be very alert. In 1972 was officially recognized by the FCI (Fédération Cynologique Internationale).

Physical characteristics

The Icelandic Sheepdog of “Islenskur Fjárhundur” it is a very old breed of dog and the only one in Iceland. The Icelandic dog is a medium-sized dog, which is coughy and only at first glance resembles a medium-sized dog. It has a dense fur, weather insensitive and robust. The top layer is medium or long, with a dense, soft sub-hair. There are Icelandic dogs with short and long hair. Different colors are allowed, from tanning to cream, chocolate brown, grey or black. Dogs should always have white markings.

The standard describes its overall appearance in this way:

The Icelandic Sheepdog is a Nordic grazing Spitz; it's a little less than medium-sized and has pointed ears and a screwed tail. Seen on side, has a rectangular format, namely, the length of your body from the tip of your nose to the tip of your buttock exceeds your height to the cross. The depth of the chest box is equal to the length of the front legs.

How big is an Icelandic Sheepdog?

Males must have a height at the cross of some 46 centimeters, the females 42 centimeters. The standard does not give any information about weight.

Longevity of an Icelandic Sheepdog

A Icelandic dog seriously raised must have a life expectancy of 12 years or more.

Character and skills

The Icelandic Sheepdog remains an agile grazing dog and a watchdog at the center of his being. However, outside Iceland, usually only raised as a companion dog. This is not a disadvantage. Rather he finds very well in his current role as family dog and companion. But it's still very agile and needs your workload. He feels comfortable watching and protecting and also likes to bark. At the same time it is a very friendly family dog that turns to people. He is considered very fond of children.

The official rule correctly describes its character as follows:

The Icelandic Sheepdog it's a sturdy grazing dog, agile and noisy and, therefore, extremely useful for grazing and driving cattle in pastures and mountains, as well as for tracking lost sheep. He is alert by nature and welcomes every visitor enthusiastically without being aggressive. His hunting instinct is underdeveloped. The Icelandic Sheepdog is happy, friendly, curious, playful and not afraid.

The Icelandic Sheepdog is definitely suitable for the ambitious beginner.

Care, health and diseases

How much care does an Icelandic Sheepdog need?

An Icelandic dog needs to be roasted during fur change. The top and bottom layer should be brushed intensely.

Is there a typical breed disease in Icelandic dogs?

The Icelandic Sheepdog it's essentially a healthy and robust breed of dog.

What food is best for an Icelandic dog?

The Icelandic Sheepdog is a trouble-free and unre demanding food. Of course, High quality food is good for your health and test. Like most dogs, sometimes he likes a bone of fleshy beef and fresh meat.

Considerations before purchase

Where can you buy an Icelandic dog?

If you are interested in a Icelandic Sheepdog, you should look for a local Icelandic dog breeder who is affiliated with an official Nordic dog club. You should fix this in time., because puppies are rare.

Icelandic Sheepdog Education and Maintenance

Do I want an Icelandic dog?

The Icelandic Shepherd Dog is a friendly and breus dog. He wants to integrate into the family and can fit in without problems. Ideally a house with a garden in the countryside. But that's not an obligation.. You can also keep it in an apartment in the city, whenever you deal with him every day.

The Icelandic Sheepdog is a loving member of the family and a great companion for children. Welcome visitors amicably and stormily. Their cordiality is contagious. If you get too bored, you can spend your energy on furniture or become a thief.

Since the Icelandic Sheepdog has little hunting instinct these days, the excursions with him to nature are quite relaxed. With an Icelandic dog you can go on a trip without problems. In the car – just by the hair – an aluminum transport box is recommended.

A Icelandic Sheepdog needs to be looked after by fur. It is very important that humans and dogs have a common interest in a lot of movement and in exploring nature. Icelandic dog is not a sofa stuffed animal.

He can be trained very well. He is open and honest and likes to work alongside his master or carer. Art lies in finding the right level of consistency and guidance for this very lively and at the same time sensitive and intelligent dog. The decisive basis is always a close emotional bond and mutual trust. Because of their good behavior, you can easily do, a certain amount of work is a basic requirement. A frustrated Icelandic dog won't thank you as an obedient companion. But this is only in the possession of your caregiver. From puppy, you have to keep an eye on your eagerness to report, which is related to the bark of joy. Here you must put the strict reins, if you don't live on a lonely, lonely property. Once again, the Icelandic Sheepdog is more effective than any alarm system.

Icelandic Sheepdog Review

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Icelandic Sheepdog” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Training ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitability of the apartment ?

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Can be alone all day ?

Rated 1 out of 5
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitable as a first dog ?

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Weight gain ?

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Intelligence ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Kindness with child ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to bite ?

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to bark ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to flee ?

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss force ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitable as a guard dog ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Joy ?

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendliness ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Power level ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images of the Icelandic Sheepdog

Photos:

1 – Icelandic Sheepdog, remembering a Corgis by Thomas Quine / CC BY-SA
2 – Icelandic Sheepdog by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/237527
3 – Icelandic Sheepdog by Canarian / CC BY-SA
4 – Icelandic Sheepdog by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/237516
5 – Icelandic Sheepdog by Alan Levine / CC BY
6 – Icelandic Sheepdog by Swedish Fair from Sweden / CC BY

Icelandic Sheepdog Videos

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 289
  • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
  • Section 3: Nordic Watchdogs and Herders. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 3 Nordic Watchdogs and Herders..
    • AKC – Nordic Watchdogs and Herders.
    • CKC – Nordic Watchdogs and Herders.
    • UKC – Nordic Watchdogs and Herders.

    FCI breed standard Icelandic Sheepdog

    Icelandic Sheepdog FCI Icelandic Sheepdog FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Icelandic Spitz, Iceland Dog, Íslenskur fjárhundur, Islandsk, Fårehund, Friaar Dog, Canis Islandicus (English).
      2. Berger islandais, Berger d’IslandeFrench).
      3. Isländischer Spitz, Isländischer Schäferhund (German).
      4. Islenskur fjárhundur (Portuguese).
      5. Íslenskur Fjárhundur (Spanish).

    Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier
    Irlanda FCI 302 . Large and medium sized Terriers

    Glen of Imaal Terrier

    It is generally believed that Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier is less excitable than other Terriers, although it takes action immediately when prompted.

    Content

    History

    The Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier originates from the Irish east coast, in county wicklow, which is in the ravine (=Valle) the Imaal. From this rough and wild valley this very old breed got its name. It was first mentioned around 1575.

    Like old farm dog, the Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier he had a very busy life and worked hard for his master. Their job was to catch rats and mice on farms and operate smaller work machines such as churns and shredders., where I had to run with leather straps. He also accompanied his master on the fox hunt, the Badger and Otter. He worked in silence and if necessary he fought to the death. Before it was banned in Ireland, the Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier also used in questionable dogfights. Of course, he was also the most loyal friend and guarded the house and the yard, never shied away from facing a much bigger and stronger opponent.

    For its owner, the Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier was as important as his daily bread, although undemanding, frugal and tough enough to share the barren life of farmers. This harsh life brought with it a ruthless selection. Only the toughest and most frugal Terriers survived, what characterizes the breed until today.

    The pedigree of Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier it's an irish secret to this day. In Ireland itself, this Terrier has never been numerous and did not leave his ancestral home until 1980, when the owners preserved him as a true child of nature, marked by great courage, skill and endurance. In 1933 the breed was officially recognized by the Irish Kennel Club ( I.K.C.). The international recognition of the F.C.I. continued on 1981.

    Physical characteristics

    The Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier it is small but strong and robust and weighs up to 16 kilograms with a maximum height at the withers of 36 centimeters. Its relatively small forward leaning ears are notable.. Its coat is medium length and consists of a rough top layer and a smooth bottom layer. It can be wheat colored, tabby blue or in different shades of red and gold. In the case of a dark colored coat, a black-blue mask is common, which can also show as stripes over the ears, along the back and tail, so these marks become clearly clearer with increasing age.

    Character and skills

    Today the Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier it is a gentle and docile family dog. Its balanced and faithful nature, as well as his average temperament make life with him very pleasant. The Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier is very affectionate, always happy and in a good mood and preferably “in the middle”. Enjoy all the attention and care, but without demanding anything. Rather, follows her around with her alert gaze and once she has gained attention, shows his joy for it with strong tail blows. If the joy is particularly great, his temperament can also run away with him.

    Children are welcome as playmates, if they show him the respect that he shows. Pets are accepted by him without problems when they get used to each other. The Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier she is always friendly with strangers, and with his contagious joy, her charm and her irresistible gaze quickly has all the sympathies on her side. After all, it is a terrier that radiates a lot of personality. He is open-minded and not afraid to learn new things. He likes to be everywhere with his nose. In general, everything that is new – Weird people, new environments, an object that has not been there before – it is very interesting and has to be examined very carefully. The Irish Glen of Imaal Terrier is a particularly attentive observer. Along with her charming nature and her desire to do everything right, is very adaptable and develops a very close relationship with his family. He likes to accompany them whenever possible. Like a very people-oriented terrier, I would defend them in an emergency, even to death. Feel more comfortable in your proximity.

    What characterizes him Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier is his great courage, his self-confidence and his intelligence above average. Sufficient workload and intellectual work are important to the intelligent four-legged friend. Enjoy almost all activities, be it sports with dogs, search games or learning tricks – is available for all kinds of fun.

    Despite its short legs, it is very agile, due to his muscular physique, a small power. Its special features are its slightly curved front legs with the legs turned outwards, his big head and his pronounced chest. The Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier it is a very balanced dog, that radiates great calm on the one hand, but on the other hand you are immediately ready for action and, if required, vigorously watches over and defends your home and family.

    The Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier – the little irish with a big heart

    Like a silent working terrier it hardly barks. It is also less excitable than other terriers. Sometimes you can see the Irish stubbornness, but the Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier not resentful. Due to its origin it does not tolerate heat very well, he likes harsh weather and when the wind blows around his nose. But if the chemistry is not correct, or if the other dog brazenly approaches him, you will receive the message – “Glen doesn't like your attitude”. Therefore, it is important to socialize with other dogs from the beginning and to have contact with many dogs of different ages.

    Care “Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier”

    Because the Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier still very original and not over-bred, still a very healthy and robust breed. Its coat has a rough top coat with a smooth undercoat that needs to be trimmed. In all other respects, his self-cleaning coat is very easy to care for. Coat color is wheat or Brindle (Blue striped).

    A consistent but loving upbringing makes the Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier a faithful companion, nice and gentle, which is easy to handle.

    Life expectancy “Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier”

    The Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier is considered an original dog breed, that is in good health and robustness due to the absence of hereditary diseases caused by breeding. If maintained in a species-appropriate manner, will live an average of twelve years.

    Images “Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier”

    Photos:

    1 – Irish Glen of Imaal Terrier during International show of dogs in Katowice – Saucer, Poland. Breeder – Piotr Kuźnik, http://www.irishglen.pl/ by Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA
    2 – Irish Glen of Imaal Terrier during International show of dogs in Katowice – Saucer, Poland. Breeder – Piotr Kuźnik, http://www.irishglen.pl/ by Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA
    3 – Adult w:Glen of Imaal Terrier by photo by Scoo / CC BY-SA
    4 – Irish Glen of Imaal Terrier during International show of dogs in Katowice – Saucer, Poland. Breeder – Piotr Kuźnik, http://www.irishglen.pl/ by Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA
    5 – Irish Glen of Imaal Terrier during International show of dogs in Katowice – Saucer, Poland. Breeder – Piotr Kuźnik, http://www.irishglen.pl/ by Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA
    6 – Glen of Imaalinterrieri by Sami Kronqvist / CC BY-SA

    Videos “Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier”

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 302
    • Group 3: Terriers.
    • Section 1: Large and medium-sized Terriers. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Terriers 1 Large and medium-sized terriers.
    • AKC – Terriers
    • ANKC – Terriers
    • CKC – Terriers
    • ​KC – Terriers
    • NZKC – Terriers
    • UKC – Terriers

    FCI standard of the breed Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier

    IRISH GLEN OF IMAAL TERRIER FCI IRISH GLEN OF IMAAL TERRIER FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Irish Glenn of Imaal Terrier, Wicklow Terrier, Glen, Glennie (English).
      2. Irish Glen of Imaal Terrier (French).
      3. Irish Glen of Imaal Terrier (German).
      4. Glen of imaal terrier (Portuguese).
      5. Glen, Wicklow Terrier, Glen of Imaal Terrier, Irish Glen of Imaal Terrier (Spanish).

    Irish Red and White Setter
    Irlanda FCI 330 . Setter

    Setter Irlandés Rojo y Blanco

    Irish hunters consider the Irish Red and White Setter higher than Irish Red Setter because of its calmer temperament and because it is less visible in the autumn landscape.

    Content

    History

    The Irish Setter it was probably well known in the late 17th century. Outside of ireland, little is known about the existence of two varieties of Irish Setter: the Irish Red and White Setter and the Irish Red Setter. It is the red and white variety that preceded the other, and it is a judicious selection that developed the uniform red color.

    When the Irish setters were first exhibited shortly after the middle of the 19th century, there was great confusion about its color. At the end of the 19th century, the red variety had eclipsed the red and white, which became so rare that the breed was thought to be extinct.

    In the Decade of 1920, the breeders tried to revive the breed and in 1944 the breed was sufficiently recovered to form a club. In the news, the breed is enjoying a slight revival, and you can find many Irish Red and White Setter in exhibitions and fields.

    The current club, the Labor and Exhibition Society of the Irish Red and White Setter, was founded in 1981. Thanks to your efforts and your line of action, the breed is now well established nationally and internationally.

    The Irish Red and White Setter, in competition with other breeds of Pointing Dogs, has been successful in field trials, and there are currently a good number of working and exhibition champions.

    Originally all Irish Setter were, in its most, red, or red and white, but around 1880 breeders began to prefer the variety of solid red color and as a result, the race was on verge of extinction.

    Photo: irwskingspeaks.nl

    Physical characteristics

    Exist 2 varieties of Irish Setter, that differ both by their morphology and by their behavior in the field.

    The Irish Red Setter can be compared to the thoroughbred horse, all steel and tension, no superfluous meat or thick muscles. It must give the impression of extreme speed and everything about it contributes to this: dry fabrics (light but strong skeleton), long, dense muscles, thin and tight skin, without jowl.

    The Irish Red and White Setter is similar to the Hunter: very resistant, powerful and robust. The chest is more rounded than the red one and its skin is thicker.

    The coat is white with solid red spots.

    Height and weight

      ▷ Male size: Of 62 to 66 cm.

      ▷ Female size: Of 57 to 61 cm.

      ▷ Male weight: Of 20 to 25 kg

      ▷ Female weight: Of 18 to 23 kg

    Character and skills

    The kind and caring Irish Red and White Setter not only is it a popular hunting dog. Thanks to its excellent ability to smell and its strong natural instincts to point and recover, does double duty as a friend of the family. He likes children and can fit in well in a family with children, with the caveat that he's quite rambunctious, especially when it's a puppy, and should always be supervised when there are young children.

    The Irish Red and White Setter is always alert, so it is a good watchdog, but does not have the protective nature of a guard dog. In general, gets along well with other dogs and is friendly with cats when raised with them. But keep in mind that it only has a score of 3 in “kindness to cats” on a scale of 1 to 5.

    This is an active sporty dog ​​that needs to exercise daily. Take it for a run, to take a long walk, walking him for half an hour twice a day or playing ball until his arms hurt. All of these activities will help you satisfy your need to be outside doing something.. If you are interested in dog sports, is an excellent candidate for agility, the flyball, obedience, the rally and the crawl. It is nice, friendly and mild-mannered once he's past the puppy stage, and it also has wood to be a good therapy dog ​​to visit facilities such as nursing homes and children's hospitals.

    In the countryside, the Irish Red and White Setter work at a moderate pace, without ever straying too far from the hunter. He is full of curiosity and seeks hunting in the field. Choose it if your hunting ground is wooded or near a river or lake (better suited to large open spaces).

    With regard to training, the Irish Red and White Setter may be a contradiction. He's kind but headstrong, smart but slow to mature. Train him with a light touch so as not to distort his determination, his courage and his high spirit.

    Health

    All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, like all people have the potential to inherit diseases. Run away from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee for the puppies, to tell you that the breed has no known problems or to keep puppies isolated from the main part of the house for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about the breed's health problems and the incidence with which they occur.

    The Irish Red and White Setter have health problems that may be cause for concern, especially if the breeder is not carefully examined. Among them are hip dysplasia, eye problems such as cataracts and progressive retinal atrophy, hypothyroidism and an immune disorder called canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD). A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in their lines..

    Do not buy a puppy from a breeder who cannot provide you with written documentation that the parents have been exempted from health issues affecting the breed. Make the dogs are “reviewed by the veterinarian” not a substitute for genetic health testing.

    Inform your dog's breeder of any serious illness. If the breeders do not know that a health problem has appeared in their line, cannot take steps to eradicate it.

    Grooming

    The Irish Red and White Setter has a silky coat that removes dirt easily. Also loose hair, but in a moderate way. The coat should look natural and, except for the bottom of the feet, does not need to be shaved or trimmed.

    Brush and comb the coat a couple of times a week - and whenever the dog has been in the field- taking care to gently remove any tangles or kills in the coat. Regular brushing will keep the coat clean, but you will need to bathe the dog from time to time if the white hair starts to get dirty.

    The rest are basic care. Trim nails when necessary, usually every one to two weeks. Brush teeth frequently with vet-approved pet toothpaste for overall good health and fresh breath.

    Characteristics “Irish Red and White Setter”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Irish Red and White Setter” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images “Irish Red and White Setter”

    Photo:

    1 – Irish Red and White Setter during the international dog show in Rzeszów, Poland. by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – Irish Red and White Setter during the international dog show in Rzeszów, Poland. by by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – Irish Red and White Setter by Ordinary Guy, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – Merlin in the kitchen by Dekker70, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    5 – Irish Red and White Setter during the international dog show in Rzeszów, Polonia by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    6 – Irish Red and White Setter during the international dog show in Rzeszów, Polonia by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Videos “Irish Red and White Setter”

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 330
    • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
    • Section 2: British and Irish Pointers and Setters. 2.2: Setter. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 2: British and Irish Pointers and Setters. 2.2: Setter
    • AKCSporting (FSS)
    • ANKC (Gun dogs)
    • CKCGroup 1 – Sporting dogs
    • ​KC – Gun dog
    • NZKCGundog
    • UKCGun dog breeds

    FCI breed standard “Irish Red and White Setter”

    FCIFCI – “Irish Red and White Setter”
    FCI Irish Red and White Setter

    Alternative names:

      1. Irish R&W Setter, IRWS/span> (inglés).
      2. Setter irlandais rouge et blanc (francés).
      3. Irischer Rot-Weißer Setter (alemán).
      4. (em inglês: Irish Red and White Setter) (portugués).
      5. IRWS (español).
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