German Longhaired Pointer
Alemania FCI 117 . Spaniel type

German Longhaired Pointer

The first thing to keep in mind is that the German Longhaired Pointer is a head to toe hunting dog.

Content

History

The German Longhaired Pointer It is one of the oldest German pointing breeds. Long-haired hunting dogs can already be seen in ancient hunting paintings and tapestries from the Middle Ages, which are very similar to the current ones “Pointing Dogs” German. These dogs were used primarily as hunting dogs to stalk, but also for catching small game in nets.

It is purebred since 1879. On the occasion of an exhibition of the association for the refinement of dog breeds in Hannover, the characteristics of the breed were established, the breed standard. The breed was based on five different breeding lines, bearing the names of authorized stallions that already corresponded to the breed standard at that time.

The German Longhaired Pointer has earned the name of “Old forest dog” in particular for its ability to do very good tracking jobs, to warn the hunter with loud barks when searching and to bring lost animals by following their blood trail. Working in the water is also one of its strengths, which is appreciated by hunters.

Photo: A German long hair called Falko by Wikimedia

Physical characteristics

The breed is bred in brown, Brown and white, and brown and white. The best known and most common is the German Longhaired Pointer pure brown, which may also have white markings on the chest or legs. Taupe comes in gradations from light gray to dark gray and the rare trout gray color variant.

The German Longhaired Pointer it is usually a strong dog, muscular, low constitution and with harmonious body shapes. Males usually have a shoulder height of 63 – 66 cm., the females of 60 – 63 cm.. Has brown eyes, long, well-edged hocks and a tail with a beautiful flag. Your coat should be of medium length and not too lush.

Character and skills

The first thing to keep in mind is that the German Longhaired Pointer he's a hunting dog from head to toe. In the hands of a knowledgeable trainer, is a useful helper in hunting and later in a second job, a very good family dog. The breed is very fond of children and family. But this should not be misunderstood at all. Why “family friendly” does not mean “family dog”. It is a fairly pronounced working dog. The German Longhaired Pointer has the strong drive and willingness to work, either on the hunt or, if required, your substitute in the form of dog sports of all kinds. Therefore, It is not a dog for beginners nor a dog for people who do not want or cannot work intensively with it.

German Longhaired Pointer
“German Longhaired Pointer” during the international dog show in Katowice, Poland

In the practice of hunting, the German Longhaired Pointer is especially praised for its pronounced calm. Is a leading dog, resistant to nerves and of a calm and even-tempered nature. At the same time, he is a kind and peaceful friend with a high threshold for irritation.. However, the German Longhaired Pointer needs a consistent education, competent and sensitive to direct his high intelligence, alert senses and their pronounced willingness to act in the right channels. With such an appropriate atmosphere of character, this breed of dog is a great friend of children, a great family companion also outside of hunting or sports work and in any case a wonderful experience of the association of man and dog.

Aptitudes:

If occasionally offered simply as a family and apartment dog, one should approach such sellers with the utmost caution. Such offers certainly come from dubious sources. As a rule, a German Longhaired Pointer belongs to the hands of a hunter who works with him professionally. If you are not kept for the hunt, must keep busy with long walks in nature or challenges in dog sports. In addition, needs a personal connection with caregiver and family. If the hunting dog does not have a physical or mental challenge, in the long run this will lead to serious behavior problems. It does not belong to a multi-story building and not to the big city. In all other respects, he has no problems and his attitude is undemanding.

Education

A German Longhaired Pointer should only be trained by an experienced owner. It must absolutely come from a recognized breeding of the Association of “Pointing Dogs” German, where parents and puppies were already socialized for their tasks from the litter box onwards. In addition, you need to train and work professionally for hunting or suitable sporting purposes. Only dogs that have successfully passed the demanding fall breeding tests are allowed for breeding. “Schorlemer”. Ask at the breeding clubs of the German Longhaired Pointer.

Health

The race German Longhaired Pointer is served in an exemplary manner by its breeding clubs organized in the Deutsch-Langhaar-Verband. As a result, the average health of the dogs has no problem.

Grooming

Caring for a German Longhaired Pointer is undemanding. Regular brushing of the coat is sufficient.

Buy a “German Longhaired Pointer”

If you are thinking of buying a German Longhaired Pointer, you should be wondering if you can meet the requirements for an appropriate character attitude from this hunting dog. And what during 12 years and more will be your companion on a daily basis. Then you should contact the local breeders who are members of the “Deutsch-Langhaar-Verband“. A puppy of this breed costs around 1000 EUR.

Characteristics “German Longhaired Pointer”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “German Longhaired Pointer” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “German Longhaired Pointer”

Kennels Obenstaat – Puppies German Longhaired Pointer – Introduction to water

“German Longhaired Pointer”

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 117
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type
  • CKCGrupo 1 – Sporting
  • ​KC – Hunting dog
  • UKCGun Dog

FCI breed standard “German Longhaired Pointer”

FCIFCI – “German Longhaired Pointer”
German long-haired pointing dog FCI

Alternative names:

    1. GLP, Pointer (German Longhaired), Langhaar (English).
    2. Langhaar (French).
    3. Deutsch-Langhaar (German).
    4. (em alemão: Deutsch Langhaar Vorstehhund) (Portuguese).
    5. Pointer de pelo largo (Spanish).

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungría FCI 57 . Braque Type

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer they are very close to their family and are affectionate and playful with their family.

Content

History

Appeared somewhere between the steppes of Russia and the Carpathians, the Hungarian Pointer (commonly known as Vizsla, What does it mean “pointer” in Hungarian) has an ancient history, probably thousands of years. He already accompanied the Magyar tribes before they settled in the Carpathian basin, where is present-day Hungary, in the 9th century.

The first references to this dog date back to the 13th century, and more precisely to the story of one of the scribes of King Adelbert III (1235-1270) that recounts the migrations of the Hungarian people, in which the use of a yellowish dog named Vizsla for hunting. It was also depicted in the 14th century in the illustrations of the chronicles written by the Carmelites. Numerous 16th century Hungarian documents also evoke his role as a faithful companion of kings and aristocracy..

While there is no doubt that the Vizsla current is the result of numerous crossbreeds between hunting dogs over the centuries, these were always carried out in order to preserve the original characteristics, as evidenced by the brown nose which is different from most of the others pointers.

Historically, the Vizsla has always had a short coat. However, early twentieth century, in the Decade of 1930, two breeders came up with the idea of ​​a Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer to the breeders club of the country. His goal was to create a dog with all the qualities of the Vizsla, but with a coat that would protect it more effectively from snow and icy water, as well as scratches and scrapes when hunting in the woods.

Although it was debated, the proposal was accepted under certain conditions, including maintaining the same coat color. Jozsef Vasa, breeder of the Hungarian Pointer, y Laszlo Gresznarik, breeder of the German Shorthaired Pointer, crossed two female Vizsla named Csibi and Zsuzsi with a male of German Shorthaired Pointer called Astor von Potat. Two generations later, Selle Day was the first Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer that was shown at a dog show.

It seems that during World War II, when the population was in decline, crosses were also made with other breeds such as the Setter Irish or the Griffon. However, there is no record of this miscegenation in the records kept by Hungarian organizations.

The breed was recognized in 1963 by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI), nine years after the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer. The first specimens were exported to North America in the decade of 1970. More quickly adopted in Canada, to the point of gaining official recognition from the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) in 1977.

In the United States, was not up 2006 and 2014 respectively than the United Kennel Club (UKC) and the American Kennel Club (AKC) they did the same, while they had already recognized the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer in 1960 (AKC) and 1984 (UKC). Its growing presence in Europe also allowed it to be recognized by the British Kennel Club. (KC) in 1991.

Photo: Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer; MVD belongs to the sample dogs of the group 7 of the FCI with proof of work by Broneder, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it is a medium-sized dog that differs from its short-haired cousin by its slightly squarer appearance on average, but also and above all because of the length and texture of its coat.

Its slightly rectangular body is dry and well developed, no superfluous roundness. He leans on legs of solid bones, well structured and with prominent muscles. The legs are oval in shape and end in brown claws.

The tail is wide at the base and tapers to the tip. For years, as a precaution for hunting parties, the queue was shortened by about a quarter. This practice of cutting the tail of dogs (tail docking) is currently prohibited in many territories, including France, Switzerland, Belgium and Quebec.

Braco-Hungaro-de-pelo-duro-1
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

The head of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it is quite wide, with a slightly domed skull at a moderate stop. Ears are back, going down along the cheeks and are slightly shorter than those of the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer. The eyes are oval, medium-sized, and brown according to the coat. The muzzle is quite short and ends in a broad brown nose as well, but darker in color than fur.

It is the latter that clearly distinguishes him from his cousin. Both have a dense, waterproof underlayer, but the top layer of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is longer (2 a 3 cm.) and it has a completely different texture. They are made of wire hair, hard, dense and very dense. These features give it excellent protection against harsh outdoor conditions.. At face level, hair is slightly shorter, except on the eyebrows and especially the beard. This is not very long (2-3cm.), but it is very pronounced and noticeable.

Like his short haired counterpart, the fur of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it's golden wheat, and the spikes may be darker in the shade. Shades of red, brown or light yellow are accepted, but they are not wanted. A small white spot on the chest is possible, as long as it does not exceed 5 cm..

At last, sexual dimorphism is well marked in this breed, the male being significantly larger and more massive than the female.

Character and skills

The character of Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is comparable to the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer, but with the addition of a wet beard when stroked.

They are very close to their family and are affectionate and playful with their own. However, generally feels closer to a particular person among them, whom he considers as his human reference, and it doesn't stop making you feel clearly.

In any case, he is much less open with humans who are not part of his home. This does not mean that he is aggressive or distrustful towards them., but rather indifferent.

However, if you perceive a threat to your family or territory, whether it comes from an unknown human or another animal, he is very protective, not hesitating to scold or even interfere.

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

He behaves in exactly the same way with children. Like this, is close to the little ones of the family, but he prefers to avoid others. You have to be careful when the first one plays with friends, as you may misinterpret some of the second's actions as aggression, and then react inappropriately. Like any other dog of any breed, should not be left alone with a young child without adult supervision.

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer gets along well with his peers, whether they are those you meet on your walks or those who share your home when necessary. Their relationships with other animals are much more complicated, as they soon fall victim to their strong hunting instinct. The domestic cat is usually protected, especially if you have grown up with him since he was young, but a rodent or a bird cannot say the same if he lives next to him in the house or is on a walk. An unknown cat is also likely to be relentlessly chased.

Used for centuries to succeed on long hunting trips, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer still an active dog today. You need to be able to exercise for at least an hour each day to feel comfortable, and he is even happier if he can spend whole days walking in the woods. Therefore, its level of activity implies that it is not suitable for an elderly or very sedentary person.

Hunting is still his favorite activity, and the one that best allows you to express all your qualities. In all other respects, canine research sports (tracking, cavemen…) they are a perfect outlet, to solicit your extraordinary sense of smell.

Obedience and agility are also disciplines that will do you good. More simply, it is also a great companion for cyclists, runners, hikers, nature lovers, mushroom pickers… This is all the more true since it is robust and capable of evolving on all types of terrain., from dense forests to rocky mountains, passing through snowy plains or swamps.

In the city, it is strongly recommended to keep him on a leash to avoid accidents if he runs after a passing cat or small animal. However, once in the desert, it is much more appropriate to let it run free. Of course, learning withdrawal orders is an essential prerequisite, for obvious security reasons. A GPS dog collar is nevertheless a good investment to help locate you if the deer you are chasing has led you into unfamiliar terrain..

In addition, as it does very well in the aquatic environment. Without being particularly fond, he likes to swim once in a while, especially if the place where you live offers this possibility.

Used to hunting quite independently and, Therefore, make decisions for yourself, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer has acquired a certain intelligence coupled with a strong character. A beginning teacher is probably overwhelmed.

If you are independent in your way of acting, does not mean that he likes to be alone. You can wait patiently at home when your family is at work during the day, but should be able to be as much as possible with the rest of the time. In addition, it is likely to hurt if left alone for a whole weekend because it cannot bear the stress caused by the absence of its masters. In addition, just because I'm physically fit to sleep in the garden, even when it's a little cool, does not mean that this is recommended. In fact, to be well in the head, do not keep him away from his family: it's more of an indoor dog, who prefers to watch television at night with his family than to admire the stars alone outside.

This is all the more true as he is surprisingly calm when his exercise needs are met., to the point of being able to live in an apartment, provided it is large enough to accommodate it in good condition. Discreet and well educated, they are not the type to bark at the top of their lungs or howl when dying, and are not usually noticed by the neighbors. In fact, they rarely bark (generally when they perceive a threat), but then they don't stop making themselves heard, since his voice rises a lot.

However, the ideal environment for him is a house with a garden (perfectly fenced) in the countryside. A walk in the city during the same time does not have the same flavor as an outing for a dog accustomed to nature and the great outdoors.

Education

Like all dogs, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer benefits greatly from socialization that begins in their first few weeks and continues through the months that follow. Usually goes smoothly, since then he is particularly open and curious, quickly getting used to the different environments and situations you encounter. It´s, because, the ideal time to get used to the people you will meet regularly in your life (friends, neighbors, veterinary…), but also to take him to all kinds of places and allow him to meet various humans and similar creatures.

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

The education of Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer can give a slightly timid caregiver a hard time, that he would not know how to be respected by his dog. Strong of character and independent, will soon prevail if left alone. However, perfectly suited to beginners, as long as they know how to assert their authority. For this, it is important to establish clear and consistent rules without delay, so much over time (what is prohibited one day is also prohibited the next day) as between the different members of the family (it is not about one person authorizing what another person prohibits), to establish impeccable discipline and ensure that he respects his master's authority. Once you understand that you cannot decide for yourself, accepts the situation and is not the one to monitor the slightest defect and constantly question the established order – If and when, of course, their masters continue to know how to impose themselves when necessary.

On the other hand, educate a Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it's much simpler, fast and effective with methods based on positive reinforcement. Compliments and caresses are a good source of motivation to make her want to learn, and sweets are also valuable allies to motivate him to do what is asked of him. On the other hand, traditional training techniques are doomed to failure, as they are likely to totally destabilize it, making him fearful and insecure.

Last but not least, withdrawal orders are high on the list of things to teach your dog as a priority. In fact, so that you can let him play freely during field trips, which is particularly beneficial for him, must be perfectly assimilated.

Health

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer they are generally robust, with a life expectancy of around 12-14 years, what is in line with the average for dogs of his size.

Their short coat protects them from both heat and cold, allowing them to live in a wide variety of climates. However, not adapted to extremes, and can't sleep outside when freezing, for example, or run in the sun in the middle of a summer heat wave.

No dog is immune to disease, and the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is no exception. In this case, to which it is most exposed are ..:

  • The Hip Dysplasia, a joint problem often favored by a hereditary predisposition, causing pain and difficulty in movement, as well as osteoarthritis with age;
  • Elbow dysplasia, a malformation of the joint, which is also possibly related to a predisposition inherited from parents, and that also causes pain and lameness;
  • Epilepsy, a nervous system disease of often hereditary origin, responsible for more or less frequent and intense seizures. The disease cannot be cured by itself, but your symptoms can be relieved with the help of medication;
  • Addison's disease, a hormonal deficiency that is usually inherited from the parents and manifests itself in various ways: weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, weightloss… The most severe form of the disease is usually fatal, while the chronic form can be kept under control with lifelong treatment;
  • Hemophilia type A, an inherited disorder that prevents blood from clotting properly, and that affects men more than women. May manifest in heavy bleeding, bruising or blood in the urine;
  • Hyperuricosia, a disease also inherited from the parents. Corresponds to an excess of uric acid, leading to the formation of crystals in the urine, which in turn can cause bleeding and kidney failure;
  • Allergies, that can be caused by factors as different as food, the environment or parasites. Allergies can be caused by factors as different as food, the environment or parasites, and most of the time they manifest as itching and redness of the skin;
  • Ear infections, as in most lop-eared dog breeds.

The Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer it is also particularly susceptible to various diseases of the eyes:

  • Progressive retinal atrophy, a degeneration of eye tissue that causes irreparable loss of sight, first at night and then also during the day;
  • Entropion, a defect in the position of the eyelid that can be inherited and causes irritation of the eyeball. The problem can be treated with surgery;
  • Ectropión, an eyelid curl problem also inherited from parents, which also causes eye irritation. Also in this case, an operation remedies the problem;
  • Glaucoma, often hereditary, which is a painful increase in the pressure inside the eye. This leads to blindness if it is not operated as soon as possible.

In addition, people who are used to hunt are particularly exposed to the risk of injuries that this activity implies.

Since many of the diseases to which the breed is predisposed are or may be hereditary, the adoption of a strict breeder of Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer maximizes the probability of getting a healthy animal, and one that stays that way. In fact, a professional breeder not only ensures that puppies are well socialized from their first weeks of life, but also that they do not inherit a hereditary defect from their parents. To achieve this goal, causes various genetic tests to be systematically performed on the breeding stock in question, and excludes all those who may present a risk. You can also have the resulting puppies examined to confirm the absence of a hereditary condition.. In any case, must be able to present the results of the tests performed, plus a certificate of good health from a veterinarian and the puppy's health or vaccination record, that includes all vaccines that have been administered.

In addition, from the moment he arrives home until the end of his life, it is essential to allow your dog to be regularly examined by a veterinarian for a complete health check. This is necessary at least once a year, and more often as you get older, as it allows early detection of a potential problem and action accordingly. These visits are also an opportunity to have immunizations increased when needed.. At the same time, It is also necessary to ensure that antiparasitic treatments of the “child” are renewed throughout the year, so you are never unprotected at this level.

Grooming

Keep warm Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it's quite simple, weekly brushing is enough to keep it clean and healthy. However, she lets go of her undercoat twice a year, in spring and autumn, and daily brushing is recommended to help remove dead hairs.

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

An occasional bath is also necessary, but the frequency of the bath largely depends on the lifestyle of your dog. For example, it is not useless to bathe several times a month an individual who is used for hunting or who often travels through muddy trails in the forest and sleeps inside the house. On the other hand, two or three a year may be perfectly enough for someone else who walks mostly on rocky trails in the mountains and whose place to sleep is in the garage. In any case, a mild shampoo designed specifically for dogs should always be used, as it can damage their fur or skin.

In addition, special attention should be paid to their ears, as their drooping shape means they are potential nests for infection (ear infections, etc.) as soon as dirt or moisture accumulates on them. Therefore, it is important to check and clean them weekly. At the same time, it is important to get used to drying them after a long time in a humid environment, and even more so after swimming in a swamp, lake or stream…

The weekly maintenance session is also an opportunity to examine and, if required, quickly clean the area around the eyes with a damp cloth, again to avoid infections that would be triggered by a deposit of dirt.

As in any dog, oral hygiene is also important. Therefore, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer you should brush your teeth at least once a week, using a toothpaste intended for canine use. This will reduce the deposit of dental plaque., that can cause bad breath, cavities and other diseases by turning into tartar.

In addition, despite what her fairly active lifestyle might have us believe, this dog needs to have its claws trimmed by hand fairly regularly. This is because they are particularly strong and difficult to wear.. On average, must be trimmed every 2 or 3 weeks, but if they are not cut every 2 or 3 weeks, it is enough to stretch your ear when walking on hard ground: if then you hear a kind of click with each step, it is because they have become too long and it is time to cut them. Otherwise, not only could it be difficult for him to walk, but you could also be injured if they broke.

Last but not least, it is recommended to examine it (fur, ears, pads…) after every hunting session or a long stay in the wild, to detect possible cuts or scratches, parasites, thorns…

As in all races, learn how to care for a Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer from a professional (hairdresser or vet) it is the best way to take care of it without risk of damaging or injuring it. It is advisable to accustom him to these different manipulations from a very young age, so that they become a moment of shared pleasure, and not in a task that I try to avoid.

Utilization and training

From the first references to its subject dating from the 13th century, the Hungarian Pointer was introduced as a hunting dog, more precisely like a pointing dog. Already at that time, as well as in later centuries, including current, his mission was to find the game and point the hunter in the direction of it. Versatile, is capable of hunting in all terrains (forests, plains, mountains…) and is not afraid of cold or water. Therefore, used to remove various game pieces, either nude or feathered, usually working alone or possibly with a partner, but rarely in a group.

Even today, hunting is the main mission of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer, and its qualities are recognized in particular by hunters in Central Europe and Great Britain, where it is present in large numbers.

The qualities it mobilizes for hunting (style, obedience, independence…) they also allow you to shine in various canine sports disciplines, either in the crawl, obedience or agility.

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it is also increasingly present in homes as a simple companion dog. Their attachment and energy can be very beneficial to their owners' morale., and the most athletic find in him a companion of choice for their long excursions in nature. In any case, your need for exercise is quite high, which makes it unsuitable for a very sedentary person, for example.

His protective side also makes him a good watchdog, that spares no effort to put intruders to flight, although not as imposing as other races.

Buy a “Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer”

The price of a puppy Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is generally between 600 and 800 EUR, without any significant price difference between males and females.

Whatever the location, and as for all races, the amount requested depends on the more or less prestigious ancestry from which the animal comes, as well as the reputation of the offspring from which it comes. Its intrinsic characteristics are, However, the main factor to take into account, which explains that prices within the same litter can vary enormously; individuals closest to the standard and with the best character traits are necessarily more expensive than others.

Characteristics “Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

1.0 rating
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer”

Hungarian Wire haired Pointing Dog
Hungarian Pointer “wire-haired” – Julius-K9®

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 57
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • AKC – Group 1 (Sports)
  • CKC – Group 1 (Sports)
  • ​KCGun Dog
  • NZKCGun Dog Group
  • UKCGun Dog Group

FCI breed standard “Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer”

FCIFCI – “Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer”
Hungarian Fur Coat FCI

Alternative names:

    1. Wirehaired Vizsla, Hungarian Wirehaired Vizsla, Drótszőrű magyar vizsla (English).
    2. (en hongrois : drótszőrű magyar vizsla), Vizsla à Poil Dur (French).
    3. (ungarisch Drótszőrű magyar vizsla), Drahthaar Vizsla (German).
    4. (em húngaro: drótszőrű magyar vizsla) (Portuguese).
    5. Vizsla húngaro de capa alambrada (Spanish).

Deutsch Stichelhaar
Alemania FCI 232 . Braque Type

Deutsch Stichelhaar

The Deutsch Stichelhaar has a calm and balanced character.

Content

History

The Deutsch Stichelhaar It is the oldest breed of wire-haired dogs. The history of Deutsch Stichelhaar goes back many hundreds of years. Already in 1539 this breed of dog could be admired in the bronze engravings. In 1888 Hans Von Kaddisch showed that this breed is not a variety of the Shorthaired Pointer Dog, but the wire-haired counterpart of the Old German Wirehaired Pointer, and that it was selected and developed from few surviving subjects who had survived in Germany.

The breed club, founded in 1892 as the “Club Stichelhaar“, changed his name to “Verein Deutsch Stichelhaar” in 1976. Since the beginning, has applied the rules of purebred breeding from the beginning, and excludes any crossing with the English breeds.

Photo: The german pointing dog Deutsch Stichelhaar by Alephalpha, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

GERMAN BRISTLE-HAIRED POINT DOG
Deutsch Stichelhaar

Males reach a withers height of 60 a 70 centimeters. Females are somewhat smaller, growing up to about 58 a 68 centimeters. The weight of a Deutsch Stichelhaar it is usually between 20 and 29 kg.

The coat of this dog is hard and bristly. Is loose and has a moderate undercoat. The Deutsch Stichelhaar comes in a variety of colors and patterns. They are often solid brown in color, or have a white patch on the chest. There are also light browns and grays. The dog's coat has a few 4 centimeters long.

The structure of this breed of dog is square and strong. Has a straight back line, leaning slightly towards the rump. The skull is widely built and slightly domed. The ears are smooth and hanging and have a high base. The appearance of the Deutsch Stichelhaar reminds a German Wirehaired Pointer.

Character and skills

The Deutsch Stichelhaar has a calm and balanced character. He is very easy to train and very willing to learn. His alertness and protective instincts are strong, but they can be controlled well.

The temperament of Deutsch Stichelhaar it is usually quiet. Your temperament manifests when your abilities are nurtured through regular training. When you bring a Deutsch Stichelhaar to your family, you have a new friendly roommate.

Your new pet is neither shy nor aggressive. If you keep your friend busy enough, will be a loyal companion. However, you must make it clear that you have the position of leader within the hierarchy. Only then will he be a loyal dog to you.

The Deutsch Stichelhaar it is very popular with hunters. However, not suitable as a pure family dog. How this breed of dog is very self-confident, you should also be a strong leader.

Training

The natural instincts of Deutsch Stichelhaar can be controlled well with proper training. The best way to do this is to train him to be a hunting dog.. The training of the Deutsch Stichelhaar it is much more complex than that of other dogs. Just visiting a normal dog school is not enough. Usually the Deutsch Stichelhaar it is only given to hunters for this reason.

Grooming

Health and Grooming

When it comes to grooming, the Deutsch Stichelhaar it is similar to many other hunting dogs. Therefore, the amount of grooming required is low. If you brush your four-legged friend's coat once a week, is perfectly enough. The Deutsch Stichelhaar it is very robust in health. Therefore, fortunately it is not very susceptible to disease.

Characteristics “Deutsch Stichelhaar”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Deutsch Stichelhaar” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “Deutsch Stichelhaar”

Deutsch Stichelhaar
Deutsch Stichelhaar

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 232
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type

FCI breed standard “Deutsch Stichelhaar”

FCIFCI – “Deutsch Stichelhaar”
FCI hard hair griffin

Alternative names:

    1. German Roughhaired Pointer , Stichelhaar (English).
    2. Braque allemand à poil raide (French).
    3. Stichelhaar (German).
    4. (Portuguese).
    5. Perro de muestra alemán de pelo cerdoso (Spanish).

German Hound
Germany FCI 299 . Small-sized Hounds

German Hound

The German Hound It is a fairly frequent dog in its country and very rare outside its borders.

Content

History

The first written traces of the German Hound date from the 18th century. German breeders wanted to create a versatile hunting dog, but it is very difficult to precisely define the ancestry of the breed. However, the German Hound was originally a descendant of Beagle, Pointer and English Foxhound. Other breeds like greyhounds, the hounds, the “Westphalian Dachsbracke“, the “Holzbracke de Sauerland tricolor” (little hound for hunting in the forest) and “Steinbracken” locals may have contributed to the breed.

Multipurpose hunting and hounds were booming in Germany at the time, after the dismantling of large hunting grounds and the abandonment of traditional hound hunting methods in favor of stalking and stalking.

Over the years, the German Hound has become known by a large number of regional variants with different names. The Deutscher Bracken Club was founded in Olpe (North Rhine-Westphalia) in 1896 and covered all the varieties of the northwest of the country. In 1900, were finally grouped into a single race called “Deutsche Bracke” (German Hound).

However, was not up 1964 that was recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI). The standard currently in force dates from 1987.

Sometimes known as the “Braque d’Olpe” (the city where one of the variants of the breed was found and where the Deutscher Bracken Club), the German Hound still a very popular hunting dog in his native region, and even in the rest of Germany. However, its distribution outside of Germany remains highly confidential.

That does not prevent it from being recognized by the American Kennel Club (A.K.C.) and the United Kennel Club (U.K.C.) in the United States, as well as by the Kennel Club (K.C.) From great britain.

Photo: hundeo.com

Physical characteristics

The German Hound it is a light hunting dog, tall and elegant that, However, it is of solid construction. The head is noble and rather light, with hanging ears of medium size and a well carried but relatively thick tail in relation to the body line. The abdomen is slightly folded.

The teething of the German Hound is particularly strong and regular, with powerful pointed incisors. The eyes, that are moderately large, they are clear and bright. The head, dry and moderately long, and relatively strong neck (compared to the head) follow each other to achieve a slightly arched top.

The coat is long, very dense and hard, and even covers the belly. It is tricolor: red or fawn, black and white. The saddle and / or coat must be black and well defined. The white markings characteristic of the breed are a continuous list on the muzzle, the neck (a totally white collar is particularly appreciated), chest and limbs. The tip of the tail is also white.

Character and skills

The German Hound he is a medium-sized dog that exudes great joie de vivre. Attached and endowed with a stable character, is happy when put to work and has plenty of outdoor space. Being able to live in complete freedom in a large fenced garden is essential if your master is regularly outside, since he likes to live outdoors and exercise. In fact, needs to vent at least two hours a day to be balanced. If you don't allow your partner to use your energy, the master has every chance of ending up with a stressed dog, overexcited, aggressive or even destructive.

German Hound

In addition, even if you have enough opportunities to exercise, the risk of the dog escaping is high with the German Hound, who especially appreciates sneaking out of his house as soon as he gets the chance, whether to explore new environments or follow tempting smells.

The German Hound not at all a suitable breed of dog for apartment living. And unless you have a very big garden – and even then… – it is also not a suitable breed of dog for an elderly or sedentary person. You need an active owner, even sporty, to provide you with the exercise and outings you need.

Nice to live, can be both a companion and hunting dog, since it is able to adapt to many situations. However, although they love to roam every corner of the garden, his great passion is still hunting, in which they excel thanks to their particularly developed sense of smell. The German Hound it is above all a tough tracking dog that needs to work hard and work hard. They excel in the pursuit of uninjured game and in the pursuit of wounded prey.

Due to his cautious behavior in front of strangers and his ability to be attentive and alert in any situation, also can, occasionally and as long as it does not last too long (your joviality is likely to regain control), occasionally assume the role of watchdog.

However, whatever your activity at that time, can be easily distracted from your mission by a pleasant smell, in which case it becomes difficult to attract their attention again.

These hunting dogs are passionate about stalking their prey, but they are also very sensitive. They are very close to their family and are very loyal to them. Therefore, should be handled with care and never intimidated, although sometimes they are on guard. Particularly loyal, faithful and sociable, the German Hound proves to be the ideal companion for the whole family, and gets along so well with adults – whose authority and leadership you seek – as with small children, who likes to have fun with. However, should not be left alone with young children, as their overwhelming energy could inadvertently push them, knock them down or knock them unconscious.

Although the German Hound is generally friendly and balanced, meeting other dogs can be a problem in some cases. Although the German Hound has long become used to living with other dogs due to its long use in pack hunting, some dogs still tend to be dominant, especially when it comes to unfamiliar animals. For this reason, any outing synonymous with a possible dog encounter involves keeping your partner on a leash.

Regarding cohabitation with other pets, especially a cat, it can also be difficult. In fact, unless you got used to it too soon, namely, created together, tends to regard other animals as potential prey. In other words, not really a recommended dog breed with a cat…

At last, the German Hound is a noisy dog ​​whose voice extends far. This is a characteristic common to all hunting dogs., since they must communicate with their master at a distance. But this might not be to the taste of the neighbors, who might complain about the dog's untimely barking. It is important to pay attention to this point when training the puppy, to prevent his barking from becoming a problem once he is an adult.

Education “German Hound”

Although it is soft, stable and very nice, the German Hound not an easy dog ​​breed to train and obedient. Therefore, requires a strong and early education, but of course without any brutality, as this could only backfire. To get the best of your partner, it is necessary to combine sweetness and firmness, and put special emphasis on the socialization of the dog.

Last but not least, if it is to be used as a hunting dog, learning how to call your dog back is obviously of particular importance.

In any case, training sessions should be short and interesting enough, since the German Hound it can be annoying, especially if tempting smells distract your attention.

For all these reasons, should be reserved for experienced teachers: not a suitable breed as a first dog.

Health “German Hound”

The German Hound it is a fairly robust and resistant dog.

However, you are particularly at risk of hip dysplasia, as well as the risk of reversal of the stomach (dilation-torsion).

Whatever the cause, a possible operation should be done with greater vigilance as this dog is very sensitive to anesthesia.

In addition, as in any breed of dog with lop ears, special attention should be paid to the risk of ear infections in the dog.

In addition, the absence of descent of one or even both testicles into the scrotum (dog cryptorchidism) it is relatively frequent in this breed. Generally prevents the affected male from reproducing and makes it impossible to confirm the dog.

At last, the German Hound are frequently found with eye problems, so it is advisable to also pay attention to this point.

Care “German Hound”

The German Hound it is an easy breed of dog to keep. Its short coat requires only minimal grooming and regular maintenance.. Brushing your dog once a week should be enough to preserve the beauty of his coat. In addition, how the coat naturally repels dirt and water, bathing is not normally necessary.

In addition, even during the molting period, loses very little hair.

In addition, as in any dog ​​with floppy ears, the inside of the tubes should also be carefully watched to reduce the risk of ear infections.

This may be an opportunity to inspect your eyes at the same time., to be able to intervene quickly if there is a problem in this area.

Food “German Hound”

As the German Hound it is a fairly resistant breed, Feeding your dog shouldn't pose any particular problems. A meat-based diet, vegetables and starchy foods, or quality croquettes, it will be perfectly adequate.

However, Be careful with the volume of the servings! If used as a hunting dog, it may certainly be appropriate to increase them by 10 a 20% during hunting season, when you are more active than usual. But they must also adapt to the dog's energy needs when they decrease, to avoid any risk of the dog becoming overweight.

In addition, it is important to avoid giving too much food before the dog goes hunting, At risk, for example, to throw up. A little pre-hunt snack is a good thing, but the bulk of the daily ration should be given in the afternoon.

Activities “German Hound”

Although they can be pleasant companion dogs, the German Hound It, above all and by its very nature, a hunting dog specialized more specifically in tracking hares, badgers and big game, whether or not they are injured. These fine hounds are experts in rough terrain and can withstand all types of weather conditions. They like to chase their prey for hours and hours. Its long snout and extremely sensitive nose are its best allies in this task.. Once the prey has been hunted, its loud and clear bark is highly appreciated by hunters, since it allows them to point out the exact position of the hunted animal.

Although the German Hound it is very suitable for hunting alone, also excels in pairs or small groups of individuals. This is how the breed was originally used.

Price “German Hound”

The price to adopt a puppy from German Hound is between 700 and 900 EUR.

Characteristics “German Hound”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “German Hound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

1.0 rating
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

1.0 rating
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “German Hound”

Deutsche Bracke
Deutsche Bracke Stöberhundwelpen district forest walk excursion

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 31
  • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
  • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.3: Small-sized Hounds. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.3: Small-sized Hounds.
  • AKCHound
  • ​KCHoundy
  • UKCScenthounds

FCI breed standard “German Hound”

“German Hound” FCI German hound FCI

Alternative names:

    1. Deutsche Bracke, German Bracke, Olper Bracke, Westphalian Bracke (English).
    2. (deutsche bracke en allemand) (French).
    3. Westfälische Bracke (German).
    4. braco alemão, (em alemão: Deutsche Bracke) (Portuguese).
    5. Sabueso de sangre de Baviera (Spanish).

Norwegian Hound (Dunker)
Noruega FCI 203 - Medium-sized Hounds

Norwegian Hound

It is found only in its country of origin and is practically unknown outside its borders.

Content

History

The Norwegian Hound was originally called Dunker, in honor of the Norwegian captain and breeder Wilhelm Conrad Dunker (1806-1860), who established the first breed standard in 1850. During the first half of the 19th century, there was a large population of hounds in norway, including various types used for hare hunting. Wilhelm Dunker selected those with the sharpest sense of smell and crossed them with a Russian Harlequin Hound to produce a versatile hound, able to hunt rabbits and hares by smell rather than sight, and tough enough to withstand the harsh weather conditions of Norway.

In 1902 was founded the Norsk Harehundklub, a club dedicated to hounds. That same year the hounds were divided into two main groups, known today as Dunker y Hygenhounds. The first was the largest and included local dogs from all over the country, providing a wide and varied breeding base.

Although Norway was less affected by World War II than other European countries, the demand for these dogs dropped dramatically, which made it difficult for the breeders to continue their work properly. As a result, the number of specimens decreased significantly.

After the conflict is over, the Dunker regained some popularity and was officially recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) in 1956.

However, this bounce was only short lived: lost ground again from the decade of 1970, due to competition from foreign breeds of hunting dogs imported into the country.

Things did not improve much in the 80, to the point that inbreeding problems began to appear. In fact, the decline in its population led many breeders to resort to inbreeding to continue breeding. This led to a high rate of congenital deafness.. For this reason, in 1987, the breeding committee of the Norwegian Hound asked the Norsk Kennel Klubb (NKK), the reference canine organization in Norway, permission to cross the Dunker with other races, but they denied it. However, how things did not improve much, the NKK finally gave his approval for some crosses two years later. This resulted in a more varied and healthy genetic makeup, while maintaining the characteristic features of the breed.

The United Kennel Club (UKC) recognized it in 1996. However, the other American reference organization, the American Kennel Club (AKC), has not done the same to this day – nor does the neighboring Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) or the prestigious British Kennel Club (KC). In fact, at the global level, recognition of the breed is still quite partial.

It's the same for broadcast. Even in the other Scandinavian countries, is almost absent, with the exception of Sweden, where the Svenska Kennelklubben records a number of births each year that can be counted on the fingers of one hand, compared to around twenty in the early nineties. In France, not a single inscription was made in the Book of French Origins (LOF) during the first two decades of the 21st century.

In Norway, The number of Dunkers recorded each year in the NKK has been around 150 since the mid-decade 2000. However, this marks a halving of the number compared to the change of the years 90. This limited number is partly explained by the deafness problem present in this breed: almost the 75% of its population suffers from deafness.

Photo: A Norwegian Hound by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

The Norwegian Hound It is a medium-sized dog distinguished by its long, well-proportioned body, his energetic and clear walk and his light weight. They have solid bones, giving an impression of strength and endurance. The back is straight, firm and long enough to give length to the rib cage. Lets on strong, dry front legs. The tail is wide and thick at the base and tapers at the tip. Descends to the hock or slightly protrudes from the hock.

Dunker
Dunker

Quite long, its head is characterized by a slightly domed skull and a marked stop. Located at half height, the ears are flat, without folds, hanging and soft to the touch. Half-width, taper towards its tip, which is rounded. Its mouth has scissor-shaped teeth dominated by a square, well-developed snout., a black nose and wide nostrils.

His eyes are round, large and very penetrating. Although they are usually dark in color, there are also individuals with one or two blue eyes, a characteristic that is associated with an increased risk of deafness. Minnow eyes are allowed in blue individuals (variegated). Regardless of the color of the eyes, the eyes express calm and seriousness.

The coat of the Dunker consists of short hair, hard, tight and dense. Its coloration is a distinctive sign of the breed: they are either black with light fawn and white spots, or blue merle (Variegated?) and mottled with light fawn and white spots. Jet black coats with dark tawny markings are less desirable, and those in which white predominates (to the point of representing at least the 50% Of the surface) are considered undesirable by the norm.

Last but not least, sexual dimorphism is not very marked in this breed: males and females are quite similar in size and weight.

Life expectancy: 12 years of age.

Size of Norwegian Hound

    – Female weight: Of 24 a 25 kg
    – Male weight: Of 24 a 25 kg
    – Female size: Of 47 a 53 cm.
    – Male size: Of 50 a 55 cm.

Character and skills “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

The Norwegian Hound is a fast and tenacious hunter with an above-average olfactory ability. They excel particularly in hunting hare and rabbit.

Being also gentle, loving, cheerful and friendly, they have all the qualities required to be an excellent companion dog. Balanced, patients, tolerant and devoid of aggressiveness, they are very good playmates for children. However, it is important to note that a dog should never be left alone with a small child without adult supervision, and this applies to all races.

His total lack of aggressiveness and his attraction to humans, even for those you don't know, make it totally impossible to use as a guard dog. In effect, not reserved at all, shy, fearful or aggressive with strangers, rather they tend to welcome them positively and trust them. They are more likely to greet a malicious person with curiosity and licking them rather than barking to warn their master or make them understand that they better go their way.

His sociability extends to other dogs too. Therefore, it is quite possible to share a house with a dog companion without fearing that conflict situations will multiply, and is generally friendly with those he meets on his walks.

With cats and other animals, things are a little more complicated. His hunting instinct naturally leads him to chase any small furry animal that is not part of the canine species.. Although he has grown up with him and must consider his little companion as a member of the family and not as a potential prey, risk can never be ruled out, so it is better to avoid such cohabitation. As for those that can be found on your walks, you probably want to chase them. Therefore, it is preferable to keep it on a leash during excursions, to avoid any accident.

Dunker
Dunker

In any case, the fear that it will chase other animals does not mean that you should not take it out enough every day, knowing that you need a lot of activity to expend your great energy. Need at least 45 minutes of exercise per day, but his stamina makes him happy to go further if given the chance. In addition, it is preferable to vary the pleasures to allow you to fully expend your energy: long walks, run through the park, sports with dogs, etc. Sports that require running (like canicross) and those that appeal to your senses (like tracking) they are the most recommended. In fact, this dog is very happy when he has to mobilize his physical and mental capacities. In any case, in addition to allowing you to exercise, all these activities reinforce the relationship with his master, which is especially important if you are hearing impaired.

From the above it follows that the Dunker not suitable for an elderly or very sedentary person, I couldn't give you all the exercise you need. The ideal for him is a master of sport, and willing to take his partner in his various activities. Retirees may be right for him, if they are active enough.

In any case, life in the city is not ideal for him, that needs large spaces to fully develop. A house with a garden in the country is a much more appropriate environment to live. However, it is important to ensure that the garden is well fenced and that the environment is safe, as his instincts and hunting instincts soon lead him to follow leads and flee.

Once your need for exercise is satisfied, the Norwegian Hound has an easy and docile character; is far from being as stubborn as many hunting dog breeds. However, your sense of smell can make training difficult, as he is easily distracted by a scent and not really responsive to his master's commands.

Their propensity to bark can also be quite annoying. He is particularly prone to doing so if his master is away for a long time without having given him any exercises beforehand and without having the means to do it himself.. In fact, inactivity can be a burden and cause those behavior problems, as well as destruction, for example. However, as long as you have something to take care of in the absence of your family, not the type of dog that suffers a lot from separation anxiety.

Education “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

Like all the other hounds, the Norwegian Hound must be socialized from an early age. In other words, so that he becomes a balanced adult and has no trouble finding his place, should be given without delay a maximum of opportunities to meet all kinds of humans (veterinary, neighbors, delivery man, etc.), Other animals, but also to face various noises, smells and situations. This is even more important as you are easily distracted by your sense of smell..

The rules established in your education should also be taught to you from an early age, when your ability to learn and docility are at their best. As with any race, bad habits are quickly acquired while he is still a puppy and become real problems when he grows up.

In any case, the Dunker it is a breed of dog that is easy to train and that listens to its master, as long as he uses a dog-friendly training method. Treatments generally prove to be very effective in positively reinforcing your good deeds and facilitating learning. However, sometimes it is necessary to show firmness and affirm your own authority to prevent this dogged dog from doing what he pleases. It can also be difficult to get their attention, given their tendency to be distracted by their sense of smell.

Since it has a strong inclination to follow its nose and to chase passing small animals, Teaching your dog to call back is especially important to avoid the risk of a frantic tug on the leash or running away if it moves freely.

It can also be helpful to try to teach him to channel his propensity to bark.. However, as it is deeply ingrained in him, should not be expected to be the calmest of dogs. If it is impossible to make him understand that some things do not necessarily require him to bark, at least he can be taught to stop on command.

Last but not least, if the dog is deaf from birth, as is the case with a significant fraction of the representatives of the breed, the master must obviously adapt to this restriction: training a deaf dog is not done in the same way as training another dog that is capable of hearing its master's voice. Trust is then even more crucial in the relationship between the animal and its master., so that you can learn and live in good conditions despite your disability. Of course, communication is then done through non-verbal communication, and it is up to the teacher to adopt explicit body language, based on gestures and precise mimics, specific for each indication you want to give.

Health “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

The Norwegian Hound is very resistant, generally have excellent health and very good longevity.

Used to living in harsh Norwegian weather, can tolerate cold and humidity without difficulty. Their coat is naturally waterproof and offers good protection from the elements. On the other hand, shows some intolerance to high temperatures, even if it is able to adapt to a Mediterranean climate. You simply need to lighten up your activities during hot flashes, or at least privilege those that are carried out inside, to make sure you always have access to a shaded place or even air conditioning and to avoid any excessive physical exercise in the hottest hours.

Its small population and its limited diffusion prevent a very important deterioration of health, but it has been shown that it is predisposed to certain problems:

  • deafness, what is a hereditary disease. According to the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA), almost the 75% of the breed population is today deaf by at least one, if not both ears;
  • hip dysplasia, a joint malformation that may be characterized by a hereditary predisposition. Can cause joint pain as well as difficulty moving;
  • Elbow dysplasia, which can also be favored by a hereditary predisposition. It is painful and leads to difficulty moving and the development of osteoarthritis;
  • progressive retinal atrophy, a hereditary and incurable eye disease. Causes loss of night vision first, then loss of daytime vision, to the point that the dog becomes totally blind;
  • Demodecic scabies, a contagious parasitic disease that causes itching and true discomfort to the dog, gradually losing appetite and sleep;
  • ear infections (otitis, etc.), due to its hanging shape.
  • In addition, individuals used for hunting are exposed to the various risks associated with this activity: wounds, parasites, thorns, etc.

    In addition, the Dunker has a strong appetite. How it is usually active, this is not usually a problem. However, if it is not, soon becomes overweight.

    Given the hereditary conditions to which the breed is predisposed, the breeder's work plays a decisive role in the adoption of a Norwegian Hound that he is in perfect health and that he will probably remain so. In addition to the results of genetic tests performed on the parents and the puppy to reduce the risk of such diseases, every serious and responsible breeder must be able to present a certificate of good health established by a veterinarian, as well as documents related to the vaccines administered.

    In addition, when the dog is small and still growing, your bones and joints are particularly fragile: therefore, any excessive or prolonged physical exercise should be avoided, since I could pay it one day or another, with potentially permanent sequelae (malformations, etc.).

    Last but not least, it is necessary to consult a veterinarian at least once a year to ensure that the dog is in good health or, on the other hand, to be able to detect as soon as possible any problem whose symptoms are not yet visible. This health check is also an opportunity to carry out your immunization reminders, which are another essential lever to keep the dog in good health. Still in the prevention registry, it is the owner's responsibility to renew the antiparasitic treatments whenever necessary throughout the year, so your partner is never unprotected.

    Care and maintenance “Norwegian Hound”

    A tough breed, the Norwegian Hound do not require much maintenance.

    However, they lose a lot of hair, so brushing your hair twice a week is not too much to help remove dead hairs and keep it looking good. During their shedding periods in spring and fall, when it should be done more often (even daily) to prevent hair growth throughout the house.

    Since his hair is not very dirty and therefore does not have a strong odor, bathing him two or three times a year is generally sufficient. In any case, a too frequent bath will make the sebum naturally present on the skin disappear, that insulates and protects it from the elements. Having said that, do not hesitate to give him a bath if he has gotten very dirty, for example during a particularly muddy hunting trip. In any case, you can only use a shampoo specially designed for dogs, at the risk of damaging your skin.

    Dunker
    Dunker

    The ears, on the other hand, require special attention, since its hanging shape implies an increased risk of infections (ear infections, etc.). They should be cleaned every week with a damp cloth or a cleaning product specially designed for this purpose.. They should also be dried after each bath or a long period of time in a humid place.

    Their eyes they should also be examined weekly and cleaned if necessary with a damp cloth.

    It is also necessary to brush the teeth of your dog every week or even every day to avoid the formation of dental plaque and its possible consequences (bad breath, diseases, etc.). A toothpaste specially designed for dogs should always be used.

    In addition, it is important to regularly check your dog's claws to make sure they are not getting too long and to trim them if this is the case. This could not only hinder your gait, it could also be broken and potentially injured at the same time. Having said that, while you're active and spending long hours outdoors, natural wear and tear is usually enough to file them.

    To know how to proceed during maintenance sessions, it is helpful to benefit from the expertise of a vet or groomer the first time. In fact, whether the various procedures for grooming the coat, the ears, the eyes, your pet's teeth or claws are not done properly, not only will satisfactory results not be obtained, but the owner may even injure or injure his pet. In addition, the owner should get used to his pet very soon, so that throughout his life he accepts to be manipulated without being rebellious.

    In addition, when your pet returns from a long time in the wild, it is a good idea to systematically take a little time to inspect it carefully: parasites, spikes or dirt may have gotten into their fur, and may also have been injured.

    What is the price of a “Norwegian Hound”

    In Norway, a puppy Dunker It costs around 7000 Norwegian crowns (a few 650 EUR). The sale price varies from one individual to another depending on the prestige of the offspring, the dog's lineage and its intrinsic characteristics.

    Since the breed does not have a wide international distribution, it is almost impossible to find a breeder of the same outside your country of origin.

    Therefore, whether you are in France, Belgium, Switzerland, Canada or elsewhere, who wants to adopt a Norwegian Hound you must opt ​​for the import solution. In this case, keep in mind that transportation and administrative costs are added to the purchase price and, of course, you must respect the regulations to import a dog from abroad.

    Characteristics “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

    Sabueso Noruego (Dunker) – Raza de Perro
    Dunker ?? Everything Dog Breeds ??

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 203
    • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds

    FCI breed standard “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)”

    “Norwegian Hound (Dunker)” FCI Norwegian Hound (Dunker) FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Dunker (English).
      2. Dunker (French).
      3. Dunkerbracke, Dunkerlaufhund (German).
      4. Dunker (Portuguese).
      5. Cazador noruego, Dunker, Sabueso de Dunker (Spanish).

    Italian Rough-Haired Hound
    Italia FCI 198 - Medium-sized Hounds

    Italian Rough-Haired Hound

    The Italian Rough-Haired Hound is reserved, wise, calm and thoughtful in his work.

    Content

    History

    The Italian hound It, according to the vast majority of authors, a dog with very ancient origins. It is believed, in fact, descended from hunting dogs that lived from ancient Egypt, they reached the shores of the Mediterranean Sea, and therefore also to Italy, thanks to the Phoenician merchants. Many Egyptian drawings dating from the time of the pharaohs show the presence of dogs very similar to the current one Italian hound.

    His best period is the Renaissance, when its level was improved and its great diffusion began. The race then underwent a slow and inexorable decline until, from the beginning of the 20th century, the Italian hound it became very popular again.

    The modern history of Italian hound started on 1920, year in which the Technical Committee of the Society of Hound Hobbyists drew up the first breed standard that a few years later, in 1929 to be exact, was approved by the Italian Kennel Club. At that time there was a single standard that unified the Italian Rough-Haired Hound and to the “Italian short-haired Segugio“; in 1976 came the prohibition of mating between the two varieties; then, in 1989, the ENCI (Ente Nazionale della Cinofilia Italiana) passed two different standards, standards that were later also recognized by the FCI which classified them in the group 6, among hound-type dogs, and related breeds.

    The Italian Rough-Haired Hound probably has the same origins as the “Italian short-haired Segugio“; in fact, in almost the entire peninsula both varieties of hounds have always coexisted.

    Photo: myanimallife

    Physical characteristics “Italian Rough-Haired Hound”

    Italian Wirehaired Hound

    Is similar to the “Italian short-haired Segugio”. It differs mainly by the coat, made up of coarse hair no more than two inches long, but thinner and shorter on the tail, ears and head; the coat colors are fawn and fiery black (both with white spots allowed, if they are well located).

    For the standard it has minimum and maximum cross heights greater than two centimeters compared to the “Italian short-haired Segugio”: therefore it is slightly larger. She is also believed to have a calmer and more thoughtful temperament than her satin-haired variant., and that this is reflected in a slightly different approach to hunting.

    Height at withers varies in male from 52 a 60 cm and in the female of 50 a 58 cm.. In the case of an excellent subject there is a tolerance of two centimeters more or less. Weight may vary in males of 20 a 28 kg and females in 18 a 26 kg. The length of the trunk is identical to the height at the withers.

    Character and skills “Italian Rough-Haired Hound”

    Great hunter and secret companion. It is used and fits perfectly both in the mountains and on the flat and in the most rugged terrain. It is equipped with resistance, as well as with good speed and works with commitment and passion both in isolation and in the diving suit.

    In comparison with the “Italian short-haired Segugio”, the Italian Rough-Haired Hound is more reserved, less exuberant, wise, calm and thoughtful in his work. A gentle look, friendly, but proud and wrapped in a halo of melancholy. A strong and very nice voice.

    This dog is first and foremost a working dog, and is rarely kept as a pet.

    Videos “Italian Rough-Haired Hound”

    SEGUGIO ITALIANO No10 Con sottotitoli in Italiano. Guarda ora a http://www.tstv.gr/it.html
    ITALIAN SEGUGIO documentary trailer

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 198
    • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • ​KCHoundy

    FCI breed standard “Italian Rough-Haired Hound”

    “Italian Rough-Haired Hound” FCI Italian Wirehaired Hound FCI

    German Spitz
    Alemania FCI 97 - European Spitz

    German Spitz

    Your hair requires certain care, especially for exhibitions.

    Content

    History

    The Spitz it is one of the oldest German domestic dog breeds, although its origins are not completely clear. There is evidence that dogs Spitz lived together with humans ago 4.000 years. Due to its wide diffusion as a guard dog on farms and in the homes of the petty bourgeoisie it also found its way into literature and painting..

    Especially in rural areas, a German Spitz was ubiquitous in the old days as a house and garden dog. Smaller Spitz were popular as lap dogs with ladies.

    The popularity of the Spitz decreased so much in the recent past that it was declared an endangered breed of pet in 2003.

    Physical characteristics

    All the German Spitz, regardless of size or color, form a family and should have similar characteristics and a typical lace look.

    The Spitz impresses with his beautiful coat. The abundant undercoat and long top coat, straight and outstanding give them their unmistakable appearance. Particularly striking is the strongly mane-like collar around the neck and the bushy, furry tail., that is carried boldly on the back. The fox-like head with quick eyes and small, narrow pointed ears give the Spitz its characteristic disturbing expression. The body of the Spitz is square.

    Measurements:

    a) Wolfspitz / Keeshond : 49 cm ± 6 cm..
    b) Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) : 46 cm ± 4 cm..
    c) Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz) : 34 cm ± 4 cm..
    d) Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz) : 26 cm ± 3 cm..
    and) Zwergspitz (Toy or Dwarf Spitz) / Pomeranian : 20 cm ± 2 cm..
    (are undesirable specimens measuring less than 18 cm.).

    Weight

    Any variation in the size of the German Spitz should have a corresponding variation in weight.

    Character and skills

    A German Spitz has a reputation for being a talkative. In fact, the dogs bark a lot; for a guard dog, making a sound is a desirable feature, that today cannot be reconciled with all the neighbors.

    A natural distrust, along with incorruptibility and loyalty, is inherent to German Spitz. This makes it predestined to be a watchdog that patrols its territory and reports suspicious incidents.. A German Spitz reliably stands up for the things entrusted to it. When not on guard, a is a very friendly and affectionate dog, sometimes a little possessive, who follows his humans closely and enjoys being petted. A German Spitz is generally regarded as a child.

    The education and attitude of the German Spitz

    With cheerful romp and docility, a German Spitzn is a dog that absolutely needs a task. Find your place as a working watchdog, but also as a companion and family dog. With a lot of positive encouragement and loving consistency, breeding is not problematic and can also be managed if you have little experience with dogs.

    For a German Spitz be respectful of animals, must be weather resistant: The Spitz it just feels really comfortable outdoors, either with sun, rain or snow. It is an ideal companion for runners, riders and cyclists. He is also an agility sports enthusiast. As the Spitz only has a weakly developed hunting instinct, does not tend to go its own way when outdoors and is easy to recover. It is less suitable for intensive accommodation, especially because he likes to bark a lot. Similar to the Poodle, the spitz is available in different sizes, from the Zwergspitz (Toy or Dwarf Spitz) / Pomeranian to Wolfspitz / Keeshond. The best known variant is the Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz) with a shoulder height of 34-38 cm and weighing up to 10 kg. Apart from its format, the types do not differ visually.

    Caring for the German Spitz

    Surprisingly, the fluffy coat of the Spitz does not require much grooming. The hair is dirt repellent, so an occasional brushing is enough. In addition, a German Spitz it is very clean and cleans itself. Also in terms of health, the Spitz they are quite robust dogs.

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 97
    • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
    • Section 4: European Spitz. Without working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 4 European Spitz.

    FCI standard German Spitz

    German Spitz FCI German Spitz FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Deutscher Spitz (English).
      2. Spitz allemand (French).
      3. Deutsche Spitze (German).
      4. Deutsche Spitze (Portuguese).
      5. Spitz alemán (Spanish).

    Photos

    1- Szpic_miniatura at the national show in Rybnik – Stone to Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA

    German Spitz varieties

    a) Wolfspitz / Keeshond.
    b) Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) .
    c) Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz).
    d) Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz).
    and) Zwergspitz (Toy or Dwarf Spitz) / Pomeranian.

    European Spitz

    1 Keeshond

    Keeshond

    Even today the Keeshond is known for its faithfulness and loyalty.

    Are Wolfsspitz and Keeshond identical?

    This question repeatedly leads to confusion among experts and laymen alike.. Although the

    Read more

    2 Pomeranian

    Pomeranian

    The Pomeranian very active, independent, Intelligent, brave and loyal.

    The Pomeranian (Deutscher Spitz;, Pom-Dog or Deutscher Zwergspitz) It is a dog of the Spitz family, named for the Read more

    3 Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz)

    Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz)

    Although I do not necessarily suspect it at first glance, the large Spitz is also extremely robust and weather resistant.

    While the small and medium varieties of the German Spitz (Pomeranian, Spitz

    Read more

    4 Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz)

    Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz)

    The Mittelspitz is by nature a bit like the old guard dog.

    The Spitz, officially called “German Spitz“, It is a classic breed of dog in Germany and Central Europe. The

    Read more

    5 Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz)

    Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz)

    The small Spitz is a loving and attentive dog, that is very people-oriented.

    The little Spitz (Kleinspitz) is a variety of German Spitz, that today is available

    Read more

    German Pinscher
    Alemania FCI 184 - Pinscher

    Pinscher Alemán

    The German Pinscher is a dog, extremely, active and lively, alert and vigilant.

    Content

    History

    The German Pinscher (German pinscher “bite”) It is a breed of dog that belongs to the family of Pinscher.

    This race, whose origins date back to the 15th century and which is also related with the Schnauzer, It was originally a dog used by the farmers of Germany to control rodent pests. It is believed that he is descended from crosses between old German dogs and some black Terrier used to hunt rodents.

    It is also the breed that arose the Dobermann and the so-called Miniature Pinscher. In Germany, due to the fame that were acquiring the dog shows in the rest of Europe and America, a standard of the breed was established in the year 1879, year in which it was also recognized as a race.

    Currently, the Pinscher is considered more of a companion and guard dog than a vermin hunter or controller dog. As a companion dog is ideal, its size enables live perfectly in a flat in city, Although, like any other dog, you need to do exercise.

    In its role as a guard dog, of course, is not as imposing as his descendant the Dobermann, but their functions.

    The use of Pinscher as a watchdog it is very satisfying, It is a dog that defends well property without falling (insofar as it is well educated) in the territoriality to his master, staying true to this at all times.

    Although it has always been considered that the Pinscher it is a very attractive breed of dog, It has never exceeded the popularity of his descendants: the Pinscher the Dobermann and miniature. In fact, According to a study conducted by the Kennel Club, the Pinscher miniature is almost 8 some times larger than the Pinscher and the Doberman 138 times more popular than this.

    Physical characteristics

    The Pinscher is a dog of size medium, between 45 and 50 cm., proud bearing and strong muscles, with a weight around the 18 kg (14 a 20 kg).

    It has a head thin and snout elongated, ears median, slightly bent at birth, they hang from the head of the dog and they are generally cut.

    Neck of average length, wide and strong, trunk elegant and stylish. Regard to the tail, like the ears, also tends to be amputated.

    The fur, It is short and rough, it comes in shades of red, brown or black, and fire in the belly and chest.

    Their fur is short and smooth, does not require much care, just brushing regularly to remove dead hair.

    Character and skills

    Because of its vitality require quite some exercise outdoors, You can fix left him free in an open field so that it can run and romp.

    Also, related to this last, It is a suitable dog to accompany people who practice physical exercise, such as running or cycling.

    It is a dog, extremely, active and lively, alert and vigilant. It is often wary of strangers.

    It would also be necessary, given his character slightly dominant, teach him to respect rules and who is charge at home.

    We need to socialize from very small, because the dominant character leads him to not tolerate the presence of other dogs too. Then, If early it breeds with another dog will have at home a barking inseparable duo.

    German Pinscher Health

    All purebred dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, do not walk, any breeder that does not offer a health guarantee in puppies, to tell you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or to tell you that your puppies are isolated from the main part of the home for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about the health problems of race and the incidence with which occur in their lines.

    Having said that, the German pinschers they are quite healthy, and breeders want to keep them like this.

    Don't buy a puppy from a breeder who can't provide you with written documentation that the parents were exempt from health issues affecting the breed. Make the dogs are “reviewed by the veterinarian” It is not a substitute for testing genetic health.

    Remember that after bringing a new puppy home, It has the power to protect one of the most common health problems: the obesity. Keep a German pinscher with a suitable weight it is one of the easiest ways to prolong life. Make the most of your preventive skills to help ensure a healthier dog for life.

    German Pinscher Grooming

    The short and smooth coat of the German Pinscher makes it easy to style. One bath every three months (or when it gets dirty) with a mild shampoo is all you need, in addition to brushing once a week with a natural bristle brush or glove. Use hair conditioner / polisher to brighten hair.

    The rest are basic care. Trim nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush your teeth often for general good health and fresh breath. Check your ears weekly for dirt, redness or odor that may indicate an infection. If the ears are dirty, clean them with a cotton swab moistened with a mild pH balanced ear cleaner. Enter the toilet of the German Pinscher when I'm too young to learn to accept it, especially the nail cut, with patience.

    German Pinscher Ratings

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “German Pinscher” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    German Pinscher Images

    German Pinscher videos

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 184
    • Group 2: Pinscher and Schnauzer- Molossoid breeds – Swiss Mountain and Cattle Dogs.
    • Section 1: Pinscher and Schnauzer type. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Pinscher and Schanuezer dogs. Molossian type Dogs and Swiss Mountain and Cattle Dogs. , Section 1: Pinscher and Schnauzer.
    • AKC – Dogs working
    • ANKC – Group 6 (utility dogs)
    • CKC – Group 6 – Non-Sporting
    • ​KC – Working dogs
    • NZKC – Utility dog
    • UKC – Terrier

    German Pinscher breed FCI Standard

    GERMAN PINSCHER FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Deutscher Pinscher (English).
      2. Pinscher (French).
      3. Pinscher (German).
      4. Pinscher standard (Portuguese).
      5. Pinscher Mediano, Pinscher Estándard, Pinscher de pelo áspero (Spanish).