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Irish Red Setter
Irlanda FCI 120 . Setter

Setter Irlandés

The Irish Red Setter is spread throughout Europe

Content

History

The origin of dogs Setter dates back to at least the second half of the 16th century: John Caius mentions them in 1570 The British book cart Canibus, What, as the name reflects, is dedicated to the dogs of Great Britain.

It is believed that the Irish Setter came up much later, in the XVIII century, as a result of a crossing. His ancestry is not known for sure, but it is believed to have developed from Irish Water Spaniel, with possible contributions from Irish Terrier, the English Pointer and the Gordon Setter. But, in early times it did not have the smooth mahogany red coat we know today, but a red and white fur, especially appreciated for hunting, since it was easy to spot in the bush. This Irish Red and White Setter -that still exists today, although it is more rare- would have gradually given way, in the course of the 18th century, to the Irish Red Setter. The Irish Red Setter stabilized as a distinct breed in the early 19th century, differing in particular by having longer legs than its bicolor ancestor.

Although its exact origins are unclear, the geographical origin of Irish Setter is well identified. Your story begins, of course, In Ireland, where hunters tried to develop a successful breed of dog for tracking, monitoring and recovery of game birds. They used it as a pointing dog that locates game by freezing in sample position, allowing the hunter to know where the bird is. The term “Setter” comes from this use for which the animal was developed. He was very appreciated from the beginning for his excellent nose, that allows you to detect odors in the air, while most hunting dogs track game on the ground. This feature made him very popular from the beginning..

In addition to his hunting skills, the Irish Red Setter it was also quickly distinguished by its elegant appearance and beautiful mahogany color. Since the early years of the 19th century, some breeders specialized in the production of specimens of this color. Jason Hazzard, of Timaskea, in County Fermanagh, Sir Saint George Gore and the Earl of Enniskillen they were some of the first breeders of the breed. These may include, the conde the Enniskillen He decided, already in 1812, who only wanted to have red-haired dogs in their kennels.

In 1862, a specimen called Palmerston stood out for the especially elongated shape of his head and the slenderness of his silhouette. These differences almost cost him his life, since its owner considered that these characteristics made it unsuitable for hunting and decided to drown it. A fan of the breed stepped in and saved him, then made him famous by presenting him in many dog ​​shows. Palmerston gave birth to a large number of offspring, and it is accepted that it appears in the family tree of most dogs Irish Red Setter that exist today. The success of Palmerston in the beauty contests in which he was exposed he was emulated, since without ceasing to be a recognized hunting dog, the Setter Irish Red later became a popular show dog.

The international spread of the Irish Setter

The Irish Setter was imported to the United States already in 1875 and quickly became a star. In fact, the first representative of the race that set foot in America, Elcho, became a star both for his presentations at dog shows and for his effectiveness in the field. It is not strange that the race is one of those recognized since its creation by the American Kennel Club (AKC). The first representative of the breed thus registered in 1878 it was called Admiral. With regard to the United Kennel Club (UKC), the other reference canine organization in the country, recognized the breed in 1914.

Shortly after his arrival in the country, the race that is sometimes called Red Setter to distinguish it from its white and red cousin it quickly became one of the most popular breeds at American dog shows. Among 1874 and 1948, nothing less than 760 of their representatives were rewarded in the rings. He was much less noticed for his field skills, since during the same period only 5 specimens were awarded for their hunting skills. This alerted some breed enthusiasts, that in 1940 published in the magazine Field and Stream a call for its rebirth as a hunting dog, its original function. His initiative was quite successful: So, although a lot of effort was put into its aesthetic characteristics, the Irish Setter was able to retain both of its functions and remains a highly prized hunting dog for tracking game birds, like the teal, the duck, partridge and quail. It is also common to distinguish between show and working bloodlines., that differ in size and robustness.

Of course, not only the United States adopted the Irish Setter. Your appreciation for the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) in 1954 contributed a lot to its spread throughout the world.

Recognitions “Irish Red Setter”

The Irish Setter is now recognized by the world's leading organizations, that distinguish it from Irish Red and White Setter. Many did not recognize the latter until much later.. In fact, the Irish Setter enjoys much greater popularity than its ancestor, although the latter is a bit at half mast…

This is the case, in particular, of United States, where he continues to be present both in the field with the hunters and in the exhibition rings. But, It is far from the heights it reached in the years 60 and 70, thanks mostly to Disney's production of 1962 in which appeared a Irish Setter call Big Red, as well as to Rey Timahoe, the famous White House dog during the presidency of Richard Nixon (1969 to 1974). Mid-years 70, came to occupy the third position in number of annual registrations in the AKC, going from about 4.000 puppies per year to more than 60.000. But, this fashion was ephemeral, and the popularity of Setter gradually declined from the second half of the decade of 1970. Today, is more likely to find the Setter around the post 75 (of something less than 200) regarding the number of annual registrations with the AKC. Keep descending, since at the dawn of the XXI century it was around the position 60.

Also in France, the Irish Setter became incredibly popular in the years 70. If at the beginning of the decade there were already more than 600 annual entries in the French Origin Book (LOF), this number shot up incessantly until approaching the 2.400 (four times more) in 1978. The reverse movement occurred in the following ten years, to the point of ending the decade of 1980 at around 700 u 800 annual births. Next, the number stabilized around 600 per year throughout the decades of 1990 and 2000, and then began to decline again in the decade of 2010, at around 500 births per year.

The recent decline in interest in the breed is also seen in other countries, like Britain. These may include, the number of annual registrations in the Kennel Club is around 700, while in early 2010 approached the 1.000.

Physical characteristics

The Puts irelandes is an active hunting dog, spirited and noble-looking, with a balanced and elegant constitution. These medium-sized dogs are distinguished by their rich mahogany red coat and fine, silky fur that extends over the ears, tail and chest. In general, it's a beautiful blend of refinement and robustness.

It is built around a deep chest that drops almost to elbow level and has a long, flat back., slightly sloping from withers to hindquarters, without an exaggerated fall. It is prolonged with a long, tapered tail, usually worn straight or even slightly curved up. Its hind legs are powerful and well developed, although its lower part is finer from the hock to the sole. They give him a good stride. The front legs are thinner, with straight and nervous forearms. The front joints are well bent, but not twisted in or out.

The head rests on a strong neck, although not very thick and slightly arched, that fits harmoniously between the shoulders. The skull is oval seen from above. The muzzle is moderately long and square, with lower and upper jaws of nearly equal length. The nose is always dark, black or chocolate, and the nostrils are wide open. The ears are placed behind the skull, slightly below eye level. They are thin and long, almost enough to touch the front of the muzzle when held taut. They hang with a sharp crease across the head. The eyes are almendrados, of medium size and quite distant from each other. They are hazelnut to dark brown in color and have a soft but alert expression.

The coat of the Irish Setter it is composed of an undercoat and a short topcoat on the top of the head and front legs, as well as on the tips of the ears. It is moderately long on the rest of the body and has long fringes on the ears., on the back of the legs and thighs and on the belly. Their feet have a good density of hair between the toes, like feathers. It also, despite its length, the coat is smooth and soft, with a shiny appearance.

Its color is one of the distinctive features of the breed. They are mahogany or dark brown, no trace of black. Some individuals have a hint of white on the chest or a thin white line on the top of the skull., but this is not particularly desirable.

Last, sexual dimorphism is only moderately pronounced in this breed: males are generally of 3 to 5 taller centimeters, but they are not, for example, significantly more massive. On the other hand, there may be actual physical differences depending on the purpose for which the animal is bred. These may include, individuals in show lines are usually more robust and larger than those intended for hunting or company, and their fur is also thicker and denser.

Size and weight

    ▷ Male size: Of 58 to 67 cm.

    ▷ female size: Of 55 to 62 cm.

    ▷ Male weight: Of 20 to 25 kg

    ▷ female weight: Of 18 to 23 kg

Character and skills

He gets along wonderfully with children, whose energy and enthusiasm perfectly match his own character. He especially enjoys play sessions with his humans and finds them ideal companions. But, care must be taken when in the company of very young children, as it can be jerky in its movements and can involuntarily push or even knock them down. In any case, a dog should never be left alone with a young child without adult supervision, and this applies to all races.

The Irish Red Setter generally not lacking in enthusiasm or curiosity. This curiosity - sometimes combined with his hunting instincts- means, However, easily distracted and it can be difficult to keep your attention. If we add to this that he is sometimes stubborn, it's easy to understand that your education can be a bit complicated at times. And the combination of these two traits can make learning a bit tricky at times!! It also has a great ability to nibble everything in its reach.. Training toys and chews for dogs should satisfy this urge., but at the beginning of learning, some objects can be destroyed.

In any case, the drive of the dog is a characteristic that is preserved for a long time, since it takes much longer than other races to reach a certain psychological maturity. For some people, Living with a puppy-minded dog at five can be challenging, but others love it. In any case, maintains a strong love for life into old age, and some dogs never settle.

In fact, the Irish Setter has a lot of energy to spare: originally bred for hunting, he is still very active and needs to spend his energy on daily walks and to be able to run without obstacles. Between an hour and an hour and a half of exercise a day is the minimum to keep you in good physical and mental health., and simple walks on a leash in the neighborhood are not enough for it to develop: you need a place away from traffic where you can run freely and safely. It is an excellent companion for those who want to go running with their pet, and is also happy to accompany bike rides.

Outings may also include time to swim, since the Irish Red Setter it is a water-loving breed. Swimming is also a good way for me to exercise.

The same goes for dog sports, that allow you to mobilize both your physical and mental capacities. The agility, obedience, crawling and rallying are disciplines that are perfectly suited to him and that he does not stop approaching with his usual enthusiasm.

In any case, an active master is necessary to keep it in good physical and mental shape: given your daily need for exercise, the lifestyle of elderly or sedentary people is not at all suitable for him.

As long as you have enough company and opportunities to exercise, he is very nice to live with and deserves his reputation in this regard.

No wonder, given your level of activity, the Irish Setter not suitable for apartment living. A house with a large fenced garden is a much more ideal living environment., but a fence is essential to prevent it from taking off. Like any self-respecting hunting dog, has a hard time restraining himself if he picks up interesting smells. In any case, even if the garden is big enough for him to run around, it's not a question of leaving it alone for a long time, because he needs to integrate into his family and interact with humans. He finds it difficult to tolerate loneliness and soon suffers from separation anxiety. The combination of lack of company and too much energy can take its toll on you, since it can lead to damage, plus other possible behavior problems (excessive barking to get attention, etc.).

Sharing a home with another species or with a representative of another species can be a smart way to avoid loneliness. Is able to get along with a cat or rodent once it has been raised and, Therefore, considers you a full member of your family. On the other hand, it is better to avoid living with birds, who are your favorite prey: his hunting instinct would have every chance of kicking in at some point and abruptly ending the experience. Obviously, the problem is especially acute in the case of individuals from hunting lines, whose instinct is the most advanced.

His sociability is not limited to family members, both animals and humans. In fact, he loves the company of the latter, and often welcomes strangers with enthusiasm: therefore, it would be quite unrealistic to expect to use it as a guardian. Having said that, Although it is not aggressive, can be protective if the situation calls for it. Will bark loudly when a stranger points their nose at him, which makes him at least a good watchdog.

His closeness to the human being, his gentle nature and intelligence make him a very good therapy dog, whether it is made permanently available to a person or used by an association that regularly intervenes in different institutions. In effect, can do wonders in accompanying patients who need emotional support.

Education

The Irish Red Setter not only is he smart and lively, He is also very cooperative in his education because he likes to work and make his masters happy.. But, keep in mind that it retains an exuberant personality for a long time, as if he were still a young cub, including a healthy dose of curiosity. This makes them easily distracted during sessions., and sometimes it can be hard to get their attention, or keep it for more than a few minutes. So, patience and a sense of humor are the keywords in the training of a Irish Setter, since he deserves his reputation for stubbornness, even stubborn at times. It is important to stay calm whatever happens, and act positive and kind.

In any case, things are easier because you really want to learn and you love challenges. So the challenge is essentially keeping it centered. The best way to do it is through play, with rewards and accolades. His very playful temperament means that he can resist if what is offered does not seem fun to him. Changing activities and rewards regularly can keep your interest and stimulate you more effectively.

Since he loves to run and has a strong hunting instinct, teaching your dog to hunt should be a high priority in your training program, What, as with any race, should start immediately. In more general terms, although in general it is full of good intentions, must learn as soon as possible to be obedient, at the risk of unleashing their tendency to be independent and stubborn.

Begin education of Irish Red Setter at a young age also helps to avoid boredom, since he needs a lot of stimuli to be happy. At eight weeks, is already capable of assimilating many things.

Regarding home training, not usually a source of major problems, although even 4 months the puppy may have difficulty controlling his bladder: if you live inside, it is therefore essential to take it outside regularly.

Like any dog, your socialization also benefits from being started without delay, and it goes much better since it is sociable by nature. Offer you many opportunities to meet all kinds of humans, companions and other animals, but also to face different environments and stimuli (noises, sounds, smells…) it is the best way to make him a perfectly balanced and very pleasant companion.

It also, especially likes to chew and nibble what is within reach. So, it is necessary not only to keep your precious belongings away, but above all to teach him to vent in a way acceptable to both him and his master: diverting their attention every time they start to chew or nibble on inappropriate things is a good way to gradually target this character trait.

Health

The Irish Setter it is a generally robust and healthy breed, and their representatives rarely have major health problems.

They are also relatively heat tolerant and, by its origin, they also acclimate well to reasonable cold and humidity. But, extreme temperatures are not really for him. Of course, must be able to take shelter in case of heat wave, but you should also be able to sleep in a heated place if the temperatures are below freezing.

The main diseases to which the breed is exposed are :

  • The dilation-torsion stomach, which mainly affects large breeds of dogs and is fatal if the vet does not intervene quickly;
  • The Hip Dysplasia, which is also common in large dogs and can be hereditary. It occurs when the thigh bone does not fit well in the hip joint and can cause difficulties in walking or running. Severe cases are usually corrected by surgery.;
  • Osteocondrosis (in osteochondritis), ossification disorder that affects the cartilage of the joints and causes lameness. This disease is still little known, but it is suspected of having hereditary causes. It usually manifests itself in the animal's growth period and affects males more frequently than females.;
  • The osteosarcoma, a bone cancer that mainly affects older animals and causes an increasingly pronounced and painful limp;
  • Epilepsy, which is similar to what is also seen in humans and leads to often impressive seizures. But, there are various treatments that allow people with epilepsy to lead almost perfectly normal lives;
  • The Hypothyroidism, a hormonal disorder that can present many different symptoms (weight gain, Dry Skin, hair loss…). It is usually treated with medications;
  • The von Willebrand disease, an inherited bleeding disorder that can cause blood in the stool or bleeding from the gums or nose. There is no known cure for this disease, but it is possible to provide care to relieve symptoms;
  • Insufficient adhesion of the leukocyte, a serious hereditary disease peculiar to the breed. It leads from a very young age to various and serious bacterial and viral infections because the white blood cells are unable to attack them. It is linked to a recessive gene, which means that an individual can be a carrier of it (and pass it on to their descendants) unaffected;
  • The progressive retinal atrophy, an incurable hereditary disease that corresponds to a slow deterioration of the retina. Produces progressive loss of vision, first at night and then during the day;
  • The entropion, a sometimes inherited eye disorder in which the eyelid rolls inward, irritating the eyeball. The problem can be treated with surgery;
  • The otitis, an ear infection favored by the drooping shape of the ears.

Although the list of diseases the breed is predisposed to can be terrifying, do not forget that their representatives usually spend most of their lives in good health. A study conducted in 2004 by the British Kennel Club and the British Small Animal Veterinary Association revealed that cancer was responsible for the 27% of deaths and that old age was the second leading cause of death, with a 22% of the cases. In other words, these two causes alone account for one in two deaths, well ahead of cardiac problems (10% of the cases) and gastrointestinal disorders (8% of the cases).

However, since many of the conditions to which the breed is predisposed are or may be inherited, adopting a serious breeder of the Setters irlandes it is crucial to obtain an animal that is not only correctly socialized, but also and above all healthy, and that it probably still is. So, must be able to present the results of genetic tests performed to parents or offspring to rule out any transmission of inherited diseases. You must also present a certificate from a veterinarian attesting that the dog is in good health, as well as the health or vaccination card of the dog, in particular to confirm that you have received all necessary vaccinations.

Once the puppy has moved to its new home, care must be taken to respect his growth and not force him to do too many things too soon. So, any particularly strenuous or prolonged activity should be avoided until the puppy's skeleton has reached full maturity, what occurs in this breed at approximately two years of age. Otherwise, you run the risk not only of injury, but also to suffer consequences for life, that may be related to malformations, for example. The risk is all the greater as the Irish Setter is predisposed to various joint problems.

It also, the adoption of a healthy dog ​​should not do without regular visits to the vet, At least once a year, to allow early detection of a potential problem, before it ends up acquiring very serious proportions. It is also an opportunity to carry out any necessary vaccine recalls..

Always in the field of prevention, it is the owner's responsibility to ensure that their animal's parasitic protection remains active at all times and, for it, renew treatments whenever necessary.

Life expectancy

13 years

Grooming

The care of Irish Red Setter takes time and effort. In fact, its beautiful long, silky coat needs to be brushed once or twice a week to stay shiny and knot-free. This regular brushing also stimulates the follicles that cause hair growth., making the coat healthier. During the molting period, in spring and autumn, hair loss is much greater, so daily brushing is recommended to help remove dead hairs.

Unless, Of course, that the Irish Setter don't need more than two baths a year, unless, Of course, that has gotten especially dirty. Care must be taken to always use a shampoo specifically designed for canines., as there is a risk that the skin will dry out due to a product that is too aggressive. In fact, the pH of dog's skin is not the same as that of human skin.

Their floppy ears also require regular maintenance., as they are a breeding ground for infections. So, should be checked weekly and cleaned with a slightly damp cloth to avoid accumulation of dirt and moisture. The same should be done after every prolonged time outdoors, for example if it is used to hunt. After bathing or soaking outdoors, it is also useful to dry them, again to prevent moisture build-up.

Your eyes should also be carefully examined and cleaned every week., again to prevent dirt from getting into them.

Coat grooming sessions also offer the opportunity to care for your dog's teeth by brushing them with dog toothpaste.. This helps prevent tartar buildup and, Therefore, reduce the risk of bad breath and, above all, of oral diseases. It is best to avoid doing it less than once a week, and the ideal is to take care of it regularly.

Given your level of activity, this dog's claws tend to wear out naturally, so no need to cut them manually. But, it is better to check it every month to make sure that it is so. In any case, if you hear them rubbing against the ground when walking on smooth ground, means that they have become too long. Beyond being then prevented from walking, they can break and potentially injure you.

Whether the fur, the ears, the eyes, teeth or claws, maintaining a Irish Red Setter should not be done randomly, at the risk of hurting or even injuring you. The first time, a visit to a professional groomer or veterinarian can be a great way to learn the correct mannerisms from a professional.

In any case, no reason to wait to start: Familiarizing your dog with these sessions from a young age is the best way for him to cooperate when he needs to be handled, and you can even make maintenance sessions moments of shared complicity.

Manipulations are also useful when you return from a long period in nature, since then it is necessary to carefully examine their fur, legs and ears to detect the possible presence of infections or small wounds, but also parasites, thorns, skewers, etc.

Utility

The Irish Setter It was originally designed and developed to accompany hunters in their search for game birds.. It was - and still is- especially appreciated for its qualities as a showing dog: It is excellent for locating game and positioning itself in a sample position so that the hunter knows where the bird is.

His grace, the beauty of its demeanor and its reddish-cashé coat also made it popular in dog shows already in the second half of the 19th century.

Today they are still recognized and appreciated for these two uses., but have also won hearts as affectionate companion dogs, smart and endearing. They are wonderfully suited to family life so owners can give them all the exercise they need, a task that can be delegated, at least in part, In the kids, with those who love to play.

Dog sports are another great way for him to exercise: excels in agility competitions, obedience and tracking, for example.

Last, its closeness to humans, his sensitivity and sweetness explain why he is also found as a therapy dog, for example in schools, hospitals and nursing homes.

On the other hand, the fact that it lacks all aggressiveness, enjoys the company of humans so much and is generally very welcoming to strangers implies that he cannot assume the role of guardian. On the other hand, it is an excellent warning dog, since it does not stop warning the arrival of a stranger.

Price

The popularity of the Irish Red Setter makes it not hard to find, as many breeders can be found both on European and North American soil.

The price of a puppy usually ranges from 500 and 1000 EUR. The average is slightly less than 800 EUR, no significant differences between males and females.

whatever the country, the price necessarily varies depending on the reputation and prestige of the hatchery from which it comes, of his lineage, as well as its intrinsic characteristics, and in particular of its greater or lesser conformity with the standard. This explains why there can be significant price differences between individuals of the same litter.

Characteristics "Irish Red Setter"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Irish Red Setter" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, you must take into account his character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, their care and if you have small children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

friendly dog ​​ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

hair loss ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection level ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need for exercise ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social need ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Home ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Toilet ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Friendly with strangers ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

barking ⓘ

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Health ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendly ⓘ

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Intelligence ⓘ

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Versatility ⓘ

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Child friendly ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Surveillance ⓘ

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joy ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images "Irish Red Setter"

Photos:

1 – Irish Red Setter Vigo – Galicia – Spain – 06-10-2006 by Luis Miguel Bugallo Sánchez (Lmbuga Commons)(Lmbuga Galipedia)Published by / Publish by: Luis Miguel Bugallo Sánchez, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
2 – Irish Red Setter by Adam Ziaja, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – Irish Setter head by Ehog.hu, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – Irish Setter of 9 years. by Can Nefesoglu, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
5 – Irish Setter by Philipp Schiffmann, CC BY-SA 2.0 OF, via Wikimedia Commons
6 – Irish Red Setter by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Irish_setter_(dog).jpg

Videos "Irish Red Setter"

Type and recognitions:

  • FCI CLASSIFICATION:
  • Group :
  • Section : . .

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 2: British and Irish Pointers and Setters. 2.2: Setter
  • AKCSporting
  • ANKC Group 3 (Gundogs)
  • CKCSporting Dogs
  • ​KC – Gundog
  • NZKCGundog
  • UKCGun Dogs

Alternative names:

1. Red Setter, Irish Setter (English).
2. Setter irlandais (French).
3. Irischer Roter Setter (German).
4. (em inglês: Irish Red Setter) (Portuguese).
5. Setter irlandés (español).

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Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungría FCI 239 . Braque Type

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer they are very close to their family and are affectionate and playful with their family.

Content

History

Appeared somewhere between the steppes of Russia and the Carpathians, the Hungarian Braco (commonly known as Vizsla, What does it mean “pointer” in Hungarian) has an ancient history, probably thousands of years. He already accompanied the Magyar tribes before they settled in the Carpathian basin, where the current Hungary is located, in the 9th century.

The first references to this dog date back to the 13th century, and more precisely to the story of one of the scribes of King Adelbert III (1235-1270) which recounts the migrations of the Hungarian people, in which the use of a yellowish dog named Vizsla for hunting. It was also depicted in the 14th century in the illustrations of the chronicles written by the Carmelites. Numerous sixteenth-century Hungarian documents also evoke his role as a faithful companion of kings and aristocracy..

While there is no doubt that the Vizsla current is the result of numerous crossbreeds between hunting dogs over the centuries, these were always carried out in order to preserve the original features, as evidenced by the brown nose which is different from most others pointers.

Historically, the Vizsla has always had a short coat. But, early twentieth century, in the decade of 1930, two breeders came up with the idea of ​​a Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer to the country breeders' club. His goal was to create a dog with all the qualities of the Vizsla, but with a coat that would protect it more effectively from snow and icy water, as well as scratches and scratches when hunting in the forest.

Although it was debated, the proposal was accepted under certain conditions, including maintaining the same coat color. Jozsef Vasa, breeder of the Hungarian Braco, y Laszlo Gresznarik, breeder of the German Shorthaired Pointer, crossed two female Vizsla named Csibi and Zsuzsi with a male of German Shorthaired Pointer called Astor von Potat. Two generations later, Selle Day was the first Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer that was shown at a dog show.

It seems that during World War II, when the population was in decline, crosses were also made with other breeds such as the Setter Irish or the Griffon. But, there is no record of this miscegenation in the records kept by Hungarian organizations.

The breed was recognized in 1963 by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI), nine years after the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer (Vizsla). The first specimens were exported to North America in the decade of 1970. More quickly adopted in Canada, to the point of gaining official recognition from the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) in 1977.

In the United States, was not up 2006 and 2014 respectively than the United Kennel Club (UKC) and the American Kennel Club (AKC) they did the same, while they had already recognized the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer (Vizsla) in 1960 (AKC) and 1984 (UKC). Its growing presence in Europe also allowed it to be recognized by the British Kennel Club. (KC) in 1991.

Photo: Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer; MVD belongs to the sample dogs of the group 7 of the FCI with proof of work by Broneder, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it is a medium-sized dog that differs from its short-haired cousin by its slightly squarer appearance on average, but also and above all because of the length and texture of its coat.

Its slightly rectangular body is dry and well developed, no superfluous roundness. He leans on legs of solid bones, well structured and with prominent muscles. The legs are oval in shape and end in brown claws.

The tail is wide at the base and tapers to the tip. For years, as a precaution for hunting parties, the queue was shortened by about a quarter. This practice of cutting the tail of dogs (tail docking) is currently prohibited in many territories, including France, Switzerland, Belgium and Quebec.

Braco-Hungaro-de-pelo-duro-1
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

The head of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it is quite wide, with a slightly domed skull at a moderate stop. Ears are back, going down along the cheeks and are slightly shorter than those of the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer (Vizsla). The eyes are oval, medium-sized, and brown according to the coat. The muzzle is quite short and ends in a broad brown nose as well, but darker in color than fur.

It is the latter that clearly distinguishes it from its cousin.. Both have a dense, waterproof underlayer, but the top layer of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is longer (2 to 3 cm.) and it has a completely different texture. They are made of wire hair, hard, dense and very dense. These features give it excellent protection against harsh outdoor conditions. At face level, hair is slightly shorter, except on the eyebrows and especially the beard. This is not very long (2-3cm.), but it is very pronounced and noticeable.

Like his short haired counterpart, the fur of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it's golden wheat, and the spikes may be darker in the shade. Shades of red, brown or light yellow are accepted, but they are not wanted. A small white spot on the chest is possible, as long as it does not exceed 5 cm..

Finally, sexual dimorphism is well marked in this breed, the male being significantly larger and more massive than the female.

Character and skills

The character of Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is comparable to the Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer (Vizsla), but with the addition of a wet beard when caressed.

They are very close to their family and are affectionate and playful with their own. But, generally feels closer to a particular person among them, whom he considers as his human reference, and it doesn't stop making you feel clearly.

In any case, he is much less open with humans who are not part of his home. This does not mean that he is aggressive or distrustful towards them., but rather indifferent.

But, if you perceive a threat to your family or territory, whether it comes from an unknown human or another animal, he is very protective, not hesitating to scold or even interfere.

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

He behaves in exactly the same way with children. Like this, is close to the little ones of the family, but he prefers to avoid others. You have to be careful when the first one plays with friends, as you may misinterpret some of the second's actions as aggression, and then react inappropriately. Like any other dog of any breed, should not be left alone with a young child without adult supervision.

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer gets along well with his peers, whether they are those you meet on your walks or those who share your home when necessary. Their relationships with other animals are much more complicated, as they soon fall victim to their strong hunting instinct. The domestic cat is usually protected, especially if you have grown up with him since he was young, but a rodent or a bird cannot say the same if he lives next to him in the house or is on a walk. An unknown cat is also likely to be relentlessly chased.

Used for centuries to succeed on long hunting trips, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer still an active dog today. You need to be able to exercise for at least an hour each day to feel comfortable, and you feel even happier if you can spend whole days walking through the forest. So, its level of activity implies that it is not suitable for an elderly or very sedentary person.

Hunting is still his favorite activity, and the one that best allows you to express all your qualities. Otherwise, canine research sports (tracking, Cavemen…) they are a perfect outlet, to solicit your extraordinary sense of smell.

Obedience and agility are also disciplines that will do you good. More simply, it is also a great companion for cyclists, runners, hikers, nature lovers, mushroom pickers… This is all the more true since it is robust and capable of evolving on all types of terrain., from dense forests to rocky mountains, passing through snowy plains or swamps.

In the city, it is strongly recommended to keep him on a leash to avoid accidents if he runs after a passing cat or small animal. But, once in the desert, it is much more appropriate to let it run free. Of course, learning withdrawal orders is an essential prerequisite, for obvious security reasons. A GPS dog collar is nevertheless a good investment to help locate you if the deer you are chasing has led you into unfamiliar terrain..

It also, as it does very well in the aquatic environment. Without being particularly fond, he likes to swim once in a while, especially if the place where you live offers this possibility.

Used to hunting quite independently and, Therefore, to make decisions for themselves, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer has acquired a certain intelligence coupled with a strong character. A beginning teacher is probably overwhelmed.

If you are independent in your way of acting, does not mean that he likes to be alone. You can wait patiently at home when your family is at work during the day, but should be able to be as much as possible with the rest of the time. It also, it is likely to hurt if left alone for a whole weekend because it cannot bear the stress caused by the absence of its masters. It also, just because you are physically fit to sleep in the garden, even when it's a little cool, does not mean that this is recommended. In fact, to be well in the head, do not keep him away from his family: it's more of an indoor dog, who prefers to watch television at night with his family than to admire the stars alone outside.

This is all the more true as he is surprisingly calm when his exercise needs are met., to the point of being able to live in an apartment, provided it is large enough to accommodate it in good condition. Discreet and well educated, are not the type that barks on top of your lungs or howls when you die, and are not usually noticed by the neighbors. In fact, they rarely bark (generally when they perceive a threat), but then they don't stop making themselves heard, since his voice rises a lot.

But, the ideal environment for him is a house with a garden (perfectly fenced) in the countryside. A walk in the city during the same time does not have the same flavor as an outing for a dog accustomed to nature and the great outdoors.

Education

Like all dogs, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer benefits greatly from socialization that begins in its first few weeks and continues for the following months. Usually goes smoothly, since then he is particularly open and curious, quickly getting used to the different environments and situations you encounter. It´s, because, the ideal time to get used to the people you will meet regularly in your life (friends, neighbors, veterinary…), but also to take him to all kinds of places and allow him to meet various humans and similar creatures.

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

The education of Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer can give a slightly timid caregiver a hard time, that you wouldn't know how to be respected by your dog. Strong of character and independent, will soon prevail if left alone. But, perfectly suited to beginners, as long as they know how to assert their authority. For this, it is important to establish clear and consistent rules without delay, so much over time (what is prohibited one day is also prohibited the next day) as between the different members of the family (it is not about one person authorizing what another person prohibits), to establish impeccable discipline and ensure that he respects his master's authority. Once you understand that you can't decide for yourself, accepts the situation and is not the one to monitor the slightest defect and constantly question the established order – If and when, of course, their masters continue to know how to impose themselves when necessary.

On the other hand, educate a Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it's much simpler, fast and effective with methods based on positive reinforcement. Compliments and caresses are a good source of motivation to make her want to learn, and sweets are also valuable allies to motivate him to do what is asked of him. On the other hand, traditional training techniques are doomed to failure, as they are likely to totally destabilize it, making him fearful and insecure.

Last, withdrawal orders are high on the list of things to teach your dog as a priority. In fact, so that you can let him play freely during field trips, which is particularly beneficial for him, must be perfectly assimilated.

Health

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer they are generally robust, with a life expectancy of around 12-14 years, which is in line with the average of dogs of their size.

Their short coat protects them from both heat and cold, allowing them to live in a wide variety of climates. But, not adapted to extremes, and can't sleep outside when freezing, for example, or run in the sun in the middle of a summer heat wave.

No dog is immune to disease, and the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is no exception. In this case, to which it is most exposed are ..:

  • The Hip Dysplasia, a joint problem often favored by a hereditary predisposition, causing pain and difficulty in movement, as well as osteoarthritis with age;
  • Elbow dysplasia, a malformation of the joint, which is also possibly related to a predisposition inherited from parents, and that also causes pain and lameness;
  • Epilepsy, a nervous system disease of often hereditary origin, responsible for more or less frequent and intense seizures. The disease cannot be cured on its own, but your symptoms can be relieved with the help of medication;
  • Addison's disease, a hormonal deficiency that is usually inherited from the parents and manifests itself in various ways: weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, weightloss… The most severe form of the disease is usually fatal, while the chronic form can be kept under control with lifelong treatment;
  • Hemophilia type A, an inherited disorder that prevents blood from clotting properly, and that affects men more than women. May manifest in heavy bleeding, bruising or blood in the urine;
  • Hyperuricosia, a disease also inherited from the parents. Corresponds to an excess of uric acid, leading to the formation of crystals in the urine, which in turn can cause bleeding and kidney failure;
  • Allergies, that can be caused by factors as different as food, the environment or parasites. Allergies can be caused by factors as different as food, the environment or parasites, and most often manifest as itching and redness of the skin;
  • Ear infections, as in most breeds of dogs with drooping ears.

The Hungarian Short-Haired Pointer (Vizsla) it is also particularly susceptible to various diseases of the eyes:

  • Progressive retinal atrophy, a degeneration of eye tissue that causes irreparable loss of sight, first at night and then also during the day;
  • Entropion, a defect in the position of the eyelid that can be inherited and causes irritation of the eyeball. The problem can be treated with surgery;
  • Ectropión, an eyelid curl problem also inherited from parents, which also causes eye irritation. Also in this case, an operation remedies the problem;
  • Glaucoma, often hereditary, which is a painful increase in the pressure inside the eye. This leads to blindness if it is not operated as soon as possible.

It also, people who are used to hunt are particularly exposed to the risk of injuries that this activity implies.

Since many of the diseases to which the breed is predisposed are or may be hereditary, the adoption of a strict breeder of Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer maximizes the probability of getting a healthy animal, and one that stays that way. In fact, a professional breeder not only ensures that puppies are well socialized from their first weeks of life, but also that they do not inherit a hereditary defect from their parents. To achieve this goal, causes various genetic tests to be systematically performed on the breeding stock in question, and excludes all those who could present any risk. You can also have the resulting puppies examined to confirm the absence of a hereditary condition.. In any case, must be able to present the results of the tests performed, plus a certificate of good health from a veterinarian and the puppy's health or vaccination record, that includes all vaccines that have been administered.

It also, from the moment he arrives home until the end of his life, it is essential to allow your dog to be regularly examined by a veterinarian for a complete health check. This is necessary at least once a year, and more often as you get older, as it allows early detection of a potential problem and action accordingly. These visits are also an opportunity to have immunizations increased when needed.. At the same time, It is also necessary to ensure that antiparasitic treatments of the “child” are renewed throughout the year, so you are never unprotected at this level.

Grooming

Keep warm Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it's quite simple, weekly brushing is enough to keep it clean and healthy. But, she lets go of her undercoat twice a year, in spring and autumn, and daily brushing is recommended to help remove dead hairs.

Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer

An occasional bath is also necessary, but the frequency of the bath largely depends on the lifestyle of your dog. These may include, it is not useless to bathe several times a month an individual who is used for hunting or who often travels on muddy trails in the forest and sleeps inside the house. On the other hand, two or three a year may be perfectly enough for someone else who walks mostly on rocky trails in the mountains and whose place to sleep is in the garage. In any case, you should always use a mild shampoo designed specifically for dogs, as it can damage their fur or skin.

It also, special attention should be paid to their ears, as their fallen form means they are potential nests for infections (ear infections, etc.) as soon as dirt or moisture accumulates on them. So, it is important to check and clean them weekly. At the same time, it is important to get used to drying them after a long time in a humid environment, and even more so after swimming in a swamp, lake or stream…

The weekly maintenance session is also an opportunity to examine and, if required, quickly clean the area around the eyes with a damp cloth, again to avoid infections that would be triggered by a dirt deposit.

As in any dog, oral hygiene is also important. So, the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer you should brush your teeth at least once a week, using a toothpaste intended for canine use. This will reduce the deposit of dental plaque., that can cause bad breath, cavities and other diseases by turning into tartar.

It also, despite what their rather active lifestyle might have us believe, this dog needs to have its claws trimmed by hand fairly regularly. This is because they are particularly strong and difficult to wear out.. On average, must be trimmed every 2 or 3 weeks, but if they are not cut every 2 or 3 weeks, it is enough to stretch your ear when walking on hard ground: if then you hear a kind of click with each step, it is because they have become too long and it is time to cut them. Otherwise, not only could it make it difficult for you to walk, but you could also be injured if they broke.

Last, it is recommended to examine it (fur, ears, pads…) after every hunting session or a long stay in the wild, to detect possible cuts or scratches, parasites, thorns…

As in all races, learn how to care for a Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer from a professional (hairdresser or vet) it is the best way to take care of it without risk of damaging or injuring it. It is advisable to accustom him to these different manipulations from a very young age, so that they become a moment of shared pleasure, and not in a task that I try to avoid.

Utilization and training

From the first references to its subject dating from the 13th century, the Hungarian Braco was introduced as a hunting dog, more precisely like a pointing dog. Already at that time, as well as in later centuries, including current, his mission was to find the game and point the hunter in the direction of it. Versatile, is capable of hunting in all terrains (forests, plains, mountains…) and is not afraid of cold or water. So, used to remove various game pieces, either nude or feathered, usually working alone or possibly with a partner, but rarely in a group.

Even today, hunting is the main mission of the Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer, and its qualities are recognized in particular by hunters in Central Europe and Great Britain, where it is present in large numbers.

The qualities it mobilizes for hunting (style, obedience, independence…) they also allow you to shine in various canine sports disciplines, either in the crawl, obedience or agility.

The Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer it is also increasingly present in homes as a simple companion dog. Their attachment and energy can be very beneficial to the morale of their owners., and the most athletic find in him a companion of choice for their long excursions in nature. In any case, your need for exercise is quite high, which makes it unsuitable for a very sedentary person, for example.

His protective side also makes him a good watchdog, that spares no effort to put intruders to flight, although not as imposing as other races.

For sale “Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer”

The price of a puppy Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer is generally between 600 and 800 EUR, without any significant price difference between males and females.

Whatever the location, and as for all races, the amount requested depends on the more or less prestigious ancestry from which the animal comes, as well as the reputation of the breeding from which it comes. Its intrinsic characteristics are, However, the main factor to take into account, which explains that prices within the same litter can vary enormously; individuals closest to the standard and with the best character traits are necessarily more expensive than others.

Characteristics "Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, you must take into account his character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, their care and if you have small children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

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friendly dog ​​ⓘ

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hair loss ⓘ

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Affection level ⓘ

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Need for exercise ⓘ

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Social need ⓘ

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Home ⓘ

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Friendly with strangers ⓘ

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barking ⓘ

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Health ⓘ

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Intelligence ⓘ

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Versatility ⓘ

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Child friendly ⓘ

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Surveillance ⓘ

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joy ⓘ

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Videos "Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer"

Hungarian Hard-Haired Braco or Hard-Haired Viszla - Breed of dog
Hungarian Hard-Haired Braco or Hard-Haired Viszla – Breed of dog
Wirehaired Vizslas | Breed Judging 2020
Wirehaired Vizslas | Breed Judging 2020

Type and recognitions:

  • FCI CLASSIFICATION:
  • Group :
  • Section : . .

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • AKC – Group 1 (Sports)
  • CKC – Group 1 (Sports)
  • ​KCGun Dog
  • NZKCGun Dog Group
  • UKCGun Dog Group


FCI breed standard "Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer"

FCIFCI - Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer
Bracco

Alternative names:

1. Hungarian Wire-haired Pointer, Wirehaired Vizsla, Hungarian Wirehaired Vizsla, Drótszőrű magyar vizsla (English).
2. Braque hongrois à poil dur, (en hongrois : drótszőrű magyar vizsla), Vizsla à Poil Dur (French).
3. Drahthaariger Ungarischer Vorstehhund, (ungarisch Drótszőrű magyar vizsla), Drahthaar Vizsla (German).
4. Braco húngaro de pelo duro, (em húngaro: drótszőrű magyar vizsla) (Portuguese).
5. Vizsla húngaro de capa alambrada (español).

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Gordon Setter
Escocia Reino Unido FCI 6 - Setter

Gordon Setter

The name Gordon Setter is due to the Dukes of Richmond-Gordon, creators of the breed

Content

History

Scottish native, the Gordon Setter was called for almost a century Black and Tan Setter, in reference to the color of their fur. Was not up 1924 when its name was changed to The Kennel Club, in memory of the Scottish Duke Alexander Gordon (1743-1827).

The latter played an important role in the development of the breed, creating at the end of the 18th century a hatchery in one of its castles, entirely dedicated to him, which allowed its standardization. Some believe other races also came into play (starting with the Saint Hubert Hound), but at least it is proven that the Gordon Setter is the result of the crossing between English Setter and Colleys. The resulting dogs had various coat colors ranging from black and white to red.. But, the Duke chose to favor black and tan subjects, excluding others from the brood; this explains why all representatives of the breed today wear this coat color.

Like this, the Gordon Setter became popular throughout Scotland and the rest of the UK in the early 19th century, to the point that it was one of the dogs exhibited in the first dog show in modern history, that was held in 1859 en Newcastle. In fact, its ability to adapt to any terrain, even the most rugged, makes you a perfect co-worker for hunting game birds.

Nor did he wait to leave his homeland. Like this, the first import of a Gordon Setter in France it dates back to 1840. Logically, the hunters would have been in charge of taking it to France. Just two years later, in 1842, Rake and Rachel were the first two representatives of the breed to cross the Atlantic and be imported to the United States. Your buyers, George Blunt y Daniel Webster, they acquired the breed directly from the kennel of the 5th Duke of Gordon, son and successor of Alexander Gordon.

The Gordon Setter was one of the first breeds recognized by the Kennel Club, the British organization of reference, since its creation in 1873. It was also one of the first nine breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) when it was founded in 1884. But, the other reference organization in the country, the United Kennel Club (UKC), waited until 1949 to do the same. The Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) it took even longer, since it was not until 1963 when he had to do the same.

But, although it is recognized around the world, the Gordon Setter is still a relatively rare breed. In United States, the Gordon Setter ranks 110 (of something less than 200) in the AKC breed classification, based on the number of births registered with the AKC each year, and the trend is for a slight decrease. In France, the number of new annual registrations in the Livre des Origines Français (LOF) has not stopped declining since the 1990s, having reached a peak in the late eighties. At that time there were more than 1.000, but today there are only a few 600, what to compare, for example, with the more than 5.000 of the English Setter.

In the United Kingdom, the Gordon Setter is considered by the Kennel Club as a vulnerable native breed. But, the number of births registered in the organization each year remains relatively stable around 250.

Physical characteristics

The Gordon Setter is a big dog, robust and well muscled. But, there are differences in size between individuals belonging to display lines and those belonging to hunting lines, the latter being significantly smaller.

The general appearance of the Gordon Setter conveys an impression of nobility and dignity. His chest is not very wide in front and his back is strong, rather short, with well arched ribs. His body is of medium length, short from shoulder to hips. Its tail is rather short and can be straight or slightly curved.

The head is taller than it is wide, with a well developed skull. The upper part of the skull is slightly rounded and the stop is well marked. Located at the end of a long snout, his nose is black and wide, with wide open nostrils. Master a strong and regular jaw.

The eyes of the Gordon Setter they are a good size, not too deep not too bulging. Dark brown and shiny, give it a lively look. Looking at your ears, they are falls, medium size and fine. They are set low and worn close to the head.

Like others Setters, the coat is soft and shiny, smooth or slightly wavy, but it should not be curly. It is of medium length over most of the body. But, is short on the top of the head and on the front of the legs, long and silky at the top of the ears, long and thin on the back of the hind legs. Last, on the belly forms a strip that can extend across the chest and throat.

Its fur is bicolor, mixing deep charcoal black and shiny chestnut. The border between black and brown must be clearly defined.

It also, chestnut-red markings can be seen in different places on the body. This is the case, in particular, above the eyes, with two spots that do not exceed 2 cm each. They are also found in the throat and on each side of the muzzle. They should not exceed the base of the nose; look like a band around the end of the muzzle. There are also two large chestnut-red spots on the chest.

Tan markings are also present on the inside of the hind legs, spreading out from the paws to the toes. They are also present on or slightly above the front legs and around the anus.

Some individuals also have a white patch on the chest and/or black spots on the toes and under the jaw..

Last, sexual dimorphism is not very pronounced, since males are not normally taller than 4 cm more at the withers than females.

Height and weight

    ▷ Male size: Of 66 to 66 cm.

    ▷ female size: Of 62 to 62 cm.

    ▷ Male weight: 29 kg

    ▷ female weight: 25 kg

Character and skills

The Gordon Setter He is a kind and very affectionate companion with his master. He is quite energetic in his youth, but it becomes much calmer as an adult.

It is an ideal dog especially with children, with whom he is tolerant and protective, and with whom he enjoys playing. But, given its size, it is better if they are already a certain age, as you will soon be able to involuntarily push them. In any case, regardless of race, a dog should never be left alone with a small child, that is to say, without adult supervision. In fact, An accident can happen at any time if you misinterpret a child's behavior and think that they are attacking. The risk of unfortunate consequences - even very serious ones- is even greater with an animal of that size, that could unintentionally upset a young child.

The close bond with the family can become problematic and can be counterproductive if the family has to be away from home often and/or for long periods of time. The dog is very likely to develop separation anxiety, what can lead to destructive behavior, escape attempts or excessive moaning.

You're also likely to be upset if you can't exercise for at least an hour a day. Although it is not at all suitable for an elderly and / or very sedentary person, it is an ideal companion for the owner of a dog who dreams, for example, with jogging with your dog, ride a bike with him or take him for long walks. But, it is essential that the rappelling process is mastered so that the dog can run without a leash, as his hunting instinct can take over at any time. He also likes games and loves to swim and play in the water.

If he is walked several times a day and his important need for exercise is satisfied, the Gordon Setter it is quiet and peaceful inside the home, able to live both in the city and in the country, and easily adapts to apartment living. If you live in a house with a garden, we must ensure that it is well fenced, since he is a fugitive by nature. Using an underground electric fence would not be an effective solution, since your determination is much stronger than the discomfort caused by electrical impulses, especially when it has sniffed a prey. In any case, it cannot be a question of making him live outside. In fact, to be happy and balanced, needs to be surrounded and interact with their masters, to feel like he is a full member of the family pack.

Although at Gordon Setter he likes to be surrounded, you greatly prefer to be around people you know or, at least, of other animals that you are used to seeing. On the other hand, he is quite suspicious, reserved and impassive with strangers, not hesitating to bark if it perceives the slightest danger. So, can be a good watchdog. They are also sometimes aggressive towards other dogs they meet for the first time.. In fact, is often a dog with a dominant temperament, who therefore wishes to seize his companions. A thorough socialization started at a very young age is de rigueur so that you learn to respect them.

But, coexistence with other animals in the home is not impossible, and having a playmate is a good way to avoid boredom in the absence of their masters. In fact, if they have grown up together, everything usually goes very well. On the other hand, the arrival of a new animal at home is only possible if it is used to living with other animals since childhood. If that is not the case, your hunting instinct is likely to lead you to regard the newcomer as prey. The same goes for the animals you see outside, especially those who venture into your garden.

His dominant character, independent and determined can also be a source of problems in the relationship with his master, if he does not know how to impose himself and make his dog respect him. A firm education is essential to prevent him from becoming difficult to handle., doing what he pleases.

Education

The socialization of Gordon Setter should be done at a young age, period when learning is easier, since it is more malleable and adaptable. Thus, it is necessary to get used as often as possible to meet new people and to face all kinds of situations and external stimuli (noises, smells, vehicles…). On the other hand, it is just as essential to teach them to tolerate loneliness, so your teacher's absences don't become a problem later. These two aspects are essential requirements to achieve a balanced and serene companion.

Given its size and its significant need for maintenance, it is convenient to get used to being handled without flinching from an early age, otherwise he will have problems when he is an adult. In view of his strong hunting instinct, learning to remember your dog is at least as important as basic commands (“Sit down”, “walk”, “stay”, etc.). This allows the dog to shed without having to worry too much, which makes it easier for him to exercise by himself and, Therefore, make you feel comfortable. Of course, this is especially important if it is used as a hunting dog. As long as I don't obey this order, must be carried on a leash when walking.

It also, the Gordon Setter it is an intelligent breed of dog and learns quickly. But, as is often the case with intelligent dogs, They are not the kind that take for granted: with a strong character, can quickly become very stubborn. This means that, to be obedient, You have to give him a firm education to prevent his intelligence from turning against his master and getting the best of him as soon as he gets home. But, do not punish your dog in any way when he does something wrong: as the Gordon Setter not really receptive to reprimands, it is better to opt for the positive reinforcement method, with the help of treats in particular.

Last, if it is intended to be used for hunting, the report and the notion of resignation are added to the reminder as indispensable teachings. In effect, must be able at all times to return when his master calls him, to catch a prey without biting it and to give it up if its owner asks.

Health

The Gordon Setter is generally in good health.

But, may be exposed to various pathologies of varying severity, as :

  • The stomach dilation-torsion syndrome, common to most large breeds of dogs and can lead to rapid death of the animal if not attended to quickly;
  • The hip and elbow dysplasia, also common in large dogs. Produces pain and lameness caused by inflammation of the joints, which can lead to osteoarthritis.
  • The progressive retinal atrophy, an inherited disease that causes retinal degeneration and can lead to total loss of vision;
  • The Hypothyroidism, a hormonal disorder responsible for many symptoms that vary from person to person;
    ear infections, due to the drooping shape of their ears;
  • The abiotrofia cortical cerebelosa, a severe inherited neurological disease due to premature degeneration of cerebellar cells. If adopted from a breeder Gordon Setter, DNA test results should be requested to establish that the puppy does not have the gene responsible for this disease. In any case, a worthy breeder does not breed an individual with a genetic disease. In the case of adoption by another route, DNA testing can be done before taking the plunge, in order to rule out this risk.

It also, as with all large breeds, It is strongly recommended to avoid subjecting a puppy to Gordon Setter to excessive physical exertion. In effect, it is very fragile during its growth, especially at the level of your bones and joints. The utmost care must be taken during this period.

Life expectancy

13 years

Grooming

The coat of the Gordon Setter requires special care and maintenance. Brushing two to three times a week with a brush or glove is essential for the sebum to be well distributed throughout the coat., removing dead hairs and preventing them from tangling. Although hair loss is moderate, brushing should be daily, during the seasonal moult in spring and fall. It is also necessary to wash the dog once every one or two months to avoid bad smells and clean its coat: due to hair length, tends to collect dirt easily. But, you must be careful not to wet the inside of their ears, as it is easily prone to ear infections.

It also, the hair between the pads and inside the ears should be trimmed once a month to reduce the risk of infections caused by small plants or spikelets that could get stuck in the pads.

It also, pay special attention to your ears. Like any dog ​​with floppy ears, are at increased risk of infections (otitis, etc.). So, should be inspected and cleaned at least once a week, and ideally every time the dog comes into contact with water, for example during a hunting trip or after bathing. This is also an opportunity to check your eyes and clean them if necessary..

Looking at your teeth, cleaning is necessary at least once a week, as for all other dogs. Regular use of a dog toothbrush or finger pad will help limit tartar and bad breath..

Last, given your level of activity, natural wear and tear is usually enough to trim the claws of the Gordon Setter. But, as you get older or don't walk enough, claws can become too long and become a nuisance or even injury. If this happens, must be trimmed with a special file or nail clippers. If the owner is not very comfortable with this maintenance task, you can ask your vet to do it or, at least, teach him how to do it so he can do it himself.

Use

Born hunter, the Gordon Setter has long been used as a hunting dog and as a pointing and collecting dog. Although they are not very fast compared to others Setter, their stamina and keen sense of smell make them excellent woodcock hunters, partridges and retrievers.

Today, although they are still used primarily as bird hunting dogs, they are also increasingly found as companion and show dogs. His calm character, gentle and affectionate makes them very endearing pets, as long as their owners are able to satisfy their need for exercise.

Their loyalty to their owners and their distrust of strangers also make them excellent watchdogs.. So, it is also a good companion for canicross, canine mountain biking or any other sporting activity, thanks above all to its resistance and its robust character.

Last, its elegance, as well as his noble attitude, also make him a competitor of choice in canine beauty contests.

Price

The price of a puppy Gordon Setter varies between the 700 and 1200 euros in Europe .

Regardless of location, price differences from one individual to another are explained by their greater or lesser conformity with the norm, as well as by their sex: males are significantly more expensive than females.

Characteristics "Gordon Setter"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Gordon Setter" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, you must take into account his character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, their care and if you have small children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

friendly dog ​​ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

hair loss ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection level ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need for exercise ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social need ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Home ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Toilet ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Friendly with strangers ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

barking ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendly ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Intelligence ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Versatility ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child friendly ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Surveillance ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

joy ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images "Gordon Setter"

Photos:

1 – The picture shows a Gordon Setter in the typical work of the race in the field. by Nordic-Gordon-Hunters, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
2 – Gordon Setter by richkidsunite
3 – Gordon Setter at a dog show in Konopiska, Poland. by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – Gordon Setter at a dog show in Konopiska, Polonia by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
5 – Gordon Setter by https://pixabay.com/photos/dog-setter-gordon-animal-pet-4320937/
6 – Gordon Setter by https://pixabay.com/photos/dog-setter-gordon-animal-pet-4320945/

Videos "Gordon Setter"

Type and recognitions:

  • FCI CLASSIFICATION:
  • Group :
  • Section : . .

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 2: British and Irish Pointers and Setters. 2.2: Setter
  • AKCSporting
  • ​KC – Gundog
  • UKCGun Dogs


FCI breed standard "Gordon Setter"

FCIFCI - Gordon Setter
Gordon

Alternative names:

1. Black and tans (English).
2. Setter Gordon (French).
3. Gordon Setter (German).
4. Setter gordon (Portuguese).
5. Setter escocés (español).

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Portuguese Pointer
Portugal FCI 187 . Braque Type

Portuguese Pointer

The Portuguese Pointer He is extremely affectionate and very attached to children, it is also a very submissive dog.

Content

Characteristics "Portuguese Pointer"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Portuguese Pointer" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, you must take into account his character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, their care and if you have small children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

friendly dog ​​ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

hair loss ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection level ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need for exercise ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social need ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Home ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Toilet ⓘ

1.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Friendly with strangers ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

barking ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendly ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Intelligence ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Versatility ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child friendly ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Surveillance ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

joy ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

History

The Portuguese Pointer arose from Perdigueiro Peninsular, an ancient breed of Iberian dogs, its presence is documented since the 10th century, Its first appearance in art is on a Visigothic-Arab tombstone of the Church of San Juan Bautista de Tomar. Its evolution was the result of several factors such as adaptation to the climate, the type of hunting, the terrain and the selection introduced through the Portuguese cultural specificity.

In the fourteenth century, It was bred in the royal kennels and used for hunting Altaria, being known as “Podengo de mostra”, showing already the possibility of stopping before the hunt. In the 16th century (reign of D. Sebastian) its use by the popular classes was common (although prohibited). The constant bleeding in the working arms caused by the discoveries, the abandonment of the fields, hunger and change of habits, led the population to resort more to hunting for food and, as a result, to the use of Pointing Dogs, that they were “prohibited” for causing, thanks to its excellent qualities, serious damage to the vested interests of the royal house and the nobility.

In the 18th century, Many English families established a presence in the Porto region in the business of wine production and came into contact with the breed being brought to England where it played an important role in the origin of the English Pointer.

At the end of the 19th century it suffered a certain decline, due to serious social upheavals and new tastes and contacts with the outside world, that gave projection to the foreign races that were then in fashion. But it is still represented in art objects (tinaja painted by D. Fernando II of Saxe-Coburg, Pena-Sintra), painting of King D.Luis and the princes in hunting clothes in the Palace of Ajuda, Lisbon), painting of a hunting trip of an Englishman in the Douro (Quinta de Gatão, Duero) or in artistic ceramics by the Real Fábrica do Rato (Pimenta Palace, Lisbon).

Only in 1920 some breeders strove to save the breed, locating some of the dogs in the inaccessible north of Portugal. The Portuguese pedigree book was then established in 1932 and the breed standard in 1938. For at least a thousand years, this dog always had the same square head, triangular ears and compact look.

Photo: “Portuguese Pointer” during the Dog World Show in Poznań. by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Portuguese Pointer comes in average proportions, straight, good guy, robust but with a harmonic conformation allied to the manifest elasticity of the movements.

The head is proportionate in relation to the body, well shaped and harmonious; seems to be big on the set. A little thick, However, it is neither bony nor thick and has loose and thin skin.

The coat is short and thick in most dogs., with a velvety texture on the ears and face .

Yellow in light varieties, common and dark, solid or white spotted on the head, the neck, chest and footwear.

In males, the height at the withers is 52 to 60 centimeters, the weight is 20 to 27 kg. In females the height is 48 to 56 centimeters and the weight is 16 to 22 kg.

Character and skills

Portuguese Pointer
An image of a “Portuguese Pointer”, a Portuguese hunting dog breed. The animal in the photo had 11 years when it was photographed.

The Portuguese Pointer he is an extremely gentle and affectionate dog, with great delivery capacity and very resistant. It is quiet, very sociable and a bit petulant in relation to other dogs. Works with vivacity and persistence and is curious by nature. He always keeps in touch with his hunter.

He moves with an easy step and is graceful. It is versatile in its function and very adaptable to various terrains, climates and types of hunting.

Extremely affectionate and very attached to children, it is also a very submissive dog. Can, for lack of education, do not obey gestures or orders. But, it's easy to train.

Health

The Portuguese Pointer has an average life expectancy of 14 years. It is considered a hardy breed with no specific health problems.. But, hip dysplasia, lunation of the patella, cancer and autoimmune diseases are potential health problems for dogs of this size.

Videos "Portuguese Pointer"

The Portuguese partridge, a versatile dog.
O Perdigueiro português, um cão polivalente
Main characteristics of the Portuguese Perdigueiro
main characteristics of “Portuguese Pointer”

Type and recognitions:

  • FCI CLASSIFICATION:
  • Group :
  • Section : . .

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • AKC – Bracco


FCI breed standard "Portuguese Pointer"

FCIFCI - Portuguese Pointer
Perdiguero

Alternative names:

1. Perdigueiro Português, Portuguese Pointer Dog (English).
2. Perdigueiro Portugais (French).
3. Perdigueiro Português, Portugiesisch (German).
4. Perdigueiro português (Portuguese).
5. (Perdigueiro Português en portugués) (español).

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Burgos Pointer
España FCI 90 . Braque Type

Perdiguero de Burgos

The Burgos Pointer is smart and learns easily, above all, tracking tasks.

Content

History

The Burgos Pointer It is a breed of dog Spain. Originally from Castile, especially in the province of Burgos, This rustic breed is intended for hunting and has exceptional characteristics for hunting small game..

It is an ancient breed from the Castilian tableland, is widespread, and according to some connoisseurs of the breed, it is likely that it has participated in the creation of other breeds of hunting dog, not only Spain.

The truth is that lot of documented material that speaks of this breed there is. Veterinary geneticist, José Manuel Sanz rudder, has dedicated several lines to the history of this breed and in a document that appears cited in many web, speaks of the Origins and Ancient History (Until 1911). You can read the complete material on the website of the Spanish Association of el Perro Perdiguero de Burgos. Here we will only mention what refers to the word “Perdiguero” and to the different theories about the origin but very briefly…

“The word ‘perdiguero‘ It occurs frequently in classical texts on venatoria and its reference corresponds to the generic Hunter dog of partridges, "perdicero" or "perdigero", but it cannot be lightly assumed that this dog was a Burgos Pointer. In numerous current texts we can read various theories about the origin of the race. The more absolute confusion arises from a whole once analysed separately. The most common mistakes that demonstrate a poor work of research are as follows:

  • Associate the word perdiguero the race Burgos Pointer.
  • Believing that the Pointing Dogs, as the Spanish classics tell us, they were Burgos Pointers and forget that they were other races.
  • Define like Burgos Pointer to the dogs that authors from Velázquez to Goya have been captured in numerous canvases where hunting dogs are reproduced.
  • Define incomprehensibly and lightly when Burgos Pointer as the origin of English Pointer, either in a display of patriotic enthusiasm, consider him further as the father of all European Braques“.

“The authors, as often happens, they do not manage to agree on the theories about the origins of animals and while some affirm that the sample dog is originally from Italy, others say that France or Spain (according to the nationality of the author) which they were born.

On the formation of the current dog Burgos Pointer the news is null and we can only apply the parameters that are studied to form a race, they are:

  • Time and place of training.
  • Genetic basis provided the race.
  • Adaptation to the environment in which is born.
  • Geographical isolation and inbreeding operated.

With regard to the first of them, not a breed created by man ex process are being, with measured doses of one or another blood, both the time and the place of training are uncertain. A race not be based in short periods of time and having no initial selection at a single point, can not think of that place of birth has been only a particular place”

(Author: José Manuel Sanz rudder).

Physical characteristics

While the Burgos Pointer, It is not as robust and defined muscular level, like its relative the English Pointer, their appearance shows the strength of the race.

It has the ears long and the tail It tends to be cut one-third of its original length.

Its fur It has variants that can form different ranges within the basic color. The basic colors of the hair are the white and the liver. These colors mingle regularly, giving variegated layers that tend to liver, gray liver, mosqueados in liver and other various combinations, depending on whether the liver or white color is predominant and depending on whether the white spots are open or closed.

It is a very common feature (Although non-binding layer), that have a clear white spot on the forehead and the ears always spotted with a homogeneous liver color. Liver-colored hairs can form sharp, well-defined liver-colored patches, regularly distributed by the layer of the animal

Its the mantle is short, thick and soft. The hair is thinner in the head, ears and limbs.

The skin is elastic, but not printing, thick, abundant, pinkish spotless. All Oris they will be Brown, never black.

The height males will of 62 to 67 cm and females 59 to 64 cm to the cross. Thinking of 25 to 30 kg.

It is an animal that as all, It requires a dose of daily exercise. A long walk, and a few races in the open air will keep you happy.

Character and skills

It is a very friendly and quiet dog, not afraid easily. It is smart and learns easily, especially in tracking work.

It is not a dog that adapts very well to urban environments.

It is used for small game (rabbits, hares, etc.).

It's perfect for hunting in any field (no matter how hard it is), since it has an enviable physical resistance and a great speed.

The Burgos Pointer it is highly appreciated by hunters who want a rustic dog, hard in any terrain and type of hunting, obedient, strong and above all excellent winds and method of hunting, due to his calm and poise in the search, as well as his sample and his impeccable collection.

Although used for small game pieces not dismisses pieces of hunting trail, in which he demonstrates great bravery.

Characteristics "Burgos Pointer"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Burgos Pointer" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, you must take into account his character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, their care and if you have small children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

friendly dog ​​ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

hair loss ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection level ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need for exercise ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social need ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Home ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Toilet ⓘ

1.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Friendly with strangers ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

barking ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendly ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Intelligence ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Versatility ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child friendly ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Surveillance ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

joy ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images: Burgos Pointer

Videos: Burgos Pointer

Type and recognitions:

  • FCI CLASSIFICATION:
  • Group :
  • Section : . .

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type


FCI breed standard "Burgos Pointer"

FCIFCI - Burgos Pointer
Perdiguero

Alternative names:

1. Perdiguero de Burgos, Burgalese Pointer (English).
2. Retriever de Burgos, Braque de Burgos, Perdiguero (French).
3. Burgos-Hühnerhund (German).
4. Pointer espanhol, Pointer de Burgos (Portuguese).
5. Perdiguera (español).

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Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers
Eslovaquia FCI 320 . Braque Type

Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers in an obedient and easy to train dog.

Content

History

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers is a relatively new breed. It dates back to the end of the decade of 1950, in Czechoslovakia after World War II and is believed to have been developed using the Weimaraner, the German Wirehaired Pointer and the Cesky Fousek.

At any given time, the Slovaks who developed the breed asked the Club Weimaraner from Germany to recognize this dog under the name of Rough-haired Weimaraner, but the request was rejected.

The resulting dog is a true wonder, that combines the talents of a hunting dog (on the plains, in the woods and in the water), a working dog and a companion dog. Adapts to all climates.

Photo: Slovakian Wire-haired Pointing Dog by Ing. Urban Michal (breeders HP), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it's a tall braco, solidly built and not too heavy. This breed is bred to be a working dog, with nobility in its forms. Tail is cut to half length when permitted by law. It stands rather high, worn at rest and in horizontal action. The eyes are almond-shaped, amber, with a clever expression. In puppies and young dogs, are blue. Dropped ears sit above the eye, they are rounded and not too long.

Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers
“Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers” during the dog show in Rybnik – Stone, Poland

The undercoat consists of a short, fine down that normally falls off in summer. The top layer is about 4 cm long, hard, straight and well laid. At the bottom of the muzzle, hairs are longer and softer and form a mustache. above the eyes, are more pronounced and are obliquely erect. The forehead and occiput are covered with short, hard hair. They are short and soft on the ears. The tail is well provided with hair, but it is not brushed. The basic color is “grey”: is a sand shaded with brown. White markings are allowed on the tips of the legs and on the chest. Smaller or larger dark spots can mark gray. There is also a speckled coat.

Character and skills

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers described in the FCI standard as easy to train and compliant. They are selected for their work characteristics as Pointer dogs. They hunt on the plains, forests and water. They work mainly after the shot, searching and recovering the game.

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it's animated, happy and eager to please. He has a lot of energy and is very intelligent., but gets bored easily. This can sometimes make training a bit difficult., and should work to make training sessions fun, interesting and not very long. They need a steady and consistent hand in disciplining with structure and limits.. Harsh words or physical punishment should be avoided. They have a strong bond with their families, and may develop separation anxiety without proper conditioning.

the Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers they are the happiest doing things with their owner. This makes the breed a great candidate as a canine companion for owners who love walks., cycling or jogging. It is imperative that they have opportunities to run free, preferably in a fenced area, since his hunting instinct is very strong, and the dog will not be able to resist the urge to chase the prey.

Health

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it is a generally healthy breed, and responsible breeders examine their breeders for health conditions such as elbow and hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy and cataracts.

Grooming

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers requires only a minimum of grooming to maintain its good condition. Wiping them with a damp cloth is usually sufficient between baths.. Using a grooming glove or comb on your coat during the fall season can help keep the amount of hair shedding in your home down.. Toenails should be trimmed every four weeks. A dental care regimen should start at an early age to avoid problems later in life.

Characteristics "Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, you must take into account his character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, their care and if you have small children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

friendly dog ​​ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

hair loss ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection level ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need for exercise ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social need ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Home ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Toilet ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Friendly with strangers ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

barking ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendly ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Intelligence ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Versatility ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child friendly ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Surveillance ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

joy ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos "Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers"

Dog Breed Video: Slovakian Rough Haired Pointer
Dog Breed Video: Slovakian Rough Haired Pointer
Slovakian wire haired pointer - training
Slovakian wire haired pointer – training

Type and recognitions:

  • FCI CLASSIFICATION:
  • Group :
  • Section : . .

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • ​KCgundog
  • AKCGroup: Foundation Stock Service


FCI breed standard "Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers"

FCIFCI - Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers
Bracco

Alternative names:

1. Slovak Rough-haired Pointer, Slovakian Wirehaired Pointer (English).
2. (Nom d’origine : Slovensky Hrubosrsty Stavac), Griffon d’Arrêt Slovaque à poil dur (French).
3. SHS, Slovenský hrubosrstý stavač (German).
4. Braco eslovaco de pêlo duro, (em eslovaco: Slovenský hrubosrsty stavac) (Portuguese).
5. Grifón de muestra eslovaco de pelo duro (español).

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English Pointer
Gran Bretaña FCI 1 - Pointer

Pointer Inglés

The English Pointer It is a dog of great kindness and loyalty to its owner and docile.

Content

History

The first records of Pointers in England they date from around 1650. The breed is believed to be the result of a cross between Spanish pointers, the English Foxhound, Greyhounds, St. Hubert Hound, Bulldog and various breeds of Setter.

The objective of the breeders was to develop an animal that combined the qualities of these different breeds, in particular the developed sense of smell and the physical constitution of the St. Hubert Hound; speed, the elegance and grace of Greyhound; the well-developed rib cage of the English Foxhound, as well as its resistance and ease of maintenance. Later, various breeds of Setters to improve the psychological characteristics of the English Pointer, since the first specimens were described as fierce.

Until the 18th century, this dog was used to search, locate and mark small game, like the rabbit, the hare or the fox. He worked in tandem with the Greyhounds and other racing dogs, which in turn were in charge of catching and killing prey.

At the beginning of the 18th century, with the development of the use of firearms for hunting birds, the hunters realized that the English Pointer stood out in the search, signaling and recovery of game birds, thanks mainly to its speed and its great resistance. So, was used primarily for this purpose.

The international diffusion of English Pointer

The English Pointer began to spread abroad in the second half of the 19th century.

It is especially at this time that the first specimens were imported to France by lovers of hunting dogs., like the gentlemen Merle, Bailly, Mayaudon, Caillard y Lambertye.

Although it is possible that the first specimens were imported much earlier by the colonists, the first official import of a English Pointer in the United States it dates from 1876. From England and with a white and lemon coat, the apt name of Sensation became the emblem of the famous dog show of the Westminster Kennel Club, which was founded the following year and is still today one of the most prestigious dog shows in the world. The breed quickly gained popularity among hunters for hunting quail.

In 1878, just two years after arriving in the United States, was accepted by the National American Kennel Club, the predecessor of the American Kennel Club (AKC). The English Pointer was one of the first nine breeds recognized by the AKC when it was founded in 1884. The other reference organization in the country, the United Kennel Club (UKC), recognized the breed in the early 20th century. But, was not up 1963 when the breed was officially recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI), which supervises the national organizations of a hundred countries (including France, Belgium and Switzerland).

Physical characteristics

The English Pointer it is a large dog with a harmonious appearance, flexible and elegant. His body is well proportioned and his muscles well developed..

His tail is rather short, thick at the base and thin towards the tip. It is straight and follows the line of the back. When on the move, beats from side to side.

His head is flat and rests on a long, muscular neck. Profile, the length of the skull and muzzle are approximately equal.

The ears are medium in size, droopy and located just above the eyes. They are slightly pointed and thin, with visible veins.

The eyes are oval in shape, with a hazel color in light-coated individuals, brown on others. In all cases, give the dog a lively look.

The nose is generally black, but may be lighter in dogs with lemon and white fur. In all cases, their nostrils are wide open.

The coat of the English Pointer is short, dense, smooth, straight and shiny. Their fur is usually bicolor, mixing white and another color: lemon, orange, brown or black. Unicolor or tricolor individuals are rarer, but they are also recognized by the standard.

Last, sexual dimorphism is quite marked in this breed: males are larger and above all more massive than females.

Height and weight

    ▷ Male size: Of 63 to 69 cm.

    ▷ female size: Of 61 to 66 cm.

    ▷ Male weight: Of 20 to 30 kg

    ▷ female weight: Of 18 to 28 kg

Character and skills

The English Pointer he is a gentle companion, loyal and affectionate with his family. Get along especially well with children old enough to have learned to interact with animals, and is a tireless playmate for them. He is also very patient and gentle with them, even when they are unruly or even bullying you. But, it is much less suitable for young children due to its large size, since you can easily push them unintentionally. In any case, regardless of race, a dog should never be left alone with a very young child without adult supervision.

The English Pointer not only does he get along very well with family members, but also with other dogs of the same breed.

Sharing your everyday life with one of them is a great way to avoid boredom when your child is away from home.. In fact, they have a hard time tolerating loneliness: if left alone too often or for too long, they are very likely to develop separation anxiety, with destructive behavior as a consequence. Whether you share your home with another animal or not, only suitable for a master who generally spends most of his days away from home.

If you like to be around your family, the Pointer, on the other hand, is much more reserved and distant with strangers. Without showing aggressiveness towards them, does not deprive himself of barking when he perceives danger or a stranger approaches his place of residence. But, although their barking and large size can be a deterrent, his ability to attack when necessary is limited, which does not make them good guardians. On the other hand, is an effective warning dog. Living with a cat or a rodent is possible, as long as they have been raised together or are used to living with other animals from a young age. Otherwise, it is better to avoid taking the risk, since its strong hunting instinct could lead it to consider newcomers as prey. This is also how he sees pet birds and small animals he doesn't know, whether they cross your path on a walk or venture into your garden.

This temperament is obviously a good thing if employed as a hunter., but it also implies that he must be kept on a leash during walks as long as he does not obey when asked to return, otherwise it will start chasing small animals that pass. Having said that, even with a good recovery workout, cannot be completely trusted: your instincts can get stronger at any time. Thus, It makes sense to invest in a GPS-connected collar, so you can easily locate it if it goes out to sea, especially since then it can get far away, but not necessarily find my way back.

In any case, the fear that he may be deceiving his masters is no reason to limit his outings, since the remedy would be worse than the disease. In effect, to be balanced, the English Pointer must be able to dedicate at least one hour a day, for example through two or three walks and / or play sessions.

It is too active to be suitable for an elderly and / or very sedentary person, but its incredible speed and stamina make it a perfect companion for a very active master.. It is a pleasure to accompany you on jogging sessions, bike outings or long walks.

His curiosity and high intelligence also mean that physical activity is not enough.: to feel good both in your head and in your body, must also be intellectually stimulated. Ideally, you have a job to do or a mission to accomplish as often as possible.. Hunting and dog sports such as agility, obedience and rally are, Therefore, great ways to allow you to exercise both physically and mentally.

In any case, your activity level makes you unsuitable for apartment living, since you need to be able to run freely at all times in a wide space to expend your excess energy. So, need a house with a garden, but the garden must be well fenced, given his unbridled temper. Using an underground electric fence would not be an effective solution, because their determination is much stronger than the discomfort felt by electrical impulses, especially when he has sniffed a prey and goes after it.

And just because a dog likes to play in the garden doesn't mean they have to spend most of their time there., away from his family. To be happy and balanced, you need to be surrounded and interact with your family. It also, once your needs are met, he is quite calm and enjoys spending time with his masters, for example lying on the sofa receiving pampering.

Education

As in any race, Socialization should be one of the pillars of the education of the English Pointer and start at a young age, when it is most malleable and adaptable. So, you need to get used to being exposed to all kinds of different situations and environments, but also and above all to regularly meet other animals and new people. This is all the more necessary as he tends to be spontaneously shy around strangers..

The other way, to avoid any hyperapego to their owners, you should also teach your dog to tolerate loneliness. Otherwise, You may find it especially difficult to cope with your absences.

The intelligence of English Pointer makes you able to learn quickly. This does not mean that he is willing to comply with all the wishes of his master.: has a strong character and can be very stubborn, so sometimes it's hard to make him obey.

So, to achieve your goals - and, in particular, to get your dog to obey you- his master must be firm in his education and not let anything pass from the beginning, at the risk of ending up with a difficult partner. Pay special attention that the rules are clear from the start, but also constant over time and from one person to another, which requires good cooperation between family members.

In general, the ideal is to start learning as soon as you get home, opting for the dog training method based on positive reinforcement. In fact, not receptive to reprimands, and responds much better to stimuli and treats.

But, the different smells and sounds that you perceive around you also interest you very much, and soon catch your attention during training sessions. So, it is better to opt for frequent sessions, short and varied, in order to keep you focused on tasks at all times.

Difficulties in achieving what is expected of him make it not really recommended for an inexperienced person, since it would soon be difficult for him to hit.

In any case, given his strong hunting instinct, remembrance is one of the most important teachings you should receive. Prevents him from constantly chasing animals he considers prey and disregarding his master's orders. Although it remains difficult to hope that his ardor will be curbed in the 100% of the cases, it must be kept on a leash during walks as long as this order is not properly assimilated.

Health

The English Pointer It, in general, a robust and healthy animal, and their life expectancy, of 12 to 15 years, is rather in the high range of the average for dogs of this size. They can withstand the heat without difficulty, but their short fur makes them especially sensitive to cold and humidity. Thus, it is advisable to cover him with a dog coat when temperatures are low. In any case, it is not suitable for living in a region where the climate is especially cold for much of the year.

Although in good general health, like any race, you can suffer from various more or less serious illnesses throughout your life. Those that predispose the most are :
  • The Hip Dysplasia, a joint malformation whose appearance may be favored by a hereditary predisposition. It produces pain and lameness that worsen over time, and favors the appearance of osteoarthritis as the animal ages;
  • The metaphyseal osteopathy (or hypertrophic osteopathy), a bone disease that usually manifests itself as the animal grows and progresses rapidly. Besides lameness, can cause various symptoms such as high fever, anorexia or abnormal fatigue. The vital prognosis is good in mild forms of the disease, but much more reserved for the most serious cases;
  • Chondrodysplasia (or dwarfism), a genetic disease that causes underdevelopment of bones and cartilage. The latter causes the front and hind limbs to be shorter than normal.. There is no cure for this disease, but medication can ease the pain, and surgery may be suggested for the most severe cases to correct any deformation of the bones and vertebrae;

  • The stomach dilation-torsion syndrome, which occurs when the stomach swells and folds in on itself, blocking the evacuation of gases and interrupting blood circulation. Unless a vet intervenes quickly, it is usually fatal, so it is a vital emergency;
  • The Addison's disease, an endocrine disorder that is sometimes inherited and is caused by destruction or atrophy of the adrenal glands. This gives rise to various symptoms that may suggest other pathologies.: vomiting, diarrhea, dejection, weightloss, anorexia, tremors… The acute form gives the animal little chance of survival, while a lifelong treatment helps fight the chronic form;
  • The Hypothyroidism, a hormonal disease that causes a decrease in metabolism. Hypothyroidism is a hormonal disease that causes a decrease in metabolism and gives rise to various symptoms that vary from one individual to another.: exhausted, damaged fur, breathing difficulties, overweight… Requires lifelong treatment to alleviate or even prevent these symptoms;
  • The epilepsy, a chronic disease of the nervous system that causes seizures whose manifestations can vary from time to time and from person to person. Although there is no cure, various treatments can reduce the intensity or number of seizures to such an extent that most people with this disease can lead normal lives;
  • Aortic stenosis, a congenital and probably hereditary heart defect that causes heart failure. This anomaly is incurable, and the risk of syncope or heart attack in the affected animal is not negligible. However, there are medications to counteract the effects of heart failure and the risk of sudden death;
  • Demodechia, dermatological disease due to overgrowth of Demodex Canis mites. Hairless spots may appear, itchy redness, blackheads and dandruff. The localized form usually heals itself, but if necessary -or in the case of a generalized form- medication and skin care can help;
  • Allergies, whether they are respiratory, food, skin or contact. Symptoms and treatments depend on the type of allergy in question.;

congenital deafness, which mainly affects white-coated dogs. Whether it affects one or both ears, is irreversible;

The ear infections, which are common in any dog ​​with floppy ears.

The English Pointer it is also especially prone to various eye diseases:
  • Progressive retinal atrophy, an incurable inherited disease that causes retinal degeneration. Causes progressive loss of vision, first at night and then during the day;
  • The gland prolapse nictitante (or cherry eye), which corresponds to an inflammation of this lacrimal gland. The most common signs are the appearance of a small red ball in the inner corner of the eye and tearing. Can be treated with surgery;
  • The entropion, which is a curvature of the edge of the eyelid towards the inside of the eye. It can be hereditary and causes pain, irritation and inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva from repeated rubbing of the eyelashes and / or hairs on the fragile parts of the eye. This can be remedied with surgical intervention.;
  • The waterfall, which mainly affects the elderly and corresponds to a clouding of the lens. If nothing is done, leads to progressive loss of vision, up to total blindness. But, an operation can allow the animal to regain correct vision.

It also, When the English Pointer used for hunting, you are obviously exposed to the risks that this activity implies – particularly that of injuries.

Having said that, although the list of conditions the breed is predisposed to may seem frightening at first glance, keep in mind that its prevalence remains low, so most of its representatives live in perfect health. This is confirmed by a study carried out in 2004 by the Kennel Club and the British Small Animal Veterinary Association, which showed that old age is the main cause of death in this breed. Old age alone accounts for a quarter of deaths, while cancers rank second and are implicated in around the 20% of the cases.

However, it is true that a large part of the diseases to which the breed is predisposed are or may be hereditary, which justifies favoring a serious breeder of English Pointer. In effect, not content with offering puppies quality socialization from their first weeks of life, a professional worthy of the name takes care that they do not suffer from a hereditary defect transmitted by their parents. To avoid this, has various genetic tests performed routinely on individuals you plan to breed, to avoid the transmission of a hereditary pathology and, of course, rule out those at risk. In addition to the test results in question, must be able to present a certificate of good health issued by a veterinarian, as well as details of the vaccinations administered, registered in the animal's sanitary or vaccination registry.

Once adopted, it must be ensured that the animal does not make any excessively long or intense physical effort during its growth, which usually lasts until 18 months. In effect, your bones and joints are then especially fragile; would run the risk of injury or developing malformations, with consequences that could last a lifetime. These may include, this could lead to the development of Hip Dysplasia, to which you are predisposed.

Last, throughout his life, the English Pointer must be taken at least once a year to the vet for a complete health check. This appointment is also an opportunity to carry out any necessary vaccine withdrawals.. At the same time, to prevent risks related to parasites (worms, ticks…), your owner must make sure to renew your deworming treatments whenever necessary.

Life expectancy

Of 13 to 14 years

Grooming

The English Pointer it is an easy breed of dog to take care of, and this is especially true for their fur. Brushing once a week with a special glove or a rubber brush is enough to remove dead hairs and spread the sebum all over his coat.. If rubbed gently with a chamois or soft cloth, will be bright. It is also the occasion to detect possible skin problems, that are frequent in him.

During your seasonal molt, in spring and autumn, hair loss is still moderate, but brushing frequency should be increased. Ideally, do it two or three times a week.

When properly cared for, the fur of the English Pointer does not get very dirty and rarely smells bad. So, no need to wash frequently: once or twice a year is enough, unless, of course, is dirty or smells bad. In any case, a mild shampoo designed specifically for dogs should always be used, to avoid damaging your skin with an unsuitable product. In fact, the pH of dog skin differs from that of human skin.

You have to pay special attention to their droopy ears, since this morphological peculiarity increases the risk of infections at this level (otitis, etc.). So, not only do they have to be inspected and cleaned at least once a week, but also spend time drying them every time they have been in contact with water or have spent a long time in a humid environment, to prevent moisture build-up.

The maintenance of your dog's ears and also the opportunity to check his eyes and clean them if necessary, in order to avoid the risk of infections.

It also, teeth should also be cleaned at least once a week with dog toothpaste and a toothbrush or pad. This helps limit the formation and accumulation of tartar., that favors the development of bad breath and various oral diseases. Ideally, brush your teeth several times a week or even daily.

Looking at its claws, the activity level of the English Pointer makes natural wear and tear normally enough to file them. But, as you age or are no longer as active as before, they can get too long and end up annoying or even hurting you. So, they must be examined regularly and cut with a file or nail clipper as soon as necessary. This is the case as soon as a kind of rattling sound is heard when walking on hard ground.

Whether the fur, the ears, the eyes, teeth or claws, do not hesitate to ask for the help of a professional (vet or groomer) to know the proper care of the English Pointer. It is also advisable to accustom your pet to being handled from a young age.

This facilitates not only grooming sessions, but also to be able to examine it easily every time you return from a long stay abroad, for example during a hunting day. In effect, this is important to make sure he is not injured or that there are no parasites or spikes stuck in his fur.

Food

As in the case of any race, the diet of English Pointer should fit your size, age, health and physical activity level, both in terms of the choice of products and the amount of food given each day. To maximize the chances of keeping your dog healthy, it is recommended to feed him with high quality croquettes or hamburgers that provide him with all the nutrition he needs.

Nutrient intake can vary significantly throughout the year. If used as a hunter, will use more energy during certain periods of the year, so your daily rations should be modified and increased, since the diet of a hunting dog is not the same as the usual. But, it is important to return to a normal amount of food once the season is over to avoid any risk of overweight in dogs.

In fact, but the English Pointer are not predisposed to obesity, it is advisable to monitor your weight every month to ensure that everything is fine at that level. This is even more important if you have been spayed, since the risk is then higher. In case the magnification is prolonged or even increased during several measurements in a row, it is necessary to take it to the vet to find out the cause of the problem and thus know how to remedy it. In any case, your diet and activity level may not be the cause, for example if weight gain is a symptom of an underlying disease.

In any case, diet is especially important when the dog is small and growing. Feeding them too much and / or giving them too much food can cause them to grow too fast, which can cause not only injuries, but also long-term problems with bones and joints, as deformities. On the other hand, improper nutrition can also cause potentially very damaging stunting.

Regardless of age, the ideal is, as with any dog, divide your daily ration into several meals. This is all the more essential since it is predisposed to the dilation-torsion of the stomach., which often follows the rapid absorption of a large amount of food. It also, to avoid the latter, meals should be taken in a quiet place and one hour away from any strenuous physical activity.

It also, the fact that it is not especially prone to obesity does not justify giving it food intended for humans (for example, table scraps), without ensuring that you can effectively meet your nutritional needs. Otherwise, it would do more harm than good, especially, of course, if the food is popular with humans but toxic to dogs.

Last, water must be available throughout the day and must be changed regularly to keep it fresh. If used for hunting, it is better to carry enough than to let him drink standing water.

Use

Before the 18th century, the English Pointer it was mainly used as Pointing Dogs for small game, like the rabbit, the hare or the fox. Thus, cared for possible prey and worked with racing dogs, who were in charge of hunting and catching them.

With the arrival of firearms in his native England in the early 18th century, began to be used more to target and retrieve game birds, function in which he stood out.

Even today, are still highly prized by hunters, who use it mainly as Pointing Dogs.

They are also found as pets. Its sweetness and affectionate character make the Pointer a very endearing companion, as long as his family can meet his great need for exercise and they are sufficiently present for him.

Their loyalty to their owners and their aloof and aloof demeanor with strangers, without depriving yourself of barking loudly when they approach, make it an excellent warning dog. But, its ability to act as a watchdog is limited by its lower propensity to attack in danger.

It is also a good companion for dog sports. Its competitive character and its resistance allow it to distinguish itself in disciplines such as canicross, el cani-VTT, obedience, the rally and agility.

Last, his elegance and his desire to please his masters also make him a sure value in canine beauty contests. In fact, he was already often seen at dog shows in the 19th century.

Price

The price of a puppy English Pointer varies between the 450 and 1.200 EUR, and the mean is around 900 EUR, without great differences between males and females. There are many breeders throughout Europe.

On the other hand, in Canada remain rare, so the number of individuals offered each year is quite limited. The amount requested usually ranges from 1200 and 3000 canadian dollars. So, the most pertinent option may be to buy in the United States, where a puppy can be acquired for between 1000 and 1500 USD. Then, you must ensure that you adhere to the regulations regarding the importation of a dog into Canada and note that transport and administrative costs are added to the purchase price.

regardless of the country, price differences from one individual to another are explained by their own characteristics (and in particular its greater or lesser conformity with the breed standard), but also by the reputation of the lineage from which they come, as well as the prestige of the breeding.

Characteristics "English Pointer"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "English Pointer" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, you must take into account his character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, their care and if you have small children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

friendly dog ​​ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

hair loss ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection level ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need for exercise ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social need ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Home ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Toilet ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Friendly with strangers ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

barking ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendly ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Intelligence ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Versatility ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child friendly ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Surveillance ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

joy ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “English Pointer”

Videos “English Pointer”

Type and recognitions:

  • FCI CLASSIFICATION:
  • Group :
  • Section : . .

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 2: Continental Pointing Dogs. 2.1: Pointer
  • AKCSporting
  • ANKC Group 3 (Gundogs)
  • CKCSporting Dogs
  • ​KC – Gundog
  • NZKCGundog
  • UKCGun Dogs


FCI breed standard "English Pointer"

FCIFCI - English Pointer
Pointer

Alternative names:

1. Pointer (English).
2. Pointer (French).
3. Englische Pointer (German).
4. (em inglês: English Pointer), Pointer (Portuguese).
5. Perdiguero inglés (español).

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German Longhaired Pointer
Alemania FCI 117 . Spaniel type

German Longhaired Pointer

The first thing to keep in mind is that the German Longhaired Pointer is a head to toe hunting dog.

Content

History

The German Longhaired Pointer It is one of the oldest German pointing breeds. Long-haired hunting dogs can already be seen in ancient hunting paintings and tapestries from the Middle Ages, which are very similar to the current ones “Pointing Dogs” germans. These dogs were used primarily as hunting dogs to stalk, but also for catching small game in nets.

It is purebred since 1879. On the occasion of an exhibition of the association for the refinement of dog breeds in Hannover, the characteristics of the breed were established, the breed standard. The breed was based on five different breeding lines, that bore the names of authorized stallions that already corresponded to the breed standard at that time.

The German Longhaired Pointer has earned the name of “Old forest dog” in particular for its ability to do very good tracking jobs, to warn the hunter with loud barks when searching and to bring lost animals by following their blood trail. Working in the water is also one of its strengths, which is appreciated by hunters.

Photo: A German long hair called Falko by Wikimedia

Physical characteristics

The breed is bred in brown, Brown and white, and brown and white. The best known and most common is German Longhaired Pointer pure brown, which may also have white markings on the chest or legs. Taupe comes in gradations from light gray to dark gray and the rare trout gray color variant.

The German Longhaired Pointer it is usually a strong dog, muscular, low constitution and with harmonious body shapes. Males usually have a shoulder height of 63 – 66 cm., the females of 60 – 63 cm.. Has brown eyes, long, well-edged hocks and a tail with a beautiful flag. Your coat should be of medium length and not too lush.

Character and skills

The first thing to keep in mind is that the German Longhaired Pointer he's a hunting dog from head to toe. In the hands of a knowledgeable trainer, is a useful helper on the hunt and then on a second job, a very good family dog. The breed is very fond of children and family. But this should not be misunderstood at all. Why “family friendly” does not mean “family dog”. It is a fairly pronounced working dog. The German Longhaired Pointer has the strong drive and willingness to work, either on the hunt or, if required, your substitute in the form of dog sports of all kinds. So, It is not a dog for beginners nor a dog for people who do not want or cannot work intensively with it.

German Longhaired Pointer
“German Longhaired Pointer” during the international dog show in Katowice, Poland

In the practice of hunting, the German Longhaired Pointer is especially praised for its pronounced calm. He is a lead dog, resistant to nerves and of a calm and even-tempered nature. At the same time, he is a kind and peaceful friend with a high threshold for irritation.. But, the German Longhaired Pointer needs a consistent education, competent and sensitive to direct his high intelligence, alert senses and their pronounced willingness to act in the right channels. With such an appropriate atmosphere of character, this breed of dog is a great friend of children, a great family companion also outside of hunting or sports work and in any case a wonderful experience of the association of man and dog.

Aptitudes:

If occasionally offered simply as a family and apartment dog, one should approach such sellers with the utmost caution. Such offers certainly come from dubious sources. as a rule, a German Longhaired Pointer belongs to the hands of a hunter who works with him professionally. If you are not kept for the hunt, must be kept busy with long walks in nature or challenges in dog sports. It also, needs a personal connection with caregiver and family. If the hunting dog is not physically or mentally challenged, in the long run this will lead to serious behavior problems. It does not belong to a multi-story building and not to the big city. Otherwise, he has no problems and his attitude is undemanding.

Education

One German Longhaired Pointer should only be trained by an experienced owner. It must absolutely come from a recognized breeding of the Association of “Pointing Dogs” germans, where parents and puppies were already socialized for their tasks from the litter box onwards. It also, you need to train and work professionally for hunting or suitable sporting purposes. Only dogs that have successfully passed the demanding autumn breeding tests of “Schorlemer”. You have to ask in the breeding clubs of the German Longhaired Pointer.

Health

The race German Longhaired Pointer is cared for in an exemplary manner by its breeding clubs organized in the Deutsch-Langhaar-Verband. Therefore, average dog health has no problem.

Grooming

Caring for a German Longhaired Pointer is undemanding. Regular brushing of the coat is sufficient.

For sale “German Longhaired Pointer”

If you are thinking of buying a German Longhaired Pointer, You should be wondering if you can meet the requirements for an attitude of character appropriate to this hunting dog.. And what during 12 years and more will be your companion on a daily basis. Then you should contact the local breeders who are members of the “Deutsch-Langhaar-Verband“. A puppy of this breed costs around 1000 EUR.

Characteristics "German Longhaired Pointer"

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "German Longhaired Pointer" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, you must take into account his character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, their care and if you have small children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

friendly dog ​​ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

hair loss ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection level ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need for exercise ⓘ

5.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social need ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Home ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Toilet ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Friendly with strangers ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

barking ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendly ⓘ

2.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Intelligence ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Versatility ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child friendly ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Surveillance ⓘ

3.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

joy ⓘ

4.0 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos "German Longhaired Pointer"

Obenstaat Kennels - Deutsch Langhaar Puppies 1st Intro. to Water

Kennels Obenstaat – Puppies German Longhaired Pointer – Introduction to water

Apportimpressionen Jagdhunde Deutsch Langhaar vom Veybach
“German Longhaired Pointer”

Type and recognitions:

  • FCI CLASSIFICATION:
  • Group :
  • Section : . .

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.2: Spaniel type
  • CKCGrupo 1 – Sporting
  • ​KC – Hunting dog
  • UKCGun Dog


FCI breed standard "German Longhaired Pointer"

FCIFCI - German Longhaired Pointer
Dog

Alternative names:

1. GLP, Pointer (German Longhaired), Langhaar (English).
2. Langhaar (French).
3. Deutsch-Langhaar (German).
4. (em alemão: Deutsch Langhaar Vorstehhund) (Portuguese).
5. Pointer de pelo largo (español).