Shikoku
Japón FCI 319 - Asian Spitz and related breeds

Shikoku

Less stubborn than the other Spitz breeds, the Shikoku, he is very little known outside his native land, Japan

Content

History

Ceramic figures from Japan that show representations of dogs have been preserved since ancient times, that look like this Japanese breed. The current breed dates back to crosses with the now extinct inu Japanese. The original field of application of these dogs was hunting, more precisely hunting in the prefecture of Kochi on isla de Shikoku – that is why the race is sometimes called “perro Kochi“. However, name Tosa-Inu, which is used in part in Japan, it's misleading, because under the name “Tosa” there is also another japanese race. In addition, three varieties of Shikoku, that were named according to the respective region in which they live: pity, Hongawa and Hata. How the Hongawa region was the most difficult to access in the past, This variety is considered to be the least modified by other influences and the closest to the ideal of Shikoku. Today, the Shikoku It is considered the national dog of Japan along with the Akita.

Photos:

1 – Shikoku Inu by https://pxhere.com/en/photo/1589477

Shikoku physical characteristics

The typical silhouette Spitz characterizes the Shikoku: It has relatively small, erect ears and a compact body. The tail is well placed and curled over the back. This medium-sized breed with a height at the withers of about 53 cm is located between the Akita bigger and the Shiba Inu smallest within the Japanese family Spitz. For many lay people in Europe this four-legged friend also reminds of a dog that is seen much more often here., the Siberian Husky. The Shikoku coat can be black sesame or white sesame. The dense coat consists, as is typical in type dogs Spitz, on a long, hard top coat over a soft, dense undercoat.

Shikoku character and abilities

Shikoku

The loyalty, intelligence and a certain stubbornness form the character of this dog with an agile nature. He is vigilant and behaves in a neutral manner to the point of distancing himself from strangers. When they meet conspecifics, conflicts can occur, particularly with males, because the Shikoku tend to dominate. As a hunting dog it is characterized by its corresponding sharpness.

His original behavior can also be seen in his dealings with people – he likes to lick his reference persons and seeks physical contact. Sometimes shows a conspicuous preference for unpleasant odors from the human point of view. The Shikoku He is very agile and likes to be outdoors – however impetuous I am moving here, a Shikoku busy behaves calmly and pleasantly indoors, where he appreciates quiet hours and pampering. Although he is a stubborn dog, not as strong as the other races of Spitz from Japan. However: The special character of Spitz not suitable for all dog lovers.

Photo:

2 – Shikoku, female. Colour: sesame by https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Shikokusesame1.jpg

Shikoku Care

The coat of this Japanese hunting dog is robust and easy to care for, but it must be brushed regularly, especially during coat change twice a year. advice: If you brush your dog every day during this time, will greatly reduce hair loss at home and also shorten the “hairy phase” In a few days. Outside these few weeks of the year, cleaning every few days is enough. Check your ears right now too, so you can clean them with a dog ear cleaner if needed. You must bathe your dog very rarely, at most every few months, and then use a mild dog shampoo. However, it makes sense to get the puppy used to bathing. However, it is usually sufficient to simply remove the dried dirt from the coat. Check the length of the claws – especially with older dogs – to shorten claws that are too long with special pliers. This is how injuries are prevented.

Shikoku Education

If he Shikoku respect his two-legged pack leader as a wise and just leader, will gladly follow your instructions. However, first you need to earn the respect of this dog. Be consistent and bring some tolerance to the small, thick skull of this four-legged friend, that will never be completely subordinate.

Screaming or harshness will not help you and will destroy your relationship with this loyal companion.. A thorough knowledge of dog training is needed to direct the dominance and hunting instinct of dogs. Shikoku in regular courses. Please, keep in mind that only a well-trained breed of dog can make a well-behaved friend, otherwise you will look for another job.

Attending classes with dog trainers in general can be of great benefit, so that the Shikoku that tends to dominate, get stronger in social affairs and learn to get along with other dogs. Male dogs in particular may face challenges that need to be countered from the age of the puppy. So don't underestimate the importance of the socialization phase., because any omission can only be corrected with difficulty.

Shikoku Health

These robust dogs are considered tough and persistent. They hardly have a genetic disposition for disease, if the breeding is done responsibly. It goes without saying that you should only buy puppies from a reputable breeder who belongs to a club. The breeder will give you competent information about the care of your animal and show you the corresponding tests. In good health, Shikoku reaches an average age of about 13 years.

Where can i find my Shikoku?

The breed is one of the very rare breeds outside of Japan. As a result, find a puppy of Shikoku it can be difficult if you have decided to have one as a new member of the family. But don't despair, because there are a handful of serious breeders in Europe who are dedicated to this breed. The first official litter outside of Japan was in 2000 in the Netherlands, where the breeders of Shikoku continue to regularly deliver litters to responsible hands. However, you may have to accept a longer trip before you can give your puppy a hug from Shikoku. No matter how rare the breed is, don't reduce the demands you can and should make on serious parenting. Learn about puppy care, of your health, ask the breeders and ask them to show you the appropriate tests, for example, in connection with exams for hip dysplasia. Of course, the breeder must also belong to a club. Will be happy to give you some good advice, but in return you will also have some questions to see if you can offer a good home to one of your protégés.

If you are looking for a Shikoku adult, you will need a lot of luck in europe. It is more promising to look for crosses of type Spitz in animal shelters and also get an impression of the breeds of Nordic Spitz.

Ratings of the Shikoku

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Shikoku” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Training ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitability of the apartment ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Can be alone all day ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitable as a first dog ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Weight gain ?

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health ?

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Intelligence ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Kindness with child ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to bite ?

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to bark ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to flee ?

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss force ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitable as a guard dog ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Joy ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendliness ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Power level ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Shikoku Videos

Shikoku Ken / Shikoku Inu play
Shikoku ken in Japan Spring 2014 四国犬

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 319
  • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
  • Section 5: Asiatic Spitz and related breeds. Without working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 5: Dogs type Spitz and primitive type – Section 5: Asian Spitz and related breeds.
  • CKC – [Without Miscellaneous]

FCI standard of the Shikoku Inu breed

Shikoku FCI Shikoku FCI

Alternative names:

    1. Kochi-ken, Shikoku-ken, Shikoku inu (English).
    2. chien de Kōchi, shikoku-inu, kochi-ken, Shikoku inu (French).
    3. Shikoku inu, Kochi-Ken, Shikoku-ken (German).
    4. Shikoku inu, kochi-ken, Mikawa Inu, Shikoku-ken, cão-lobo japonês (Portuguese).
    5. Kochi-ken, Shikoku-ken, Shikoku (Spanish).

Japanese Spitz
Japón FCI 262 - Asian Spitz and related breeds

Japanese Spitz

The Japanese Spitz is a very people-oriented dog.

Content

History

The strong similarity to the Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz) German allows us to suppose that the Japanese spitz descends from this same race. Other cynologists assume that the Spitz descends from the Nordic Spitz. One thing is for sure: the origin of Japanese spitz not in japan, but in Europe. From there he arrived in Japan at the beginning of the 20th century together with the travelers.

The attractive white dog with the charming character quickly gained popularity among the Japanese population. With more caps from China, Canada and the US, he established his own breeding in Japan in the years 20. While in Europe an attempt was made to increase the size of the lace, thus creating the German Spitz, the Japanese tended to opt for the more original compact form. In 1948 the Japanese Kennel Club established a first breed standard for the first time. Japan was designated as the country of origin in the standard. The FCI, that has officially recognized the Japanese spitz from 1964, includes it today in the Group 5 (Spitz and dogs of the original type), as well as in the Subsection 5 (Asian Spitz and related breeds), under Standard No. 262.

In his native Japan, the Japanese spitz it was very popular for a long time, especially in the years 50 the last century. Although it is still more common there in terms of numbers than in Europe, the demand of the little companion is gradually changing. While in Japan the number of recently registered cubs is decreasing, is increasing in North America and Europe.

Physical characteristics Japanese Spitz

This breed is distinguished by the fact that it is exclusively pure white.. Thanks to his straight and dense hair, the Japanese Spitz seems strong. What is no less important, it is also caused by the swollen inner layer. The beautiful ruffle on the shoulder, neck and sill contributes to attractive appearance. Typical of the tail is a long and voluminous flag.

Despite her short legs, the Japanese Spitz is sporty and extremely agile. Due to its balanced proportions, the appearance of this compact pedigree dog is both striking and harmonious.

The height at the cross – the elevated transition from neck to back – tends to be of 30 a 38 cm in adult males. Females reach a somewhat smaller size. The Japanese Spitz weighs between 4,5 and 11 kg.

Character and skills Japanese Spitz

The well balanced nature of the Japanese Spitz fits the very harmonious appearance. He is an attentive guard. Anyone who approaches him is not immediately signaled with a savage bark. Only when the Japanese pedigree dog feels a serious threat, gets loud and fights back vehemently.

At home, the Japanese Spitz behaves quite calmly. Abroad, on the other hand, he likes to show the energy he has inside of him. To enjoy the Japanese Spitz, you must like a little dog who likes to play. You should also have fun on long trips with your four-legged friend.

The Japanese Spitz he is a very people-oriented dog. Whether it belongs to one person or has a master or caregiver at the same time, he does not care. He also likes to live with the family. People's company is the priority. Pets or other pets are not enough. Although the Japanese spitz usually get along with them. So if you have little time for a dog, a Japanese Spitz probably not the right thing for you.

The white puppy enjoys the company of people and would like to be with them always and everywhere. He is very receptive and eager to learn. Which makes education in combination with devotion quite easy even for untrained dog owners.

An apartment in the city is suitable for him, as long as you are well occupied with extensive walks and activities.

Japanese Spitz Care

Despite the hereditary predisposition to many diseases, Many of the ailments can be avoided by taking proper care of your Spitz. Dental problems in particular can be prevented through regular dental care, namely, brush your teeth at least once a week, or better daily. Diseases or inflammations of the eyes, nose, the ears and claws can also be detected and treated at an early stage with proper care and regular check-ups. Another important aspect of grooming is the care of the coat of the Japanese spitz. Despite the impressive and luxurious fur, This is not very elaborate and therefore it is usually sufficient if the hair is combed or brushed thoroughly twice a week. Only in the coat change phase (twice a year) grooming effort increases until daily styling.

Japanese Spitz health

An indication of good and serious parenting is the presentation of genetic test results.. The farm animals used must have an impeccable genetic makeup to exclude genetic diseases from the outset. Dogs in which hereditary diseases typical of the breed have occurred should be excluded from breeding for the sake of the breed's health. This also includes the tendency to dislocate the patella (kneecap slipping out of its guide), which can also be inherited in many dogs, especially in small dog breeds. Also eye problems, such as distichiasis or narrowing of the tear ducts, as well as dental problems can occur with the Japanese spitz. No other typical diseases of the breed are known.

The correct nutrition of the Japanese Spitz

In a special way, correct nutrition contributes to the health and well-being of the Japanese spitz. Small dogs with a very compact constitution have a strong tendency to be overweight. Too many pounds can easily lead to joint disease and heart and circulation problems.. Overweight dogs are also at higher risk for diabetes.

As the owner of a Japanese spitz, you should always keep the amounts recommended by food manufacturers. In addition, the dog should not be given too many treats between meals.

It is not only the quantity but also the quality of the food that is important. Besides vegetables or rice, good dog food consists largely of high-quality meat. Poor quality food often contains an excessive amount of cereals. Under no circumstances should it contain flavor enhancers or sweeteners.

Before buying, you should find out the exact composition of the dog food in the manufacturer's instructions. Several vendors offer good and safe dog food, both dry and wet.

It is not unusual for dog owners to prefer homemade dog food. This can also be an alternative to the ready-to-eat food available in stores for the Japanese spitz. However, it is essential that you acquire the necessary knowledge to cook balanced dog food yourself.

The diet BARF it is also a good way to feed Japanese spitz with a healthy diet. BARF means “Bone And Raw Food” (Bones and raw foods). All food components, like meat, fish, vegetables or fruit, they are only given raw. Various vendors and specialty stores facilitate BARF to the dog owner. Like cooking food, this feeding method requires a certain amount of knowledge about the correct use of raw ingredients.

You must feed a puppy of 3 a 5 times a day, an adult raw food and bones 2 times a day.

Buying a Japanese Spitz

Despite the growing popularity and demand in the European and American continent, the Japanese spitz still belongs to the rare dog breeds. The waiting period for a new litter in a breeder can be very long. Who doesn't necessarily care about a purebred puppy, but also consider buying a Spitz adult, should – parallel to the search for a breeder – also look around the animal shelter, where over and over again Spitz or the crosses of Spitz they are waiting for a new and loving home. A puppy, on the other hand, should only be purchased from a serious and certified breeder.

How do I recognize a serious breeder?

When choosing a suitable breeder, various factors play a role. It's not just “formalities” the ones that must be correct, namely, the papers, the pedigree and the sales contract, but also personal reasons that ultimately decide the purchase. The breeder must, first, be understanding with you, and this cannot be found out with a short email or a short phone call. One or better several meetings are necessary to get a complete picture of the breeder and his dogs.. Does the breeder invite you to his house? Will you willingly show your “dog pound” and the animals live in close contact with the breeder's family? The first weeks are very important for the socialization of the puppies and therefore the environment must correspond absolutely to the affectionate nature of the puppies. Japanese spitz. In addition, a serious breeder will be able to tell you a lot about the breed and its characteristics. They will also ask you about your life circumstances to make sure your puppy has fun with you..

Ratings of the Japanese Spitz

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Japanese Spitz” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Training ?

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitability of the apartment ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Can be alone all day ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitable as a first dog ?

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Weight gain ?

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Intelligence ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Kindness with child ?

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to bite ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to bark ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to flee ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss force ?

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitable as a guard dog ?

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Joy ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendliness ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Power level ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images of the Japanese Spitz

Photos:

1 – Japanese spitz by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1273902
2 – Japanese Spitz Siberia by 0894Leanne, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – Japanese Spitz Puppy by [email protected], CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – Japanese spitz by https://www.pikist.com/free-photo-sixhn
5 – Japanese spitz by https://www.pxfuel.com/en/free-photo-xghfb
6 – Japanese Spitz by Trev Grant, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
7 – Japanese spitz by HTTPS://www.pikrepo.com/fflza/japanese-spitz-near-wall

Japanese Spitz Videos

Kubo – Japanese Spitz Puppy – 2 Weeks Residential Dog Training
Japanese Spitz / Breed of dog

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 262
  • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
  • Section 5: Asiatic Spitz and related breeds. Without working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 5: Dogs type Spitz and primitive type – Section 5: Asian Spitz and related breeds.
  • ANKC – Group 7 (Non-Sporting)
  • CKC – Group 6 – Non-Sporting
  • ​KC – Utility
  • NZKC – Non-Sporting
  • UKC – Northern Breed Group

FCI standard of the Japanese Spitz breed

FCI Japanese Spitz FCI Japanese Spitz

Alternative names:

    1. Nihon Supittsu (English).
    2. Nihon Supittsu (French).
    3. Nihon Supittsu (Japan-Spitz), Japanischer Spitz (German).
    4. Nihon Supittsu (Portuguese).
    5. Nihon Supittsu (Spanish).

Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz)
Alemania FCI 97 . European Spitz

Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz)

The small Spitz is a loving and attentive dog, that is very people-oriented.

Content

History

The Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz) (Kleinspitz) is a variety of German Spitz, which today is available in five different sizes and in numerous colors. The exact origin of dogs spitz it is difficult to determine. In many regions there are indications of an early appearance of the breed. For example, in the terracotta pieces Mycenaean or in the Greek vases you can already find illustrations of similar dogs. From the Middle Ages, the Spitz guard and court dogs were popular, especially among the rural population. The obedient dogs took their duties as court protectors so seriously that they pinched the “intruders” on her calves. For this reason, Spitz was formerly considered a loved one.

At the beginning of directed breeding, all representatives of the breed with a height at the withers less than 29 centimeters were summarized under the term Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz). As it was mainly in the area of Mannheim, he was also known as “Mannheimer Spitz“. Only later did the Dwarf Spitz (Pomeranian) with a height at the withers of up to 22 centimeters developed as a separate variety. Internationally the breed belongs to the group 5 from FCI “Spitz and dogs of the original type” in the section 4 “European Spitz“.

Physical characteristics

With a height at the cross of 23 a 29 centimeters, the Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz) is the second smallest of the five varieties of German Spitz. Just the Pomeranian (Zwergspitz) is smaller. His pointed ears and mischievous eyes resemble those of a fox and give him a playful and mischievous look. It has a dense and protruding coat, consisting of two layers. The top layer is soft and long, while the undercoat is soft and dense. Around the neck the fur forms a mane like that of a lion and the bushy tail is carried over the back. Most of the coat color is black, brown, white, orange and cloudy gray. But some tips are cream too, cream-saber, orange-saber, black and tan.

Character and skills

The Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz) he is a loving and attentive dog, that is very people-oriented. Like all German Spitz, does not like to be alone and is glad of the full attention of their owners. They are quite reserved and distrustful of strangers. Puppies defend their territory with force and tend to bark when they are not trained. However, due to its charming nature and lack of hunting instinct, the little ones spitz they are also easy to train for beginners. With proper training you can take the dog off leash without any problem. Although he can sometimes be a bit rebellious and cheeky, the four-legged friend gets along with other dogs.

Kleinspitz Education

Despite its small size, the Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz) he is a dog to be taken seriously and needs constant training. Therefore, show the puppy the basic rules from day one and do not allow him to do anything that he is not allowed to do as an adult dog. Don't let her charm and cuteness bewitch you. In the young years, dogs learn better and want to please their owner. When training the puppy, you should not rush anything and allow time for new orders. Success is best achieved with consistency and praise. Early socialization is very important, especially for the cheeky ones Spitz. In this way he learns to deal with other dogs and remains more relaxed in everyday life.. It is recommended to attend a puppy school or a trainer.

Activities with the little Spitz

The Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz) he is a lively and attentive dog that loves to be by your side at all times. Daily walks are the order of the day with him in any weather. Dog sports such as agility are also suitable for sports workload. For the mental load you can provide with the intelligence toy. Smart tops are also known for their love of learning tricks and tricks. The loving Spitz is with a good education a pleasant companion dog. You can easily take it with you on vacation or on small trips.

Health and care Kleinspitz

Despite its long fur, the Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz) it is not a breed that requires much care. Protruding hairs give it a natural firmness, that hardly tangles. Therefore, just comb the coat from time to time and remove any dirt. Your dog will be pleased with the extra care. However, during the coat change, the small spitz also need your help to get rid of superfluous hair. The Spitz it is also one of the least susceptible breeds in terms of health. Some members of the breed are susceptible to tartar, but it can be prevented by using chewing bone or a dog toothbrush.

Buy a Kleinspitz

Due to its size, the Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz) it is also suitable for smaller homes and will be happy both in a city apartment and in a house. The most important thing is to give him enough exercise and not treat him like a lap dog. The cheerful and affectionate dog is well suited to singles or pensioners, but also fits in a family without problems. The puppy needs one or more caregivers who take care of it daily. So you should think carefully about buying a puppy from Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz) and not rush anything.

If you are sure that the breed suits you, you have to find a serious breeder. For a purebred puppy with papers and vaccines, many breeders charge up to 1.500 EUR. A laudable alternative is, therefore, a shelter dog. As the German Spitz they only differ in size, you will also be happy with a Pomeranian or a Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz).

Kleinspitz Videos

Puppies Spitz Aleman. Kleinspitz

Our kennel of Kleinspitz

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 97
  • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
  • Section 4: European Spitz. Without working trial.

Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz)
Alemania FCI 97 . European Spitz

Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz)

Although I do not necessarily suspect it at first glance, the large Spitz is also extremely robust and weather resistant.

Content

History

While the small and medium varieties of the German Spitz (Pomeranian, Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz) and Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz), Keeshond) were more common among common people in the Middle Ages, the Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) , with its impressive and elegant shape, found its way into the homes of the noble and middle classes. The Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) white enjoyed great popularity even among representatives of the English nobility. The “German Spitz” He was also able to make a name for himself in America and was kept mainly by German immigrants. In the course of the negative image of Germany after the 1st World War, the Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) was renamed as “American Eskimo

The Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) black, on the other hand, used to be more common in vineyards in Baden Württemberg. His excellent wakefulness instinct was a great help to the winegrowers in keeping off the grape thieves, both animals and humans, away from the valuable vines.

According to Gesellschaft zur Erhaltung alter und gefährdeter Haustierrassen e. V. (Society for the Conservation of Ancient and Endangered Breeds of Domestic Animals), to the Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) is considered today in danger of extinction. Over the years 2000 a 2002, for example, there was only 11 Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) blacks in Germany and 38 white dogs. To preserve this breed of enterprising and cheerful dogs, there are initiatives to mate the Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) white and black with each other and to cross them with Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz) and the Keeshond.

Physical characteristics

The Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) is characterized by its special double layer. The long straight top layer looks very bushy due to the thick, padded undercoat and stays away from the body. Particularly striking is the strong horsehair fur collar and the bushy tail that curls over the back. The fox head with the agile eyes and the pointed ears, small and narrow give this Spitz its characteristic appearance.

With a shoulder height of up to 50 cm and a weight of 15-20 kg, the Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) is the second largest representative of the German Spitz after the Keeshond. It is raised in black colors, White and Brown.

Males and females category “Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) ” they are very similar in weight and size. However, the males representing the breed mostly appear heavier and larger. This is due to the fact that their coat is slightly longer and therefore appears more voluminous than that of female dogs..

Character and skills

The Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) needs a lot of movement and exercise. Therefore, long walks and running games and slides should always be on the agenda. In addition, dog sports such as agility, obedience or tracking can bring additional variety to the dog's life and make optimal use of the breed.

Breed-specific character traits

The Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) He is very affectionate by nature and would like to accompany his family everywhere. Staying home alone does not suit them at all and can make dogs experience their grief intensely. As a rule, the more attention and affection a Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) , more comfortable feels. That's why they like to be with the family, since they also get along very well with children. But, of course, every four legged friend, no matter how sociable I am, he also needs his rest. It is important that all members of the family respect these phases, which are usually quite rare with the Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) . Thanks to his kind and loving character, many representatives of this breed of dog are also suitable as therapy dogs.

Although I do not necessarily suspect it at first glance, the Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) it is also extremely robust and weather resistant. Due to its distinctive protective instinct, they are also considered ideal guardians for the house and yard. However, without proper training, can become a very barking dog. Through an appropriate workload for each species, good socialization and a consistent but loving upbringing, desirable behavior can be encouraged, namely, “don't bark”.

Grossespitz training

Get enough attention and feel well integrated into family life. As they have almost no hunting instinct, they are usually relatively easy to train and can be recommended for beginners. However, it is important to inform yourself widely about the breed and its requirements beforehand.

Like all the other spitz, to the Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) likes to be in contact with children and loves to play with and protect them. Therefore, fits well in a lively little family, in which there is always something to do and much to discover.

So that the Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) can exercise your favorite activity as a watchdog, the ideal would be to keep it in a house with a patio and garden. If the four-legged friend moves regularly and has mental problems, you can also consider keeping it in a city apartment, as long as there are enough opportunities for exercise nearby.

Grossespitz videos

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 97
  • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
  • Section 4: European Spitz. Without working trial.

German Spitz
Alemania FCI 97 - European Spitz

German Spitz

Your hair requires certain care, especially for exhibitions.

Content

History

The Spitz it is one of the oldest German domestic dog breeds, although its origins are not completely clear. There is evidence that dogs Spitz lived together with humans ago 4.000 years. Due to its wide diffusion as a guard dog on farms and in the homes of the petty bourgeoisie it also found its way into literature and painting..

Especially in rural areas, a German Spitz was ubiquitous in the old days as a house and garden dog. Smaller Spitz were popular as lap dogs with ladies.

The popularity of the Spitz decreased so much in the recent past that it was declared an endangered breed of pet in 2003.

Physical characteristics

All the German Spitz, regardless of size or color, form a family and should have similar characteristics and a typical lace look.

The Spitz impresses with his beautiful coat. The abundant undercoat and long top coat, straight and outstanding give them their unmistakable appearance. Particularly striking is the strongly mane-like collar around the neck and the bushy, furry tail., that is carried boldly on the back. The fox-like head with quick eyes and small, narrow pointed ears give the Spitz its characteristic disturbing expression. The body of the Spitz is square.

Measurements:

a) Wolfspitz / Keeshond : 49 cm ± 6 cm..
b) Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) : 46 cm ± 4 cm..
c) Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz) : 34 cm ± 4 cm..
d) Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz) : 26 cm ± 3 cm..
and) Zwergspitz (Toy or Dwarf Spitz) / Pomeranian : 20 cm ± 2 cm..
(are undesirable specimens measuring less than 18 cm.).

Weight

Any variation in the size of the German Spitz should have a corresponding variation in weight.

Character and skills

A German Spitz has a reputation for being a talkative. In fact, the dogs bark a lot; for a guard dog, making a sound is a desirable feature, that today cannot be reconciled with all the neighbors.

A natural distrust, along with incorruptibility and loyalty, is inherent to German Spitz. This makes it predestined to be a watchdog that patrols its territory and reports suspicious incidents.. A German Spitz reliably stands up for the things entrusted to it. When not on guard, a is a very friendly and affectionate dog, sometimes a little possessive, who follows his humans closely and enjoys being petted. A German Spitz is generally regarded as a child.

The education and attitude of the German Spitz

With cheerful romp and docility, a German Spitzn is a dog that absolutely needs a task. Find your place as a working watchdog, but also as a companion and family dog. With a lot of positive encouragement and loving consistency, breeding is not problematic and can also be managed if you have little experience with dogs.

For a German Spitz be respectful of animals, must be weather resistant: The Spitz it just feels really comfortable outdoors, either with sun, rain or snow. It is an ideal companion for runners, riders and cyclists. He is also an agility sports enthusiast. As the Spitz only has a weakly developed hunting instinct, does not tend to go its own way when outdoors and is easy to recover. It is less suitable for intensive accommodation, especially because he likes to bark a lot. Similar to the Poodle, the spitz is available in different sizes, from the Zwergspitz (Toy or Dwarf Spitz) / Pomeranian to Wolfspitz / Keeshond. The best known variant is the Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz) with a shoulder height of 34-38 cm and weighing up to 10 kg. Apart from its format, the types do not differ visually.

Caring for the German Spitz

Surprisingly, the fluffy coat of the Spitz does not require much grooming. The hair is dirt repellent, so an occasional brushing is enough. In addition, a German Spitz it is very clean and cleans itself. Also in terms of health, the Spitz they are quite robust dogs.

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 97
  • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
  • Section 4: European Spitz. Without working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 5 – Section 4 European Spitz.

FCI standard German Spitz

German Spitz FCI German Spitz FCI

Alternative names:

    1. Deutscher Spitz (English).
    2. Spitz allemand (French).
    3. Deutsche Spitze (German).
    4. Deutsche Spitze (Portuguese).
    5. Spitz alemán (Spanish).

Photos

1- Szpic_miniatura at the national show in Rybnik – Stone to Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA

German Spitz varieties

a) Wolfspitz / Keeshond.
b) Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz) .
c) Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz).
d) Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz).
and) Zwergspitz (Toy or Dwarf Spitz) / Pomeranian.

European Spitz

1 Keeshond

Keeshond

Even today the Keeshond is known for its faithfulness and loyalty.

Are Wolfsspitz and Keeshond identical?

This question repeatedly leads to confusion among experts and laymen alike.. Although the

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2 Pomeranian

Pomeranian

The Pomeranian very active, independent, Intelligent, brave and loyal.

The Pomeranian (Deutscher Spitz;, Pom-Dog or Deutscher Zwergspitz) It is a dog of the Spitz family, named for the Read more

3 Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz)

Grossespitz (Giant or Large Spitz)

Although I do not necessarily suspect it at first glance, the large Spitz is also extremely robust and weather resistant.

While the small and medium varieties of the German Spitz (Pomeranian, Spitz

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4 Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz)

Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz)

The Mittelspitz is by nature a bit like the old guard dog.

The Spitz, officially called “German Spitz“, It is a classic breed of dog in Germany and Central Europe. The

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5 Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz)

Kleinspitz (Miniature or Small Spitz)

The small Spitz is a loving and attentive dog, that is very people-oriented.

The little Spitz (Kleinspitz) is a variety of German Spitz, that today is available

Read more

Finnish Spitz
Finlandia FCI 49 - Nordic Hunting Dogs

Finnish Spitz

It is a dog that can annoy the neighbors, because he barks a lot and with a particularly penetrating voice.

Content

This four-legged friend of the Finnish fox color with the typical terse character of the Spitz is a Nordic hunting dog, who has gathered a small but loyal following around the world. It is especially popular in its homeland, Finland. Below you can read interesting facts about the Finnish Spitz, which in Finnish is called “Suomenpystykorva“.

History

Finnish national dog

For centuries, the Finnish Spitz has been used as a hunting companion in northern and eastern Finland. In particular, has helped hunt small predators, moose and waterfowl, and later this dog became more and more specialized in grouse and black grouse: Scare these large birds into the surrounding treetops. Now him Finnish Spitz barks persistently until its two-legged partner is close enough to shoot prey.

Little is known about the exact development of the breed. However, the Finnish Spitz probably descended from dogs Spitz, who have been the everyday helpers of the people in Russia for more than 1.000 years. Towards the end of the 19th century, finnish Hugo Roos observed the original Spitz in northern Finland while hunting and recognized its extraordinary abilities. He advocated selective breeding and thus developed the modern Finnish Spitz – although the standard has been changed several times since then. In Russia, the four-legged friend is also known as the Karelo-Finnische Laika, but in 2006 the Finnish and Russian breeding associations agreed that the two names are the same breed. This means that Finland has been recognized as the breed's country of origin and is responsible for the standard.

From 1979 the Finnish Spitz has been the national dog of Finland.

Physical characteristics

Compact body, upright ears and a bushy tail curled over the back: The Finnish Spitz medium-sized is optically a typical Spitz and stands out especially for its red or golden brown fur. This consists of two layers: The soft, dense undercoat and the hard top coat. The undercoat is always a little lighter.

Males can reach a height at the withers of about 47 cm., the females some 42 cm.. Depending on its size, the dogs weigh between 10 and 15 kg.

Character and skills

If you want a stuffed dog that always strives for recognition from his two-legged friends, you are wrong with a Finnish Spitz. This independent and sovereign dog knows better than anyone where he is going, and therefore never fully subordinate. He is extremely intelligent and loves to learn, if you can teach him something new. Frequent repetitions quickly bore you, so your willingness to cooperate can decrease rapidly. He is brave and very keen to bark: one of its characteristics is a penetrating voice – More on this later. A Finnish Spitz can be used as a guard dog, but he needs to be connected to his human pack. He is friendly with his caregiver or family and enjoys spending time with children.

Attention: It is a very Barking Dog.

At this point we would like to point out a special characteristic of this dog, the bark of joy from Finnish Spitz. Please, consider it: In finland, with a population density of about 16 Inhabitants per square kilometer, the closest neighbor usually lives far away. Here the dog is not only known for its strong voice, but also positively emphasized and encouraged in the form of barking competitions.

This skill is extremely important for hunting, so that the dog can offer good guidance to the two-legged hunter who cannot move so easily through partially snowy forest. The Finnish Spitz they don't just bark, they also dominate different variations, from short sounds to a kind of song.

Many Finnish Spitz they can do up 160 sounds per minute. So if you are thinking about the arrival of such a dog, first you must inform yourself about his joy of barking. Even if you can control or reduce it, some Finnish Spitz will continue to bark more than most other dogs – this is simply in their genes. If you live in a rural area, you can use the Finnish Spitz as an excellent guardian of the house and the yard.

Activities with the Finnish Spitz

To the Finnish Spitz he loves the time he spends with his reference person, as well as being outside. Therefore, it's better to combine both as often as possible and take it for long, long walks. It is a wonderful companion on walks, if you keep him on a leash or have his hunting instinct under control. This last, However, it's a challenge with this breed, if recoverability is not trained from the beginning. Frequent repetitions are not fun for him Finnish Spitz, they are looking for a common activity that also trains their smart little head. The trace job, for example, it's a pleasure for him Finnish Spitz. In all sports activities, you must ensure that your partner does not overexert himself., so you stay motivated and injuries don't occur.

Finnish Spitz education

If you are thinking that a Finnish Spitz move in with you, You should already have some canine experience to guide this independent companion to the required basic obedience. Don't expect me to be completely subordinate to you, race is too independent for that. Be consistent with everything that is important to you, but leave the Finnish Spitz his own head (testaruda) elsewhere.

With a loving consistency and positive reinforcement you can train this dog well as a rule. Anyway, he is very intelligent and likes to learn new things – then it is also, as a result, cooperative. Use this for your training. With a young man Finnish Spitz it makes sense to visit the puppy school, to establish positive contacts with puppies of other breeds and to strengthen or develop your social streak. Also basic command training in a dog school can be very helpful with him – it's best if you find a dog school that already has experience with the idiosyncratic character of Spitz.

Robust health

The typical Finnish Spitz is a robust and weather resistant dog: the breed is considered to be hardly affected by specific inherited diseases. If you are thinking of acquiring a dog of this type, it is important that you buy it from reputable breeders, as these reduce the risk of genetic diseases through responsible breeding. An example would be the predisposition of some dogs to Hip Dysplasia or problems with the knee and elbow joints. Talk to the breeder in question about the health care of parental animals.

You can contribute greatly to the health of your dog yourself by providing a healthy diet and exercising appropriately for his age and level of training..

This breed of Spitz it is quite sensitive to heat due to its origin in the far north… The walks in winter, on the other hand, are to the taste of this four-legged friend. The breed reaches an average age of 12 a 13 years.

The Finnish Spitz diet

In addition, a balanced diet adapted to the needs of your four-legged friend is an important component for their health. Like all dogs, the Finnish Spitz requires a meat-based diet. Therefore, make sure meat is the first ingredient for the pet food you choose. The grain should not be included. This applies regardless of whether wet or dry food is chosen. With a pure diet of dry food, you should pay special attention to the fact that your quadruped gets enough liquid.

Water must always be freely available. After meals, their Finnish Spitz definitely must have time for a digestive nap, so it is better to feed after the joint excursions. Remember that treats must be added to the daily ration, otherwise your dog's slim waist will be in danger. It is also possible to bring dry food as a reward.

Dry chews, like cattle ears, satisfy your partner's chewing needs. Dental care treats or freeze-dried meat snacks especially for dogs are other sensible rewards that you can give your four-legged friend a tasty little treat with..

Care for the Finnish Spitz

Although caring for this dog's coat is quite easy, should not be careless, especially during coat change. In spring and autumn the Finnish Spitz usually has a lot of hair – help him get rid of dead hairs by brushing him regularly – preferably daily. This way you can prevent skin irritation, which can develop rapidly if too many hairs from the dense undercoat remain on the dog. Outside the coat change, just brush your partner once a week. During this grooming ritual, that you should already practice with your puppy, it is better that I also look in the ears, that you should clean with a dog ear cleaner if necessary. A brief claw check should also be performed at regular intervals – usually older quadrupeds or those that only walk on soft ground need support from you in the form of a pedicure. Here a dog gripper provides valuable services.

Does a Finnish Spitz suit me?

A dream home for a Finnish Spitz It is a large plot of land in the field to watch over her, including family connection. The breed is suitable for dog lovers with a great sense of independence, who like to move in nature with their partner and who can impart basic obedience to the stubbornness of their four-legged friend thanks to the skill, consistency and calm. It is not a city dog ​​and its barking of joy alone could make it unsuitable for keeping indoors, even if you can have a quiet Finnish Spitz as a roommate through lots of activity and patient training.

As a family dog ​​it is very suitable, provided you have the appropriate occupation and education. In addition, is patient and trusting with children with whom he usually has a good relationship – but make sure the four-legged friend can retreat if he feels like it. The Finnish Spitz not suitable for hot regions and also not a companion for a beach holiday – loves cooler climates, what is much better for him.

Talking about vacation: Before deciding on this dog, Please also consider that you should be well looked after in case of illness and on vacation. Preferably from someone who already knows you and is familiar with the characteristics of a Spitz. Of course, you can also take it on vacation with you, but before registering it in a hotel, you must be sure that you do not want to charm every hotel guest with your loud voice. Therefore, this type of trip is only possible with a very well bred Finnish Spitz.

Also consider in advance the one-time costs and especially the regular costs that you will have to pay when your new pet roommate moves in.: In addition to the basic equipment and purchase price of a dog from a reputable breeder, there may be considerable travel expenses for a puppy bought abroad. Once your Spitz lives with you, there will be high quality food costs, taxes and insurance for the dog and expenses for regular visits to the vet, including vaccinations and deworming.

Where can I find my Finnish Spitz?

Like many other races from the far north, the Finnish Spitz is a rarity in southern Scandinavia. In many countries not a single litter of Finnish Spitz in a year, so if you have fallen in love with this breed, you will usually have to travel long distances to get a puppy as a new member of the family. Contact the Nordic dog breed clubs, that can help you find a dog of this breed, which is especially popular in your home country, and possibly establish contacts with breeders in Scandinavia. If you adopt a puppy from abroad, there are some things you should consider… Get informed in time! Remember: It always makes sense to visit the puppy in the kennel to meet the parents and the circumstances in which the four-legged friends live.. If possible, you should also visit the breeder personally before deciding to buy a puppy from abroad. Here there is also the possibility of sniffing and asking questions without time pressure. After all, buying a puppy is a matter of trust.

If you want a Finnish Spitz adult as companion, there is little chance in most Central European countries of getting a matching dog – maybe you are considering a trip to Finland in the near future and find it there. Otherwise, Nordic dog breed clubs will help you in your search. Maybe a Nordic cross or another breed of Spitz can conquer your heart.

advice: Start looking for your new partner with watchful eyes and an open heart, because many hybrids of Spitz have similar characteristics.

Ratings of the Finnish Spitz

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Finnish Spitz” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Training ?

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitability of the apartment ?

1.0 rating
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Can be alone all day ?

1.0 rating
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitable as a first dog ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Weight gain ?

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Intelligence ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Kindness with child ?

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to bite ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to bark ?

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to flee ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss force ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitable as a guard dog ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Joy ?

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendliness ?

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Power level ?

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images of the Finnish Spitz

Spitz finlandes

Spitz finlandés by Pets Adviser from Brooklyn, USA / CC BY

Spitz finlandes

Spitz finlandés by Pets Adviser from Brooklyn, USA / CC BY

Finnish Spitz Videos

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 49
  • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
  • Section 2: Nordic Hunting Dogs. Working trial only for the Nordic countries (Sweden, Norway and Finland).
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 2 Nordic Hunting Dogs.
    • AKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • ANKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • CKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • ​KC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • NZKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs
    • UKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs

    FCI standard of the Finnish Spitz breed

    Finnish Spitz FCI Finnish Spitz FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Finnish Hunting Dog, Finnish Spets, Finsk Spets, Loulou Finois, suomalainen pystykorva, suomenpystykorva (English).
      2. Spitz finlandais (French).
      3. Karelo-Finnische Laika, Suomenpystykorva (German).
      4. Spitz finlandês (Portuguese).
      5. Loulou Finois, Suomalainen pystykorva, Finsk Spets (Spanish).

    Norrbottenspets
    Suecia FCI 276 - Nordic Hunting Dogs

    Norrbottenspets

    The Norrbottenspets is also used as a draft dog.

    Content

    History

    The Norrbottenspets (Spitz from the North Bothnia country) probably originates from the small spitz-type Laika that was known to live with hunters in the North Cape area, already in prehistoric times. Little hunting spitz have survived for thousands of years through natural selection - survival of the fittest. In the very harsh and difficult areas of the northern part of the Scandinavian Peninsula, hunting for food and skins was a necessity in order to survive. Precious skins like saber, Sable fur and ermine were the only valid currency for centuries. When fur prices fell drastically after WWII, so did the interest in him Norrbottenspets.

    The breed disappeared and there were no records for many years, hence the Kennel Club of Sweden (SKK) declared it extinct. But only a decade later news came that true-type specimens had been found living as pets and watchdogs in small inland homes in North Bothnia.. Due to the very dedicated work of a few men, this ancient hunting spitz was saved.
    In 1967 the Norrbottenspets was introduced to the Registries and a new standard was drawn up.

    Source: http://www.fci.be/en/nomenclature/NORRBOTTENSPITZ-276.html

    Physical characteristics

    It is a small spitz-type dog with a rather square appearance, compact and plump, with a lean and strong musculature. The bearing is handsome, with head and tail high. The breed has a strong sexual dimorphism, although the ideal specimen for both sexes is a well-characterized small spitz, attentive, good guardian, of harmonious construction and good character.

    The skull is sharp, with the ears set high and relatively small, eyes are dark and bright, and express calmness and predisposition towards work.

    Ears are slightly below average size with sparse hair and erect bearing. The tail is set relatively high, fairly tall in a semicircle, with the tip touching the sides of the thighs. When it stretches, must not exceed the tip of the hock.

    Hair: hard, short, straight and quite bushy, with fine and dense undercoat. The length varies depending on the body area: longer around the neck and on the thighs and shorter on the skull and front of the extremities.

    Color: all colors are allowed. The ideal is white with yellow or brownish red spots.

    Size: males 45 cm.; females, 42 cm.

    Character and skills

    Norrbottenspets

    The pretty white colored Spitz, medium size and short hair is very rare in his native country and practically unknown outside of Sweden.

    He is an excellent guard with a lot of drive, temperament and stubbornness. With proper physical and mental tension, it is also a nice and friendly companion dog.

    As a born hunter, the Norrbottenspets He is very Brave, fearless and alert. He is extremely lively and has a lot of temperament and self-confidence. The Norrbottenspets it is very suitable as a guard dog, because it reports everything I miss immediately without being aggressive. In the family he is very sociable, friendly and gentle. But the intelligent and self-confident dog can also be stubborn and needs a sensitive education and clear guidance..

    The Norrbottenspets he is very docile, but it needs a lot of movement and a lot of demanding and varied activity. The ideal are, for example, tests with companion dogs, sports tournaments with dogs or rescue dog training. Only with appropriate mental and physical activity will Norrbottenspets it is also a nice and friendly family companion dog. As a pure house dog or for a life in the city it is not the right dog.

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 276
    • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
    • Section 2: Nordic Hunting Dogs. With working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 2 Nordic Hunting Dogs.

    FCI standard of the Norrbottenspets

    Norrbottenspets FCI Norrbottenspets FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Nordic Spitz, Norrbottenspitz, Pohjanpystykorva (English).
      2. Spitz nordique (French).
      3. Norrbottenspets, Pohjanpystykorvat (German).
      4. Spitz nórdico (Portuguese).
      5. Spitz nórdico (Spanish).

    Staffordshire bull terrier
    Gran Bretaña FCI 76 . Bull type Terriers

    Staffordshire bull terrier

    It is the smallest of the bull terriers and also the most popular in England..

    Content

    History

    As its name implies, the Staffordshire bull terrier comes from the English city of Stafford and is a cross between different terriers. In the 18th century the Staffordshire Bullterrier was especially popular with dog fighters and as a rat biter.. Unlike other countries, where the breed is considered a fighting dog, in Great Britain it is a very popular family dog. There the Staffordshire It's also called “Babysitter dog” or “Nurse dog” for its kindness to children and is one of the five most common dog breeds.

    Physical characteristics

    The Staffordshire Bullterrier he is medium in size and has a compact stature, muscular, almost bulky. The characteristic thing is his ears, that are up high and leaning slightly forward.

    Height:

    Height at the withers between 35,5 and 40,5 cm..

    Weight:

    Males should reach a weight of 12,7 – 17 kg, females weigh between 11 and 15,4 kg.

    Coat colors and length

    The coat of the Staffordshire bull terrier is short, smooth and simple. Can be the colors red, white, black, cervato, blue or tabby.

    Character and skills

    The character of Staffordshire Bull Terrier it depends a lot on your attitude. Has a fearless and courageous nature and is faithful and kind from the start. With a loving but strict attitude and a close family relationship, the Staffordshire can become a loving companion. In addition, he is considered faithful, persistent and dominant. These characteristics are unfortunately exploited by many dog ​​owners who rude the Staffordshire Bullterrier and train him to be strong and aggressive..

    Attitude with family connection

    In many countries the Staffordshire Bullterrier is classified as a dangerous fighting dog. Its maintenance is strongly restricted and the importation of the breed to many countries is prohibited. Apart from that, the Staffordshire it is easy to maintain, because it is very adaptable. It can be kept in a house as well as in a city apartment. Needs a family connection and proximity to his master. Therefore, not suitable for a kennel. The Staffordshire has a great need to move and likes to play. Daily exercise in combination with extensive ball games is, therefore, a need.

    Staffordshire Bullterrier Education

    The Staffordshire Bullterrier it is by no means a beginner dog. In the education of this breed it is important to bring out the traits of good character with consistency and loving rigor. Traits such as tenacity, dominance and fearlessness must be kept in check. Harsh training should be avoided so that the dog does not become aggressive and stubborn. To get used to Staffordshire Bullterrier other dogs and socialize them very well, a visit to the dog school is advisable. Especially important in education is hierarchy. Even as puppies, to the Staffordshire they like to test their limits and try to take command. However, as an owner you should never be intimidated by your dog and you should make it clear, but with love, that you are higher in the hierarchy.

    Health and care of the Staffordshire Bullterrier

    Coat care

    The coat of the Staffordshire Bull Terrier it is very easy to care for. An occasional brushing is enough to remove dirt and dust and stimulate blood circulation.

    Typical diseases

    As typical diseases, the Staffordshire Bullterrier may suffer from poor hip development (Hip Dysplasia) and elbows (elbow dysplasia) and dislocation of the patella (dislocation of patella). Eye diseases such as cataracts are also typical of the breed. However, most diseases can be caught early and treated well with a regular visit to the vet.

    Nutrition / Food

    A healthy and balanced diet is the basis for a long life for dogs. Feed the Staffordshire Bullterrier with high quality food and ingredients is, therefore, a need. The dog being fed dry food, wet or BARF is irrelevant. It is only important that the food is free of dyes, preservatives and sugar and is high in meat.

    The life expectancy of the Staffordshire Bullterrier

    If he Staffordshire remains in good health and is well cared for, easily reaches an age between 12 and 14 years.

    Buy a Staffordshire Bullterrier

    The Staffordshire It is classified as an attack dog in many countries and its maintenance is subject to a series of conditions. Before buying, one must therefore inform oneself thoroughly about the breed and restrictions. If the purchase decision is made, one must first look at various breeders and animals. As a registered breeder's dog, a Staffordshire Terrier It costs around 1000 EUR. A shelter dog, or from an animal welfare organization is much cheaper. Especially older dogs should not be accepted by beginners, because they can be more difficult in their education than puppies.

    Staffordshire bull terrier ratings

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Staffordshire bull terrier” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    adaptation ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    1.0 rating
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    1.0 rating
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Staffordshire bull terrier images

    photos:

    1 – Staffordshire Bull Terrier by https://es.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archivo:Staffie.jpg
    2 – Staffordshire Bull Terrier by https://www.pxfuel.com/es/free-photo-oegwc
    3 – Staffordshire Bull Terrier by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/343556
    4 – Profile shot of a white Staffordshire Bull Terrier by Public Domain – no attribution required / CC0
    5 – Brindle & white Staffordshire Bull Terrier by Serial Number 54129 / CC BY-SA
    6 – Staffordshire Bull Terrier, called “King”, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia by Ashoornamrood / CC BY-SA
    7 – Black Staffordshire Bull Terrier sitting on a green lawn by Public Domain – no attribution required / CC0

    Videos of the Staffordshire bull terrier

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 76
    • Group 3: Terriers.
    • Section 3: Bull type terriers. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 3 – Section 3 Bull type Terriers.
    • AKC – Terriers
    • ANKC – Terriers
    • CKC – Terriers
    • ​KC – Terriers
    • NZKC – Terriers
    • UKC – Terriers

    Staffordshire bull terrier breed FCI standard

    STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER FCI STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIER FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Stafford, Staffy, (English).
      2. Stafford, SBT (French).
      3. SBT, Stafford (German).
      4. Staffbull, Staffie, SBT (Portuguese).
      5. Staffy, Stafford Inglés, Stafford (Spanish).

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