Estonian Hound
Estonia FCI 366 - Medium-sized Hounds

Estonian Hound

The Estonian Hound they are extremely hardy hunting dogs used to long days in the woods

Content

History

The history of Estonian Hound (or Eesti Hagijas in the language of your country of origin) begins at the beginning of the 20th century in Estonia, when the crossing of english hounds, Poles and Finns used by local hunters gave rise to a large dog unofficially considered regional and ancestor of the current Eesti Hagijas.

Given the sharp decline in the population of large game and in order to reestablish it, in 1937 a law was passed that prohibited hunting with dogs over 45 cm to the cross, which in fact caused a change of orientation towards smaller animals, like foxes and hares. As a result, Estonian hunters and breeders had to breed smaller dogs than they had then, therefore, the breeding program was introduced Beagles, the Dachshunds and Swiss Hounds.

This law was amended three years later, in 1940: the maximum size was increased to 55 cm., and breeders stopped their efforts to miniaturize local hunting dogs.

In 1947, when Estonia was part of the USSR, the Soviet Ministry of Agriculture decided that all “republics” who made up Estonia had to have a local breed of dog. The Estonian hunting dog population was then estimated at around 900, and the intense selection helped to stabilize the characteristics of the breed that would become the Estonian Hound.

In 1954, the Ministry of Agriculture sent a specialized commission to Estonia to study the 648 specimens submitted by local breeders, and were clearly convinced: the first breed standard was approved by the Ministry a few months later. This year marked the official introduction of the Estonian Hound like a race, whose stamina and formidable nose were immediately emphasized.

After the collapse of the Soviet regime, Estonia gained independence and in 1998 la Estonian Kennel Club, the main canine association in the country, recognized race. Being the only native of the country, it was not surprising that it was granted national dog status.

The organization set out to make the breed known and recognized internationally. His efforts were crowned with success in 2019, cuando the International Cynological Federation (FCI) provisionally accepted the breed and published a standard. Having said that, there is still a long way to go, since it is not recognized, for example, by the prestigious British Kennel Club, nor by American reference organizations such as the United Kennel Club (UKC) o el American Kennel Club (AKC).

The Estonian Hound is popular in an area encompassing Estonia and nearby Russian regions, and its population is estimated at about 1200 individuals. It is still used there as a hunting dog and has also made a place in many homes as a pet.. However, has not yet conquered the rest of the world. Rare in europe, even in the neighboring countries of Estonia, is practically absent from the North American continent.

Photo: Estonian Hound by Marcin Błaszkowski, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

Estonian-hound
Estonian Hound

The Estonian Hound They are medium-sized hunting dogs that can easily be mistaken for the Beagle, one of the races that helped create them. However, they are bigger than the Beagle and they have a more pointed snout.

His powerful and muscular body is very long. Its solid bone legs are straight and almost half the size at the withers.. Saber-shaped tail flicks when in motion and remains fairly low, no higher than back level.

The head is quite wide at the level of the skull and the long muzzle ends in a very black nose. His slightly oblique eyes are more or less dark brown, while her long, thin ears fall along her cheeks.

The coat of the Estonian Hound is short, rough and shiny, with a moderately dense undercoat. Their fur is usually tricolor, with black spots with more or less wide red edges on a white background. However, the standard accepts bicolor individuals with completely red spots, without any trace of black. In all cases, the tips of the legs and tail should be white, as well as the throat and chest.

Sexual dimorphism is marked, the female being slightly longer than the male, which is taller in the legs and wider.

Physical characteristics

Estonian Hound
Estonian Hound

The Estonian Hound he is particularly devoted to his family, who likes to spend time with. They are a breed of dog especially recommended for children: they love to interact with them and are very patient with them, they even accept having their tails or ears pulled. However, you should remember that interactions between a young child and a dog of any breed must be under the supervision of an adult.

This strong attachment to his family makes him not like loneliness, which can lead to separation anxiety. If you are often left home alone for long periods of time, not surprisingly you may experience destructive behavior.

A solution for a caregiver who is absent regularly during the day may be to provide a playmate. Made to hunt in a pack, the Estonian Hound they enjoy the company of other dogs. If they are used to its presence from an early age, They can also make friends with any feline in the house. On the other hand, as they have a strong hunting instinct, should not live with rabbits or other rodents.

Rather shy and not fond of novelty, the Estonian Hound they tend to bark at strangers and then observe their master's behavior from a distance. If he invites the newcomer to the house, comes to greet you politely, but stay reserved.

Extremely hardy hunting dogs used to long days in the woods, they need a lot of exercise to expend their great energy: a daily walk of one hour is a minimum for them. It is recommended to always keep it tied during these outings, as your excellent sense of smell often allows you to find an interesting track that you are likely to want to follow for hours, ignoring withdrawal orders. A dog owner who still wants to let him walk freely at this time should equip him with a GPS dog collar, so you can easily get your hands back on it if it disappears.

The Estonian Hound you can live in an apartment as long as you are outdoors often enough to satisfy your need for exercise, but he is much happier when he has a garden where he can patrol and play. However, this outdoor space must be well fenced to eliminate the risk of escape if you see potential prey to pursue.

A peculiarity of this dog is its need for routine and its aversion to novelty, which makes their behavior sometimes compared to that of domestic cats. This is not at all an appropriate choice for a master who wants to take their dog on vacation.: he is a poor traveler, you get stressed out when you get in the car and you don't like spending time in a place you don't know at all.

Last but not least, it is a breed of dog that barks often and forcefully. For the peace of the neighborhood, it is necessary to teach him from a young age not to bark for any reason and to shut up when ordered to do so.

Education

Estonian Hound
Estonian Hound

Like all its fellow men, the Estonian Hound must be socialized from an early age. This requires spending as much time with him as possible so that he meets all kinds of people (neighbors, family, friends, strangers…) And animals, but also so that you get used to the situations that you may face later.

This need to become very quickly acquainted with the outside world is all the more pronounced as it is fearful by nature. In particular, to prevent future vet visits from becoming a nightmare to handle, it is recommended to get used to traveling by car as soon as possible.

Addressing the barking issue at an early age is also imperative, so that you understand that it is not necessary to bark for hours at every unfamiliar noise.

It is also important to teach your dog to remember to bark, as you will not hear any more commands once you have sniffed the trail of a game animal and go in pursuit. Hunting instinct is well established in this breed, so it does not require any specific training to be able to follow a trail for hours and be an excellent hunter.

Relatively independent and headstrong, the Estonian Hound require patience to be trained, but they like to please their master and usually end up listening to him. If necessary, be firm to assert your dominant position and show your dog who is the master, traditional training methods should be avoided, at the risk of damaging the relationship of trust. It is preferable to opt for a learning technique based on positive reinforcement.

Health

As the Estonian Hound it is a relatively new breed and not very widespread, there is still no real and in-depth study of their possible health problems. However, looks quite robust, undoubtedly thanks to a reasoned breeding program that has prioritized the personality and abilities of individuals over their appearance.

However, you have probably inherited from Beagle and the Foxhound a certain predisposition to the following diseases:

  • Progressive retinal atrophy, a breakdown of the eye tissue that can eventually lead to blindness;
  • entropion and ectropion, problems with the eyelids that cause itching and / or irritation of the eye, but that can be surgically corrected;
  • dislocation of the patella, which affects the kneecap and causes walking difficulties. It can also be responsible for premature arthritis;
  • Elbow or hip dysplasia, that can cause lameness.
  • In addition, the Estonian Hound is sensitive to allergies and sinusitis. These ailments are not serious in themselves, but they can cause a certain amount of stress to the dog, as this breed relies heavily on its sense of smell. Therefore, a temporary loss of your sense of smell is likely disorienting you.

    At last, like most hunting dogs, the Estonian Hound have a ferocious appetite that can lead to overweight or even obesity if they don't get enough exercise.

    Grooming

    Despite her short hair and sparse undercoat, the Estonian Hound require some maintenance. Brushing twice a week is recommended to remove dead hairs and avoid finding them all over the house. This also helps to distribute sebum on the skin to better protect it against infectious agents..

    During shedding periods, in autumn and spring, it is even necessary to opt for a daily frequency, to cope with the large amount of hair she loses during this period.

    On the other hand, it is only necessary to bathe your dog when it is particularly dirty, for example, if he has rolled in the mud.

    Besides keeping your coat, it is recommended to check your teeth once a week to make sure there are no cavities, and wipe your eyes with a damp cloth to remove any dirt that may cause an infection.

    Weekly ear care is especially important: like any dog ​​with floppy ears, the Estonian Hound are at increased risk of ear infections and infections.

    Buy a “Estonian Hound”

    The price of a puppy Estonian Hound is of some 700-800 euros in your country of origin, and there is no price difference between male and female puppies.

    However, it is difficult to find outside of Estonia, but the situation may change rapidly after the breed is recognized by the FCI in 2019.

    Characteristics "Estonian Hound"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Estonian Hound" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

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    Dog friendly ⓘ

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    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos "Estonian Hound"

    Estonian Hound / 99+1 Dog Breeds
    ESTONIAN HOUND PUPPIES / ESTONIAN HUNDRED PUPPIES

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.


    FCI breed standard "Estonian Hound"

    FCIFCI - Estonian Hound
    Hound

    Alternative names:

      1. (Estonian: eesti hagijas) (English).
      2. eesti hagijas (French).
      3. (estnisch: Eesti hagijas), Estnische Bracke (German).
      4. Eesti hagijas (Portuguese).
      5. Cazador estonio (Spanish).

    Swiss Hound
    Suiza FCI 59 . Medium-sized Hounds

    Schwyz Hound
    Schwyz Hound

    In the breed standard, the temperament of Swiss hound is described as “Vivaz y apasionado por la caza, sensitive, docile and very attached to his master”.

    Content

    History

    It is said that the Swiss Hound is among the oldest members of the Group of Hounds. According to a 15th century letter to Ernst, Elector of Saxony (1441-86), Swiss working dogs were among the best. 17th century images show packs of hounds “with the same color and the same size, large heads and very long ears”.

    Three centuries later, the german dog writer Richard Strebel wrote in “Die Deutschen Hunde” (German dog breeds, 1903-05) that hounds that lived separately in a restricted area of ​​Switzerland therefore developed separately.

    In the decade of 1890, it seemed that purebred hounds were marked for death in Switzerland, despite the breeding of the Schwyz Hound, Bernese Hound and Lucerne Hound. Some hounds were exported to Scandinavia and, thanks to the crossing with native hounds, the Stövares (scandinavian hounds) they were blooming. But at the same time, the Thurgauer Laufhund quietly disappeared in Switzerland, and the Aargauer Laufhund gave way to Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound).

    In 1903, J. Dust del Swiss Kennel Club founded the Schweizerische Laufhunde-Club (Swiss Hound Club) and in 1907 an appeal was made to save the Swiss hound of extinction. Then something remarkable happened: the breed club bought good quality Swiss hounds and gave them to prudent breeders and hunters. Test rules and regulations were developed and a series of obligations were established: -) only one dog at a time when hunting; b) the dog had to be under control when hunting; c) a dog that disappeared while hunting had to return to its master within half an hour; y d) the dog was to return as soon as the horn sounded, regardless of whether the dog was looking. Using these rules, the breed club tried to exclude disobedient dogs and forced owners to properly breed and train their dogs.

    Four varieties

    The development of Swiss Hound started in the decade of 1930, but it took time and effort. In 1937, only five hounds were entered in the Swiss herd book. The Dr. O. Vollenweider managed to gather 11 hound collectors in the city of Soleura, in northwestern Switzerland. Suitable dogs were selected for breeding and, in 1933, a breed standard was published. In the standard, the varieties were distinguished by coat color and pattern.

    In 1944, 150 Swiss hounds were entered in a hound exhibition. (As a neutral country, Switzerland did not participate in WWII) It was no longer forbidden to work with dogs that gave tongue, and bloodhounds of more than 20 inches (50 centimeters) to the cross.

    Attempts to save or restore the Laufhund de Argovia they were unsuccessful; in 1933, the breed standard was canceled. Four varieties remained: the Bernese Hound, the Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound), the Lucerne Hound and the Schwyz Hound. Their names connect them with cities and areas of Switzerland (Berne, Lucerne, Jura), or with Switzerland.

    It is said that between 1902 and 1922, a few 1.200 swiss hounds, mainly Schwyz Hound white-yellow, they were raised in Norway. Some years, there were more Swiss hounds outside of Switzerland than in their home country. In 1993, about 1.000 copies of Lucerne Hound they lived in sweden.

    France is another importer. Seventy-five Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound) enrolled in an exhibition in Lyon in 1976. It is not surprising that the Jura is predominantly found in France and Switzerland, and that it extends to Germany. Since the 15th century, Swiss hounds were also exported to Italy. According to Räber, they frequently crossed paths with his Italian cousin, the Italian short-haired Segugio.

    Photo: XXXVIII Wystawa krajowa psów rasowych w Częstochowie. Gończy ze Schwyz: Ella Haniccina Zahradka z hodowli Z Pastorowej Sfory należąca do Mariusza i Wioletty Antoszczuk by chained, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Swiss Hound varieties:

    1 Bernese Hound

    Bernese Hound

    The Bernese Hound It is mainly used for hunting hare.

    The Swiss Hound has a very ancient origin. Its existence in

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    2 Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound)

    Bruno Jura Hound

    The Jura Hound It is very distant with strangers and needs firm handling if kept as pets.

    In the year

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    3 Lucerne Hound

    Lucerne Hound

    The Lucerne Hound is a lively dog, but gentle and docile. Very attached to his master.

    The breed was originally bred in the

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    4 Schwyz Hound

    Schwyz Hound

    The Schwyz Hound they are a very lively and energetic breed that requires a significant amount of daily exercise.

    The Schwyz Hound has

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    Smaland Hound
    Suecia FCI 129 - Medium-sized Hounds

    Smaland Hound

    The Smaland Hound It is used for hunting hare and fox; It is not a pack dog and is not used for deer hunting.

    Content

    History

    The history of Smaland Hound starts in the county of Smaland, in southern Sweden; there existed a great variety of hounds in the 19th century. Some, of german origin, Polish or Baltic, had arrived in the company of soldiers returning after the great wars between 1611 and 1678.

    These hunting dogs were later crossed with local farm dogs type Spitz and english hounds, becoming the ancestors of Smaland Hound. The size, tail color and length varied at that time: some dogs were black and tan, others red or yellow. However, white markings were common. Some cubs were born with short tails.

    During the early years of the 20th century, great efforts were made to rebuild the type of the old Smalandsstövare, especially the short-tailed variety. The first standard, written in 1921, allowed dogs to have both short and long tails. It was first decided that the color would be black and tan, but red and yellow were allowed, as well as the white spots.

    The Smaland Hound received continuous infusions of new blood, sometimes using strong lines from other dog breeds. The new blood was last used in the 1990s. 1950, When, for a short period, dogs of unknown origin were registered, but accepted type, as Smaland Hound.

    Photo: Smalandsstovare by amoreaquattrozampe.it

    Physical characteristics “Smaland Hound”

    Smaland-Stövare
    Smaland-Stövare

    The Smaland Hound he is a robust dog, similar to Rottweiler, and elegant looking. His eyes are dark brown with a calm expression. Ears are stuck high, slightly raised when the dog is paying attention. They are carried hanging, with rounded ends. The tail is placed in the extension of the line of the back, straight or slightly saber-shaped. May be short at birth.

    Hair: average length, rough, well attached to the body; thicker in the back and neckline. The undercoat is colored: black and fiery (all shades range from amber to reddish brown). Small white spots are allowed on the bib and fingers.

    Size: males 46-54 cm. (ideal 50 cm.); females 42-54 cm. (ideal 45 cm.).

    Character and skills “Smaland Hound”

    These Hounds form a strong bond with their owners, being loyal and devoted, kind and loving, which also makes them great companions at home.

    When they hunt, they are used mainly for hunting fox and hare. He is gifted with exceptional talent, he is a brave and determined dog.

    At home, is a gentle, calm and affectionate family companion. They are known to be territorial and distrustful of strangers, which makes them good watchdogs that will not fail to warn their masters of marauders.

    The Smaland Hound is very intelligent and they learn easily. He gets along well with his peers if they have grown up together, but it must be presented with delicacy and attention to other dogs and other animals.

    It is a dog that needs a lot of time in the presence of its master, you need space and the ability to expend your energy. Therefore, it is not a dog for owners who are absent or who do not have enough time to dedicate to it.

    The breed needs space and is therefore not suitable for apartment living.

    Characteristics “Smaland Hound”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Smaland Hound" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos “Smaland Hound”

    Smålandsstövare / Smalands Hound / Smalandstevare

    harjakt med smålandsstövare diva

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds


    FCI breed standard "Smaland Hound"

    FCIFCI - Smaland Hound
    Hound

    Alternative names:

      1. (Swedish: Smålandsstövare) (English).
      2. Smålandsstövare (French).
      3. Småland-Bracke, Smålandsstövare (German).
      4. Smalandsstovare (Portuguese).
      5. Cazador de Småland (sueco: Smålandsstövare) (Spanish).

    Schiller Hound
    Suecia FCI 131 - Medium-sized Hounds

    Schiller Hound

    The spread of Schiller Hound is regular in your country of origin, but very small abroad.

    Content

    History

    The Schiller Hound It is a working breed that has existed in Sweden since the Middle Ages. However, the breed was not really established and recognized until 1952. This recognition is due in large part to a breeder, Per Schiller, who gave the breed its name.

    In 1886, at the first Swedish dog show, they were shown 189 hounds. Among them were Tamburini and Ralla I, a brother and sister belonging to Per Schiller. They descended from the famous bloodhounds of the Kaflas estate. These dogs probably came from southern Germany: rather small, fawn in color with black fur and slight white markings.

    The Schiller Hound they were then based on the crossing of Swiss dogs, Germans and Austrians, as well as in British hunting dogs, especially the Harriers, to produce a fast and light breed that quickly acquired its type. curiously, Per Schiller worked alongside a Swedish doctor named Adolf Hamilton, and also led to the development of a similar dog named Hamilton Hound, that can be differentiated from Schiller Hound for its tricolor coat.

    Still very rare outside of his native country, the Schiller Hound was recognized by the Swedish Kennel Club in 1907.

    The Schiller Hound has been traditionally used as a sniffing dog, although some describe it as a hunting dog. The breed is known for both its speed and superior olfactory ability; able to quickly track its prey and then howl loudly when its master approaches, alerting of its position. It is a hardy dog ​​that can tolerate cold Swedish winters well.. Often, work individually rather than in a pack and typically hunt rabbits and foxes. Even today, many dogs still work as hunters, although they are equally good household pets.

    Photos: Schiller Hound during International show of dogs in Katowice – Spodek, Poland by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Physical characteristics

    The conformation of Schiller Hound it's that of an athletic dog, and with his well-muscled body and strong limbs, you are clearly well suited to your job role. Its head is relatively small but long and has a well defined stop. The bridge of your nose should be straight and the nose itself is black with wide nostrils. His dark brown eyes are bright and alert, set deep in your face. Its medium-sized, high-set ears hang close to its face and do not extend beyond its lower jaw. Its long and thin limbs are parallel and are surely one of the main reasons for its impressive speed; giving them a very long stride. Their body is rectangular in shape and they have a deep chest with a robust and solid back.. Its long, tapered tail should not be carried too high in the exhibition ring..

    The Schillerstövare's shiny, straight coat fits perfectly against its skin. The top coat is actually quite tough, although the shorter fur on his face and ears is softer to the touch. Predominantly tan in color, the coat also has a prominent black coat. Only small white spots are allowed on the coat. Their fur is expertly designed to protect them in icy weather conditions.

    The Schiller Hound It is a medium to large sized hound for hunting fox and hare, what does it measure 53-61 cm to the withers and weighs 18-25 kg . The coat is rough and not too short, and it's close to the body.

    Character and skills

    These vivacious dogs live life to the fullest and are a pleasure to be around. Always alert, need a lot of attention and crave human company. The Schiller Hound they will form a close bond with their family, and although they tolerate children well, require supervision when with younger children, as they can be quite disruptive.

    The Schiller Hound are normally kept indoors and can be calm and polite housemates, although they can bark melodiously at times. The watchful nature of this dog means that it will always alert its owner to any unannounced guests., However, they are not territorial enough to be used as guard dogs. This dog's distrust of new people can be a problem, although this can usually be overcome by early and thorough socialization.

    Although it is not conventionally worked in packs of dogs, the Schiller Hound can socialize well with other dogs if given the opportunity. Of course, smaller animals are not safe in your company and are likely to be viewed as little more than prey.

    Health

    Most members of the breed live into adolescence and tend to enjoy good health.. There are a couple of conditions to consider when it comes to Schiller Hound:

    Hip Dysplasia

    Malformed hips result in an uneven gait, lifelong muscle loss and discomfort. Affected canines are treated with a variety of therapies, including physiotherapy, hydrotherapy and pharmaceutical pain relief. Prudent screening programs in adult dogs of breeding age can help reduce the overall incidence in the population. If a dog of breeding age scores low on the hip, must be neutered and removed from the kennel.

    Ear infections

    The floppy ears of hunting dogs are a magnet for infection as they create moist environments within the ear canal for bacteria and yeast to thrive.. Keeping your ears clear and dry can reduce the potential for infection. If wax builds up, an ear cleaner should be used. Infections should not be allowed to become infected and should be treated as soon as they are noticed. Chronic and whiny infections can pose a real challenge to healing and make the dog very uncomfortable and unhappy while they persist.

    Characteristics "Schiller Hound"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Schiller Hound" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images "Schiller Hound"

    photos:

    1 – A female Schiller Hound by Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – A female Schiller Hound by Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – Schiller Hound (Schiller's wanted poster) International Dog Show in Katowice 28 – 30. 03.2008 by Lilly Mreal name: Małgorzata Miłaszewska, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – Schiller Hound during dogs show in Katowice, Poland by Lilly M, CC BY-SA 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons
    5 – “Schiller Hound” by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/cachorro-hound-schillerst%C3%B6vare-837998/
    6 – Schiller Hound (Schiller's wanted poster) International Dog Show in Katowice 28 – 30. 03.2008 by Lilly Mreal name: Małgorzata Miłaszewska, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Videos "Schiller Hound"

    Schillerstøveren Cora jager hare som unghund.
    Uttak på hare med Schillerstøveren Tilda

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.


    FCI breed standard "Schiller Hound"

    FCIFCI - Schiller Hound
    Hound

    Alternative names:

      1. Schiller Bracke, Schillerstövare (English).
      2. Schillerstövare (French).
      3. Schiller-Bracke, Schillerstövare (German).
      4. Schillerstövare (Portuguese).
      5. Schillerstövare (Spanish).

    Finnish Hound
    Finlandia FCI 51 - Medium-sized Hounds.

    Finnish Hound

    The Finnish Hound he is friendly, calm and never aggressive. He is energetic in hunting and is a versatile tracker.

    Content

    History

    As its name implies, the Finnish Hound It is a breed of dog native to Finland. His story is the same as that of many other hounds, as it was developed in response to the need for a hunting dog perfectly adapted to its environment.

    It is the result of a breeding program started in the early 19th century by various breeders who used the English Foxhound and several hounds, as well as French and German hunting dogs. The aim of these crosses was to create an animal capable of withstanding the extreme temperatures of Finnish winters, with excellent resistance in mountainous terrain, a trumpet bark to alert hunters and a particularly developed sense of smell that would allow it to excel at tracking hares and foxes. This breeding program was a success, and the bitch he gave birth to, call Suomenajokoira, quickly gained popularity thanks to his admirable hunting skills and friendly temperament.

    When it was founded Suomen Kennelliitto, Finland's leading dog organization, in 1889, his first initiative was to develop a standardized hound breed from Finland. Many breeders came forward to try to get their production recognized as the standard to follow. Three dogs were selected in the organization's first dog show in 1891, and eight more were added the following year. The first breed standard of Finnish Hound It was established in 1893 based on these individuals. It was decided, among other things, accept only fawn as coat color. However, this color did not completely stabilize, and the individuals of successive litters very often had coats of other colors, like black and white. This forced the Kennelliitto to also recognize a tricolor coat (Griffon, black and white) early twentieth century, which finally became the norm. The standard evolved again in small touches later, but in its main lines it has remained the same since 1932.

    The Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) recognized the breed in 1954, but it didn't have many emulators. For example, it wasn't until more than 40 years later, in 1996, that the United Kennel Club (UKC) he did the same. The other reference organization in the United States, the American Kennel Club (AKC), has not yet taken the step.

    In fact, just like the prestigious British Kennel Club or the Canadian Kennel Club (CCC), for example, most national organizations do not yet recognize the Finnish Hound.

    Outside Finland, the Finnish Hound remains totally unknown to the general public.

    On the other hand, the Finnish Hound is much more popular in his native Finland, to the point of appearing in the Top 10 of the most common breeds in the country, which makes it the most widespread national breed. However, with about 1.000 births per year registered in Suomen Kennelliitto, has been in free fall for several decades. In fact, at the dawn of the 21st century the number was more than 2500, and at the end of the 90 even exceeded 4000. This sharp decline is due to increasing urbanization and the decline in hunting activities.

    The same development can be found in the other Scandinavian countries that have adopted the Finnish Hound, namely, Sweden and Norway. In the first, the number of births registered each year in the Svenska Kennelklubben is now within 400, compared with more than double at the end of the 1990. The number of births registered in the Svenska Kennelklubben is now little more than 150 by year, compared to more than triple that number in the late 1990s.

    The Finnish Hound still commonly used as a hunting dog in Finland, Sweden and Norway, but they are practically unknown outside the Scandinavian region.

    Photo: Finnish Hound by RemoteFly, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Physical characteristics “Finnish Hound”

    Athletic, resistant and strong, the Finnish Hound he has a robust and muscular silhouette and a medium size. His body is rectangular, with a deep chest and well sprung ribs. The tail is carried low; is wide at the base and tapers to a point at the end.

    The head is well proportioned in relation to the body and slightly domed. A characteristic detail of the breed is the upper lip, that falls to the sides of the mouth forming an N-shaped curve when viewed from the front. His eyes are dark brown with a calm expression. The ears are large, plan, falls and not very long.

    The Finnish Hound have a double coat consisting of a short undercoat, dense and smooth in texture and a medium length top coat, straight and quite hard. The coat is tricolor, mixing black, fawn and white. Specifically, the fur is black, while the head, the outer parts of the legs and shoulders are tawny. At the same time, white markings are generally present on the muzzle, the neck, the chest, the belly, the feet and the tip of the tail.

    Last but not least, sexual dimorphism is only slightly marked in this breed, since the females are on average barely 3 cm smaller than males.

    Character and skills “Finnish Hound”

    The Finnish Hound it is above all a true working dog with a highly developed predatory instinct and a strong character.

    Decades of independent hunting have caused them to be stubborn and stubborn. For this reason, not recommended for a novice teacher: only an experienced and firm owner can establish and maintain the appropriate level of authority to elicit acceptable behavior from him.

    This does not detract from its formidable hunting qualities., an activity in which he is alert, energetic and durable. It is mainly used to hunt hare, fox and sometimes wildcat. Regardless of weather and terrain, is always there and never spares his efforts, able to follow a trail for hours in terrible weather conditions – aided by his highly developed sense of smell. He is also a very vocal hunting dog., appreciated for its characteristic barking, who plays a key role in allowing his master to follow him even when he is out of sight, and to alert of the presence of hunting.

    To counteract your boundless energy while hunting, the Finnish Hound is generally calm and friendly during rest periods, especially when they are at home.

    Once trained and socialized, the Finnish Hound blends surprisingly well into family life. They are known to be very affectionate and are constantly in search of human companionship., forming extremely close ties with their owners. He is also a dog that loves children. However, they must be taught to interact with him appropriately and to respect him, since they may not appreciate being mistreated. In any case, a young child should never be left alone with a dog, regardless of race.

    His good relationships with humans are not limited to his family circle. He is usually very nice to strangers. In other words, though his thunderous barks might suggest he's a good watchdog, this is not the case at all.

    The Finnish Hound is also sociable with other hounds, especially if they have been well socialized from a young age. Therefore, it is perfectly conceivable to adopt a second dog to keep him company.

    This is all the more true since his closeness to his masters easily makes him suffer from separation anxiety when left alone for too long., since it needs a lot of attention. The presence of a small playmate can help alleviate the problem.

    In any case, it must not be a cat, rodent, bird or any other small animal. In fact, even if you are used to being around him, it is clear that I would not be safe in their presence, because the predatory instincts of the Finnish Hound they can take control at any time. In addition, it is recommended to always keep it on a leash during your daily walks, to prevent him from rushing in pursuit of small animals that would pass.

    The Finnish Hound it is very resistant and extremely active, so you need a lot of exercise every day. In the days when you used to hunt, your tracking activity should be an appropriate amount of exercise. The rest of the time, need at least one hour of vigorous exercise a day: run, long walks, etc.

    Keeping an active mind is also very important, so it is advisable to train him regularly to follow the tracks or play ball. This helps maintain your mental well-being., in addition to your physical health.

    To be happy, the Finnish Hound needs constant access to a sufficiently large outdoor space in which to run freely. It is essential that the area is fenced in to prevent the Finnish Hound chase the surrounding animals. Not suitable for a small house without a garden or in an apartment. Wherever i live, his hunting nature causes him to bark a lot and can be a source of tension with potential neighbors.

    Education “Finnish Hound”

    The Finnish Hound he's smart and energetic, but it's a difficult breed to train. Accustomed since its creation to hunt alone, over time has developed a strong character, independent and stubborn. He needs to have in front of him a master who is at least as determined, namely, experienced, able to show your dog that he makes up his mind and to keep a firm hand in his education throughout his life. Therefore, not recommended for a beginning teacher, over the one who would soon win the hand. In addition, if it is important that the rules are clear and defined from the beginning by the master, it is equally important that they are constant over time and consistent from person to person, namely, that all members of the house enforce them to the letter.

    The Finnish Hound it's hard to handle, but it shows real sensitivity, as evidenced by his closeness to his family. Therefore, punishments can affect you emotionally; it is preferable to take a positive approach to educate him, using positive reinforcement techniques and therefore the use of rewards: candies, petting, stimuli…

    In any case, hunting practice and the ability to follow a trail require very little training, since they are things that he knows how to do instinctively.

    However, is strongly inclined to want to use his hunting skills in circumstances that do not lend themselves to it, for example, rushing potential small prey on walks. Teaching your dog to remember is therefore of particular importance with the Finnish Hound. However, this can be difficult, because once he's thrown on a track, can be very reluctant to abandon it, completely ignoring the orders of its owner. Feel free to begin and perfect your workout in a secure, enclosed space such as your home or garden before attempting outdoor exercise..

    In addition, It must be remembered that this breed has been encouraged from its beginnings to bark frequently and loudly. If it's not meant to be used for hunting, it is possible to try to teach your dog to refrain from barking. However, although the latter can be reduced through specific training started at a very early age, it is impossible to hunt completely naturally, namely, make them disappear completely.

    At last, like any dog, benefits from being socialized from their first months, to become a balanced adult who knows how to be among humans. In addition to confronting him with a wide range of situations and stimuli (noises, smells, etc.), it should be introduced without delay to the people you will meet later in life (family, friends, neighbors, veterinary, etc.), as well as getting used to crossing all kinds of humans, congeners and representatives of other species. Given their hunting instinct, this last point is not unimportant: the more accustomed you are to the presence of other animals, less likely to hunt them later.

    Health “Finnish Hound”

    The Finnish Hound is generally robust and healthy.

    Its dense coat provides excellent protection against cold and weather, but also against the heat. Although they need shade or even air conditioning in hot weather, the Finnish Hound is generally able to adapt to almost any climate.

    The main health problems the breed is most prone to are:

    • Ataxia cerebelosa, generally hereditary, which affects coordination of movements and prevents affected puppies from moving. Then it is necessary to euthanize them;

    Certain heart diseases:

    • Valvular disease, heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) and cardiomyopathy;
    • Lymphoma, a type of cancer that affects lymphocytes, white blood cells that help the immune system fight infection. Symptoms depend on the location and stage, but the most common are lack of appetite, weight loss, general weakness and lethargy, and enlarged lymph nodes in the neck. Treatment with chemotherapy and radiation therapy is usually started, but relapses are common;
    • Hip and elbow dysplasia, orthopedic conditions marked by a hereditary predisposition, where the bones don't fit well. This leads to movement difficulties (limp, etc.);
    • Ear infections (ear infections, etc.), favored by the drooping shape of their ears;
    • Black hair follicular dysplasia, a rare dermatological condition that causes black hair loss in the first weeks of a puppy's life, to the point that it usually disappears before their first birthday. It does not usually affect the health of the dog, but it can irritate the skin and make it susceptible to infection;
    • Atopic dermatitis, an inflammatory skin condition caused by an allergy. It usually has a genetic cause and is manifested by itching, systematic scratching and licking of the paws, armpits and face.

    In addition, an individual used for hunting is also more exposed to the risk of injury, parasites, thorns… It is highly recommended to check it every time you return home, to make sure everything is okay.

    Adopting a breeder Finnish Hound serious and responsible (breed club member for example) normally allows the best guarantees regarding the present and future good health of the animal. Must be able to present a certificate of good health established by a veterinarian, the history of the vaccines administered and the results of the genetic tests carried out on the parents and / or the puppy in relation to diseases that may have a hereditary dimension.

    In addition, as with all dogs, must be taken at least once a year to a veterinarian for a complete health check. This will ensure that you stay up-to-date on your vaccinations and can lead to early detection of any problems.. At the same time, it is important to make sure that you renew your deworming treatments whenever necessary. This is even more important since you spend a lot of time outdoors..

    Use of “Finnish Hound”

    The Finnish Hound is a renowned hunting dog in his homeland, where has always been, and it still being, used to hunt rabbits, foxes, wildcats and sometimes even moose. They prefer to work alone and are particularly good at following tracks in the air or on the ground., barking loudly.

    Although the main purpose of breeding this breed has never been to make a pet, fits surprisingly well into family life and can sometimes be kept just for that purpose. However, only suitable for an experienced teacher, who lives in a house with a large garden, often present, and able to meet your high physical activity needs.

    Last but not least, the Finnish Hound is loyal, Gentile, loving and affectionate with their owners: all the qualities that can make him a good psychological support dog for his owners. Their sensitivity and close bond with their owners allows them to react intuitively to their owners' emotions and offer them comfort when they notice something is wrong..

    Buy “Finnish Hound”

    In finland, the purchase price of a puppy of Finnish Hound it is usually between 600 and 800 EUR. The amount charged depends on the prestige of the calf, the lineage from which the animal descends, as well as its intrinsic characteristics, especially physical, so there may be price differences within the same litter.

    As the breed is very difficult to find outside of Scandinavia, importing from abroad is often the only option. In this case, transportation and administrative costs are added to the purchase price, not to mention the cost of possible registration in the national registry of the adopted country. In addition, It is important, of course, ensure that the regulations for importing a dog from abroad are followed.

    Characteristics "Finnish Hound"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Finnish Hound" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images "Finnish Hound"

    Finnish Hound

    Finnish Hound

    Photos:

    1 – Finnish hound by https://pixabay.com/fi/photos/koira-n%C3%A4lk%C3%A4-pelko-vihainen-5317972/
    2 – Finnish hound by https://www.hankikoira.fi/koirarodut/suomenajokoira

    Videos "Finnish Hound"

    Suomenajokoira ajaa kettua

    Finnish Hound / Finnish Hound

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.


    FCI breed standard "Finnish Hound"

    FCIFCI - Finnish Hound
    Hound

    Alternative names:

      1. Finnish Bracke (English).
      2. Chien courant finnois (French).
      3. (Suomenajokoira, Finnenbracke, Finsk Stövare) (German).
      4. (em finlandês: Suomenajokoira) (Portuguese).
      5. (en finlandés: Suomenajokoira) (Spanish).

    Slovakian Hound
    Eslovaquia FCI 244 - Medium-sized Hounds

    Slovakian Hound

    The Slovakian Hound stands out for its extraordinary sense of direction, which is considered the best among the canine breeds.

    Content

    History

    It has remote and completely unknown origins: its official recognition dates back to after World War II, but the race already existed for centuries.

    While there are no historical records, The Slovenský Kopov is widely believed to have existed in central Europe for many hundreds of years and to have descended from other local breeds, including the Austrian Black and Tan Hound and the Polish Hound.

    Not widely kept for any purpose other than hunting, the Slovakian Hound He has honed his hunting skills over the centuries and is respected within Slovakia for his tracking ability and endurance. Despite its proven track record in the field, rarely seen internationally. curiously, when seen internationally, sometimes it is called “Black Forest Dog”, a completely wrong name, since the Slovakian Hound it's not now, and has never been, native to the Black Forest region.

    Like many other breeds of dogs of the time, the population of the Slovakian Hound decreased dramatically during the World Wars period. It is attributed to a Slovak named Koloman Snail having brought the race from the brink of extinction at this time, by establishing successful breeding programs nationwide.

    Officially accepted as a breed in the decade of 1870, the first club of the breed Slovakian Hound was recently formed in 1988, in the capital of Bratislava. The Slovakian Hound it is so popular in its birthplace that it has been named the national breed of Slovakia.

    Photo: Slovakian Hound during dog’s show in Racibórz,Poland by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Physical characteristics

    Always black with fire marks, the Slovakian Hound have solid bones despite their fairly slight stature. The body is in the shape of an elongated rectangle. His eyes reflect vivacity and courage. They are dark and almond-shaped. The ears are of medium length, rounded at the tip and falls flat against the head. This dog is notable for its constancy in following a cool trail or trail for hours, giving the voice without hesitation. They are also distinguished by their bite, so they are used in their native country to hunt wild boars and other carnivores.

    He is endowed with a lively temperament. Your sense of direction is extraordinarily well developed.

    Hair is 2-5 cm long, medium thick, well lying, dense. Longer in the back, neck and tail. The undercoat is dense, especially during the winter months; However, it should not be absent in summer either.

    SIZE AND WEIGHT :

    Males 45-50 cm.

    Females 40-45 cm.

    Weight: 15-20 kg

    Character and skills

    This determined hunter must be tenacious when on the road and courageous when facing the animals he hunts., like wild boar and deer. They have excellent olfactory abilities and will painstakingly trace a scent back to the source. An independent animal who is happy to work with minimal human interaction, the Slovakian Hound need little direction. Despite this, they are obedient, and they will happily follow their master's plans when necessary.

    The Slovakian Hound it's a good watchdog, as he is continuously alert and observant. This, along with the fact that they become devoted to their owners, means they are often protective, and can be used successfully as watchdogs, becoming potentially aggressive if the situation calls for it. Barking can be a problem and is a common complaint of many owners. Excessive barking can be prevented by ensuring that the Slovakian Hound are not insufficiently exercised and have lots of activities and jobs to fill your day.

    Health

    The Slovakian Hound it is a very resistant dog. In the country of origin the owner has a dog, rarely from, who does not live in a kennel but in contact with the master from morning to night, often used as a general purpose dog, taking care of the house as well as the livestock, and of course hunting. It is adapted to outdoor life and has an iron constitution.

    Care and maintenance

    The Slovakian Hound it is a very resistant dog, no particular grooming problems. Short hair, when he comes back from hunting he will be the happiest in the world if you give him the necessary brushstroke for a superficial cleaning at the level of the spikes, caught between the pads, ticks possibly not yet hooked.

    He will quickly get used to coming to you for this cleaning because he is looking for contact with his master.

    Qualities

    It's a farm dog, the quintessential farm dog. Bad guys just do that. The good ones are able to give the voice, to take the lead by yelling or barking directly at any stranger before coming into view. A good Slovakian Hound should give voice instantly. Not after ten minutes (Although, depending on the conditions…). The smell of Slovakian Hound it's excellent, as fine as that of the best Hounds, but his hunting style leads him to voice only in the moment, and of course staring.

    The Slovakian Hound is a search engine, a hunting finder. Hunting instinct is among the best hounds, really very developed, out of the ordinary as in some Warren hound and some representatives of primitive races.

    Farm dog, you don't need to see the animal, the wild boar to bark after, like some pointing dogs that only bark at sight, or to the noise. With experience, depending on the origins, will start barking after turning around to make sure the animal is ten meters away, or more. Once you have fired the bark it will zoom in pretty quickly, but always with care, always staying safe. The Slovakian Hound is not a brave and daring specialist like some races of German Hunting Terrier or pointing dogs, who are inevitably injured frequently. With the, used in its specificity, theoretically, no need for a boar vest, because he knows how to handle attacks. Some are never hurt, if used properly, alone or as a couple.

    The Slovakian Hound it is a dog that is easy to start with the boar. Because it's in their nature, to bark, and the only animal that does not flee automatically but goes to meet is the wild boar. If you are used to hunting in hunts where wild boars are rare but deer are numerous, you will enjoy easily guiding your animals for half an hour or more, but as soon as you notice that there is a wild boar in the area, will leave this animal too elusive to go and do what it was designed to do.

    A good Slovakian Hound, alone or as a couple, rarely caught by a wild boar. Otherwise, in dog teams he becomes a vulnerable dog like any other because his passion is terrible, and there, better equip it with a vest…

    Characteristics "Slovakian Hound"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Slovakian Hound" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images "Slovakian Hound"

    Photos:

    1 – SLOVENSKÝ KOPOV Rantafejs Cezary Av Fileddy MyDOG, Nordens största hundevenemang: www.mydog.se by Swedish Fair from Sweden, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – A female Slovakian Hound. by Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – Slovakian Hound during dog’s show in Racibórz,Poland by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – Slovakian Hound during dog’s show in Racibórz,Poland by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    5 – Slovakian Hound during dogs show in Katowice, Poland by Lilly M, CC BY-SA 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons
    6 – Chien courant slovaque sur fond blanc by Desaix83, from the work of Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Videos "Slovakian Hound"

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds


    FCI breed standard "Slovakian Hound"

    FCIFCI - Slovakian Hound
    Hound

    Alternative names:

      1. Black Forest Hound, Slovak Hound (English).
      2. (slovenský kopov en slovaque) (French).
      3. Slowakische Schwarzwildbracke (German).
      4. Cão da floresta (Portuguese).
      5. Cazador eslovaco (Spanish).

    Schwyz Hound
    Suiza FCI 59 . Medium-sized Hounds

    Schwyz Hound

    The Schwyz Hound they are a very lively and energetic breed that requires a significant amount of daily exercise.

    Content

    History

    The Schwyz Hound has ancient origins, the details are a bit confusing though. Dogs of this type are represented in mosaics dating from the Roman Helvetian era and the first specimens of the breed were highly sought after in Italy during the 15th century and then by the French during the 18th century..

    It is believed that the Schwyz Hound was influenced by the French Hounds brought to Switzerland by traveling mercenaries and eventually became one of the five varieties of “Swiss Hound”. More specifically, the Schwyz Hound it is one of the four breeds sometimes referred to – the other varieties are:

    The first breed standard for the Schwyz Hound was established in 1882 and reviewed in 1909. The breed was accepted by the FCI under the name of Schweizer Laufhund in 2001.

    Physical characteristics

    It is a dog with medium height at the withers. Your body structure indicates strength and tenacity. Its slim head with long snout and long ears give it an expression of nobility.

    Size: Males: 49-59 cm.. Females: 47-57 cm..

    Color: White with orange spots or orange "saddle" shape, sometimes with orange splashes; an orange coat is allowed.

    Character and skills

    The Schwyz Hound it is a friendly breed that can do well in a family environment as long as its exercise requirements are consistent. These dogs get along well with other dogs and can also be gentle with children. Just be careful around cats and other household pets because these dogs have strong hunting instincts – raising pets together and working on early socialization will help. You should also make sure your dog gets plenty of mental and physical exercise to avoid the kind of boredom that can lead to destructive behavior.

    The Schwyz Hound they are a very lively and energetic breed that requires a significant amount of daily exercise. These dogs need at least an hour of moderate to vigorous exercise each day and will also appreciate having time to run around in a fenced yard. This breed can also be a good candidate for dog sports, if you are looking for opportunities to get you some additional exercise.

    Training

    The Schwyz Hound has strong hunting instincts that can be developed and controlled through training. These dogs are trained to hunt in packs, so they are a bit independent by nature and can be stubborn at times. Keeping your training sessions short and offering plenty of food rewards will help ensure training success., in addition you must maintain a firm and consistent hand in leadership with this breed. Early socialization is also important for this breed.

    Characteristics "Schwyz Hound"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Schwyz Hound" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos "Schwyz Hound"

    Willie de Schwyzer Laufhund 2
    Willie de Schwyzer Laufhund

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds


    FCI breed standard "Schwyz Hound"

    FCIFCI - Schwyz Hound
    Hound

    Varieties of “Swiss hounds”

    The four varieties of Swiss Hounds have their own specific hunting characteristics:

    – The Bernese Hound, with her beautiful throat (“the howler of the Jura”), demanding, mainly used for hares;
    – The “Jura Hound“, an excellent recuperator
    – The Lucerne Hound, reminiscent of Small Blue Gascony, he is an active and passionate dog that hunts deer very well;
    – The “Schwyz Hound”, less widespread outside of Switzerland, is reserved for rabbits and hares.

    Lucerne Hound
    Suiza FCI 59 . Medium-sized Hounds

    Lucerne Hound

    The Lucerne Hound is a lively dog, but gentle and docile. Very attached to his master.

    Content

    History

    The breed was originally bred in the Lucerne area, Switzerland. Already in appearance it is closely related to the dog Bloodhound. It can be assumed that the Small Blue Gascony may also have played a role in the development of the breed: Striking colored coat with speckled pattern suggests this. It is one of the four Swiss Hounds, that have been combined by the FCI under a single breed standard, but they are judged separately in the exhibitions. The other varieties of the breed are:

    Physical characteristics

    Height at the withers up to 59 cm..
    The ears are far back, very large, heavy, bent and turned.
    Hair: Short, thick and thick, Fox fur
    color: blue, of a combination of black and white hairs, very mottled, with black spots or a black chair.

    Character and skills

    The Lucerne Hound is a lively dog, but gentle and docile. Very attached to his master.

    Like all dogs Swiss hounds, this breed is also relatively small. This is partly due to the fact that environmental conditions in the mountains, where were these dogs born, they are extremely hard, so animals with low energy requirements survived better than larger dogs. The Lucerne Hound used for a wide variety of hunting, from wild boars to deer and hares. Although the dense coat protects the dog from the cold and likes to live outdoors, look for comfort; therefore he feels comfortable in the city, but needs a lot of activity and enough exercise. There is an almost identical breed with shorter legs – the Small Lucerne Hound, one of the varieties of Small swiss hound. It is suitable as a working dog, hunting and company.

    Characteristics "Lucerne Hound"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Lucerne Hound" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos "Lucerne Hound"

    chiens courant lucernois entrainement 2
    chiens courant lucernois entrainement 1

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds


    FCI breed standard "Lucerne Hound"

    FCIFCI - Lucerne Hound
    Hound

    Alternative names:

      1. Lucerne Hound (English).
      2. Courant lucernois (French).
      3. Blausprenkel (German).
      4. Sabujo Lucerna (Portuguese).
      5. Perro sabueso suizo de Lucerna (Spanish).

    Varieties of “Swiss hounds”

    The four varieties of Swiss Hounds have their own specific hunting characteristics:

    – The Bernese Hound, with her beautiful throat (“the howler of the Jura”), demanding, mainly used for hares;
    – The “Jura Hound“, an excellent recuperator
    – The “Lucerne Hound”, reminiscent of Small Blue Gascony, he is an active and passionate dog that hunts deer very well;
    – The Schwyz Hound, less widespread outside of Switzerland, is reserved for rabbits and hares.