Japanese Spitz
Japón FCI 262 - Asian Spitz and related breeds

Japanese Spitz

The Japanese Spitz he is a very people-oriented dog.

Content

History

The strong similarity to the Mittelspitz (Standard or Medium Spitz) German allows us to suppose that the Japanese spitz descends from this same race. Other cynologists assume that the Spitz descends from the Nordic Spitz. One thing is for sure: the origin of Japanese spitz not in japan, but in Europe. From there he arrived in Japan at the beginning of the 20th century together with the travelers.

The attractive white dog with the charming character quickly gained popularity among the Japanese population. With more caps from China, Canada and the US, he established his own breeding in Japan in the years 20. While in Europe an attempt was made to increase the size of the lace, thus creating the German Spitz, the Japanese tended to opt for the more original compact form. In 1948 the Japanese Kennel Club established a first breed standard for the first time. Japan was designated as the country of origin in the standard. The FCI, that has officially recognized the Japanese spitz from 1964, includes it today in the Group 5 (Spitz and dogs of the original type), as well as in the Subsection 5 (Asian Spitz and related breeds), under Standard No. 262.

In his native Japan, the Japanese spitz it was very popular for a long time, especially in the years 50 the last century. Although it is still more common there in terms of numbers than in Europe, the demand of the little companion is gradually changing. While in Japan the number of recently registered cubs is decreasing, is increasing in North America and Europe.

Physical characteristics “Japanese Spitz”

This breed is distinguished by the fact that it is exclusively pure white.. Thanks to his straight and dense hair, the Japanese Spitz seems strong. What is no less important, it is also caused by the swollen inner layer. The beautiful ruffle on the shoulder, neck and sill contributes to attractive appearance. Typical of the tail is a long and voluminous flag.

Despite her short legs, the Japanese Spitz is sporty and extremely agile. Due to its balanced proportions, the appearance of this compact pedigree dog is both striking and harmonious.

The height at the cross – the elevated transition from neck to back – tends to be of 30 to 38 cm in adult males. Females reach a somewhat smaller size. The Japanese Spitz weighs between 4,5 and 11 kg.

Character and skills “Japanese Spitz”

The well balanced nature of the Japanese Spitz fits the very harmonious appearance. He is an attentive guard. Anyone who approaches him is not immediately signaled with a savage bark. Only when the Japanese pedigree dog feels a serious threat, gets loud and fights back vehemently.

At home, the Japanese Spitz behaves quite calmly. Abroad, on the other hand, he likes to show the energy he has inside of him. To enjoy the Japanese Spitz, you must like a little dog who likes to play. You should also have fun on long trips with your four-legged friend.

The Japanese Spitz he is a very people-oriented dog. Whether it belongs to one person or has a master or caregiver at the same time, he does not care. He also likes to live with the family. People's company is the priority. Pets or other pets are not enough. Although the Japanese spitz usually get along with them. So if you have little time for a dog, a Japanese Spitz probably not the right thing for you.

The white puppy enjoys the company of people and would like to be with them always and everywhere. He is very receptive and eager to learn. Which makes education in combination with devotion quite easy even for untrained dog owners.

An apartment in the city is suitable for him, as long as you are well occupied with extensive walks and activities.

Care “Japanese Spitz”

Despite the hereditary predisposition to many diseases, Many of the ailments can be avoided by taking proper care of your Spitz. Dental problems in particular can be prevented through regular dental care, namely, brush your teeth at least once a week, or better daily. Diseases or inflammations of the eyes, nose, the ears and claws can also be detected and treated at an early stage with proper care and regular check-ups. Another important aspect of grooming is the care of the coat of the Japanese spitz. Despite the impressive and luxurious fur, This is not very elaborate and therefore it is usually sufficient if the hair is combed or brushed thoroughly twice a week. Only in the coat change phase (twice a year) grooming effort increases until daily styling.

Japanese Spitz health

An indication of good and serious parenting is the presentation of genetic test results.. The farm animals used must have an impeccable genetic makeup to exclude genetic diseases from the outset. Dogs in which hereditary diseases typical of the breed have occurred should be excluded from breeding for the sake of the breed's health. This also includes the tendency to dislocate the patella (kneecap slipping out of its guide), which can also be inherited in many dogs, especially in small dog breeds. Also eye problems, such as distichiasis or narrowing of the tear ducts, as well as dental problems can occur with the Japanese spitz. No other typical diseases of the breed are known.

The correct nutrition of the “Japanese Spitz”

In a special way, correct nutrition contributes to the health and well-being of the Japanese spitz. Small dogs with a very compact constitution have a strong tendency to be overweight. Too many pounds can easily lead to joint disease and heart and circulation problems.. Overweight dogs are also at higher risk for diabetes.

As the owner of a Japanese spitz, you should always keep the amounts recommended by food manufacturers. In addition, the dog should not be given too many treats between meals.

It is not only the quantity but also the quality of the food that is important. Besides vegetables or rice, good dog food consists largely of high-quality meat. Poor quality food often contains an excessive amount of cereals. Under no circumstances should it contain flavor enhancers or sweeteners.

Before buying, you should find out the exact composition of the dog food in the manufacturer's instructions. Several vendors offer good and safe dog food, both dry and wet.

It is not unusual for dog owners to prefer homemade dog food. This can also be an alternative to the ready-to-eat food available in stores for the Japanese spitz. However, it is essential that you acquire the necessary knowledge to cook balanced dog food yourself.

The diet BARF it is also a good way to feed Japanese spitz with a healthy diet. BARF means “Bone And Raw Food” (Bones and raw foods). All food components, like meat, fish, vegetables or fruit, they are only given raw. Various vendors and specialty stores facilitate BARF to the dog owner. Like cooking food, this feeding method requires a certain amount of knowledge about the correct use of raw ingredients.

You must feed a puppy of 3 to 5 times a day, an adult raw food and bones 2 times a day.

Buying a “Japanese Spitz”

Despite the growing popularity and demand in the European and American continent, the Japanese spitz still belongs to the rare dog breeds. The waiting period for a new litter in a breeder can be very long. Who doesn't necessarily care about a purebred puppy, but also consider buying a Spitz adult, should – parallel to the search for a breeder – also look around the animal shelter, where over and over again Spitz or the crosses of Spitz they are waiting for a new and loving home. A puppy, on the other hand, should only be purchased from a serious and certified breeder.

How do I recognize a serious breeder?

When choosing a suitable breeder, various factors play a role. It's not just “formalities” the ones that must be correct, namely, the papers, the pedigree and the sales contract, but also personal reasons that ultimately decide the purchase. The breeder must, first, be understanding with you, and this cannot be found out with a short email or a short phone call. One or better several meetings are necessary to get a complete picture of the breeder and his dogs.. Does the breeder invite you to his house? Will you willingly show your “dog pound” and the animals live in close contact with the breeder's family? The first weeks are very important for the socialization of the puppies and therefore the environment must correspond absolutely to the affectionate nature of the puppies. Japanese spitz. In addition, a serious breeder will be able to tell you a lot about the breed and its characteristics. They will also ask you about your life circumstances to make sure your puppy has fun with you..

Characteristics “Japanese Spitz”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Japanese Spitz” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Training ?

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitability of the apartment ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Can be alone all day ?

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitable as a first dog ?

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Weight gain ?

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Intelligence ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Kindness with child ?

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to bite ?

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to bark ?

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Tendency to flee ?

Rated 2 out of 5
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss force ?

Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Suitable as a guard dog ?

Rated 3 out of 5
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Joy ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat friendliness ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Power level ?

Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Images “Japanese Spitz”

Photos:

1 – Japanese spitz by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/1273902
2 – Japanese Spitz Siberia by 0894Leanne, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
3 – Japanese Spitz Puppy by [email protected], CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
4 – Japanese spitz by https://www.pikist.com/free-photo-sixhn
5 – Japanese spitz by https://www.pxfuel.com/en/free-photo-xghfb
6 – Japanese Spitz by Trev Grant, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
7 – Japanese spitz by HTTPS://www.pikrepo.com/fflza/japanese-spitz-near-wall

Videos “Japanese Spitz”

Kubo – Japanese Spitz Puppy – 2 Weeks Residential Dog Training
“Japanese Spitz” / Breed of dog

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 262
  • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
  • Section 5: Asiatic Spitz and related breeds. Without working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 5: Dogs type Spitz and primitive type – Section 5: Asian Spitz and related breeds.
  • ANKC – Group 7 (Non-Sporting)
  • CKC – Group 6 – Non-Sporting
  • ​KC – Utility
  • NZKC – Non-Sporting
  • UKC – Northern Breed Group

FCI standard of the Japanese Spitz breed

FCI Japanese Spitz FCI Japanese Spitz

Alternative names:

    1. Nihon Supittsu (English).
    2. Nihon Supittsu (French).
    3. Nihon Supittsu (Japan-Spitz), Japanischer Spitz (German).
    4. Nihon Supittsu (Portuguese).
    5. Nihon Supittsu (Spanish).

Japanese Terrier
Japón FCI 259 . Small sized Terriers.

Japanese Terrier

The Japanese Terrier it hardly enjoys diffusion and is practically to discover.

Content

History

In the middle of the Edo era, about 1700, a small dog appeared in Japan that looked a lot like the terrier type. It was the result of a cross between small Japanese dogs with English Fox Terrier Smooth, which was brought to the port of Nagasaki by Dutch sailors. At that time the port of Nagasaki was the only port open to western countries, especially the dutch. After several generations, some descendants of these dogs were bred as a type of Italian Greyhound.

Around 1900, al final de la era Meiji, some of the best of the aforementioned dogs were seen in the Kobe district and called “Terriers de Kobe”. His type was something between modern Fox Terrier Smooth and the modern Japanese Terrier. They were the first terriers to be bred in Japan. This “Kobe Terrier” and some of their ancestors were also called “Oyuki Terrier” and “Mikado Terrier” and it is said that they were lovingly cared for by locals and also by foreigners.

Around 1916 an ancestor of the Japanese Terrier in the Nada district, near Kobe, a so-called dog “KURO” (born in 1913 in Kobe), that means “black” in Japanese. This dog was a cross between a English toy terrier and Bull Terrier miniature, both imported from western countries. These pups were raised with dogs of the aforementioned Kobe Terrier. The result was a very short haired dog, thin and small of the Terrier type and was called Japanese Terrier (NIHON) since then. In those days, Osaka County's top breeders engaged in inbreeding and line breeding to consolidate appearance. Thanks to your efforts, the breed was firmly established in 1930.

In 1932 NIHON TERIA CLUB was founded under the presidency of Tamara KIKUJIRO. The Japanese Terrier it was ideal for city dog ​​breeders and became fashionable.

In 1940, where cities were built everywhere and with these cities grew the demand for a smaller and more active dog than the large guard dogs, the Japanese Terrier became very popular. However, in all its history, this breed was twice threatened with extinction. The first time, during WWII and again, about 1948, due to loss of popularity among the Japanese, since other western races were more fashionable.

Although the Japanese Terrier was recognized by the F.C.I. (Federation Cynologique Internationale) in 1964, this breed was practically unknown outside of Japan.

According to the documents, three basic lines of Japanese Terrier: “LANDMARK” (by Mr.. Nobuaki Shigematsu, Yamaguchi Prefecture), “APPLY” (by Mr.. Sumiko Amano, Hamamatsu City) and “TAMA TAKAHARA” (by Mr.. Jun Takahara, Such).

Around 1985, there was less than 50 bitches available for breeding throughout Japan. After the great efforts of some volunteers, who were aware of the need for immediate protection of the race, the number of dogs had reached about 400 breeding dogs after seven years.

Therefore, special mention must be made of the efforts of Mr.. Jun TAKAHARA, whose commitment made the Japanese Terrier was known beyond the borders of Japan.

The breed was not seen in European countries until 1991, when a couple of Japanese Terriers arrived in France at the request of Mrs.. Luisa González de Castejón. Their dog names were “Kuroyuri Maru de Tama Takahara” (male) and “Keshinome Brains de Tama Takahara” (female).

Another European breeder had also joined this adventure in the years 90: The Sr. Roberto Verde from Naples (Italy) he also owned three beautiful Japanese Terriers.

Time and time again there have been and still are some breeders who care for this breed, but unfortunately it was not possible to establish a stable population in Europe.

After 2 years of establishing contact with the Japanese breeder Mr.. Thoshihide OZAKI was able to import the FIRST Japanese Terrier the 4.11.2014 to AUSTRIA. “YODOGIMI de OZAKI FARM JP” Born 28.06.2014. This dog was registered with the Austrian Kennel Club (ÖHZB) con JAPT 1.

In order to create a breeding base, more dogs have been imported from Japan in recent years. In total 4 females were brought to Austria and two males (Ozaki Farm JP’s HIBIKI Swiss / 2017 & Ozaki Farm JP’s SHIN / 2018) were transferred to Switzerland. In 2017 the first Japanese Terrier.

Physical characteristics

It is a small dog, elegant in appearance, and a defined and compact configuration.

Shoulder height: 30 cm. – 33 cm.; Weight: a few 5 kg

Fur: Short (2mm) smooth, dense and glossy; the coat does not need any additional care;

Color: Head: Tricolor (fire and white); Body: Basic color white with small black or tan spots.

The breeders of the Japanese Terrier they are very demanding in terms of appearance and color markings, that are sometimes considered more important than your sports skills. The ideal colors and markings in a Japanese Terrier are the black, chocolate brown and beige: The head, ears and nose bone should be dark in color, black or chocolate brown. The muzzle to the nose and on each cheek and above each eye should be light brown. The lower jaw will be white. A clear “V” is visible on the neck. Occasionally there are also dark gray heads with light brown markings. However, this is considered to be the worst of the color variations. This is different with the deep black heads. This black color is allowed, because it reminds one of the old kobe dogs.

Character and skills

The Japanese Terrier not only is he a very intelligent puppy, but also mischievous and full of terrier temperament. Knowing him means loving him for his great sensitivity. Has a cheerful character and will participate in games with pleasure and joy. It is a one-man dog whose devotion flatters its owner. As an attentive house dog will warn of the approach of a stranger but without being aggressive. It is very easy to train and can learn all kinds of tricks. His greatest effort is to please his owner. As a sports partner he has great skills and innate instincts. Has an excellent sense of smell and good eyesight, but still has no hunting ambitions. It's never quarrelsome, She gets along well with other dogs, especially with his own race.

It is an independent puppy, whose characteristics make it a pleasant “partner”. It is suitable for young people, for both athletes and the young at heart. And one thing is especially important for the little terrier: snuggling with its owner.

Attitude: The Japanese Terrier it's a small dog, but still needs enough activity. It is the ideal companion for active people. Likes to learn and is therefore also suitable for mind games or dog sports that are suitable for small breeds.

It is a “perro faldero” in the positive sense. But that's only if you're tired of the many races!

With the kids:

The Japanese Terrier is very attached to his owners and enjoys a good snuggle. However, he is not a babysitter dog. As in all small dog breeds, small body size has advantages when traveling, but it becomes a disadvantage with – and I say it with affection – the clumsy hands of children. This means that when they have children, make sure children handle the dog with care. Offer the dog an area where he can retreat if he becomes too heavy for him. If this is observed, nothing stands in the way of positive cooperation.

Correct nutrition Japanese Terrier

Proper nutrition is extremely important to avoid diet-related diseases. It is important to have a balanced diet that suits your beloved. Due to its active nature, the Japanese Terrier has its own nutritional requirements. It is very agile, so you need to pay attention to a sufficient power supply.

High-quality whole foods are precisely tailored to your dog's nutritional needs. This ensures a supply of all the nutrients your dog needs.. High-quality prepared foods have the advantage that no feed additives are needed.

Terriers are often susceptible to allergies based on gluten-containing grains. In this case, you must ensure that the food contains other sources of carbohydrates. Rice or potatoes are a good alternative here. Food intolerance can lead to skin rashes, inflammation and digestive problems.

It is recommended to feed your terrier several times a day in small portions. After each feeding, a pause in digestion must be ensured. You should refrain from eating before planned sports activities.

Care Japanese Terrier

The coat of his Japanese Terrier it is extremely easy to care, since it only measures about 2 cm long. Don't lose much, but you will enjoy removing loose hairs with a silicone glove. Even dandruff can be removed and the blood circulation of the skin is stimulated.

Your terrier's hair doesn't grow too thick. Therefore, it is recommended to put on a coat during the cold months. If you stay outdoors for a longer period of time, protect your stomach and nose with sun milk.

When caring for your terrier's teeth, you should make sure not to feed him any food that contains sugar. These damage teeth, which in turn can lead to serious digestive problems.

The Japanese Terrier has a highly developed musculature, but its bone structure is quite fine. Therefore, the use of a dog harness is recommended instead of a collar. If you stay home alone for a while, chewing bones of an appropriate size can be used as a toy.

Images “Japanese Terrier”

Photos:

1 – At photo Amakakeru-Meiji White Oleander – Japanese Terrier on dogs show in Konopiska, Poland. The owner is Paweł Gąsiorski by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Pleple2000
2 – At photo Amakakeru-Meiji White Oleander – Japanese Terrier on dogs show in Konopiska, Poland. The owner is Paweł Gąsiorsk by Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA
3 – At photo Amakakeru-Meiji White Oleander – Japanese Terrier on dogs show in Konopiska, Poland. The owner is Paweł Gąsiorski by Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA
4 – At photo Amakakeru-Meiji White Oleander – Japanese Terrier on dogs show in Konopiska, Poland. The owner is Paweł Gąsiorski. by Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA
5 – A Japanese Terrier by Canarian / CC BY-SA
6 – Bernie Lindsey, my dog by Bernielindsey44 at en.wikipedia / Public domain
7 – At photo Amakakeru-Meiji White Oleander – Japanese Terrier. by Paweł Gąsiorski / CC BY-SA

Videos “Japanese Terrier”

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 259
  • Group 3: Terriers.
  • Section 2: Small-sized Terriers. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Terriers 2 Small sized Terriers.
    • Japan Kennel Club – Terriers
    • FCI Japanese Terrier Breed Standard

      JAPANESE TERRIER FCI JAPANESE TERRIER FCI

      Alternative names:

        1. Nippon Terrier, Nihon Teria, Nihon Terrier, Kobe Terrier, Mikado Terrier, Oyuki (snowy) Terrier (English).
        2. Nihon teria (French).
        3. Nippon-Terrier, Nishon-Terrier (German).
        4. nihon, nippon terrier (Portuguese).
        5. Nihon teria, Terrier Nipón, Terrier Japonés (Spanish).

    Cardigan Welsh Corgi
    Gales FCI 38 - Sheepdogs

    Corgi-Cardigan Welsh-de-

    Affectionately called the “Dog garden” in his native Wales, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is active, fun and very affectionate.

    Content

    History

    It is believed that the Cardigan Welsh Corgi It is the oldest of the two races Corgi. Although nobody knows for sure, their ancestors may have come to Wales with the ancient Celts who migrated from Central Europe. The dog we know today comes from the hills of Cardiganshire, that once they were filled with farms and valleys that were perfect for cattle breeding. His predecessors had cattle to market, their heels for cattle moved, and they deviated from the path if cattle drew back.

    Industrialization ended the usefulness of the Corgi on the farm, and people began to cross with other dogs herding breeds, including Collies and the first Pomeranian, which they were much larger than the current standard of Pomeranian. The crossing with Collie You may have thrown the blue merle color to the genetic background of the Cardigan.

    For a while, seemed that the Cardigan follow the way of the dinosaur because it was less popular than its cousin, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. At any given time, both they were considered the same race, but the Kennel Club separated in 1934, giving the cardigans better chance of surviving on their own.

    Physical characteristics

    The Cardigan Welsh Corgi It is best described as a Pembroke tailed, but it stands out from his cousin, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, in other respects. The Cardigan has larger, rounder ears and comes in a variety of colors, including tricolor (black and white, with tans or brindle points), blue merle, striped, marten and red. Most Cardis also have white markings on neck, the chest, paws and tail tip. They weigh between 11 and 17 Kg, which makes them a little larger than Pembroke.

    Although the Cardigan and Pembroke Welsh Corgi were developed in Wales, They have different ancestors: twin sons of different mothers, it could be said. The Cardigan, dog nicknamed the garden in his home county of Cardigan, shares ancestors with another long race, the Dachshund.

    Character and skills

    The fun Cardigan Welsh Corgi it's a classic herding dog: even, loyal and loving. His real goal in life is to spend time and please his people. Its moderate size and activity level make it adaptable to any type of home or family, and it is robust and tolerant of children and other pets. In fact, the company of another dog or cat is a great benefit to him.

    Cardigans may not seem athletes, but they are agile. You will be surprised how fast you can run a Corgi when chasing a ball or compete in agility trials. If you can deviate from the path of mad cow, certainly you can browse frames, tunnels, jumps and other obstacles. Cardi has a lot of resistance, You can even walk the trails, but also it conforms with a short walk or play on the playground.

    Start training your puppy the day you bring it home. Even at eight weeks old, He is able to absorb everything you can teach you. Do not wait until you have 6 months to start train or have to deal with more stubborn dog. If possible, Take it to the class of kindergarten for puppies when you have between 10 and 12 weeks, and socializes, socialice, socialice. However, Note that many kinds of training puppies require certain vaccinations (such as kennel cough) are a day, and many veterinarians recommend limited exposure to dogs and other public places until vaccines puppies (including rabies, distemper and parvovirus) They are completed. Instead of formal training, You can start training your puppy to socialize at home and among family and friends until immunizations are completed in the puppy.

    Of course, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi distrust strangers, thanks to its heritage grazing, so early socialization is important. To counter this trend, invite people to your house, to be used to receive regular visits.

    Health Cardigan Welsh Corgi

    The Cardigan Welsh Corgi they are a generally healthy breed, but they are susceptible to some health conditions, including intervertebral disc disease and eye problems such as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and cataracts.

    Veterinarians can not predict whether an animal will be free from these diseases, so it is important to find a reputable breeder and insist on seeing an independent certification that the parents of the dog have been examined for defects and considered healthy.

    Careful breeders their dogs examined for genetic diseases, and only raise better-looking specimens, but sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas and a puppy can develop one of these diseases. In the majority of cases, still you can live a good life, thanks to advances in veterinary medicine. And remember that you have the power to protect his Cardigan one of the most common health problems: the obesity. It keep a proper weight is a simple way to extend the life of its Cardi.

    Characteristics “Cardigan Welsh Corgi”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Cardigan Welsh Corgi” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images “Cardigan Welsh Corgi”

    credits:

    1 – FatFairfax / CC BY-SA
    2 – Wikimaster97commons / CC BY-SA
    3 – RdRnnr / CC BY-SA
    4 – Blue Merle Cardigan Welsh Corgi by WJ van den Eijkhof

    Videos “Cardigan Welsh Corgi”

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:Group 1 –> Herding dogs (except Swiss Cattle Dogs ) / Section 1 –> Sheepdogs. With working trial.
    • FCI 38
    • Federations: FCI , AKC , ANKC , CKC , ​KC , NZKC , UKC
    • FCI standard of Cardigan Welsh Corgi breed
    • WELSH CORGI (CARDIGAN) FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Cardigan, CWC, Cardi (English).
      2. Cardigan (French).
      3. Cardigan (German).
      4. Cardigan Welsh Corgi (Portuguese).
      5. Cardigan Welsh corgi, Cardi, Corgi (Spanish).

    Skye terrier
    Escocia FCI 75 .Small sized Terriers.

    Skye terrier

    The Skye It is a typical Terrier: tenacious hard with a propensity to bark and dig.

    Content

    History

    The Skye terrier it is one of the oldest Scottish breeds. The Skye was known as the Western Isles Terrier which comprised the Skye Terrier with a mixture of races like their ancestors, including prototypes of the Cairn Terrier.

    References to a terrier Scottish island of Skye back to long ago. In his book of the sixteenth century “Ingleses Dogs”, Johannes Caius wrote that the Skye Terrier was “out of the barbarous borders of the countries farthest north… what, because of the length of hair, does it look or face or body”. That certainly sounds like a description of profuse coat Skye.

    The dogs were bred to hunt and kill foxes, badgers and otters that threatened livestock farm or property damage caused. His long coat and his facial hair were meant to protect them from injuries and rainy weather typical of Scotland.

    Three centuries later, the Queen Victoria, dogs lover, he became interested in the race during one of his visits to Scotland, and dogs became fashionable pets noblewomen. It was said that even a duchess would be ashamed to show his face in the park without the company of a Skye. A portrait of Queen Victoria with one of his Skyes, Rona II, was painted by William Nicholson, and other Sykes appeared in paintings Sir Edwin Landseer.

    Under threat of extinction

    There is concern that the breed could disappear entirely, since during 2012 only 44 puppies were born in the UK. The particularly lowest period for this breed was in 2005, when they registered only 30 Puppies. Today this is the most threatened canine breed within the UK Kennel Club classification of Vulnerable Breeds3, and it is calculated that if we continue like this within 40 years the breed could go extinct.

    Did You Know?

    One of the best known and loved Skye Terrier It was Greyfriars Bobby, who faithfully he watched the grave of his owner, John Grey, during 14 years after the death of man. A statue honoring the loyalty of the dog is visited Edinburgh for dog lovers around the world.

    Physical characteristics

    The Skye terrier it's a long-bodied dog. Its length is twice its size with good length hair. It moves seemingly effortlessly. its members, body and jaws are strong. His head is long and powerful. It has a long body and under. The flat edges occur because the coat that falls straight.

    The mantle is double layer. The inner layer should consist of short hair, thick, soft and fleecy. The outer layer for reasonably long hair, hard, straight, flattened without curls that should never prevent movement. On the head the hair is shorter, softer and falls over his forehead eyes watching but not preventing vision. He meets the hair on the sides of the head, surrounding ears like a fringe allowing appreciate the way.

    Its color can be black, dark or light gray, Griffon, cream, all with black markings.
    Its ideal height is 25 – 26 cm..
    Length from tip of nose to tip of tail: 105 cm.. Females are slightly smaller in the same proportions.

    Health

    The Skye Terriers They may be affected by various medical conditions, including eye problems (as glaucoma and dislocation of the lens), hipotiriodismo, of von Willebrand disease (a disorder of blood clotting), allergies and ulcerative colitis.

    The “lameness of Skye” or “cojera dog” sometimes it occurs in puppies between 3 and 10 months of age. You can resolve without treatment, but some veterinarians suggest that activity is restricted. The Skye Terriers They can also undergo genetic forms of liver and kidney disease. The breeder of your puppy should be willing – in fact, anxious – to review health records of their dogs and discuss the prevalence of these and other health problems in their lines.

    Character and skills

    The Skye It is a classic Terrier: bold to, good, anything, friendly people who know, reserved and cautious with strangers. An old Scottish word, “clever”, It applies to him too. It is an intelligent dog and prudent people will consider carefully before deciding whether granted his affections. However, Once you are given, They are given lifetime.

    It may not seem like a great athlete at first sight, but Skye has resistance, strength and agility galore. You'll find it by participating in agility, obedience and tracking, but it is also a partner willing sofa. Two or three rides 15 minutes or day games meet your exercise needs, but he is willing to further game if you are. If your temperament permits, Skye can also be a therapy dog ​​cheerful, visiting people in facilities such as nursing homes and children's hospitals.

    Like all terrier, the Skye has a mind of its own, but learns well. Train this sensitive dog with loving firmness and enjoy their trust and respect will win.

    Ratings Skye terrier

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Skye terrier” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images “Skye terrier”/h2>

    Videos “Skye terrier”

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:Group 3 –> Terriers. / Section 2 –> Small sized Terriers. . Without working trial.
    • FCI 75
    • Federations: FCI , AKC , ANKC , CKC , ​KC , NZKC , UKC
    • FCI Estádar of Skye Terriers
    • SKYE TERRIER FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Skye (English).
      2. Skye (French).
      3. Skye (German).
      4. Skye (Portuguese).
      5. Skye (Spanish).

    Photos:

    1 – Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA
    2 – Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA
    3 – A Skye terrier at the 2019 Kelso Dog Show © Copyright Walter Baxter and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.
    4 – Skye Terrier, Gold Country Kennel Club Dog Show, Grass Valley by Larry Miller – Flicker

    Silky terrier australiano
    Australia FCI 236

    Australian Silky Terrier

    The Silky terrier australiano It is not appropriate to live with other smaller pets.

    Content

    History

    The Silky terrier australiano is a native of Australia dog, Although the types and ancestral breeds were of Great Britain. The ancestors of the Australian Silky Terrier include the Yorkshire Terrier (originating in England and Scotland before being considered) and the Aussie (It descends from brought type wire-haired Terrier of Great Britain to Australia century 19), but the records do not indicate whether early dogs were simply Terrier Australian born with silky fur, or if there was an attempt to create a breed apart.

    In accordance with the American Kennel Club, the race began at the end of the 19th century, being result of crosses between a Yorkshire Terrier and Aussie. At the beginning, "the race was known as"the Sydney silk”, that was mainly in the city of Sydney, Australia. Although most Australian breeds are listed as working dogs, Australian Silky Terrier, is considered to be, was raised - mainly- to be an urban pet and companion of the family, but also It is a breed known for killing snakes in Australia.

    Until 1929, the Australian Terrier, the Silky terrier australiano and the Yorkshire Terrier they were not clearly defined, in the same litter, could birth three dogs of breeds considered over time, different. According to the existing information, they were separated by the appearance in different types once they raised separately.

    After 1932 in Australia, miscegenation was tweaking, and in 1955 the name of the race officially became Australian Silky Terrier. The breed was recognized by the national canine Council of Australia, in 1958 in the Toy group.

    During and after World War II American soldiers who had been sent to Australia, return to United States, they brought several Australian Silky Terrier. Pictures in the newspapers of the time (1954), They show the soldiers, back home wearing their pets Australian Silky Terrier, and this caused a rise in popularity to the race, and Australian Silky Terrier hundreds were imported from Australia to the United States.

    The American Kennel Club He acknowledged the race as the Silky Terrier in 1959, like the United Kennel Club ((UNITED STATES)UU.) in 1965, and the Canadian Kennel Club. The breed is recognized by all major canine clubs of the English speaking world, and internationally by the Federation Cynologique Internationale as breed number 236.

    Physical characteristics

    The Australian Silky Terrier is a Terrier, but is usually placed in the Group of dogs Toy type, instead of the Terrier group, due to its small size. The Federation Cynologique Internationale has a special section of the Terrier group that includes only the smaller dogs, While other canine clubs, place the breed in the Toy group, but universally everyone agrees that the breed type is Terrier.

    His mantle's hair is grey, Griffon's soft texture and bluish, smooth and long. It requires constant maintenance and brushing. An Australian Silky Terrier should have approximately 23 to 25 cm to cross and weighs between 3.6 and 8 kg, Although the steps may vary between the different federations. It should be a little bit longer than that width (about one-fifth longer than the height at the cross).

    El Silky terrier australiano, small, almond-shaped eyes. According to the rules, the eyes are considered to lack. The ears are small and erect. It has a tail of high adjustment and small feet, almost like a cat. The hair should be long. The hair on the face and ears is usually cut.

    This breed must have with a Barber every three weeks and their teeth should be brushed. The Terrier are known to have problems with teeth and gums.

    The layer of Silky Terrier is very susceptible to tangles and mats and requires daily brushing and the hairstyle. This breed requires a deep commitment to the owners. To keep the shiny fur, regular washing is necessary. The use of an avocado and oatmeal shampoo will help relieve the itching of the skin, characteristic of this breed dry.

    Character and skills

    The breed standard describes the ideal temperament of the Australian Silky Terrier as a sharp warning and active. They love to have opportunities to run and play, but you must have a well fenced garden. They also enjoy vigorous walks and play ball. What can be done to combat the boredom will be well received by these small.

    Although in the past it was used as mouse-eared dog though currently its main function is the be pet as it adapts to life in houses or apartments without any problem. Gets along very well with people who respect him and cared for. It can cause problems with other dogs because despite their tiny size they tend to be slightly angry. It is not appropriate to live with other small pets. Thanks that you be walking. Live an average of 15 years.

    Australian Silky Terrier pictures

    Australian Silky Terrier Videos

    Group 3 / Section 4 – Terrier company

    Pomerania
    Alemania FCI 97 . European Spitz

    Pomerania

    The Pomerania very active, independent, Intelligent, brave and loyal.

    Content

    History

    The Pomerania (Dwarf German Spitz, Lulu from Pomerania or Deutscher Zwergspitz) It is a dog of the Spitz family, named for the region of Pomerania Central, Eastern Germany, and is classified as a dog “Toy” because of its small size.

    The ancestors of the Pomerania were Iceland and Lapland sled dogs, He came to Europe because of Pomerania.

    The region of Pomerania, washed to the North by the Baltic Sea and bounded westward by the island of Rügen and on the East by the Vistula River, It was occupied by many peoples, Celtic, Slavs, Poles, Swedes, Danish and Prussian. Its name comes from Pomore or Pommern, what it means “by the sea”, and it was given in times of Charlemagne. Is in Pomerania where the Spitz won fame as a pet and dog work.

    Read more

    Pinscher miniature
    Alemania FCI 185 - Pinscher

    Pinscher Miniatura

    The Pinscher miniature has much temperament, vitality and is an excellent companion dog.

    Content

    History

    It is often thought that the Pinscher miniatura is a Pinscher German small, but it predates that race at least in 200 years. Originally paid for his maintenance as a buzzard in the German pens. It is believed to have been created by the crossing of races as diverse as the Dachshund, the old german pinscher, the Manchester Terrier and the Italian Greyhound. The result was a spirited and fearless puppy.

    It was very popular in Germany and in the Scandinavian countries, but it is not surprising that its international star began to grow. The Pinscher miniatura was first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1925 like Terrier for his mouse experience. The Miniature Pinscher Club of America was formed in 1929, and the dogs were reclassified as a toy breed in 1930. In America they were called Pinscher (Toy) until 1972, when they were renamed Miniature Pinscher.

    Today, the Pinscher miniature ranks 40th among AKC registered breeds, below 17th in 2000. As with many races, has changed position at the whim of the public, possibly because he's not the cute little lap dog that some thought he would be, or simply because other races have caught the public's attention.

    Physical characteristics

    The Pinscher miniature is the achicada image of the German Pinscher, flawless dwarfism. Its elegant square construction is clearly visible through her short hair, smooth and tight.

    Its proportions are square because it has the same length as the cross height, between the 25 and 30 cm..

    Its weight varies between the 4 and 6 kg maximum, at risk of suffering from the heart.

    The hair is short and smooth, admitting only copies monocolores Red in their different shades and copies bicoloured Black with fire marks.

    Traditionally, the Miniature Pinscher was the tail and ears cut, but now this practice is prohibited throughout the European Union.

    Character and skills

    A small dog with a great attitude and a bigger mouth, the Pinscher miniature he has no idea he's not as big as a Doberman. Will face any threat, including a dog many times bigger than him. Will try to protect his family, will chase cats out of the yard and sound the alarm whenever he deems necessary, which is constant. And although it will fit in your puppy bag, you won't like being there. This is a dog with a mind and a will of its own, not an accessory.

    Don't let its designation as a toy dog ​​fool you. Like his older Terrier cousins, the Pinscher miniatura dig, will bark and chase anything that moves, including squirrels, cats and quite possibly other dogs. Unless well-bred and well-socialized – and sometimes even despite such advantages – is prone to being an annoying barker, suspicious of strangers and not very good with children.

    The Pinscher miniatura It can be wonderful with older kids as long as the kids don't mistreat them. Your activity and energy level is suitable for children, and loves to be a family dog. Monitor interactions with young children so they don't hurt the dog, or viceversa.

    Due to his tendency to be protective and territorial, the assertive, proud and stubborn Pinscher miniatura needs a firm and consistent training from the puppy stage to control his bites, as well as any tendency you have to bark inappropriately. Don't let him get away with bad behavior or he'll quickly become an almost impossible habit to break. In addition, like many small dogs, Miniature Pinschers are difficult to train at home; firmness and consistency are the keys to success.

    The Miniature Pinscher is innately curious and likes toys that move or make noises. However, it is likely that at some point you will try to eat the toys… will gut a squeaky toy in no time. Flimsy rubber or plastic aren't the best bets for him.

    Start training your puppy Pinscher miniatura the day i bring it home. Even at 8 or 10 weeks of age, He is able to absorb everything you can teach you. If possible, Take it to a trainer when you have between 10 and 12 weeks, and socializes, socialice, socialice. However, Note that many kinds of training puppies require certain vaccinations (such as kennel cough) are a day, and many veterinarians recommend limited exposure to dogs and other public places until immunizations are completed for puppies (including that of rage, distemper and parvovirus). Instead of formal training, You can start training your puppy to socialize at home and among family and friends until immunizations are completed in the puppy.

    Talk to the breeder, Describe exactly what you want in a dog and ask for help choosing a puppy. Breeders see their pups daily and can make incredibly accurate recommendations once they know something about their lifestyle and personality.. If you are looking for a Pinscher miniatura, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized since the puppy's first stage.

    Miniature Pinscher Health

    All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, and all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, do not walk, any breeder that does not offer a health guarantee in puppies, to tell you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or to tell you that your puppies are isolated from the main part of the home for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about the health problems of race and the incidence with which occur in their lines.

    The Miniature Pinscher is prone to some health problems. Here is a brief summary of some of the conditions you should know.

    Like most small dogs, Miniature Pinscher's knees can be unstable and can come out of position easily, the common condition known as dislocated kneecaps. This is one of the reasons why it is essential to keep your Miniature Pinscher at a proper weight..

    Hip disease known as Legg-Calve-Perthes disease occurs in Min Pins. Causes a reduction in the blood supply to the head of the hind leg bone, which then begins to degrade. The first sign of Legg-Calve-Perthes, the limp, usually appears when the puppy has 4 to 6 months of age. In many cases, treatment requires surgery to remove the head from the leg bone.

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI, the MPSVI, it is a genetic defect in the way the body processes certain molecules. An accumulation of dermatan sulfate (a complex molecule) can occur in specific areas of the body. Stunted growth, joint damage, cloudiness of the eyes (which may look like waterfalls) and damage to the heart valves are some of the consequences of MPSVI. DNA test can identify affected dogs, Carriers and Normal - Breeding two carriers can produce affected puppies.

    Other conditions that affect race include diabetes, dislocation of the elbow, congenital deafness and eye problems such as progressive retinal atrophy, glaucoma and hypoplasia of the optic nerve.

    Not all of these conditions are detectable on a growing puppy, and it can be difficult to predict whether an animal will be free from these diseases, so you should find a trusted breeder who is committed to raising the healthiest animals possible. Must be able to produce independent certification that the dog's parents (and grandparents, etc.) have been screened for genetic defects and considered healthy for breeding. As a minimum, the breeder must have hip and knee evaluations of both breeding dogs.

    If the breeder tells you that you don't need to do those tests because you have never had a problem with your lines, your dogs have been vet checked, or any of the other excuses bad breeders have to skimp on their dogs' genetic testing, vaiyase.

    Careful breeders examine their breeding dogs for genetic diseases and breed only the healthiest and best looking copies, but sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas and a puppy develops one of these diseases despite good breeding practices. Advances in veterinary medicine mean that in most cases dogs can still live a good life. If you are going to have a puppy, ask the breeder about the ages of the dogs in their lines and what they died from.

    Not all visits from Pinscher miniatura to the vet they are due to a genetic problem. Due to its size and athletics, broken legs are not uncommon.

    Remember that after bringing a new puppy home, It has the power to protect one of the most common health problems: the obesity. Keep a Pinscher miniatura with a suitable weight it is one of the easiest ways to prolong life. Make the most of diet and exercise to help ensure a healthier dog for life.

    Caring for the Miniature Pinscher

    Miniature Pinschers are very easy to groom due to their short, soft fur. Just use a bristle brush once or twice a week. They lose an average amount, but its small size means less hair is lost than in a larger dog with the same type of short hair.

    Bathe the Miniature Pinscher as desired or only when it gets dirty. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, You can bathe a Miniature Pinscher weekly if you want without damaging its coat.

    As with all Toy breeds, dental problems are common. Brush your Miniature Pinscher's teeth daily with a vet-approved pet toothpaste and have them checked regularly by your vet. Nails should be cut every two weeks; you should not hear the click of the toenails when the dog walks.

    Reviews of the Miniature Pinscher

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Pinscher miniature” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    The Miniature Pinscher pictures

    Videos del Pinscher Miniatura

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 185
    • Group 2: Pinscher and Schnauzer- Molossoid breeds – Swiss Mountain and Cattle Dogs.
    • Section 1: Pinscher and Schnauzer type. Without working trial.
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Pinscher and Schanuezer dogs. Molossian type Dogs and Swiss Mountain and Cattle Dogs. , Section 1: Pinscher and Schnauzer.
    • AKC – Toys
    • ANKC – Group 1 (Toys)
    • CKC – Group 5 – (Toys)
    • ​KC – Toys
    • NZKC – Toys
    • UKC – Company breeds

    FCI Standard of the Miniature Pinscher breed

    GENEOUTL APPEARANCE : The Miniature Pinscher is a reduced

    image of the German Pinscher without the draw-backs of a dwarfed appearance. His elegant square build is clearly visible due to his short smooth coat.

    IMPORTANT PROPORTIONS :

    • The ratio from length to height shall make his build appear as square as possibl
    • The length of the head (measured fom the tip of the nose to the occiput) corresponds to half the length of the topline (measured from the withers to the set on of the tail).

    BEHAVIOUR/TEMPERAMENT : Lively, spirited, self assured and evenly tempered. These qualities make him an agreeable family and companion dog.

    HEAD

    CRANIAL REGION

    Skull : Strong, elongated without markedly protruding occiput. The forehead is flat without wrinkles, running parallel to the bridge of nose.

    Ston: Slight, yet clearly defined.

    FACIAL REGION

    Noris: Noseleather well developed and black.

    Muzzle: Ending in a blunt wedge. Bridge of nose straight.

    Linps: Black, smooth and tight-fitting to the jaw. Corners of lips closed.

    Jaws/Teeth : Strong upper and lower jaw. The complete scissor bite (42 pure white teeth according to the dentition formula), is strong and firmly closing. The chewing muscles are strongly developed without pronounced cheeks interfering with the smooth outline. Eyes: Dark, oval, with black pigmented close fitting eyelids.

    Ears : Prick ears ; drop ears, set high, V-shaped with the inner edges lying close to the cheeks, turned forward towards temples. Folds parallel, should not be above the top of the skull.

    NECK : Nobly curved, not too short. Blending smoothly into the withers without any marked set on. Dry without dewlap or throatiness. Throat skin tight-fitting without folds.

    BODY

    Torplinnand: Slightly sloping from withers towards rear.

    Withers: Forming the highest point in topline. Back: Strong, short and taut.

    Itinns: Strong. The distance from last rib to hip is short to make the dog appear compact.

    Croup: Slightly rounded, imperceptibly blending into tail set on.

    ChEast: Moderately broad, oval in diameter, reaching to elbows. The forechest is distinctly marked by the point of the sternum.

    Underline and belly : Flanks not too tucked up, forming a nicely curved line with the underside of the brisket.

    TATHE: Natural; a sabre or sickle carriage is sought after.

    LIMBS

    FOREBYRTISS :

    General appearance: Seen from the front, the front legs are strong, straight and not close together. Seen from the side, the forearms are straight.

    Shoul(d)ers: The shoulder blade lies close against the ribcage and is well muscled on both sides of the shoulder bone, protruding over the points of the thoracic vertebrae. As sloping as possible and well laid back, forming an angle of appr. 50° to the horizontal.

    Uppis poor: Lying close to the body, strong and well muscled,

    forming an angle of 95° to 100° to the shoulder blade. Elbows: Correctly fitting, turning neither in nor out.

    Forearm: Strongly developed and well muscled. Completely straight seen from the front and the side.

    Carpal joint: Strong and firm.

    Pastern: Strong and springy. Seen from the front,vertical, seen from the side, slightly sloping towards the ground.

    Forefeet: Short and round, toes well-knit and arched (cat feet), pads resistant, nails short, black and strong.

    HINDQUARTISS :

    General appearance: Standing obliquely, when seen from the side, standing parallel but not close together seen from the rear.

    Uppis thigh: Moderately long, broad, strongly muscled.

    Stinsleep: Turning neither in nor out.

    Itwis thigh: Long and strong, sinewy, running into a strong hock. Hock: Markedly angulated, strong, firm, turning neither in nor out.

    Metatarsus : Vertical to the ground.

    Hinnd feet: Somewhat longer than forefeet. Toes well-knit and arched. Nails short and black.

    GAIT/MOVEMENT : The Miniature Pinscher is a trotter. His back remains firm and rather steady in movement. The movement is harmonious, sure, powerful and uninhibited with good length of stride. Typical of the trot is a ground covering, relaxed, fluent movement with strong drive and free front extension.

    SKIN : Tight fitting over the whole body.

    COAT

    HAIR : Short and dense, smooth, close and shiny without bald patches.

    COLORR

    • Self coloured : Deer red, reddish-brown to dark red brown.
    • Black and Tan : Lacquer black with red or brown marking

    The aim is for markings as dark, as rich and as clearly defined as possible. The markings are distributed as follows: Above the eyes, at the underside of the throat, on the pasterns, on the feet, at the inside of the hind legs and under the root of the tail. Two even, clearly separated triangles on the chest.

    SIZE AND WEIGHT

    Height at withers : Dogs and bitches: 25 to 30 cm..

    Weight : Dogs and bitches: 4 to 6 kg.

    FTOLTS : Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

    Particularly:

    • Clumsy or light in build. Too low or too high on leg.
    • Heavy or round skull.
    • Wrinkles on forehead.
    • Short, pointed or narrow muzzl
    • Pincer bit
    • Light, too small or too large ey
    • Ears set low or very long, unevenly carried.
    • Throatin
    • Too long, tucked up or soft back.
    • Roach back.
    • Croup falling away.
    • Long feet.
    • Pacing movement.
    • Hackney gait.
    • Thin coat.
    • Roans; black trace on the back, dark saddle and lightened or pale coat.
    • Over- or undersize up to 1 cm..

    ISRIOUS FAULTS :

    • Lack of sexual type (in. doggy bitch).
    • Light appearance
    • Apple head.
    • Lines of head not parallel.
    • Elbows turning out.
    • Hindlegs standing under the body.
    • Straight or open hocked hindleg
    • Hocks turning out.
    • Over- or undersize by more than 1 cm but less than 2 cm..

    DISQUALIFYING FAULTS :

    • Aggressive or overly shy dog
    • Any dog clearly showing physical or behavioural abnormalities shall be disqualified.
    • Malformation of any kind.
    • Lack of breed typ
    • Faults in mouth, such as over- or undershot or wry mouth.
    • Severe faults in individual parts, such as faults in structure, coat or colou
    • Over- or undersize by more than 2 cm..

    N.B.:

    • Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.
    • Only functionally and clinically healthy dogs, with breed typical conformation should be used for breeding.

    The latest amendments are in bold characters.

    Alternative names:

      1. Min Pin, King of the Toys (English).
      2. Pinscher Nain (French).
      3. Rehpinscher, Miniature Pinscher, Minpin, Minidoberman; in Österreich auch unter Rehrattler bekannt (German).
      4. Pinscher miniatura (Portuguese).
      5. Pinscher enano (Spanish).

    Norwegian Lundehund
    Noruega FCI 265 - Nordic Hunting Dogs

    Lundehund

    Most of the Norwegian Lundehund live in Norway and Finland, it is believed that there are some 2000 copies around the world.

    Content

    History

    The Lundehund (Norsk Lundehund or Norwegian Puffin Dog) It is a small breed of dog of Spitz type, originally from Norway. Its name is composed of the prefix Lunde, Norwegian lundefugl (puffins), and the suffix hund, What dog. The breed was developed to hunt these birds and their eggs.

    The Norwegian Lundehund is a small, rectangular Spitz, with a wide variety of mobility in the joints of your bones, What makes him able to enter through small and intricate passages.

    They remain able to rotate the head back on the backbone and bend the hind legs to the side at an angle of 90 degrees such as the arms of humans, In addition to six toes on the feet.

    The breed has a long history. Already in 1600 It was used for hunting puffins along the Norwegian coast. Its flexibility and extra toes were ideal for hunting of birds in their places of nesting in the inaccessible cliffs and caves.

    Video “Norwegian Lundehund”


    My lundehund

    Interest in the breed declined as new hunting methods for puffins, as for example, the use of networks…, and this ex officio contortionist, was no longer needed. Puffins were a precious object of hunting, the meat was horse and kept and feathers were used to make quilts.

    The breed was nearly extinct around World War II, when the canine distemper hit Værøy and the islands surrounding. In 1963, the population was decimated… Only six copies of Lundehund (one Værøy and 5 in Soon, to the South of Norway), These five puppies was of the same litter.

    Due to the care of the breeding with strict guidelines, currently there are approximately 1500 or 2000 copies of Lundehund around the world, of this population around 1.100 are in Norway and almost 350 in the United States.

    The official record of the Lundehund was approved by the American Kennel Club's in the miscellaneous class 1 in July of 2008, After a unanimous vote of the Board the 13 in November of 2007. The race debuted at the AKC National Championship / Eukanuba in Long Beach, California (United States), the 13 and 14 in December of 2008, being one of the most important events of the American canine world.

    The 12 in February of 2010, The American Kennel Club Board of Directors voted to accept the Lundehund in the AKC Source Book and became part of it on 1 in December of 2010. The 1 in January of 2011, It became a part of the "non-Sports Group".

    For the American Kennel Club and Canadian Kennel Club, the non-sports group is a diverse classification that comprises a variety of robust dogs with different personalities and appearances as the Chow Chow , and the Keeshond, among others. Covered by the non-sporting group breeds, It is very diverse in terms of appearance, size, layer, personality and, in general.

    According to the classification of the CRF is located in the Group 5 Dogs type Spitz and primitive type. Section 2 Nordic Hunting Dogs.

    Physical characteristics

    The Lundehund medium in size looks a bit like a fox and is, also because it is one of the rare races, sometimes mistaken for a mestizo, a Nordic mongrel. On the contrary, is very specialized: The Lundehund has been bred for hunting puffins, a kind of bird that breeds in burrows. This brings with it some unique physical characteristics: your shoulder joints are more flexible, allowing you to rotate your front legs 90 ° to the side. In addition, this dog can close his pointed, upright ears, allowing you to dive better.

    The most striking features are undoubtedly the six toes of each foot and the up to eight pads, which give the ancient cliff hunter immense security. Some of these dogs also lack molars, which facilitated the transport of the captured birds without damaging them.

    The Norwegian Lundehund It has a height at the withers of up to 38 cm and weighs 7 kg. sporty and light. The dense coat is short and red to fawn, with black hair tips in places. have a smooth undercoat, very fine and a rough top coat.

    Character and skills

    The Norwegian Lundehund is a four legged friend, simple and skillful, but he has a lot of energy and wants to live it. Due to its independent nature – the Lundehund was left to fend during the hunt – always kept his own head and thus will never fully subordinate himself. Who respects this, win with him Lundehund an easy to train and loyal friend for life.

    Basically the breed is considered quite shy, so a close relationship with its owner is especially important – this is how your Lundehund gain security. Towards strangers he is usually reserved – it is also considered to be alert. He usually gets along well with other dogs. The Lundehund not a typical hunting dog, but it is also wonderfully suitable as a companion dog.

    The education of the Norwegian Lundehund

    This is a breed of dog with a stubborn and stubborn character, they are still easy to train and learn the basic commands with great motivation.

    Although the breed belongs to hunting dogs, the Lundehund can accompany you, with some effort in their education, on your nature walks without the need for a leash, since it is not an elusive dog, nor a traditional prey tracker. A bigger challenge is getting our dogs to stop barking: Lundehund, like all nordic dogs, announce aloud all the supposedly interesting things in their environment – and that in part is quite persistent. So patience is absolutely necessary when training a Lundehund. Already in puppyhood, be sure to keep this in mind when training your dog. Play lessons for puppies, as well as attending a dog school, have a positive effect on Lundehund – here you can not only socialize it more with other four legged friends, but you will surely also get some tips and tricks for the education of this dog.

    Health: the syndrome Lundehund

    Since the population dates back to only five dogs, Controlled breeding of the breed made a fresh start in the decade of 1960, with what the Lundehund has a very small gene pool. One of the five founding dogs developed stomach and intestinal symptoms at the age of about three years, that have spread even further among the descendants. Today, this is known as the Lundehund syndrome: a chronic and inflammatory bowel disease that is associated with increased loss of protein through the intestines. About half of the population is affected by it, although to varying degrees. A genetic test can be used to determine if a dog intended for breeding is a carrier, so that the risk of Lundehund syndrome can be reduced. There is no cure for this disease, only symptoms can be relieved. While some dogs are barely limited by the disease and have long symptom-free phases, other affected quadrupeds have a more severe course and eventually lead to death.

    Before deciding to acquire a representative of this breed, must be informed in detail about the Lundehund syndrome and the corresponding genetic test and its meaning. The Nordic Dog Clubs can also provide you with more information on this.. The healthy ones Norwegian Lundehund are, for the rest, very robust and can reach an age of about 14 years.

    care “Norwegian Lundehund”

    The coat of this Norwegian Coastal Dog is insensitive to weather conditions and requires little grooming. However, the more you brush, less hair is distributed in your home – especially during coat change a daily brushing may make sense, because the Lundehund then lose a lot of hair. In all other respects, care is quite simple: dirt brushes better when dry. By the way, the Norwegian Lundehund It is one of the few dogs that really enjoys grooming. If you support them with the brush, you are also doing something for their bonding.

    Check the ears and eyes regularly and clean them with special ear and eye cleaners if necessary. If the eyes get wet, what happens in many dogs due to narrow tear ducts, just clean and dry them gently once a day with clear water. Some dog owners opt for daily dental care in the form of toothbrushing with dog toothpaste and toothbrush.. If you already introduce your puppy to this ritual, is an optimal prevention against tartar and associated secondary diseases.

    Activities “Norwegian Lundehund”

    Long walks in nature, enjoying the wind and the weather are the base of activity of this Norwegian breed. In addition, most of these dogs love to swim. Make your partner happy and give him the opportunity to do it! But you should also encourage and challenge their brain and skills. There is a wide range of joint activity possibilities at your disposal: Dog lovers can enjoy almost all types of sports with dogs, with the exception of sports with training dogs. Due to his great independence you should not expect unconditional obedience from him, but a relaxed approach to the respective human-animal hobby jointly. Try together with your animal companion which sport you like the most!

    Is a “Norwegian Lundehund”?

    A Norwegian Lundehund fits well in a sporty family, where at least one family member already has experience with dogs. Learn easily and with pleasure, but for education you still need a certain knowledge and consistency. In addition, it is important to use the dog to its full potential – the small Lundehund not a couch dog, needs a lot of outdoor exercise and a lot of time.

    He is usually very fond of children and can also make friends with cats, especially if you met them as a puppy. This dog can also live in a medium-sized apartment, but of course also enjoy a garden (leak proof). It is important to direct the joy of the breed's barking in a controlled manner.

    Before moving, make sure no one in your household has an allergy to animal hair and consider whether you can and want to take the dog on vacation – many hotels today host four-legged friends – or how you organize care. Although the Lundehund it's more like a small dog, can be quite expensive in terms of regular costs: Apart from a high quality diet with a high content of fish, this includes taxes and dog insurance, as well as visits to the vet. In addition, is, of course, the not inconsiderable purchase price of this rare four-legged friend – with possible travel expenses – and if necessary the basic equipment.

    Where can i find my “Norwegian Lundehund”?

    First of all: A Norwegian Lundehund It's very weird. In total, there are some 1.300 specimens around the world. Therefore, you may very well have to wait a long time and travel many miles to get hold of such a rare dog. The majority of the Lundehunds they live in norway. Check with a Norwegian dog club in your country to find out how to contact the breeders of the Norwegian Lundehund. Ask your potential dog breeder about the Lundehund syndrome and the diet of the breed.

    His young Lundehund will move in with you at the earliest at the age of eight weeks – if you come from a European country, you will normally need a valid rabies vaccine for the trip in addition to the necessary papers. It is essential that you remember booster shots and also talk to your vet about regular deworming of your four-legged friend.

    It is extremely unlikely to find an adult dog, especially outside of norway. So if you are looking for a four legged adult friend, it is advisable to contact a Nordic dog club. There are also often wonderful mongrel dogs looking for a new home., value the adoption of one of them.

    We wish you much joy with your extraordinary Norwegian Lundehund!

    Characteristics “Norwegian Lundehund”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Norwegian Lundehund” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images of the Norwegian Lundehund

    photos:

    1 – “Norwegian Lundehund” by http://www.petsadviser.com/
    2 – “Norwegian Lundehund” by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/754827
    3 – “Norwegian Lundehund” by https://pxhere.com/es/photo/880994
    4 – Norwegian puffin town Andrva / CC BY-SA
    5 – “Norwegian Lundehund” by https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lundehund.jpg
    6 – The Norwegian Lundehund “With” looking out at the ocean on the north side of the island Værøy in Northern Norway. The island on the top, in the middle, is “The mosque”, the island in the top left is “Mosques” by ZorroIII / CC BY-SA

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 265
    • Group 5: Spitz and primitive types.
    • Section 2: Nordic Hunting Dogs. With working trial only for the Nordic countries (Sweden, Norway,
      Finland).
  • Federations:
    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 2 Nordic Hunting Dogs.
    • AKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs.
    • CKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs.
    • UKC – Nordic Hunting Dogs.

    Norwegian Lundehund breed FCI standard

    Norwegian Lundehund FCI Norwegian Lundehund FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Norsk Lundehund, lundehund, Norwegian Puffin Dog (English).
      2. lundehund (French).
      3. Norsk Lundehund (German).
      4. Cão de papagaio-do-mar (Portuguese).
      5. Perro frailecillo, Lundehund (Spanish).