Emma's Parakeet
Pyrrhura emma

Emma's Parakeet

Description:

23 cm.. length.

Emma's Parakeet

The Emma's Parakeet (Pyrrhura emma) is a bird, in its most, green, with blue in the wings, reddish-brown in rump, on tail and in the back; Scaled plumage chest yellowish color on a gray background olive; wings with red shoulder, inconspicuous.

The face red plum, while the pileum It is brown and gray forecrown blue. Abdomen with dark red stain, tail with green base, edge red and below all red.

Eye ring grey, cheeks red with white spot on ears. Bill Dark. It has no sexual dimorphism.

  • Sound of the Emma's Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Cotorra of Emma.mp3]

Habitat:

They can be seen in hill forests in the coastal mountain range in Venezuela, in moist forests and edges as well as in adjacent clear with scattered trees and groves (pit et to the., 1997).

Usually it moves in flocks, on quick flights up 25 specimens, before landing in the canopy.

Reproduction:

There is insufficient information regarding reproduction and food. Probably the breeding season between May and July. Period of incubation: 24-25 days.

Food:

They have been observed eating flowers of Ochroma and nectar (Hilty 2003).

Distribution:

Size of its range (reproduction / resident): 88.300 km2

The Emma's Parakeet inhabits forested areas of the northern coastal range Venezuela, from Yacacuy and Carabobo until Miranda, and disjuntamente from Anzoátegui to Sucre and northern part of Monagas (Del Hoyo et al., 1997, Juniper and Parr 1998, Hilty 2003, Forshaw 2006).

It is mainly found at altitudes 250-1.700 m, but you can see at sea level in eastern Sucre (Hilty 2003), where it is quite common (Hilty 2003, P. Boesman in a bit., 2006). Its distribution within this range is complex and disjoint, found especially in mountainous terrain at lower elevations (Hilty 2003).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the population

Apparently, the population size of this species has not been quantified.

Justification of trend

The capture for trade and changes in land use may be causing a decrease in population of this species, although the trend has not been quantified, and none of these is considered serious threats to this species today(CJ Sharpe a slightly. 2014).

Conservation Actions Underway

They live in several national parks (P. Boesman in a bit., 2006), with a population “substantial” in the Guatopo National Park, Miranda (Juniper and Parr 1998, Hilty 2003).

Conservation Actions Proposed

Continue to monitor this species in the field and in trade.

Strengthen the network of protected areas within the range of this species.

Cotorra de Emma en cautividad:

Very rare in captivity. Very intelligent, active and playful. They are very aggressive with other species. Price per couple: 400 EUR.

Alternative names:

Emma’s Parakeet, Emma’s Parakeet (incl. auricularis), Painted Parakeet (Venezuelan), Venezuelan Parakeet (English).
Conure d’Emma, Conure emma, Conure emma (incl. auricularis) (French).
Emmasittich (German).
Emma’s Parakeet (Portuguese).
Cotorra de Emma (Spanish).

Salvadori Tommaso

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrrhura
Scientific name: Pyrrhura emma
Citation: Salvadori, 1891
Protonimo: Pyrrhura emma

Images Emma's Parakeet:

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Emma's Parakeet (Pyrrhura emma)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Venezuelan Parakeet | Perico Pintado ( Pyrrhura emma)By Fernando Flores from Caracas, Venezuela [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Venezuelan Parakeet | Perico Pintado ( Pyrrhura picta emma) By Fernando Flores from Caracas, Venezuela [CC BY-SA 2.0 or CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Venezuelan Parakeet | Perico Pintado (Pyrrhura emma) by Fernando FloresFlickr
(4) – Venezuelan Parakeet | Perico Pintado (Pyrrhura emma) by Fernando FloresFlickr
(5) – Venezuelan Parakeet | Perico Pintado (Pyrrhura emma) By Fernando Flores from Caracas, Venezuela [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Pyrrhura emma = Pyrrhura picta, Painted Parakeet by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds:

Pacific Parrotlet
Forpus coelestis


Pacific Parrotlet

Description:

12-13 cm.. height.

The Pacific Parrotlet (Forpus coelestis) It is a small bird, chubby with a tail short and finished in tip. Distinguishable in flight by the blue and Brown on the inside of the wings. It has blue behind the eye and in the middle of the wing at the top. The female does blue stain on the top of the wing and the blue behind the eye is paler. The Immature males they are similar to the adult male, but more pale and with back brownish.

Habitat:

The Pacific Parrotlet they frequent most of the dry wooded habitats, such as scrub thorny, bosque deciduous, dense thickets of Captus with balsa trees, plantations of banana and mango, riparian zone, irrigated fields in Savannah and gardens, Although their preferred areas are those of the humid tropical vegetation such as the coastal mangales.

Older records of this species are from below sea level of 1.000 m, but are to 2.150 meters on the West side of the Andes in Huancabamba, East of Piura, Peru, and a 1.370-1.650 meters in the South of Loja, Ecuador.

Generally gregarious; they form large flocks where abundant food.

Reproduction:

It nests in the cavity of trees, in cactus, fence posts, piping or the nests of the Pale-legged Hornero (Furnarius leucopus), of the Necklaced Spinetail (Synallaxis stictothorax) or Fasciated Wren (Campylorhynchus fasciatus).

The breeding season includes the months of January to may. Sometimes, they breed once again throughout the year. The laying of eggs 4-6.

Food:

The diet of the Pacific Parrotlet includes seeds grass, berries, fruit (example, of Tamarindus, Amaranthus spinosus) and cactus fruits. It forages among the vegetation and land.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 147.000 km2

This species is found in the West of Ecuador, in Manabi Since the latitude of the Valley of the Rio Chone to the South across the South of Pichincha, The rivers and Guayas (including the Isla Puna), until Gold and Loja, entering the Northwest of Peru, in Tumbes, Piura, Lambayeque and South of Cajamarca, until Freedom and Trujillo.

Irregularly-common, sometimes abundant; most numerous in arid areas. The population apparently still has not been affected badly by the trade in live birds or the conversion of natural and semi-natural habitats for the Agriculture. The species is probably Forpus most numerous in captivity.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

Suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

Cotorrita of Piura in captivity:

Colorful, charming and intelligent. These small birds have become in very popular pets in recent years. Its small size and quiet nature make of the Pacific Parrotlet an ideal choice for people living in apartments. Nicknamed "Pocket parrots" in the pet trade, These parakeets are actually the smallest of the family of parrots, and they are as smart as many larger species. Some learn to speak quite well, Although the species is not particularly known for the ability to speak.
An interesting fact upon the Pacific Parrotlet its closest relative is the the Amazon Parrot. Although the two species differ greatly in size, owners often report striking similarities between them. Despite being small birds, they are not in any way "birds of low maintenance". While it is true that they are, course, easy to clean, in comparison with the larger birds, However require your daily care to keep them docile, socialization at an early age is the key to be in a future good behavior.
They have tendency to obesity. They must be able to get out of their cages, spread your wings, and exercise their muscles to maintain their physical and mental health.

Their metabolism is very high, and they should have food available at all times. They are known for their appetite voracious, and occur in one diet varied that consists in fruits and vegetables fresh, small seeds such as millet, the high-quality commercial pellets, and sources of proteins from boiled egg.

There are many mutations.

Alternative names:

Pacific Parrotlet, Western Parrotlet (English).
Toui céleste, Perruche-moineau céleste (French).
Himmelsperlingspapagei, Himmelspapagei (German).
Tuim-peruano (Portuguese).
Catita Enana Amarilla, Cotorrita de Piura, Cotorrita Celestial (Spanish).
Periquito Esmeralda (Peru).

René Primevère Lesson
René Primevère Lesson

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Forpus
Scientific name: Forpus coelestis
Citation: (Lesson, 1847)
Protonimo: agapornis heavenly

Pacific Parrotlet images:


Pacific Parrotlet (Forpus coelestis)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife
  • Book parrots, Parrots and macaws.

Photos:

(1) – Male Green Pacific Parrotlet, named Jackson By Susan C. Griffin (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Pacific Parrotlets (also known as Lesson’s Parrotlet and Celestial Parrotlet) at Wilhelma Zoo, Stuttgart, Germany By Undertable [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – A pet Pacific Parrotlet – yellow colour mutation By Becky Wetherington (originally posted to Flickr as 82/365 – Good bird.) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – A pet male Pacific Parrotlet (also known as Lesson’s Parrotlet and Celestial Parrotlet) By Erin Purcell (originally posted to Flickr as [1]) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – Pacific Parrotlet (also known as Lesson’s Parrotlet and Celestial Parrotlet) in El Empalme, El Oro Province, coastal SW Ecuador By markaharper1 [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Tepui Parrotlet
Nannopsittaca panychlora

Cotorrita de tepuy

Description:

Tepui Parrotlet

The Tepui Parrotlet (Nannopsittaca panychlora) measured between 14 and 15,7 cm.. height. Small size, with wings sharp and tail cut and wedge.

The head It is green with yellow tinge oliváceo; the eye area is yellow, color extending below and behind the eyes. The upperparts they are green (brighter and less than oliváceo head). Upperwing-coverts green. Flight feather blackish green tipped primary, brownish opaque below; INFRACA-wing coverts green. The underparts yellowish green turn yellow-green in the undertail-coverts. Upper, the tail is green; undertail, yellower. Bill grey; cere grey; Bello to singr dark gray; irises brown; legs Rosaceae.

Both sexes are similar; the female has the forecrown Off-white to yellowish.

  • Sound of the Tepui Parrotlet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Tepui Parrotlet.mp3]

Habitat:

Montane rain forests inhabit in tropical and subtropical highlands, sometimes in the rainforest of the lowlands around tepuyes, generally 750-1,850 m (Gran Sabana), although they observed at the top of Auyantepui to 2,200 meters and near the summit Monte Roraima A 2,200 m; to 750-950 metres in Sucre.

Can reproduce in subtropical and tropical zone descend to feed. Recent records in the view of birds in the lowlands suggest at least seasonal aparienciones at lower altitudes. Fly very high, fast and in a straight line, in compact flocks of 6 to 150 individuals. It´s resident but it shows seasonal migrations.

Reproduction:

Sleeps and nests in Tepuis. Not much more information about the reproduction of this species in the wild.

Food:

In their natural habitat, the Tepui Parrotlet normally eat fruits, seeds and small insects.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 486.000 km2

Mainly montana, It is distributed in several scattered populations in eastern Venezuela and the adjacent area of ​​western Guyana; concentrated in Gran Sabana East of Bolivar in Venezuela (for example, Montes Roraima and Auyantepui); It is also present around the meseta del Duida and the lowlands of River Ventauri, Amazon, and in the West of Guyana from the area Río Camera to; a more distant population occupies the Paria peninsula (for example, the Monte Papelón), Sucre, to the northeast of Venezuela. Probably you can be observed at the north end of Roraima, Brazil.

Apparently locally common and stable, but perhaps it diminished in Paria Peninsula due to large-scale deforestation. Much of the range is included in Canaima National Park.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common, but unevenly distributed” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

It is suspected that this species has lost 6,9-11,6% of habitat within its distribution over three generations (15 years) starting from a model of deforestation Amazon (Soares-Filho et to the., 2006, Bird et to the., 2011). Given the susceptibility of the species to hunting and / or capture, It is suspected that its population decline by <25% during three generations.

Cotorrita of tepui in captivity:

It is very rare captive breeding outside South America. It is intelligent, quiet and very sociable.
Can normally live about 20 years.

Alternative names:

Tepui Parrotlet, Tepui Parakeet, Tepui parrolet (English).
Toui des tépuis, Toui tépui (French).
Tepuisittich, Grünsperlingspapagei, Tepui Sittich (German).
Periquito-dos-tepuis, periquito-do-Tepui (Portuguese).
Catita Chirica, Cotorrita de tepuy, Cotorrita Tepuí (Spanish).
Chirica (Venezuela).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Nannopsittaca
Scientific name: Nannopsittaca panychlora
Citation: (Salvin & Godman, 1883)
Protonimo: Brotogerys [sic] panychlorus


Tepui Parrotlet (Nannopsittaca panychlora)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife
  • Book parrots, Parrots and macaws Neotropical

  • Photos:

(1) – Credit: © Scott Echols, DVM
(2) – Brotogerys panychlorus = nannopsittaca panychlora (color green) & Microcerculus ustulatus (color brown) By J G Keulemans (Ibis 1883 (Web)) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Grey-hooded Parakeet
Psilopsiagon aymara

Grey-hooded Parakeet

Description:

19-20 cm.. height.

Grey-hooded Parakeet

The Grey-hooded Parakeet (Psilopsiagon aymara) has the body mostly green, elongated and with a very long and pointed tail; the forecrown and lores, until the area back from the neck (including the ear-coverts), grayish brown, forming a kind of CAP that comes, slightly, to below the eyes.

Mantle green, lightly olive dyeing; Back and scapulars green; rump and uppertail-coverts, green, slightly brighter; upperwing-coverts green; flight feather green with blackish tips; underwing-coverts of color greenish-yellow. Chin and throat pale-whitish grey; chest grey silver pale, sometimes with dye bluish on the feathers on both sides of the chest; flanks of color yellow pale greenish; the belly and undertail-coverts, green, with faint bluish tint.

Upper, the tail green; undertail, gray. The bill pale flesh-colored; irises dark brown; legs grey-brown.

Both sexes similar, though the male may have brighter grey in the chest.

Immature they have the tail shorter.

NOTE This species was treated as Bolborhynchus aymara.

[audio:]

Habitat:

You prefer arid habitats shrubs or Woody hills and ravines, dense bushes and trees around settlements and agricultural areas, also distributed in high Andean steppes and sometimes in the Highlands, at altitudes of 1.800 to 3.400 m, sometimes more low (1,200 m in winter) and supposedly until the 4.000 m in Tucumán, Argentina.

The Grey-hooded Parakeet is a bird gregarious, usually seen in small flocks, at least outside of the breeding season; large gatherings near areas with water.

Reproduction:

Nest sometimes in colonies, in holes dug in sand banks or in hollows and cactus in desert area. Egg laying in the month of November in Tucumán. Clutch 4-5 eggs. Up to seven in captivity.

Food:

The Grey-hooded Parakeet they tend to consume berries and other fruit, In addition to seeds herbaceous and grasses (by example Viguera and other compounds); tend to descend to the floor to collect fruits fallen and seeds from the grass.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 383.000 km2

Is it can be found in the Andes from the South of Bolivia until Argentina and possibly North of Chile.

In West Bolivia It is known from Peace and Cochabamba to the South of Tarija and Potosi, and in the Northwest of Argentina on the slopes Andean of Jujuy to the South of Mendoza and to the hills of the South East of Córdoba. In the North of Chile (for example, Tarapacá) is reported as resident, visitor or absent.

Some movements at altitude seasonal; the Grey-hooded Parakeet move higher in summer. Generally common and apparently without pressure; Small numbers are caught and exported as cage birds.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

It is suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial, Although it is exported as bird cage in small quantities.

Catita Aimará en cautividad:

Rare in poultry.

Alternative names:

Gray-hooded Parakeet, Andean Parakeet, Aymara Parakeet, Gray hooded Parakeet, Gray-headed Parakeet, Grey hooded Parakeet, Grey-headed Parakeet, Grey-hooded Parakeet, Sierra Parakeet (English).
Toui aymara, Perruche d’Aymara (French).
Aymarasittich, Aymara Sittich (German).
Periquito-da-serra (Portuguese).
Periquito-da-serra (Spanish).
Periquito-da-serra (Argentina).
Periquito-da-serra (Bolivia).

Alcide Dessalines to Orbigny
Alcide Dessalines d ’ Orbigny

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Psilopsiagon
Scientific name: Psilopsiagon aymara
Citation: (d’Orbigny, 1839)
Protonimo: Arara aymara

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Grey-hooded Parakeet (Psilopsiagon aymara)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Book parrots, Parrots and macaws Neotropical

Photos:

(1) – Grey-hooded Parakeets (also known as the Aymara Parakeet and the Sierra Parakeet) in Capilla del Monte, Córdoba, Argentina By Nes (originally posted to Flickr as Periquitos) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) -Psilopsiagon aymara by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Green-cheeked Parakeet
Pyrrhura molinae


Green-cheeked Parakeet

Description:

25 cm.. in length and 62-81 grams of weight.

cotorra-de-molina-6

The Green-cheeked Parakeet (Pyrrhura molinae) has a close frontal band and lores, you are reddish brown to blackish; crown, of color brown or brown grayish marked laterally in shades blue and green; rear area of the crown and nape with blue tips; cheeks and sometimes the supercilii area (area of the front), of color green with dye olive; ear-coverts of color grey clear to pale.

Upperparts green. The primary coverts are bluish green and the remaining are mainly green, except for some feathers scattered of color blue, yellow or orange in the leading edge of wing. Primaries blue, secondaries Green with blue near the axis; both grey below. Underwing-coverts green. Feathers in the chest, the throat and the sides of the neck, of color Brown at the base with purple pale, light grey, or yellowish opaque in the tips, giving effect squamous; central belly with brown patches of varying size (only scattered feathers some birds); sides of the belly, the thighs and bottom of the chest, green; undertail-coverts bluish green.

Upper, the tail brown, with green at the base of the center of the tail feathers (hidden under the coverts); below, the tail brown.

The bill, grey; the cere white; bare periophthalmic whitish; irises brown; legs grey.

Both sexes are similar.

Immature paler. with the irises darker and less a defendant patch brown of the belly.

  • Sound of the Green-cheeked Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Green-cheeked Conure .mp3]
Subspecies description
  • Pyrrhura molinae australis

    (Todd, 1915) – Slightly smaller the species nominal, pale margin to the throat and to the close down of the chest; Brown-colored area in the chest more extensive; less blue in the undertail-coverts.

  • Pyrrhura molinae flavoptera

    (Maijer, Herzog, Kessler, Friggens & Fjeldsa, 1998) – Similar to the nominal species, but with the bend of wing and the carpal edge, orange-red; Alula with feather blue and yellow / white mixed.

  • Pyrrhura molinae hypoxantha

    (Salvadori & Festa, 1899) – Previously listed as Pyrrhura molinae sordida. The cheeks more pale that the of the nominal species; the color red in the belly less prominent and the skirting of feathers in the throat and the chest less distinctive.

  • Pyrrhura molinae molinae

    (Massena & Souancé, 1854) – The nominal.

  • Pyrrhura molinae phoenicura

    (Schlegel, 1864) – It differs from the species nominal and of the subspecies Pyrrhura molinae australis, by having the basal half of feathers of the Centre of the tail, green. Some birds are yellow in the leading edge of wing.

  • Pyrrhura molinae restricta

    (Todd, 1947) – More blue that other subspecies, with stain blue in them lower cheeks and strong blue subfusion in the undertail-coverts. The blue tips on the feathers of the nape and zone back in the neck they form a most distinctive collar which in the nominal species.

Habitat:

The species Green-cheeked Parakeet inhabits dense forests, often low and forests with clear primary and secondary , including stripes of Chaco, Savannah, deciduous forest and Gallery in pantanal, as well as moist forests MOSS-covered in the Eastern Andes where is reported to 2.900 meters above sea level.

In Brazil the subspecies Pyrrhura molinae hypoxantha are located mainly in deciduous forest above the 500 m.

Gregarious (at least outside of breeding season), usually in flocks of 10-20, sometimes many more.

Very often seen in rapid flight, under, fairly erratic and slightly wavy. Difficult to detect as it feeds calmly in the treetops.

Reproduction:

It nests in hollow natural of trees. The laying is of 4 to 6 eggs during the month of February in the northeast of Argentina. Period of incubation: 20-24 days.

Food:

There is no information about the diet of the Green-cheeked Parakeet, but probably similar to nearby conspecifics; Forages in the treetops.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 675.000 km2

Its distribution runs from the southwest of Brazil and Northwest of Argentina to the East of Bolivia and probably South of Peru.

To this species is it can be observed in Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso from the South, in the southwest of Brazil, and in Beni, Peace, Cochabamba, Chuquisaca, Tarija and Santa Cruz, to the East of Bolivia, to the fringes of the Chaco. They can be distributed through the North of Bolivia up to the end South of Peru, in where is captured an individual hybrid with the Black-capped Parakeet (Pyrrhura rupicola).

Apparently absent from the land low of the pantanal and restricted in the basin of the Río Paraguay isolated plots of forests of chaco in the Highlands on the right bank of the river.

In the Northwest of Argentina is distributed in Salta, Jujuy and with less frequency in Tucumán (a record in Catamarca is probably wrong).

They can live on the fringes of the Northwest of Paraguay but not is tested. Some local seasonal movements they can occur, birds in the higher elevations down to altitudes lower in winter (Mar-Aug).

Generally common (very common in Salta and Jujuy); Highest densities in deciduous forest; It is the most common parrot in the forested valleys of Bolivia East but probably declining there due to the rapid clearance of its habitat.

Is sold during those years eighty and was extended in captive outside of its area of distribution.

Distribution of subspecies

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the population

The size of the world population It has not been quantified, but this species is described as “common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

Suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

Molina parrot in captivity:

Unknown in those birds up to the Decade of 1970, currently it is quite common. They have become one of the favorite birds in the pet trade, due to his sweet personality and at your disposal for fun. Are playful, loving and Smart.

Are not considered the best talkers. However, some Green-cheeked Parakeet, especially smart, they learned to speak very well, according their owners. Even so, most say only a couple of things, and there is no guarantee that you ever learn to speak. They also have low and serious voice, so even if managed to talk, It would not be easy for you to say something understandable.

Price per couple (ancestral): 120-200 EUR. Hypoxantha: 150-300 EUR.

Alternative names:

Green-cheeked Parakeet, Green cheeked Parakeet, Green-cheeked Conure, Yellow-sided Conure (English).
Conure de Molina, Perriche de Molina, Perruche de Molina (French).
Molinasittich, Molina Sittich, Molina-Sittich (German).
cara-suja, tiriba-de-cara-suja (Portuguese).
Chiripepé cabeza parda, Chiripepé de cabeza gris, Cotorra de Molina, Perico Amarillo, Perico Verde, Cotorra de mejillas verdes (Spanish).
Chiripepé cabeza parda (Argentina).
Chiripepé cabeza parda (Paraguay).
Chiripepe cabeza parda (Bolivia).
Kirki (Aymara).
Sira (Guaraní).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrrhura
Scientific name: Pyrrhura molinae
Citation: (Massena & Souancé, 1854)
Protonimo: Conurus molinae

Images Green-cheeked Parakeet:

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Green-cheeked Parakeet (Pyrrhura molinae)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
-Book parrots, Parrots and macaws
avianweb

Photos:

(1) – A Green-cheeked Parakeet perching on the index finger of a left hand By Eric Sonstroem from California, USA (Green-Cheeked ConureUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Green-cheeked Conure perching in an aviary at Kuala Lumpur Bird Park, Malaysia By Brandon Lim (Rainbow LorakeetUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Green-cheeked Conure perching in an aviary By Brandon Lim (Rainbow LorakeetUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(4) – A juvenile pet Yellow-sided Green-cheeked Conure (also Sordid Conure and the Yellow-sided Conure). It is a naturally occurring subspecies of the Green-cheeked Conure. The photograph shows a wing-clipped pet parrot in a bird cage. By therouxdown (Reese closeupUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(5) – A juvenile pet Yellow-sided Green-cheeked Conure (also Sordid Conure and the Yellow-sided Conure). It is a naturally occurring subspecies of the Green-cheeked Conure. The photograph shows a wing-clipped pet parrot perching on a food bowel By therouxdown (originally posted to Flickr as Reese profile) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(6) – Molina’s Parrot from Philip Lutley Sclater and W. H. Hudson, Argentine Ornithology: A Descriptive Catalogue of the Birds of the Argentine Republic (1888-89) in Wikimedia

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

Santa Marta Parakeet
Pyrrhura viridicata

Cotorra de Santa Marta

Description:

25 cm.. height.

The Santa Marta Parakeet (Pyrrhura viridicata) It, in general, green, with a strip red feature in the half of the chest that continues until the shoulder and armpit. The scales of the chest is less evident; the flight feathers blue. Band front narrow red in the forecrown and behind the eye with red and yellow dye. Tail over green and below red opaque.

Bill color bone; Brown IRIS; pale black legs. It has no sexual dimorphism.

  • Sound of the Santa Marta Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Cotorra Santa Marta.mp3]

Habitat:

It inhabits in mountain rainforest, clouded forest, pastures and edges, from 1900 to 2800 m. They fly at dawn and at dusk in compact and numerous flocks on the canopy of the forest. Is les has observed flying over them clear adjacent and each time more visiting them mulberry plantations.

The species rests and nests in couples and in lesser proportion in groups of three individuals in cavities of Palms of bouquet Ceroxylon ceriferum (Arecaceae).

Reproduction:

The period reproductive is starts in December and lasts until June, the cavities are visited on average 4 to 5 times a day. There is a sexual dimorphism and a low reproductive success can be associated with displacement or predation by the Aratinga wagleri wagleri (Scarlet-fronted Parakeet) or the Santa Marta Toucanet (Aulacorhynchus lautus prassinus) – Ramphastidae.

Food:

Twelve plant species are incorporated into the diet so far known to the Santa Marta Parakeet, It consists mainly of flowers and fruits, the inflorescence of the Croton bogotanus (Euphorbiaceae) is their main source of food. It forages in groups of size variable, showing an integration and disintegration of subgroups throughout the day. A sentinel system was observed.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 1,600 km2

Endemic species of Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, to the northeast of Colombia. The towns registered include The Summit, East of Taquiña on the basis of the Páramo of Mamarongo in the Guajira, and Cerro Quemado in the mountains of San Lorenzo.

Will produce some movements altitudinal seasonal. Almost all the habitat forest subtropical is designated as reserve forest or Park national, but the clearing for plantations of marijuana has been extensive, similar to the use of herbicides to combat it. So it only remains for the 15% the original forest (especially in the hillsides North), including only 200 the preferred height of the species km2. Quite common within this range very restricted, but the population probably below of the 5.000 birds.

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: In danger of extinction.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the red list category

The range of this species and its small population are probably decreasing as a result of habitat loss. Therefore, qualifies as in danger.

Justification of the population

The population It has been estimated for a long time between 5.000 and 10.000 individuals, equivalent approximately to 3.300-6.700 mature individuals. The density of population is of 1 Ave per km2 (Botero-Delgadillo et to the. 2012). Assuming that the 680 km2 of habitat are fully occupied, the population total is calculated that is 2,900-4,800 birds, which is equivalent to 1,933-3,200 mature individuals; However, with occupation part is likely to remain less than 2.500 birds (Botero-Delgadillo et to the. 2012).

Justification of trend

Se sospecha una decrease moderate and continuous of the population on the basis of the rates of habitat loss.

Threats

· Is only a 15% the original vegetation of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, to a large extent on the slope North, where this species is found (LM Renjifo, Com. 1993, 2000).

· The main threat today is the expansion of plantations of non-native trees, such as the of Pine and eucalyptus, In addition to the clearance of land for the livestock (C. Olaciregui in litt. 2012).

· Historically, the conversion of forests in plantations of marijuana and coca was also a major threat (LG Olarte in litt., 1993, com LM Renjifo. Comm., 1993, J. Fjeldså verbally of 2000, pers LM Renjifo. Comm., 2000, C. Olaciregui in litt. 2012), that is compounded by the Government with application of herbicides in the sierra (LG Olarte in litt., 1993, com LM Renjifo. Comm., 1993, 2000).

· Other threats that followed to the human migration to the area Since the Decade of 1950 hereafter include slash & burn (Dinerstein et to the., 1995, Snyder et to the. 2000, Salazar and Strewe undated, PGW Salaman in litt. 1999).

· We know that it is hunted in the Valley of the river cold, and in the San Pedro district individuals in mulberry plantations have skyrocketed. The species not found in the local bird trade (Strewe 2005).

Cotorra de Santa Marta en cautividad:

Not marketed for captive.

Alternative names:

Santa Marta Parakeet, Santa Marta Conure (English).
Conure des Santa Marta, Perriche de Santa Marta, Perruche de Santa Marta (French).
Santa-Marta-Sittich, Santa Marta Sittich, Sittich (German).
Santa Marta Parakeet (Portuguese).
Cotorra de Santa Marta, Perico Oliva, Periquito de Santa Marta (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrrhura
Scientific name: Pyrrhura viridicata
Citation: Todd, 1913
Protonimo: Pyrrhura viridicata


Santa Marta Parakeet (Pyrrhura viridicata)

Sources:

Avibase
Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
Oliveros rooms, H.. 2005. Population and ecological evaluation of the Santa Marta parakeet Parrot parakeet in the sector of San Lorenzo, Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia. (ProAves.org)

Photos:

(1) – Fundación ProAves – Proaves.org

Sounds: By GABRIEL MILK (Xeno-canto)

Fiery shouldered Parakeet
Pyrrhura egregia


Fiery shouldered Parakeet

Description:

25 cm.. height.

Fiery shouldered Parakeet

The Fiery shouldered Parakeet (Pyrrhura egregia) has a close frontal band brown; crown, lores, rear area of the neck and upper cheeks, brownish; ear-coverts reddish brown; feathers on the sides of the neck basically green with subterminal band of color beige, narrow dark tips giving a scaly appearance to the whole.

The upperparts Green with dark and narrow edges to some feathers. Carpal area and front edge of the wing , Orange with yellow marks; primary coverts usually blue but sometimes colored yellow shiny; upperwing-coverts green. Outerwebs of flight feather, blue. Underwing-coverts marked with yellow orange; Bottom of the flight feather gray. Feathers in the throat and the chest basically green with the subterminal band Hazelnut color and dark tips, giving a scaly appearance; underparts green, with the majority of the feathers of the belly Brown at the base and green-tipped, sometimes forming a brown patch. Upper, the tail Brown very dark, green at the base; by down gray.

The bill color horn; skin peri-oftalmica naked white; Brown the irises; legs Brown-Black.

Both sexes are similar.

The immature It has much less yellow and orange in the upperwing-coverts and infra-alares; the crown Green and flakes in the chest and on the sides of the neck less pronounced.

Subspecies description:

  • Pyrrhura egregia egregia

    (Sclater,PL, 1881) – The nominal.

  • Pyrrhura egregia obscura

    (Zimmer & Phelps,WH 1946) – Similar to the species nominal but with the upperparts darker green and the underparts also slightly more dark. Patch Brown in the belly less frequent and less prominent.

  • Sound of the Fiery shouldered Parakeet.
[audio:HTTPS://www.mascotarios.org/wp-content/themes/imageless_gray_beauty/sonidos/Fiery-shouldered Conure.mp3]

Habitat:

The species inhabits in forests humid premontane and forest secondary dense on them Tepuis, between 700 to 1800 m. Generally flocks of 7-25 birds.

Reproduction:

Little information on the breeding; is reproduce between March and April with fledged young people between May-June. Period of incubation: 23 Dias.

Food:

There is no information about the diet, except that birds visit Amerindian villages from July to August to feed of fruit of, for example, guavas mature.

Distribution:

Distribución de tamaño (reproduction / resident): 49.400 km2

Distribution restricted to the Tepui region in the north-eastern interior of South America. The species is known from Venezuela on Gran Sabana to the southeast of Bolivar, in the Mount Roraima and Arabopo and from the Mount Auyan-tepui and the Mt. Ptari-tepui.

Can be found in adjacent areas of the West of Guyana, for example, in the surroundings of the River Chamber and top of the Mazaruni River, the Merume mountains and Pacaraima mountains to the South of Annai.

The reports of Suriname still no confirmed. Probably are distributed in the northeast of Roraima, Brazil.

Inaccessible range and few details about his status, but apparently fairly common. Large part of the range Venezuelan included in the Canaima National Park.

Small quantities exported from Guyana to end of the years eighty and subsequently bred in captivity.

Distribution of subspecies:

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Decreasing.

Justification of the population

The population size World has not been quantified, but this species is described as “quite common” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

Justification of trend

It is suspected that this species has lost 3.3-10.5% of habitat suitable within their distribution during three generations (18 years), based on a model of Amazon deforestation (Soares-Filho et to the., 2006, Bird et to the., 2011). Given the susceptibility of the species to hunt or capture, It is suspected that will decrease in <25% durante tres generaciones.

Cotorra Egregia en cautividad:

Intelligent, relatively calm and playful. Young birds are very timid.
They are aggressive with other birds and it is very rare in captivity, with small quantities exported from Guyana at the end of the 1980s and subsequently raised in captivity.

Price per couple: 300-400 EUR.

Alternative names:

Fiery-shouldered Parakeet, Fiery shouldered Parakeet, Fiery-shoulderd Conure, Fiery-shouldered Conure (English).
Conure aile-de-feu, Perriche aile-de-feu, Perruche aile-de-feu (French).
Feuerbugsittich, Feuerbug-Sittich (German).
tiriba-de-cauda-roxa (Portuguese).
Cotorra Egregia, Perico de Cola Morada, Perico colimorado (Spanish).
Perico de Pantepui (Venezuela).

Philip Sclater
Philip Sclater

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrrhura
Scientific name: Pyrrhura egregia
Citation: (Sclater, PL, 1881)
Protonimo: Conurus egregius

Fiery shouldered Parakeet images:

————————————————————————————————

Fiery shouldered Parakeet (Pyrrhura egregia)

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – Demerara Conure By Gazelle74 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(2) – Demerara female “at work”. These little parrots love to gnaw at wood, paper and many other things By Gazelle74 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
(3) – Fiery-shouldered Parakeet (Pyrrhura egregia) by Margareta Wieser. A pair perching on a branch – HBW
(4) – Fiery-shouldered Parakeet (Pyrrhura egregia) by Andrew Emmerson. An adult bird – HBW
(5) – Fiery-shouldered Parakeet (Pyrrhura egregia) by Andrew Emmerson. An adult preening – HBW
(6) – Conurus egregius » = Pyrrhura egregia (Fiery-shouldered parakeet) by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds: (Xeno-canto)

El Oro Parakeet
Pyrrhura orcesi


Cotorra de El Oro

Description:

22 cm. of long and 73 g. of weight.

The El Oro Parakeet (Pyrrhura orcesi) is a bird relatively striking, with plumage mostly green. Has the forecrown red; feathers on the sides of the neck with the white base; Red patch from the shoulder up to the half of the wing , end of the wing blue (more visible in flight), tail above with a reddish tint and below completely red except the base.

Beak and legs blackish.

The females It is thought that less red have around the face.

the youth they are generally paler and lack much of the red marks that are seen in adults.

Habitat:

It inhabits in the very wet tropical forest between 800-1.200 m (occasionally at altitudes as low as 300 m). It has been reported that he tolerates some habitat fragmentation (Schaefer and Schmidt 2003). Performs seasonal movements. Are usually distributed in groups of 4-15, Although it has been observed in flocks of up to 60 birds. They may be closely related with the Maroon-tailed Parakeet (Pacific) (Pyrrhura melanura pacifica) and the Maroon-tailed Parakeet (Pyrrhura melanura)

The rest sites They seem to change frequently and are generally located between 2 and 24 meters above the ground, in natural cavities in trees or open branches.

It is extremely noisy and conspicuous when flying.

Reproduction:

As is a species discovered recently, very little is known about its ecology.

Seems to prefer the Dacryodes peruviana family Burseraceae for nest (Garzon 2007), and communal, sharing the tasks of incubation between several birds, Although a couple exhibited a behavior of pre-anidamiento in the cavity of a small tree Meliaceae in 1997 (Snyder et to the. 2000), and reported nests in natural cavities of 1,8-24 m above the ground in a variety of tree species (Schaefer and Schmidt 2003).

The time of incubation is of approximately 31 days.

The main breeding station seems to be between November and March (Garzon 2007), Although it is difficult to realize because the effects of 'El Niño' breeding between December and January.

Movements seasonal altitudinal down to forests have been reported in the Buenaventura reserve (T. Schaefer in litt., 2007).

Food:

Discreetly feeding in the canopy, composing your diet of various fruits (including fig Ficus spp.), Fruits and flowers Cecropia (Snyder et to the., 2000).

Distribution:

Distribución de tamaño (reproduction / resident) 750 km2

The El Oro Parakeet is an endemic bird. They inhabit in the western slope of the Andes, in the southwest of Ecuador (in Cañar, Azuay, Gold and Loja), where was discovered in 1980.

Apparently, its population is limited to an area of only 100 km from North to South, and a maximum of 5-10 km wide (Juniper and Parr 1998), with its highly fragmented Habitat and with a population estimated in less than 1.000 individuals (Garzon 2007).

Its population in the town of Buenaventura has remained stable since 2002-2007 (Juniper and Parr 1998), estimated in 171 birds in the period 2005-2006 (2007 Garzon, HM Schaefer in litt. 2012).

Conservation:

• Current red list category of the UICN: In danger of extinction

• Population trend: In decline.

The El Oro Parakeet is in danger of extinction due to deforestation and the extreme fragmentation of the forest for cattle breeding, What causes the habitat degradation. This degradation destroy sites of nesting and feeding that these birds need to survive and reproduce at a healthy pace.

Population estimated in less than 1.000 individuals.

The Habitat limited only to the Andes, to the West of Ecuador and because of this, sensitivity to the destruction of the Habitat is very heavy. Protection for some of the habitat of this species has been established in the Book ecological Buenaventura. In reserves, bird houses have been built in trees to help promote reproduction and has had some success. Other projects have been proposed to evaluate the size of the population.

Cotorra de El Oro en cautividad:

Don't usually see in the poultry farming.

Alternative names:

El Oro Parakeet, El Oro Conure (English).
Conure d’Orcés, Conure d’Orcès, Perruche d’El Oro (French).
Orcessittich, Orces Sittich, Orces-Sittich (German).
Tiriba-do-el-oro (Portuguese).
Cotorra de El Oro, Perico de orcés (Spanish).

Scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrrhura
Scientific name: Pyrrhura orcesi
Citation: Ridgely & Robbins, 1988
Protonimo: Pyrrhura orcesi


El Oro Parakeet (Pyrrhura orcesi)

Sources:

  • Avibase
  • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
  • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
  • Birdlife

Photos:

(1) – fjocotoco.org

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