▷ The world of Pets: Dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, amphibians

Rose-headed Parakeet
Pyrrhura rhodocephala

Cotorra Coronirroja

Content

Description:

Rose-headed Parakeet

24-25 cm.. height.
The Rose-headed Parakeet (Pyrrhura rhodocephala) is a small parrot with the body almost all green and a long tail. The more notorious is the hood pink reddish and the patch red behind them eyes; cheeks until uppertail-coverts green. Primary coverts white, other coverts green except, sometimes, some feathers scattered red-orange in the bend of wing. Outerwebs of them flight feather, Blue with black tips. Undertail-coverts green. Feathers of the throat, the chest and the sides of the neck, of color green olive with tips brownish that give an effect of scaly very dim; belly slightly more green olive that the upperparts, with a pale patch red in the center; the undertail-coverts green; at the top, the tail brownish red color; undertail, red clear.

Bill color pale horn; bare periophthalmic white; brown the irises; legs dark gray.

Both sexes similar.

The immature shows a crown bluish green with scattered red feathers, primary coverts Blue and base green until it tail.

Habitat:

Video – "Rose-headed Parakeet" (Pyrrhura rhodocephala)

Pyrrhura Rhodocephala

It inhabits mainly in humid forests, secondary, and páramo, between 800 to 3400 m. Resident Although daily make long migrations.
Fly in flocks of 10 to 30 individuals.

Reproduction:

There is little information on reproduction, probably it breeding season between the months of May-June.

Food:

It probably feeds on berries, seeds, fruits and flowers.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 17,000 km2

This Parrot is endemic to the Andes, in the Northwest corner of Venezuela, on both slopes of the Cordillera de Mérida from Táchira until Trujillo, with records in the mountains of Merida and North of Barinas.

Is probably resident but perform movements daily to distances considerable. They are distributed in several protected areas, apparently, effective, but the continuous deforestation in its small range must represent a threat to long term.

Conservation:

State of conservation ⓘ


Status Minor Concern ⓘ (UICN)ⓘ

• Current category of the Red List of the UICN: Least concern.

• Population trend: Stable.

Justification of the population

The size of the world's population has not been quantified, but the species is described as quite common (Hilty 2003).

Justification of trend

They suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

"Rose-headed Parakeet" in captivity:

Absent in captivity, at least out of Venezuela.

Alternative names:

Rose-headed Parakeet, Rose headed Parakeet, Rose-crowned Conure, Rose-crowned Parakeet, Rose-headed Conure (English).
Conure tête-de-feu, Perriche tête-de-feu, Perruche tête-de-feu (French).
Rotkopfsittich, Rotkopf-Sittich (German).
Tiriba-cabeça-rosa (Portuguese).
Cotorra Coronirroja, Perico de Cabeza Roja (español).


scientific classification:

Philip Sclater
Philip Sclater

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Psittacidae
Genus: Pyrrhura
Scientific name: Pyrrhura rhodocephala
Citation: (Sclater & Salvin, 1871)
Protonimo: Conurus rhodocephalus

Images "Rose-headed Parakeet"



Especies del género Pyrrhura

Sources:

Avibase
– Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
– Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
Birdlife
– Parrot Book, Parrots and macaws Neotropical

Photos:

(1) – fouragesofsand
(2) – Pyrrhura rhodocephala, Rose-crowned Parakeet by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Sounds:

▷ The world of Pets: Dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, amphibians

Pink cockatoo
Cacatua leadbeateri

Cacatúa Abanderada

Content

Description


Anatomy-parrots-eng

35 cm.. length and weighing approximately between 340 and 425 g.
The Pink cockatoo (Cacatua leadbeateri) is distinguishable by its spectacular Crest composed by 16 long feathers forward curved. These pens have a wide base with a slightly pink and yellow red-stained central part.

The top ends of the crest are white. Another set of more rounded feathers grow over the eye, forming a white base when the crest is raised. The forecrown is spanned by a band thin and reddish.

The face, neck and underparts are salmon, becoming is white in the coverts.
The flight feather and tail are white with infiltration of salmon on the bottom.

The bill is horn. The irises dark brown and legs grey.

The female looks like your partner, but the head Pink salmon and underparts they are paler. The band Yellow that decorates the bill is brighter and wider. Upper belly It is white instead of Pink salmon. The irises are reddish-pink.

The immature they are identical to the female. The frontal band is bright orange-red, the irises light brown.

Description 2 subspecies

  • Cacatua leadbeateri leadbeateri

    (Vigors, 1831) – Nominal.


  • Cacatua leadbeateri mollis

    (Mathews, 1912) – Both similar to the kind adults nominal, but with the crest darker red, with little or no yellow. White Peak.

Behavior:

The couple is the basic social unit, but are maintained contact with other couples nonreproductive through the establishment of groups.

Out of it breeding season, There are mainly small bands consisting of 10 to 50 birds. Major gatherings occur only during periods of drought or when food sources are abundant. In this case, There may be a few hundred individuals, among them, small Galah.

Dormitories they are occupied exclusively outside the breeding season and the birds leave early at dawn.

The Pink cockatoo they forage in trees and on the ground. But, This species is more arboreal that the Galah wave Little corella.

When moving on the ground, He walks slowly to avoid the tall grass.

In the Flock, a bird play always the role of Sentinel. It adopts a very careful attitude, it partially roughcast its crest and regularly pauses during which is very upright inspecting the surroundings.

During the mid-day heat, it finds shelter in the foliage of the trees.. During the summer, rest period is longer.

The paired birds they are always near each other. During periods of intense heat, This bird visit water points, even during the day. At sunset, they return to your bedroom.

Habitat:

Video – "Pink cockatoo" (Cacatua leadbeateri)

Cockatoo leadbeateri _ Inkakakadu`s in Aktion

Its population is distributed by a variety of forest habitats in arid or semi-arid areas.
The species is closely related to the areas of “Mallee“.

Found particularly in afforestation of cypress and eucalyptus, in mixed plots of eucalyptus and Casuarinas or near cliffs.
Its presence in a place is largely also to the existence of a water fountain.
On the other hand, shows a very weak attachment to the fragmented habitats that is no long.

Reproduction:

The nesting season running from August to December. Cockatoos return to their traditional nesting sites.

The cavity for the nest receives improvements: the entrance is enlarged and covered with a layer of fresh chips placed at the bottom of the nest. The nests they are almost always far from one another, at a distance of 2 km.

The spawning is between 2 and 5 eggs being deposited between 2 and 3 days. The incubation It made both parents, begins after the deposit of the third egg and lasts between 23 and 24 days.

The chicks they remain at the bottom of the cavity during 57 days and are fed by the male and the female indistinctly. The family stays near the nest until the last hatchling leaves the nest., they will then join other family groups in the place where food resources are appropriate.

On rare occasions, the Pink cockatoo is forced to eject a couple of Galah He started to lay eggs in their nest, but it can also happen that this form of parasitism is a success. In this case, the partner of the Pink cockatoo takes care of eggs and young after hatching. When are born, the young of the species Eolophus roseicapilla, they behave exactly like their hosts, ignoring the difference in origin.

Food:

With feed seed, herbs, cereals and often of melons (Cucumber myiocarpus). Also consume fresh local figs, pine cones, eucalyptus seeds, bulbs, dried fruits, estate, insects and larvae.

During and after your meal, These birds biting branches and pieces of bark, causing a shower of timber crushed at the foot of the trees.

During periods of intense heat, increase the frequency of his visits to water points.

Distribution:

Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 2,88 million km2

endemic to Australia. Its main strongholds are in the southwest of Queensland where is quite extended and South of Australia, where is locally common.

In other parts of the continent are very rare and scarce, going back to the vicinity of the Northern Territory and carrying out raids in Western Australia.

Distribution 2 subspecies:

  • Cacatua leadbeateri leadbeateri

    (Vigors, 1831) – Nominal.


  • Cacatua leadbeateri mollis

    (Mathews, 1912) – Interior West and centre of Australia, towards the East, up to the eyre peninsula and the basin of the Lake Eyre, South of Australia.

Conservation:

Least concern (Red list 2006).

• Listed as vulnerable by NSW national parks and wildlife.

Threatened by the law of conservation of species (2005).

Its distribution is very unequal, but only in the Centre - this actually is and South-East where they have widespread. In other parts of Australia, This species is declining due to the thinning of the habitat and its marketing as bird cage.

Competition with the Galah's disability for nesting cavities may be a crucial problem in the future if this species continues to grow. The world population of the Pink cockatoo It is estimated in a little less than 20 000 birds. It is classified as near threatened.

"Pink cockatoo" in captivity:

It is a frequently held in captive animal in your Australia natal, but it is less known in other countries like ours. Its price in the market is very high, especially that of males, being one of the most expensive white cockatoos.

Very noisy, with a great personality, playful and very active. It is very destructive, We must therefore provide toys and wood to gnaw, or otherwise you will satisfy with house furniture and other elements. Inactive animals, bored or stressed tend to yell a lot.

Its life expectancy round between the 40 and 60 years of life.

Alternative names:

Pink Cockatoo, Leadbeater’s Cockatoo, Major Mitchell’s cackatoo (ingles).
Cacatoès de Leadbeater, Cacatoès commandant Mitchell (French).
Inkakakadu (German).
Cacatua-rosa (Portuguese).
Cacatúa Abanderada, Cacatúa Inca (español).

scientific classification:

Order: Psittaciformes
Family: Cacatuidae
Genus: Cockatoo
Scientific name: Cacatua leadbeateri
Citation: (Vigors, 1831)
Protonimo: Plyctolophus Leadbeateri

Images Flag-crested Cockatoo:



Species of the genus Cacatua
  • Cacatua tenuirostris
  • Cacatua pastinator
  • —- Cacatua pastinator derbyi
  • —- Cacatua pastinator pastinator
  • Cacatua sanguinea
  • —- Cacatua sanguinea gymnopis
  • —- Cacatua sanguinea normantoni
  • —- Cacatua sanguinea sanguinea
  • —- Cacatua sanguinea transfreta
  • —- Cacatua sanguinea westralensis
  • Cacatua goffiniana
  • Cacatua ducorpsii
  • Cacatua haematuropygia
  • Cacatua galerita
  • —- Cacatua galerita eleonora
  • —- Cacatua galerita fitzroyi
  • —- Cacatua galerita galerita
  • —- Cacatua galerita triton
  • Cacatua ophthalmica
  • Cacatua sulphurea
  • —- Cacatua sulphurea abbotti
  • —- Cacatua sulphurea citrinocristata
  • —- Cacatua sulphurea parvula
  • —- Cacatua sulphurea sulphurea
  • Cacatua moluccensis
  • Cacatua alba

  • Sources:

    Avibase, infoexoticos, Oiseaux.NET

    – Photos: imagenesdeanimalessalvajes (Alexis Obninsk), David Cook Wildlife Photography, Wikimedia , parcodeipappagalli , Geoffrey Dabb

    – Sounds: Patrik Åberg (Xeno-canto)

    ▷ The world of Pets: Dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, amphibians

    Pygmy hanging parrot
    Loriculus exilis

    Pygmy hanging parrot

    Content


    Anatomy-parrots-eng

    Description

    10 to 11 cm.. length.

    Pygmy hanging parrot

    The head of the Pygmy hanging parrot (Loriculus exilis) is green, brighter around the base of the bill and bathed in bluish green at the chin, the throat, the cheeks and the part front of it crown.

    The underparts is green, with the rump and uppertail-coverts dark red (very extended below the tail); the sides and the base of the rump are greenish-yellow. Wings green. Under, the wings Turquoise with coverts green. Throat of color red bordered of blue pale and extending is about part superior of the chest; rest of the underparts green, slightly more clear that the upperparts. The tail, at the top, Green with yellowish tips; undertail, the tail is of a pale color green blue.

    The bill coral red; irises yellow; legs oranges.

    The females lack of the bib red (or have very small bib). Also have a reduced blue diffusion in the chest and irises brown.

    The young birds they have a bib Red small, a bill yellowish brown, and a pale brown iris.

    Habitat:

    Usually little-known. It is distributed by forests, coastal mangroves, around the villages and in the open field, from the lowlands to the wooded hills to some 1.000 m, altitudes and in similar habitats to the of the Great hanging parrot.

    The birds are found in groups of up to five copies, feeding in the canopy of figs or the trees in flower nectar; their power moves have been compared with the movements of crawling in the Pygmy Parrot Micropsitta. Larger flocks have been found in the mangroves during may, Although the species can reproduce twice a year, in February and August; it is not known if these represent post-breeding concentrations or nomadic groups.

    Reproduction:

    A hole in a dead palm tree is the only known record of a zone of nesting.

    Food:

    Feeds of figs or nectar.

    Distribution:

    Size of the area of distribution (reproduction / resident): 103.000 km2

    Endemic to Sulawesi, where is located from the North, on Minahassa Peninsula, to the South.

    Conservation:


    Status


    • Current IUCN Red List category: Near threatened

    • Population trend: Decreasing

    The size of the world population It has not been quantified, Although it is estimated at more than 10.000 specimens. The species is described as uncommon and rare.

    There are no data on trends in the population, but the species is suspected to be decreasing at a moderately fast pace, due to degradation of the habitat.

    "Pygmy hanging parrot" in captivity:

    Very rare in captivity.

    Alternative names:

    Red-billed Hanging-Parrot, Celebes Lilliput Hanging-Parrot, Green Hanging Parrot, Green Hanging-Parrot, Lilliput Hanging-Parrot, Pygmy Hanging Parrot, Pygmy Hanging-Parrot, Red billed Hanging Parrot, Red-billed Hanging Parrot, Talabula Hanging-Parrot (ingles).
    Coryllis vert (French).
    Däumlingspapageichen, Däumlings-Papageichen (German).
    Lorículo Exiguo (Portuguese).
    Lorículo Exiguo (español).

    scientific classification:

    Order: Psittaciformes
    Family: Psittaculidae
    Genus: Loriculus
    Scientific name: Loriculus exilis
    Citation: Schlegel, 1866
    Protonimo: Loriculus exilis

    Videos "Pygmy hanging parrot"

    Videos "Pygmy hanging parrot"

    ————————————————————————————————

    “Pygmy hanging parrot” (Loriculus exilis)


    Sources:

    Avibase
    – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    – Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    – Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – By Peter Waanders – Caged female has attracted wild male. lynx
    (2) – Loriculus exilis by John Gerrard Keulemans [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

    Sounds: Mike Nelson (Xeno-canto)

    ▷ The world of Pets: Dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, amphibians

    Blue-crowned Conure
    Psittacara acuticaudatus


    Blue-crowned Conure

    Content

    Description:

    33-38 cm.. length and a weight between 170 and 176 g..

    The Blue-crowned Conure (Psittacara acuticaudatus) It is one of the largest of the genus birds Aratinga. elongated body, and long tail gradada, equal to all the Aratinga.

    You have the front of the crown, the forecrown, the cheeks and lores pale bright blue. The sides of the neck, the nape, the the mantle, scapulars and back are bright green; the rump and uppertail-coverts are green pale. Upperwing-coverts bright green; alula with blue dye.

    Anatomy-parrots-eng Primaries and secondaries green above, with pinkish tinge in the vane inner, olive gold below. Underwing-coverts green.

    The underparts are pale green with shades of olive green; some feathers of the chest drenched blue. Upper, the tail green color in the vane outer, red brick in the vane inner with fusion of opaque green tips; undertail, the tail Red, distally faded to pale brown brick.

    Ilustración Aratinga Cabeciazul

    Rosacea the upper jaw, greyish the lower; nude orbital region creamy white; irises yellowish-orange; legs pale pink.

    Sexes similar in plumage.

    The immature has the blue color of the head restricted to the forecrown and to the crown, no blue tint in the chest. The copies juveniles of the nominal species has bill a paler tone.

    Subspecies description
    Subspecies

    A more thorough research is needed to assess the taxonomic status of this species. The date of the original publication of the subspecies koenigi It is discussed; This and the use of nigrirostris apparently synonymous (by the same author) requires clarification. Five recognized subspecies.

    • Psittacara acuticaudatus acuticaudatus

      (Vieillot, 1818) – The species nominal


    • Psittacara acuticaudatus haemorrhous

      (Spix, 1824) – Both jaws pale pink, underparts bright green and blue of the head narrower that the of the nominal species.


    • Psittacara acuticaudatus koenigi

      (Arndt, 1995) – Similar to the subspecies “harmorrhous“, but with the vane inner at the bottom of the the tail feathers less reddish brown. Smaller (34 cm.).


    • Psittacara acuticaudatus neoxenus

      (Cory, 1909) – Similar to the subspecies “haemorrhous” but bluish green in the chest and the belly; smaller than other subspecies except the “koenigi” (34cm.).


    • Psittacara acuticaudatus neumanni

      (Blake & Traylor, 1947) – Only the forecrown, the lores and the front of the crown, are blue, Green the rest of the head.

    Habitat:

    Video – "Blue-crowned Conure"

    Lolita. Aratinga acuticaudata

    The Blue-crowned Conure they live in dry deciduous forests and open habitats including habitats semi-desiertos associated. Registered in the caatinga and the closed with vegetation of Palms Mauritia in the northeast of Brazil, in gallery forest Venezuela and Colombia, deserts in Bolivia, and pampas in Argentina; Also cultivated areas and grassland in dry forest areas.

    In general, they live in the lowlands (400 m in Colombia, 600 metres in Venezuela), but ascend to 2650 m in Bolivia, in leguminous forest habitats with columnar cacti.

    Usually, in pairs or small flocks, but with larger aggregations outside the breeding season, especially where is food abundant, resulting in considerable local movement and consequent fluctuations in local bird numbers.

    In some places, birds roost in crevices of the rocky cliffs. Observed in association with the Mitred Parakeet (Psittacara mitratus) and White-eyed Parakeet (Psittacara leucophthalmus).

    Reproduction:

    Nest in high tree cavities, among the cultivated species are included as the Mango wave guava; in some areas nested in the cavities of the cliffs sandstone.

    The egg laying, generally three to four, takes place in December in Paraguay and Argentina; the brood probably between the months of March and July in Venezuela.

    The female incubated eggs during 26 days, and chicks they leave the nest a few 52 days after birth.

    Food:

    The Blue-crowned Conure they feed in the trees in bushes, and also in land.

    Reported foods that make up their diet include seeds of sorghum and Bambusa, berries of Condalia lineata, fruit of Cactus and crops as the Mango Mangifera, possibly also feed on of insects.

    Distribution:

    Its distribution is discontinuous and wide much of South America. Can be observed in several separate populations from Venezuela to Argentina. One of the largest areas of distribution extends from the northeast of Colombia (to the southeast of the Andes to Department of Meta), including the Guajira Peninsula and Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta in the Northwest of Venezuela to the East of Monagas (including the Margarita Island) and South to the North of Bolívar.

    A second population of the Blue-crowned Conure resides in the Northwest of Brazil, to the East of Piauí, North of Bay, Pernambuco and Alagoas. A third You can see from the East of Bolivia and West of Mato Grosso, Brazil, even more to the South, through Paraguay and South of Argentina until The Pampa and southwest of Buenos Aires, perhaps also some individuals in the West of Uruguay.

    Pretty common in Colombia. Frequent in Venezuela, although the abundance of birds varies with the season. From just frequent up to quite common in Bolivia. In Northeast Brazil It is most abundant in some locations Parrot. Of common to quite common (but possibly in decline) in the North of Argentina.

    Possibly extinct or very rare in West Uruguay. In the Margarita Islands very few examples (between 100 and 200 birds released) the loss of habitat due to tourism, his capture as a domestic fowl, and due to their predation by rats.

    There are a large number of specimens in captivity (more than 94.000 birds were exported from Argentina in the period between 1985-1990).

    Subspecies distribution
    Subspecies

    Conservation:

    State of conservation ⓘ


    Status Minor Concern ⓘ (UICN)ⓘ

    • Red List category of the UICN current: Least concern

    • Population trend: Decreasing

    The size of the world population It has not been quantified.

    The Blue-headed Parakeet is common in most of its distribution. But like almost all species of parrots, It is threatened by deforestation and the degradation of the habitat.

    Some subspecies, in particular the “Psittacara acuticaudatus neoxenus” they are threatened by the cage bird trade. Since 1981 When it was included in the Appendix II, 193,299 individuals were captured in the wild and reported for international trade (UNEP-WCMC trade database CITES, January 2005).

    The predation of nests seen as a threat by the rats. But, the Blue-crowned Conure is not considered threatened by now.

    "Blue-crowned Conure" in captivity:

    Birds are very sociable, very attached to their owners. It is also known have to imitate the human voice, able to learn some words and short sentences.

    With regard to its longevity, according to sources, a specimen lived for 31 years in captivity

    Its feeding in captivity it is omnivorous and varied, will include sunflower and pumpkin seeds, Tender corn, Green peanuts, oats, wheat, cañamones, In addition to fruits and vegetables: Apple, pear, banana, lettuce, Escarole, etc. During the breeding and fattening, You will be offered biscuit paste and egg yolk.

    Paulie

    Until the release of the movie “Paulie“, It presented a Blue-crowned Conure, This species was one of the secrets better kept in poultry production.

    Alternative names:

    Blue-crowned Conure, Blue crowned Parakeet, Blue-crowned Parakeet, Sharp-tailed Conure (English).
    Conure à tête bleue, Conure à front bleu, Perriche à tête bleue, Perruche à tête bleue (French).
    Spitzschwanzsittich (German).
    Periquito-de-cabeça-azul, Aratinga-de-testa-azul, Aratinga-de-testa-azul / Periquitão, jandaia-de-cabeça-azul, maracanã, periquitão, periquito-de-bico-rosa, periquito-de-pé-rosa (Portuguese).
    Aratinga Cabeciazul, Calacante común, Calancate, Calancate Común, Loro Cabeza Azul, Maracaná cabeza azulada, Perico Frentiazul, Periquito de Cabeza Azul (español).
    Calacante común, Calancate, Calancate Común (Argentina).
    Calancate (Bolivia).
    Loro frentiazul, Perico Frentiazul (Colombia).
    Maracaná cabeza azulada (Paraguay).
    Loro Cabeza Azul (Uruguay).
    Carapaico, Ñangaro (Venezuela).
    Marakana, Ñendai (Guarani).

    scientific classification:

    Order: Psittaciformes
    Family: Psittacidae
    Genus: Psittacara
    Scientific name: Psittacara acuticaudatus
    Citation: (Vieillot, 1818)
    Protonimo: Psittacus acuticaudatus

    • Clements, version 2017: Thectocercus acuticaudatus

    Images Blue-crowned Conure:


    Species of the genus Psittacara

    Sources:

    • Avibase
    • Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    • Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    • Birdlife

    • Photos:

    (1) – Blue-crowned Parakeet, Blue-crowned Conure, or sharp-tailed conure (Aratinga acuticaudata) By John Graziano en:user:Gnocchi [GFDL, CC-BY-SA-3.0, GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (2) – Blue-crowned Parakeet (also known as Blue-crowned Conure and Sharp-tailed Conure) in the square of the small village of San Isidro, Santa Cruz dept, Bolivia By Håkan Sandin [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Feral Blue-crowned Parakeets (also knows as Blue-crowned Conure and Sharp-tailed Conure) in Miami, Florida, USA By Kevin from Rotterdam, The Netherlands (threesomeUploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – A feral Blue-crowned Parakeet in Pompano Beach, Florida, USA By John Spade from Pompano Beach, USA (Guava ThiefUploaded by snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (5) – Blue-crowned Parakeet, Blue-crowned Conure, or sharp-tailed conure (Aratinga acuticaudata) By Richard (originally posted to Flickr as Looking at you!) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (6) – Conurus acuticaudatus = Aratinga acuticaudata (Blue-crowned Parakeet) Marc Athanase Parfait Oeillet Des Murs [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

    ▷ The world of Pets: Dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, amphibians

    Brown-throated Parakeet
    Eupsittula pertinax

    Aratinga Pertinaz

    Content

    Description:


    Anatomy-parrots-eng

    Of 17 to 20 cm. length between 76 and 102 g. of weight.
    The Brown-throated Parakeet (Eupsittula pertinax) it is a polytypic species. Its fourteen subspecies are distinguished by the mix yellow and Brown on his face and throat.

    In the case of the Eupsittula pertinax aeruginosa, the lores previous, the frontal area, underside of cheeks, both sides of the neck and ear-coverts, are dark brown; dark stripes visible on the cheeks; the feathers of the ocular region are of color orange-yellow; the crown greenish blue. Upperparts olive green. Lesser and medium coverts green; bluish green the primaries and greater coverts. Primaries and secondaries green up, Blue dark on the tips, Blue them vane outer in the secondaries; by down dark grey. Underwing-coverts brighter yellowish green. The throat and the top chest dark brown; the underparts Matte yellowish green with an orange patch in the central area of the belly. For above, the tail is of color green blue, bluer towards the tip; undertail greyish-yellow.

    Eupsittula pertinax

    The bill brownish-grey; bare periophthalmic yellowish white; irises yellow, legs grey.

    Both sexes similar, without sexual dimorphism, where males are larger than females.

    The youth they tend to lack intense yellow, that is alive in individuals adults. Its forecrown is dark greenish blue. The throat and the chest are greenish, while the belly is green with a bit of orange or yellow.

    Description subspecies Eupsittula pertinax
    Subspecies
    • Eupsittula pertinax aeruginosa (Linnaeus) 1758 – See description.

    • Eupsittula pertinax arubensis (Hartert) 1892 – Cara and throat color opaque marron-oliva. Narrow yellow line on the eyes. Crown greenish blue.

    • Eupsittula pertinax chrysogenys (Massena & Souance) 1854 – Similar to the aeruginosa subspecies, but darker.

    • Eupsittula pertinax chrysophrys (Swainson) 1838 – Similar to the subspecies margaritensis and venezuelae but with the forecrown a pale yellowish brown.

    • Eupsittula pertinax griseipecta (Meyer de Schauensee) 1950 – Similar to the aeruginosa subspecies, with the cheeks, the throat and top of the chest, Gray-olive, veins in the cheeks absent. The crown Green with little blue.

    • Eupsittula pertinax lehmanni (Dugand) 1943 – Is similar to the aeruginosa subspecies, but with yellowish feathers around the eye more extensive; the Blue head limited with the forecrown and less blue in the flight feather.

    • Eupsittula pertinax margaritensis Cory 1918 – Forehead whitish, the cheeks and ear-coverts color oliva-marron with forecrown greenish blue.

    • Eupsittula pertinax ocularis (Sclater,PL & Salvin) 1865 – Patch distinctive yellow below and behind the eyes (absent in the immature). Forehead and crown green color with tint blue in some birds. Throat, top of the chest, the cheeks and lores warm brown; ear-coverts slightly darker.

    • Eupsittula pertinax paraensis (Sick) 1959 – Similar to the aeruginosa subspecies, but with the irises of color red and the vane outer of primaries and secondaries blue.

    • Eupsittula pertinax pertinax (Linnaeus) 1758 – The nominal. Extensive but variable amount of yellow color in the forecrown, the cheeks, the throat and lores. It may be more off or more Orange under and behind the eyes. Crown Green with only a few light blue indications.

    • Eupsittula pertinax surinama (Zimmer & Phelps,WH) 1951 – Similar to the subspecies margaritensis but with narrow frontal band orange-yellow color, orange-yellow colour around the eyes extending towards the cheeks and yellowish-green (not brown) the throat.

    • Eupsittula pertinax tortugensis (Cory) 1909 – Similar to the aeruginosa subspecies but larger, orange-yellow color on both sides of the head and underwing-coverts more yellowish.

    • Eupsittula pertinax venezuelae (Zimmer & Phelps,WH) 1951 – Similar to the subspecies margaritensis but more pale and yellow on the underparts.

    • Eupsittula pertinax xanthogenia (Bonaparte) 1850 – Clearer (almost sallow) the head the species nominal, with yellow tones ranging from a variable on the front of the crown and nape.

    Habitat:

    Video – "Brown-throated Parakeet" (Eupsittula pertinax)

    Brown-throated Parakeet Eupsittula pertinax / dirty face parakeet

    The Aratinga Pertinaz occupies all kind of fields wooded open of the Savannah, transparent areas of dry scrubland full of cactus and acacias, forests of mangrove, tropical forests (where is the most abundant parrot species often), gallery and white sand forests, Mangroves of Rhizophora, edges of moist evergreen forests, and agricultural areas with palms and other trees.

    Move at altitudes on the 1.200 m or more, Although they tend to stay below the 1.200 m. This Aratinga also lives in artificial clearings such as public parks or gardens..

    In general, observed in flocks or pairs, forming larger groups where food is abundant and in communal roosts.

    Reproduction:

    The Brown-throated Parakeet It monogamous. With plays After the season of rains, in general from February to April. Birds very social, assess potential mates in large communal roosts. Also used strong calls in select to your mate / to.

    Its breeding season It begins after the rainy season, and varies geographically between the months of February and September. Between February and April in Goal, Colombia; from February to April in Venezuela and any time of the year in Suriname, Curacao, Aruba and Bonaire.

    When the conditions are favorable this species You can reproduce several times a year. Son colonial and have been observed up to seven pairs nesting next to each other.

    Nest in the cavities of trees, artificial nesting boxes, or in arboreal termite. There are reports of nests made in cracks in rocks. The nests they are very simple, without any plant covering and the eggs, often, they are placed on the floor of the cavity nude. The number of eggs in a nest varies from two to seven.

    The female is the primary incubator, with one incubation which can last thirty-six to thirty-seven days in the wild. The chicks they leave the nest after 50 days. The young join their parents and form small family groups that last until the parents begin a new breeding season..

    Food:

    The Brown-throated Parakeet consuming a wide variety of food, including, for example, in the Northwest of Venezuela seeds of Cassia, Peltophorum, Lagerstroemia and Cedrela, fruits of Muntingia, Swietenia, Psidium and Solanum as well as flowers of Tabebuia, Delonix, Eryihrina and Gliricidia.

    Sometimes it causes damage to crops (for example, of millet and handle), of corn in Colombia and in fruit plantations of the Netherlands Antilles. Despite being considered pests in some areas, the Brown-throated Parakeet they are not strongly persecuted.

    They feed in very vocal groups that often include macaws and amazon parrots.

    Distribution:

    The Brown-throated Parakeet are distributed to the North of South America, Panama and the islands of the Southern Caribbean.

    In Panama are present in the slope of the peaceful, rarely on the side of the Caribbean, even in the canal area. But, they occupy the lowlands of the Northern Caribbean and northeast of Colombia, from the East of the Sinu River up to the Guajira peninsula, including the Center and low Magdalena valley, and observed at elevations more low in the East of the Andes and the lowlands of the South of the Alto Orinoco, to the North of Vaupés.

    Probably can be observed in all Venezuela, extending to the Margarita Islands, Turtle (Venezuela), Curacao, Aruba and Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles); introduced in St Thomas, virgin islands, in the 19th century.

    Its distribution extends through of the Guianas and the North of Brazil, from Roraima until Amapá, as well as discontinuously in the upper part of the basin of the Tapajos River, For and in the basin of the Black river, amazon.

    In spite of his uneven distribution, usually common to abundant, in many places it is the most common parrot (for example in localities of Guyana), locally common in Panama and reportedly very common in black rivers and Branco, Brazil.

    Your area of distribution possibly be increasing due to deforestation. In general resident with local seasonal movements (for example, in the region of Santa Maria, Colombia) the availability of food and the dispersion of the areas of reproduction-related.

    Distribution subspecies Eupsittula pertinax
    Subspecies
    • Eupsittula pertinax aeruginosa (Linnaeus) 1758 – North of Colombia, Northwest of Venezuela and the upper part of the basin of the Rio Branco, in the Northwest of Brazil

    • Eupsittula pertinax arubensis (Hartert) 1892 – Aruba

    • Eupsittula pertinax chrysogenys (Massena & Souance) 1854 – Region of Black river and, possibly, Solimões River, North of Brazil; There are no details about its area of distribution

    • Eupsittula pertinax chrysophrys (Swainson) 1838 – Southeast of Venezuela, Guyana Interior and North of Roraima, Brazil.

    • Eupsittula pertinax griseipecta (Meyer de Schauensee) 1950 – Valley of the sinu river, North of Colombia. Range in relation to the aeruginosa subspecies unclear

    • Eupsittula pertinax lehmanni (Dugand) 1943 – It is from Colombia and possibly Venezuela.

    • Eupsittula pertinax margaritensis Cory 1918 – Islands Margarita and The friars, Venezuela. the birds of the Paria Peninsula in the North of Venezuela, they can be of this subspecies; see the subspecies venezuelae

    • Eupsittula pertinax ocularis (Sclater,PL & Salvin) 1865 – Pacific slope of Panama.

    • Eupsittula pertinax paraensis (Sick) 1959 – High of the Tapajos River and Cururu River, For, Brazil.

    • Eupsittula pertinax pertinax (Linnaeus) 1758 – The nominal. Curaçao and introduced in St Thomas

    • Eupsittula pertinax surinama (Zimmer & Phelps,WH) 1951 – French Guiana and Suriname through the coast of Guyana to Delta Amacuro, Northeast of Venezuela.

    • Eupsittula pertinax tortugensis (Cory) 1909 – Turtle Island, Venezuela.

    • Eupsittula pertinax venezuelae (Zimmer & Phelps,WH) 1951 – North and Central Venezuela. Areas of contact with other little-known Venezuelan subspecies: see aeruginosa, surinama and chrysophrys.

    • Eupsittula pertinax xanthogenia (Bonaparte) 1850 – Bonaire

    Conservation:

    • Red List category of the UICN current: Least concern

    • Population trend: Growing

    The Eupsittula Pertinax (Pit and neck of 2014) was considered, previously, belonging to the genus Aratinga.

    The subspecies Griseipecta, endemic of the sinu valley in Colombia, There have been since 1949 and is likely to be extinct (T. Donegan in litt. 2011).

    The size of the population world of this kind not has been quantified, but is described as “common” (Stotz et to the. (1996). Is considered as the Parrot more abundant in the land low for the Caribbean, Plain in Colombia, Guyana, North of Suriname and the three islands of the Netherlands Antilles.

    A density of five to eighty and nine birds by kilometer square is has estimated in the regions of the Northwest of Venezuela.

    It is believed that populations on the continent are increasing their range in response to an increase in the conversion of the forest into farmland.

    This species is often captured with commercial purposes, but not has been consequences serious, with the exception of the subspecies Aratinga pertinax margaritensis and Aratinga pertinax tortuguensis.

    The Aratinga pertinax tortuguensis It is also vulnerable to severe climate changes. (Juniper and Parr, 1998;. Pit, et to the, 1997)

    "Brown-throated Parakeet" in captivity:

    The Brown-throated Parakeet has a average vinein the nature of about ten years. But, When live in captivity with the proper supervision, they have come to live up to twenty-five years.

    common in the industry of the pet because, mainly, to your behavior affective. Captured for the pet trade and occasionally as food.

    Pretty noisy, both in the nature as in captivity. With certain skills for repeated whistles and words short.

    Alternative names:

    Brown-throated Parakeet, Brown throated Parakeet, Brown-throated Conure, Caribbean Parakeet, Curacao Conure, Curacao Parakeet, St. Thomas’s Conure (English).
    Conure cuivrée, Conure de Saint-Thomas, Perriche cuivrée, Perruche cuivrée (French).
    Braunwangensittich (German).
    Aratinga de-cara-parda, aratinga-de-bochecha-parda, periquito-de-bochecha-parda (Portuguese).
    Aratinga Pertinaz, Perico cara sucia, Perico Carisucio, Perico Gorgicafé, Periquito de Cola Corta, Periquito Gorgimoreno (español).
    Loro carisucio, Perico Carisucio (Colombia).
    Perico Gorgicafé (Costa Rica).
    Perico Cara Sucia (Venezuela).


    Carl Linnaeus
    Carl Linnaeus

    scientific classification:

    Order: Psittaciformes
    Family: Psittacidae
    Genus: Eupsittula
    Scientific name: Eupsittula pertinax
    Citation: (Linnaeus, 1758)
    Protonimo: Psittacus pertinax

    Brown-throated Parakeet Images:


    Especies del género Eupsittula
  • Eupsittula nana
  • —- Eupsittula nana astec
  • —- Eupsittula nana nana
  • —- Eupsittula nana vicinalis
  • Eupsittula canicularis
  • —- Eupsittula canicularis canicularis
  • —- Eupsittula canicularis clarae
  • —- Eupsittula canicularis eburnirostrum
  • Eupsittula aurea
  • Eupsittula pertinax
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax aeruginosa
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax arubensis
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax chrysogenys
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax chrysophrys
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax griseipecta
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax lehmanni
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax margaritensis
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax ocularis
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax paraensis
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax pertinax
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax surinama
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax tortugensis
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax venezuelae
  • —- Eupsittula pertinax xanthogenia
  • Eupsittula cactorum
  • —- Eupsittula cactorum cactorum
  • —- Eupsittula cactorum caixana

  • Sources:

    Avibase
    – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    – Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    – Birdlife
    Animal Diversity Web

    Photos:

    (1) – Aratinga pertinax By Genes Luna (Flickr: IMG_0309.jpg) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (2) – Aratinga pertinax xanthogenia By gailf548 (originally posted to Flickr as Young Parrot) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Eupsittula pertinax arubensis By Alexander Yates (originally posted to Flickr as Aruba Parakeet) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – Brown-throated Parakeet (Aratinga pertinax venezuelae) in Cagua, Estado Aragua, Venezuela By Cristóbal Alvarado Minic [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (5) – Aratinga pertinax aeruginosa By Aratinga_pertinax_-Colombia-8a.jpg: anthrotectderivative work: Snowmanradio [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (6) – Eupsittula pertinax By Leizelt, Balthasar Friedrich; Wilhelm, Gottlieb Tobias [CC BY 2.0 or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

    Sounds: Peter Boesman (Xeno-canto)

    ▷ The world of Pets: Dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, amphibians

    Pileated Parrot
    Pionopsitta pileata

    Pileated Parrot

    Content

    Pileated Parrot

    Description:

    22 cm.. length and a weight between 98-120 g..

    The Pileated Parrot (Pionopsitta pileata) has the forecrown, lores, crown anterior upper cheeks to behind eyes, bright red; patch reddish brown in ear-coverts; the lower cheeks, sides and rear of the neck, green.

    The upperparts, green. Primaries and greater coverts, alula and feathers bend of wing, violet blue; other coverts, green. Outerwebs of the primary and secondary, violet blue with blue-green edges. Under, the wings bluish green, coverts with some darker blue feathers. Underparts green with bluish tint in the chest and throat, and with a yellowish tint in the belly and undertail-coverts. Upper, the tail centrally green, laterally violet blue; undertail, bluish green.

    Bill dark brown, becoming dark horn distally in both jaws; bare periophthalmic naked, pale grey, irises and legs, grayish brown.

    The female has most of its head green but with a pretty pale blue in the forecrown.

    Immature as female, but with grayish green or green spots and dark spots on the base bill; young male sometimes with red limited in forecrown with a patch orange behind.

    • Sound of the Pileated Parrot.

    Habitat:

    They inhabit in forests, including humid tropical forests and forests dominated by araucarias, mainly in lowlands in the south of the mountain range, although penetrating the coastal mountains Brazil, at altitudes of 300 to 1.500 m; also in areas partially cleared. gregarious in groups of approximately 10 birds; apparently rare in greater numbers.

    Reproduction:

    They nest in the cavities of trees. probably reproduce mainly in the months of November to January. Clutch 3-4 eggs in captivity.

    Food:

    The fruits of Euterpe edulis They are among the favorite foods during the winter in eastern Paraguay; also recorded fruits Podocarpus and Solanum, and bark Eucalyptus; visit when ripe fruit orchards in Rio Grande do Sul.

    Distribution and status:

    Size of its range (breeding/resident ): 1.650.000 km2

    The Pileated Parrot It is located in southeast Brazil, to the South of Bay, through the belt of the Atlantic forest in Espirito Santo, probably east of Minas Gerais, Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Paraná and Santa Catarina, until Rio Grande do Sul, extending to the east Paraguay and northeast of Argentina in Missions and possibly in Currents (no recent records); also they have been reported east of Chaco in Argentina, where they can arrive as an irregular visitors.

    Some seasonal movements occur Paraná, where birds leave the inland coastal plateau after breeding, and in Paraguay where it is in Amambay in October.

    Nomad in the Intervales State Park of São Paulo. Its population is widespread but declining due to the extensive loss of forests by urban growth, agriculture and mining.

    Described as uncommon to fairly common in Missions, Argentina. Apparently its population is still not at risk due to habitat loss, since birds are still quite numerous where fragments of forest remain. (for example, east of Paraguay) and travel between them on land without trees. More numerous are more extensive where the remains of forest, It is more common in eastern Paraguay and adjacent Paraná and São Paulo in Brazil.

    Conservation:


    Status


    • Current category of the Red List of the UICN: Least concern.

    • Population trend: Stable.

    Rationale for the Red List category

    This species has a very large range and therefore it is not close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of size range (Extension Occurrence <20,000 km2 combinada con un tamaño de rango decreciente o fluctuante, extensión / calidad de hábitat o tamaño de población y un pequeño número de lugares o fragmentación severa). La demographic trend appears to be stable and, therefore, the species does not approach the thresholds Vulnerable under the criteria of population trend (> 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size It has not been quantified, but it is not believed to be close to the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un descenso continuo estimado> 10% in ten years or three generations or a population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as the least concern.

    Justification of the population

    The size of the world's population has not been quantified, but this species is described as “Rare” (Stotz et to the., 1996).

    Justification of trend

    They suspected that the population is stable in absence of evidence of any decline or threatens substantial.

    "Pileated Parrot" in captivity:

    Very rare in captivity.

    Alternative names:

    Pileated Parrot, red-cappe parrot, Red-capped Parrot (English).
    Caïque mitré, Perroquet mitré (French).
    Scharlachkopfpapagei, Scharlachkopf-Papagei (German).
    Cuiú-cuiú, caturra, cuiú, cuiuiú, curica-cuiú, maitaca-de-cabeça-vermelha, periquito-rei, tui-maritaca (Portuguese).
    Catita cabeza roja, Catita decabeza roja, Lorito cabeza roja, Lorito de Cara Roja, Lorito Pileado (español).
    Catita cabeza roja, Catita decabeza roja (Argentina).
    Lorito cabeza roja (Paraguay).


    scientific classification:

    Giovanni Antonio Scopoli
    Giovanni Antonio Scopoli

    Order: Psittaciformes
    Family: Psittacidae
    Genus: Pionopsitta
    Scientific name: Pionopsitta pileata
    Citation: (Scopoli, 1769)
    Protonimo: Psittacus pileatus


    Images “Pileated Parrot”:

    Videos "Pileated Parrot"

    ————————————————————————————————

    “Pileated Parrot” (Pionopsitta pileata)


    Sources:

    Avibase
    – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    – Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    – Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – Pileated Parrot Loro Parque – Tenerife (Spain) by Florin FeneruFlickr
    (2) – Pileated Parrot Loro Parque – Tenerife (Spain) by Florin FeneruFlickr
    (3) – Pileated Parrot Loro Parque – Tenerife (Spain) by Florin FeneruFlickr
    (4) – Pionopsitta pileata by Taguató yetapaFlickr
    (5) – Red-capped parrot (Pionopsitta pileata) – “Appropriate” Campina Grande do Sul | The Birds of Brazil by Ben TavenerFlickr
    (6) – Catita Cabeza Roja by Argentavis – Birds of Argentina

    ▷ The world of Pets: Dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, amphibians

    Burrowing Parakeet
    Cyanoliseus patagonus

    Burrowing Parakeet

    Content

    Burrowing Parakeet

    Description:

    39-52 cm. length between 260 and 280 g. of weight.

    The Burrowing Parakeet (Cyanoliseus patagonus) has the forecrown, crown, lores, cheeks and nape olive brown with slight yellowish tinge; sides of neck, the mantle and back Brown olive; rump and uppertail-coverts bright canary yellow.

    Blades brown, some slightly blue; covered primary blue, other yellowish olive brown. Primaries and Outer secondaries dark blue with edges innerwebs distal; inner secondary bluish brown. Underwing-coverts Yellow olive; underside of flight feather brown. Breast olive brown with white-cream area at the top of chest; rest of the underparts yellow-orange red patch through central belly. Uppertail brown tinted blue, especially next to the tips; undertail brown.

    The bill It is grayish-black; the periophthalmic skin skin whitish; the irises is pale yellow; the legs They are pale yellowish brown.

    Both sexes similar. Immature has horn upper mandible and the irises brown.

    • Sound of the Burrowing Parakeet.

    Description Burrowing Parakeet subspecies
    • Cyanoliseus patagonus andinus

      (Dabbene & Lillo, 1913) – Similar to the species nominal but it lacks the bright yellow belly with pale areas on the sides of chest and rump olive colored duller. This and subspecies Cyanoliseus patagonus conlara they have the upperwing-coverts more brown than the nominal species.


    • Cyanoliseus patagonus bloxami

      (Olson, 1995) – Size larger than the nominal species (wings 250-263), upperparts, throat lower chest and dark brown; bill larger and heavier and patches creamy most extensive on the sides of chest (in some birds merge to form a band breast pale).


    • Cyanoliseus patagonus conlara

      (nores & Yzurieta, 1983) – Breast darker than the other Argentine subspecies.


    • Cyanoliseus patagonus patagonus

      (Vieillot, 1818) – Nominal.

    Habitat:

    The species usually inhabit areas open pastures, although it has also been reported in Savanna, wooded valleys cliffs and farmland some 2.000 m. Usually in a fairly arid land, although often it found near elevations or streams. Gregarious, forming large flocks, sometimes exceeding 1.000 birds, with common roosts trees, on wiring (sometimes in villages) and in tunnels dug to nest.

    Reproduction:

    It reproduces colonially in warrens carved into cliffs (usually limestone or sandstone Chile) often with stunning views. In San Luis, Argentina, reproduction is reported in the wet season (November–April), the birds return to nest in the cliffs lay eggs in September and November to December in San Luis, spreading of bird breeding sites in April; apparently earlier in Chile. Clutch 2-4 eggs. The male takes care of feeding the female during the incubation period.. The young leave the nest at 2 months of age, However, They continue to be fed by their parents until 6 months of age.

    Food:

    The diet of the Burrowing Parakeet It consists mainly of seeds and fruits predominance of fruit in the summer months (November to February). Food reported include berries of buckthorn joke and Discaria, fruit of Geoffroea decorticans, Prosopis caldenia, P. chilensis and P. flexuosa and seeds of Carduus mariana. Sometimes damaged grain crops; often it feeds on the floor or around.

    Distribution:

    Extending its range (breeding/resident): 1.590.000 km2

    The Burrowing Parakeet They are distributed by the South South America, extending from northern Santa Cruz and Chubut in Argentina, passing by Black river and Pampa, up to Buenos Aires, San Luis and Córdoba, San Juan, La Rioja, Catamarca, Tucumán and Salta, reaching westward across southern Uruguay.

    They were recorded in the early 1920 from the center of Formosa, Argentina, away from Andes mountains, and above the center Chile from the North of The lakes to north of Atacama, but now they are confined to a few localities in the foothills of the Andes, for example in Bio Bio.

    Will produce some seasonal movements, including the northward migration of birds south in the Argentine winter and shifts down Chile.

    In Argentina is locally common or abundant, although in some places (p. e.g.. in Córdoba and Buenos Aires Eastern) They are rare or occasional. Few and far between in Uruguay. drastic decline during the twentieth century Chile, so that the subspecies Cyanoliseus patagonus bloxami It is considered at risk, with an estimated population of less than 3.000 individuals at the end of the decade 1980. The decrease in parts of the Argentina It is attributed to the catch for the trade, the hunting for food, converting grassland and arable land persecution as crop pest. Probably continues to decline overall.

    Burrowing Parakeet subspecies distribution

    Conservation:


    Status


    • Current category of the Red List of the UICN: Least concern.

    • Population trend: Decreasing.

    • Population size : 95000 individuals.

    Rationale for the Red List category

    Even though the demographic trend It appears to be declining, the decline is not believed to be rapid enough to approach the Vulnerable thresholds based on demographic trend criteria (> 30% decrease in ten years or three generations). The population size is very large, and therefore does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the criterion of population size (<10.000 individuos maduros con un descenso continuo estimado en >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specific population structure). For these reasons, the species is evaluated as Least concern.

    Justification of the population

    The species is still common in many parts of its range in Argentina, with only small contractions reported in range Córdoba (R. M. Fraga a slightly. 2003). The population size of four subspecies was estimated as follows by MASELLO et al. (2011): Cyanoliseus patagonus patagonus 43.330 nests, Cyanoliseus patagonus conlara 1.700 individuals, Cyanoliseus patagonus andinus 2.000 nests, Cyanoliseus patagonus bloxami 5.000-6.000 individuals. Based on these figures, the population Total overall can be about 95.000 mature individuals.

    Justification trend

    They suspected that the population is declining due to continuing habitat destruction and unsustainable levels of exploitation.

    Threats

    The species has been the subject of a intense trade: from 1981, year it was included in the Appendix II of the CITES, they have been 122.914 individuals caught in international trade (UNEP-WCMC CITES CITES Trade Database, January 2005).

    Conservation actions underway

    The species is included in the Appendix II of the CITES.

    "Burrowing Parakeet" in captivity:

    The average life expectancy is of 15-20 years in captivity. Protected by Appendix II of the CITES.

    To help conservation Burrowing Parakeet, You can report your hunt, sale, trade and illegal possession, thus, We will be cooperating with the conservation of this species and not be complicit in the decline of their populations and their future extinction of wild.

    Alternative names:

    Burrowing Conure, Burrowing Parakeet, Burrowing Parrot, Patagonian Burrowing Parrot, Patagonian Conure, Patagonian Parrot (English).
    Conure de Patagonie, Perriche de Patagonie, Perruche de Patagonie (French).
    Felsensittich, Felsen-Sittich (German).
    Periquito-das-barreiras (Portuguese).
    Loro Barranquero, Loro de la Patagonia, Loro Patagonico, Tricahue (español).
    Loro barranquero (Argentina).
    Tricahue (Chile).
    Loro barranquero, Loro Patagonico (Uruguay).
    Perico Barranquero (Mexico).

    scientific classification:

    Order: Psittaciformes
    Family: Psittacidae
    Genus: cyanoliseus
    Scientific name: Cyanoliseus patagonus
    Citation: (Vieillot, 1818)
    Protonimo: Psittacus patagonus

    Images “Burrowing Parakeet”:

    Videos "Burrowing Parakeet"

    ————————————————————————————————

    “Burrowing Parakeet” (Cyanoliseus patagonus)


    Sources:

    Avibase
    – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    – Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – A Burrowing Parrot captive in Madeira By Rakkhi Samarasekera from London, United Kingdom (P6122982Uploaded by Snowmanradio) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (2) – Two Burrowing Parrots in Limari Province, Chile By Gerzo Gallardo (Flickr: Parrots) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – Pair of cockles Cyanoliseus patagonus in the RN Cypress River By BioVipah (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – Burrowing Parrot (also known as the Patagonian Conure) to Lille Zoo, France By Olivier Duquesne (originally posted to Flickr as Perroquet) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (5) – A Burrowing Parrot at Birds of Eden, an aviary in Western Cape, South Africa By Dick Daniels (http://carolinabirds.org /) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons
    (6) – A painting of a Burrowing Parrot, also known as Patagonian Conure, (originally captioned “Psittacara patagonica. Patagonian Parrakeet-Maccaw”) by Edward Lear 1812-1888 – Wikipedia

    Sounds: Cristian Pinto, XC380836. accessible www.xeno-canto.org/380836.

    ▷ The world of Pets: Dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, amphibians

    Yellow-crested cockatoo
    Cacatua sulphurea

    Yellow-crested cockatoo

    Content

    Description

    Medium-sized, 35 cm.. long.

    Yellow-crested cockatoo

    The Yellow-crested cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea) It is distinguished by its long, thin yellow erectile crest, that curves forward, and extending upward, above the nape, when it folded. The front of his crown and main feathers crest, are white. The rest of your plumage It is also white, except in yellow suffusion ear-coverts, under the wings and in the innerwebs of the undertail-coverts. The bases of the hackles and underparts, They are yellowed; some birds show a slight yellow tone, particularly on chest and the belly. The bill It is black; eye ring pale bluish; irises dark brown; legs grey. The female is similar to the male but with the irises reddish and slightly smaller.

    The young birds They show both sexes irises dark taupe, although females They begin to acquire the red coloration in the first year. The bill and legs immature are also lighter.

    Description 4 subspecies
    • Cacatua sulphurea abbotti

      (Oberholser, 1917) – Similar to the parvula, but largest.

    • Cacatua sulphurea citrinocristata
    • Cacatua sulphurea citrinocristata

      (Fraser, 1844) – Slightly larger than the nominal, with one crest orange & ear-coverts orange yellow. Additional research may provide a basis for improving this subspecies to a specific status..

    • Cacatua sulphurea parvula

      (Bonaparte, 1850) – Similar to the nominal species, but with the ear-coverts paler and less yellow on yellow feathers underparts. the size of the bill in this subspecies it increases clinically towards the west.

    • Cacatua sulphurea sulphurea

      (Gmelin, 1788) – Nominal.

    Habitat:

    Video – "Yellow-crested cockatoo" (Cacatua sulphurea)

    SULPHURE COCKATUA

    They inhabit at the edges of the forest, wooded areas, farmland, cocoteros, semi-arid areas and forests until the 800 m (locally 1.200 m).

    The Yellow-crested cockatoo usually they found in pairs or small groups of up to ten individuals, although they may meet in larger flocks to feed on fruit trees. They can form flocks with Eclectus Parrot (Eclectus roratus).

    They tend to be noisy and visible, but can be difficult to spot when moving silently in the canopy, and they are more often in flight. The groups who leave their resting places in the montane forest areas frequently displace forage at lower altitudes including cultivated fields. Pairs may hover conspicuously above the forest canopy searching for fruitful trees, allowing a reasonably close approach when resting on a branch.

    The crest It is generally stands when landing, or when an individual is making calls from a perch. Like most of the Cockatoos They enjoy a bath in the rain.

    Reproduction:

    Specimens of Yellow-crested cockatoo on the island of button in State reproductive during the months of September and October, although Nusa Tenggara the breeding It occurs in the months of April and May. The female It lays two or three white eggs in the hollow of a tree, and incubation lasts around 28 days with both parents participating. Chicks they leave the nest to 10 weeks and are dependent parent for about two months.

    Food:

    They feed in trees and soil. Its diet It includes seeds, corn (Zea mays) of cultivated fields, fruit, berries, egg yolks, flowers and nuts (including large coconuts (cocos nucifera)).

    Distribution and status:

    Size of its range (breeding/resident ): 1.360.000 km2

    The Yellow-crested cockatoo They are confined Indonesian, where they can be seen in the lowlands Isla Celebes (virtually extinct in the north), islands in the Flores sea, in Nusa Tenggara and isolated islands Masalembu in the Java Sea.

    introduced in Singapore and Hong Kong. The species is found in both wooded areas and cultivated and is scarce throughout its range. It is estimated that the world population total is less than 40.000 birds and is decreasing. Although populations of the nominal subspecies and of the subspecies parvula may still be close to 10.000 specimens, the citrinocristata subspecies It has an estimated population between 800 and 7.200 only individuals, having declined by 80% between the years 1986 and 1989, while the distinctive subspecies abbotti It is now represented by only nine individuals in nature.

    Although habitat loss is clearly a factor in Sumba, where distribution appears to be linked to the extent of primary forest (is only about 15% the original forest), trade is the main threat to the species as a whole. Trade data show that exported almost 100.000 birds in years 1980-1992. The export citrinocristata subspecies It was banned in 1992 by local authorities, and 26 birds were confiscated in September of that year. There are probably at least 50 individuals of each subspecies in public collections and more than 2.000 in private aviculture, although the numbers for the subspecies abbotti They are unknown.

    Distribution 4 subspecies

    Conservation:

    State of conservation ⓘ


    Critically Endangered critically endangered (UICN)ⓘ

    • Current category of the Red List of the UICN: critically endangered.

    • Population trend: Decreasing.

    Its crashing fall It is almost entirely attributable to the unsustainable exploitation for domestic and international trade. Logging to the conversion of forests for agriculture as well as the use of pesticides for land and large-scale.

    Justification of the population

    Based on recent surveys in various parts of the range of the species, C. Trainor in some (2007) It has been estimated the world population in less than 7.000 individuals: 3.200-5.000 en Sumba (though perhaps only 562 in 2012, Burung Indonesia en preparación), 500 en Komodo, 200-300 en Timor Leste, 200-300 en Sulawesi, 20-50 in West Timor, 40-70 Flores, 50-100 en Sumbawa, 100 in Rinca and other 700 birds in total. The best data is located in the band 2.500-9.999 individuals, equivalent to 1.667-6.666 mature individuals, rounded here to 1.500-7.000 mature individuals.

    Conservation actions and research in progress

    CITES Appendix I (2005). It has developed and adopted a recovery plan cooperative and has prepared an update 2012 (D. Mulyawati in some. 2012). The populations are found in various protected areas, It is the most important Rawa Aopa Watumohai (55 copies in 2011 [Waugh 2013]) and National Parks Caraente (en Sulawesi), supporting up 100 individuals (transgressed 2006) , Reserva Natural de Wildlife en Pulau Moyo, Komodo National Park and two national parks in Sumba: Manupeu-Tanadaru y Laiwangi-Wanggameti. Nini Konis Santana National Park declared in Timor has a 100 estimated birds (Trainor et al., Without date) . In Rawa Aopa Watumohai nests they have been protected from predators by removing vegetation pendant necklaces and installation of plastic around the tree trunks nesting (Waugh 2013). Moratoriums on international trade are in effect, although it is likely that a large proportion of trade is a national. Several subpopulations of Sulphur-crested Cockatoo have increased in Sumba between 1992 and 2002, due to conservation efforts (including local education, ecotourism and law enforcement), although densities remained below those typical for other cockatoo species (Cahill et al ., 2006) . Capture for trade has declined dramatically in Sumba through a variety of awareness and protection measures of the community (D. Mulyawati in some. 2012).

    Following the surveys of 2008 and 2009, the Indonesia Parrot Project and Konservasi Kakatua Indonesia have started meetings with community leaders and villagers in Masakambing and Masalembu, as well as with the military and local police, to raise awareness and gain support for Sulphur-crested Cockatoo conservation (Metz et al. Al., 2009) . A conservation program-awareness-pride has also begun to involve adults and school Archipelago Masalembu (Metz et al. , 2009, Translating et al., 2009) And in Southeast Sulawesi (Anon., 2012). He wrote a “Regulations village” to make it illegal to catch, possess or transport the species and initiate measures to reduce habitat destruction and employ a former village chief to guard and protect nests and study Sulphur-crested Cockatoos (Translating et al., 2009) . Moronone community in Rawa Aopa Watumohai NP, where four members of the village have been hired as Forest Wardens (Anon., 2012), have established similar community-based regulations. The guards protect the species against poachers and perform monitoring activities (Waugh 2013). The pest status of the species can be addressed by planting crops to compensate for losses and to act as a “culture sacrifice”, for example, sunflower fields are used to attract the species out of other crops (Waugh 2013). Mangrove restoration is also being used to increase nesting habitat available (Waugh 2013). a repeat of the population census is planned abbotti , together with studies on its biological history and ecology (Metz et al., 2009) .

    Proposed Research and Conservation Actions

    Carry out further studies (including Roti, but also more studies on Alor and Pantar) to identify the most appropriate action for conservation areas and to periodically monitor key population surveys repeating ago 8-10 years. Provide relevant support for protected areas and conservation initiatives within its range and protect nests when possible. Strengthen the protection of forest Poronumbu, Sumba, declaring Nature Reserve (Translating y Agustina 2012). Strengthen control, the enforcement and monitoring of trade and establishing greater management of captive populations. Improve law enforcement in designated protected areas and other key areas for trade, including ports, markets, etc. Promote widespread community conservation initiatives. These may include, en la isla de Pasoso, Sulawesi Central, work to protect the Sulphur-crested Cockatoo should involve all five families living on the island and introduce community involvement programs for children and adults on several other islands where the species occurs (Translating y Agustina 2012). The recommendations formulated specifically for the protection of the species in the Komodo National Park consisted of carrying out an annual monitoring, maintain regular patrols, sensitize local communities and studying human activities and impacts within the park (Imansyah et al ., 2005, Benstead 2006) . Conduct ecological research to clarify options for management and conservation. Other objectives should be to study the abundance and distribution of nest holes and water sources.. The provision of artificial sources of water near the nesting sites, that is to say, water ponds, It is essential for the species on the island of Komodo and may also be necessary to protect the nests of young Komodo dragons in Komodo (Translating y Agustina, 2012).

    "Yellow-crested cockatoo" in captivity:

    The male Yellow-crested cockatoo It is especially aggressive with the female, sometimes to kill her. This phenomenon is known in many cockatoo species..

    among the white cockatoos, this is somewhat difficult to breed in captivity. As a pet can be a formidable partner provided it has been raised for that purpose and to provide much attention.

    It is very difficult for them to disconnect in the presence of their owners and entertain themselves without seeking continuous interaction.
    Great ability to imitate human sound within the world of cockatoos.

    Note: Because of its status, CRITICALLY ENDANGERED, only controlled captive breeding is recommended in an attempt to recover this species in the wild.

    Alternative names:

    Yellow-crested Cockatoo, Lesser sulphur-crested cackatoo, Sulphur-crested Cockatoo (ingles).
    Cacatoès soufré, Petit Cacatoès à huppe jaune (French).
    Gelbwangenkakadu, Orangehaubenkakadu (German).
    Cacatua-de-crista-amarela (Portuguese).
    Cacatúa de Moño Naranja, Cacatúa Sulfúrea (español).

    Gmelin Johann Friedrich
    Gmelin Johann Friedrich

    scientific classification:


    Order: Psittaciformes
    Family: Cacatuidae
    Genus: Cockatoo
    Scientific name: Cacatua sulphurea
    Citation: (Gmelin, JF, 1788)
    Protonimo: Psittacus sulphureus


    Images Sulphur-crested Cockatoo:



    Species of the genus Cacatua
  • Cacatua tenuirostris
  • Cacatua pastinator
  • —- Cacatua pastinator derbyi
  • —- Cacatua pastinator pastinator
  • Cacatua sanguinea
  • —- Cacatua sanguinea gymnopis
  • —- Cacatua sanguinea normantoni
  • —- Cacatua sanguinea sanguinea
  • —- Cacatua sanguinea transfreta
  • —- Cacatua sanguinea westralensis
  • Cacatua goffiniana
  • Cacatua ducorpsii
  • Cacatua haematuropygia
  • Cacatua galerita
  • —- Cacatua galerita eleonora
  • —- Cacatua galerita fitzroyi
  • —- Cacatua galerita galerita
  • —- Cacatua galerita triton
  • Cacatua ophthalmica
  • Cacatua sulphurea
  • —- Cacatua sulphurea abbotti
  • —- Cacatua sulphurea citrinocristata
  • —- Cacatua sulphurea parvula
  • —- Cacatua sulphurea sulphurea
  • Cacatua moluccensis
  • Cacatua alba

  • Sources:

    Avibase
    – Parrots of the World – Forshaw Joseph M
    – Parrots A Guide to the Parrots of the World – Tony Juniper & Mike Parr
    – Birdlife

    Photos:

    (1) – Cacatua sulphurea by Charles LamFlickr
    (2) – Citron-crested Cockatoo(Cacatua sulphurea citrinocristata) in the Walsrode Bird Park, Germany By Quartl (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (3) – A Yellow-crested Cockatoo at Auckland Zoo, New Zealand By Ashleigh Thompson (originally posted to Flickr as Captain) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (4) – Cacatua sulphurea citrinocristata, Citron-crested Cockatoo. Photograph of upper body and crest By Ruth Rogers (originally posted to Flickr as Citron Cockatoo) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (5) – Citron-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea citrinocristata). The glass between the camera and this parrot makes the picture just a little bit blurry By Alexander Tundakov (originally posted to Flickr as White Parrot) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (6) – Photo of Lesser Sulphur-crested Cockatoo (wings clipped) By Snowmanradio, with permission from Tropical Birdland, Leicestershire, England. (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (7) – Yellow-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea) at the KOBE Oji Zoo by opencage.info
    (8) – Lesser Sulphur-crested Cockatoo (wings clipped) By Snowmanradio, with permission from Tropical Birdland, Leicestershire, England. (Own work) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons
    (9) – Yellow-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua sulphurea) by Darren – Flickr
    (10) – Yellow-Crested Cockatoo, Cacatua sulphurea by Sek Keung LoFlickr
    (11) – Cacatua sulphurea by Charles LamFlickr
    (12) – Cacatua sulphurea by Charles LamFlickr
    (13) – Cacatua sulphurea by Pichon Charles LamFlickr
    (14) – A painting of a Yellow-crested Cockatoo, also known as the Lesser Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, (originally captioned “Plyctolophus sulphureus. Lesser Sulphur-crested Cockatoo”) by Edward Lear 1812-1888. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

    Sounds: (Xeno-canto)