Kooikerhondje (Kooiker)
Holanda FCI 314 . Flushing Dogs

Kooikerhondje

The Kooikerhondje was initially listed among companion dogs, outside of the Netherlands it is practically unknown.

Content

History

This puppy with an unpronounceable original name has a long history, that begins in the Middle Ages, more specifically in the fifteenth century, when the Spanish brought the first Spaniels to the Netherlands. Several crosses with local dogs resulted in the Kooikerhondje (Kooiker). The dog quickly spread, appearing in many paintings by 17th century Dutch masters, como Jan Steen (1626-1679), but also in literature, especially in the Dutch Historian Stories Pieter Corneliszoon Hooft (1581-1647).

It was his special talent for hunting ducks that made him famous. Dutch for "small cager dog" (other name of Kooikerhondje – Kooiker). He was trained to lure ducks with his white plumed tail into trapped channels that ended in a cage (“eendenkooi“, in Dutch), where the hunters (“kooiker“) they could easily catch them. The specimens used for this hunting technique were called “hondjes de Kooiker“, and the name has remained in this breed.

Apart from the Kooikerhondje (Kooiker), few breeds are capable of learning this hunting technique. A notable exception is the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, which appeared in the 19th century and is generally considered to be a descendant of the Kooiker.

However, the usefulness of the dog did not end there: when it wasn't duck hunting season, it was used to hunt vermin.

Its population declined rapidly between the two wars, mainly due to the abandonment of this hunting method (which required a lot of work to maintain the channels from the traps) in favor of the use of the rifle, facilitated by the greater precision of firearms. Like this, on the eve of World War II, the breed had almost disappeared, with a total number of individuals estimated at only thirty.

After the invasion of the Netherlands in 1940, the baronessa von Hardenbroek of Ammerstol, in the spirit of resistance to the German occupation, decided to save this typically Dutch dog. Delivered a black and white photo to several street vendors, asking them to notify you if they encountered such an animal. This is how he found tommy, a female Kooiker from the north of the Netherlands, which was the reason for the rebirth of the breed as we know it today.

Between 1942 and 1976, the baroness raised 52 layers of Dutch foxhounds that were named after his kennel, from Valhalla, and obtained the recognition of the breed by the Raad van Beheer (the country's official canine organization) in 1971. Later, the breed was recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) in 1990 and by the United Kennel Club (UKC) American in 1996. The other leading American organization, the American Kennel Club (AKC), did the same in 2004.

If he Kooikerhondje (Kooiker) has become a relatively common dog in its home country, not yet the case in the rest of the world, where remains unknown. However, things seem to be changing since the decade of 2010.

Like this, en el Reino Unido, where it is recognized by The Kennel Club, Enrollments have increased considerably since 2013, to the point of already exceeding fifty copies a year.

Also in France there is a certain madness for this breed: while in 2007 and 2012 they only signed up 5 specimens in the LOF (French Origins Book), between 2013 and 2018 there were more than 200.

In United States, the Dutch for "small cager dog" still very weird, but the Dutch Kooikerhondje Club of America (NKCUSA) registered 11 new breeders in 2018 and 2019, suggesting that the breed is also enjoying growing interest there, and that its population will increase rapidly.

Photo: Kooikerhondje puppy by Petful

Physical characteristics

The Kooikerhondje – Kooikerhondje is a medium-sized dog with a harmonious build, with a general appearance reminiscent of a Spaniel. Her body, slightly longer than tall, he is muscular but thin: they are dogs made for speed and agility. The tail follows the line of the back and reinforces its slim appearance.

The head is carried high, which gives it an aristocratic air. The skull is quite wide and rounded, while the muzzle, ending in a black nose, is slightly truncated. His dark brown almond eyes express intelligence and kindness. The ears are medium in size, placed in a line that starts from the nose and passes through the eye, falling down the cheeks.

The coat is of medium length and can be smooth or slightly wavy. The legs have a longer plumage on the hind legs than on the front ones., but the plumage of the tail is the most characteristic of the Kooikerhondje: long and white, giving the tail a feathery look. The long black hairs on the tips of the ears, known as “Earrings”, they are highly sought after.

The coat is predominantly white, with large well-marked orange-red spots on the body. The rule Kooiker accepts small marks of this color on the legs, as well as the presence of some black hairs mixed with the orange-red color. The head should have a clear white line that reaches the nose.

Sexual dimorphism is moderately marked, the male being slightly larger than the female, that tends to shed more hair during the shedding period.

Size and weight

▷ Male size: 38 – 42 cm.
▷ Female size: 36 – 40 cm.
▷ Male weight: 10 – 13 kg.
▷ Female weight: 9 – 12 kg.

Character and skills

The Kooikerhondje It is a loyal dog, very attached to his family, from which he does not like to part. However, they are not effusive and prefer to stay quietly by their master's side rather than jump up to show their attachment. You also need a quiet environment, and does not bear stress well: frequent parties or quarrels would risk lasting disruption.

Logically, not a recommended breed of dog for young children, since the cries of a baby or the whims of a small child are hardly to his liking. They are much better suited to a family that shares their calm and relaxed approach to life..

They are quite suspicious of people they do not know, but they quickly accept those who pay them a little attention, especially if they take the trouble to offer them a reward.

Although it accepts other dogs of a similar character, does not especially seek the company of other dogs. Regarding coexistence with other animals, especially with cats or rodents, can be especially difficult due to strong hunting instincts. Even if he is able to get along with the household animals he has been raised with, the risk that one day he will start chasing the family cat is very real.

If its placid character could make it suitable for the elderly, he forgets a bit quickly that he is also very active, needing at least two hours of exercise a day. Having said that, he is not very demanding with what he does, and he is as likely to accompany his owner on a long and quiet walk as he is to play chasing a ball with the children in the garden or looking for it. However, prefers water activities: to swim, jumping into the water or just playing in a pond are activities that make this water-loving dog happy, since he was originally bred to work on the canals.

If you can live in an apartment as long as your daily need for activity is met, the Kooikerhondje greatly prefers to have a garden to frolic in. However, you need to make sure the space is well fenced because, even if I do not have a special predisposition to flee, his hunting instinct is likely to push him to run after all the animals in the region and, Therefore, to move away from your residence.

In any case, although it is generally calm, Problems can arise if you don't have a chance to expend your energy and are left alone too often. In particular, the owner may face inopportune barking and / or destructive dog behavior.

Smart and attentive, to the Kooikerhondje he likes to be stimulated intellectually; they especially like obedience exercises or learning new tricks. However, your intelligence is a double-edged sword, as they quickly pick up on any hesitation on the part of their master, and they can decide to assume the leadership of the family pack. Therefore, It is a breed reserved for a master who already has experience, in addition to being able to provide you with the stable environment you need.

Education

Like all dogs, the Kooiker needs to be socialized from a young age to get used to people, places, noises, smells… that you will know during your life. It is especially advisable to introduce the small animals that share your home as soon as possible, to minimize the risk of lawsuits or even accidents once you are an adult.

The Kooikerhondje, very sensible, reacts poorly to stressful situations and can be traumatized by traditional training methods. Therefore, their training should be based on positive reinforcement: the compliments, accompanied by caresses and some sweets, they work much better than reprimands. However, your teacher must stand firm and consistent, so as not to confuse you and make you lose confidence in your leader's ability to lead.

It is important that all family members are involved in their education, to assimilate and accept your authority.

Active, smart and eager to please, the Kooikerhondje It is an ideal student for obedience exercises as well as for learning different canine sports: Flyball, agility, dogs-cross…

Health

The Kooiker has a small gene pool and, Therefore, is prone to many life-threatening genetic diseases. Fortunately, the work of selecting the breeders responsible for Kooiker has resulted in the practical elimination of these risks today.

These diseases with which the breed has often been associated are:

  • The von Willebrand disease, which causes blood clotting problems and can lead to death from bleeding. Widespread DNA testing since the years 90 make that today we hardly find more affected subjects;
  • Hereditary necrotizing myelopathy, a neurological problem that affects the spinal cord and causes paralysis. Thanks to a responsible breeding policy, now there is less than one case a year worldwide;
  • The hereditary epilepsy, which can cause seizures that range from a few seconds to several minutes. The number of affected dogs is steadily decreasing, to the point that this disease only affects between 1 and 5 dogs a year;
  • The miositis, o polymositis, it is a chronic inflammation of one or more muscles that can cause very different symptoms depending on the muscles affected. Potentially deadly, this disease is still relatively widespread, affecting about the 1% of the population;
  • The waterfall, an opaque filter in the eyes that can cause blindness in dogs, that has been practically eliminated;
  • The patellar dislocation moderate, which is disabling but not dangerous, and it is by far the most common condition. In fact, almost the 15% of the breed representatives are affected.
  • Another risk to the health of the Dutch for "small cager dog" is obesity, so the owner should regularly check that the dog is not overweight, in addition to giving him enough exercise.

    Last but not least, like all breeds of dogs with hanging ears, are at increased risk of ear infections.

    Life expectancy

    12 - 14 years

    Grooming

    The Kooikerhondje it is a low maintenance breed of dog. A quick weekly brushing is more than enough to keep the coat healthy. However, during the shedding periods in spring and fall, brushing more frequently is recommended to remove dead hair.

    Bathing your dog is seldom necessary. In any case, you should not bathe your dog more than twice a year, so as not to damage your skin. On the other hand, After the Kooikerhondje have fun in a pool, in the sea or in a doubtful-looking pond, it is advisable to rinse it with fresh water to remove any traces of chlorine, shall, algae or bacteria.

    On the other hand, it is advisable to take advantage of the weekly brushing session to check the eyes, teeth and, above all, the dog's ears, to ensure that there is no dirt that could cause the start of an infection or otitis.

    Last but not least, the claws of Kooikerhondje are tough and grow relatively quickly: natural wear and tear is often not enough, and then you have to trim them manually when they have become too long.

    Utility

    Historically used for duck hunting in the canals of the Netherlands, the Kooiker is today mainly a pet.

    His high level of activity and intelligence also allow him to obtain excellent results in dog sports competitions, and a patient and dedicated trainer can turn you into a flyball or agility champion.

    Characteristics "Kooikerhondje (Kooiker)"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Kooikerhondje (Kooiker)" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images "Kooikerhondje (Kooiker)"

    Photos:

    1 – Kooikerhondje by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/perro-kooikerhondje-kooiker-3917568/
    2 – Kooikerhondje by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/perro-kooikerhondje-mascotas-4744089/
    3 – Dutch Decoy Dog puppy by Jeroenzwaan, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – KOOIKERHONDJE PUPPY by https://pixy.org/4695950/
    5 – Kooikerhondje by Burner83 / from wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    6 – Kooiker – petsadviser.com by Pets Adviser from Brooklyn, USA, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Videos "Kooikerhondje (Kooiker)"

    Kooiker – 16 weeks – MOOS
    Carino in der Hundeschule

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group 8: Retrievers - Flushing Dogs - Water Dogs
    • Section 2: Flushing Dogs. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 8: Retrievers - Flushing Dogs - Water Dogs – Section 2: Retrievers
    • AKCSporting
    • ​KC – Gundog
    • UKCGun Dogs


      • FCI breed standard "Kooikerhondje (Kooiker)"

        FCIFCI - Kooikerhondje (Kooiker)
        Spaniel

        Alternative names:

          1. Kooiker, Dutch Spanie (English).
          2. Petit chien hollandais de chasse au gibier d’eau (French).
          3. Kooikerhondje (German).
          4. (em neerlandês: Kooikerhondje) (Portuguese).
          5. Kooikerhondje, Pequeño Perro Holandés para la caza acuática (Spanish).

    Australian Kelpie
    Australia FCI 293 . Sheepdogs

    Kelpie Australiano

    The Kelpie is very smart, laborious and is always alert.

    Content

    History

    The Australian Kelpie is a sheepdog developed around the decade of 1870 by Australian breeders by mixing several sheepdogs from Collie type imported directly from England. His goal was to develop a breed well adapted to Australian climatic conditions., especially to heat, and with enough independence to herd sheep and cows over a vast territory without too much supervision.

    Until very recently, the race was also thought to be mixed with the Dingoes, australian wild dog, but recent genetic studies have shown otherwise. However, towards the end of the 19th century the Australian Kelpie also mixed with shorthaired Scottish Sheepdogs, giving it the characteristics it has today.

    The word Kelpie has its origin in Celtic mythology. In fact, a Scottish legend mentions metamorphic spirits called kelpie, that appear most often in the form of a horse made of water, and lurking in the rivers and lakes of Scotland. These malevolent spirits are meant to attract humans, especially to children and young people, to his death. It is unclear how the name came to be associated with this breed of dog.. However, the story that comes up most often, although it is not officially documented, is that of a Scottish breeder named George Robertson who, in 1872, it is said that he named Kelpie one of the first specimens of this breed; this name would simply have remained afterwards to designate all the dogs of this breed.

    Today, there are around of 450.000 sheepdogs in Australia, and most of them are Australian Kelpie. Since the decade of 1930, two types of Kelpie have been used in Australia: those used as working dogs and those used as show dogs. Show lines developed as the breed gained popularity at dog shows. Having said that, in most other countries, this distinction doesn't really exist.

    In any case, the Australian Kelpie has been exported to many countries. This is particularly true in the United States., where its great flexibility has allowed it to adapt to different climates and terrains, as well as working with different types of livestock.

    Whether in Australia or anywhere else in the world, the Australian Kelpie has convinced by its versatility. In fact, not only is it an excellent sheepdog, both in real conditions and in sheepdog competitions, it can also be found in many other roles, like the sniffing dog of the police, therapy dog ​​or assistance dog for the blind.

    Although it is not yet officially recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC), the Australian Kelpie is authorized from 2015 to participate in sheepdog competitions organized under the auspices of the organization. It is also not recognized in Great Britain by the Kennel Club.. On the other hand, the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) recognizes the breed from 1973.

    Physical characteristics

    The Australian Kelpie worker and the Australian Kelpie competitive look similar, although the latter is slightly smaller and a little less thin. They are medium-sized dogs, very athletic and muscular that doesn't look heavy. Their characteristics give them great flexibility of movement and unlimited energy..

    The Australian Kelpie are slightly longer than tall, what gives them a perfect body for running. They have a slim appearance, with a deep chest and long strong legs. One of its peculiarities is that it seems to make no effort when running, a bit like I'm flying, with its four legs that seem to touch the ground at the same time.

    The Australian Kelpie has a slightly rounded skull with large, straight ears on top. The muzzle is conical, with a fairly small mouth and large teeth ready to chew. The eyes are oval in shape and in shades of dark brown.

    The standards of Australian Kelpie established by the various organizations that recognize the breed allow a fairly wide range of coat colors. However, in the countries – like australia – where there is a distinction between lines of work and lines of display, only one solid color layer is recognized for the latter. In fact, regardless of lineage, the Australian Kelpie is most often black or chocolate with red markings, blue-gray or beige.
    His hair is of medium length and covers a fairly soft undercoat..

    Character and skills

    The Australian Kelpie not a suitable animal for all families. In fact, is an extremely intelligent and energetic dog that requires a lot of attention. Hates being alone, and must be strongly stimulated mentally and physically, through at least two hours of daily exercise. In fact, not at all a suitable breed of dog for an elderly or very sedentary person, but rather for a very active and sporty master, willing to do different activities with your dog. Excels in activities that require agility like Frisbee or agility competitions.

    Like the vast majority of sheepdogs, to the Australian Kelpie he likes to be busy; you are never happier than when you have a task to do. Like this, in addition to the essential walks and / or races, it is recommended that each dog play with him or train him in various activities in which he must apply the instructions given by his master, which he does with great devotion and seemingly limitless energy.

    Lack of encouragement would be a huge problem for the Australian Kelpie; if bored, can become destructive, disobedient and engaging in various other behaviors intended to combat boredom, whether or not it conforms to the rules of the home. For example, can gnaw on various objects or make the garden look like a minefield by digging holes everywhere.

    Therefore, the Australian Kelpie he is not a sedentary dog ​​and can only be unhappy in a home that has little time and / or energy to give him. On the other hand, space is not necessarily a problem, as long as you get enough attention: can even cope with apartment living, whenever he has the opportunity to follow his master on excursions and activities, and thus be active daily.

    Usually makes a good family dog, but you may be tempted to “to play” with the pastor with the children or even with the visitors passing by. Therefore, take special care with the youngest, as you may be tempted to nibble on your heels to get them back to where you feel they belong, or to encourage them to participate in an activity. With the Kelpie, the shepherd instinct is never far away.

    The same goes for other pets, so it should be kept under surveillance if necessary. In any case, socializing him from a young age with other species can only be beneficial to prevent him from being mistaken for a herd once he is an adult.

    In addition, although they can get along with other dogs, generally prefer the company of humans to that of other dogs.

    Although originally developed for life on the farm, the Australian Kelpie not a dog to leave outdoors, since he gets bored quickly if separated from his family. However, as they are used to operating independently without much instruction, want to be an integral part of family life and tend to act like a member of the family rather than a pet. As a result, he is also a sensitive dog who does not like to be excluded from family activities.

    With a lot of frequency, owners who have not taken the trouble to inform themselves seriously before adoption end up abandoning their Australian Kelpie because it takes too much time and attention. The energetic character, Kelpie's need for activity and intelligence should be taken very seriously when it comes to choosing the breed of dog to adopt. In any case, when your needs are well cared for, he is a very nice and loyal companion.

    He does not easily trust strangers and is very territorial, it is also a very good watchdog, very alert and vocal, that alerts as soon as it hears a strange noise. Therefore, it is best to prevent strangers or even neighbors' pets from venturing into your territory, since I could be aggressive with them. The loud barking of the dog can also be problematic in an urban environment; if the dog is destined to live in the city, this is an aspect that should be particularly worked on as part of your education.

    Education “Australian Kelpie”

    The Australian Kelpie It is a breed of dog reserved for an experienced and very active owner. Either during training or after, it is important to give you clear and consistent rules, as it works much better in a structured environment.

    However, your training is made easier by the fact that you need to keep busy, and is therefore generally content to participate in dog training activities. Can also be trained to participate in family chores: either picking up the mail, picking up clothes or toys off the floor or helping bring groceries, always ready for a new activity, even at a young age. Completing tasks is an integral part of Kelpie's personality, and can help you feel part of the family.

    This willingness to be active and helpful makes the Australian Kelpie one of the easiest dog breeds to train. Excel in dog sports, they love to learn new orders and enjoy helping their owner. Training is not a particular problem, since they are completely obedient when they are sufficiently stimulated both intellectually and physically. On the other hand, boredom sets in soon, because he is an intelligent dog, and therefore learn quickly: it is useless to make him repeat the instructions too often, but he must be able to find new challenges and new activities for him regularly. A good solution may be to join a dog club that offers agility courses and games like Frisbee. (discdog).

    Dog training techniques based on positive reinforcement, leading to rewarding the dog for desired behavior rather than punishing it for inappropriate behavior, are preferable with the Australian Kelpie, who has a rather sensitive personality and does not respond well to punishment or an overly imposing master. In fact, there is no point wanting to show your dog at all costs that you are the master, since he does not perceive his dog as superior, but rather as a companion. Therefore, you should treat him with respect and not underestimate his intelligence, especially since he is used to working alone and without too many instructions.

    Last but not least, education should give priority to the socialization of the puppy from an early age, because the Australian Kelpie it is a territorial and distrustful dog. Otherwise, you risk becoming aggressive towards strangers and / or other animals. This will help you learn to react appropriately to strangers., preventing his natural mistrust from taking hold of him.

    Health “Australian Kelpie”

    The Australian Kelpie it is usually a healthy dog, but you run the risk of some of the problems often associated with the sheepdog group:

    • Abiotrofia cerebelosa;
    • Collie eye abnormality: Despite its name, this condition not only affects Collie: the Australian Kelpie you can also be a victim of it. This inherited recessive disease can even lead to blindness;
    • Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament: rupture of this ligament located in the knee can be caused by trauma (20% of the cases), but more often it is simply due to joint fragility or false movement. It can also be caused by early deterioration of the joint, which is common in very active dogs like Kelpie. It is the most common cause of lameness in this breed, and can cause arthritis;
    • dog hypothyroidism;
    • dog microphthalmia;
    • Progressive retinal atrophy (ARP): is the most common inherited disease in Collie family.

    Most genetic diseases can be prevented by tight control of the genetics of farm animals to reduce inbreeding, as well as by detecting these diseases to prevent individuals carrying these genes from producing offspring. These are, of course, points that any breeder of Australian Kelpie worthy is particularly attentive.

    Last but not least, the Australian Kelpie also leans for :

    • dog cryptorchidism;
    • Hip Dysplasia;
    • dislocation of the patella. May be of congenital origin, due to trauma or simply caused by wear and tear. The latter case is frequent in an active dog such as the Australian Kelpie.

    You also have a higher than average risk of being overweight, so special vigilance is required at this level, in particular by regularly weighing your dog to control his weight.

    Care and maintenance “Australian Kelpie”

    Like the fur of the Australian Kelpie can vary quite a bit from one individual to another in terms of density and length, so does its maintenance. However, usually sheds a large amount of hair throughout the year, so it is necessary to brush the dog twice a week. Hair loss is obviously even more pronounced during shedding periods, in spring and autumn, and then it is necessary to opt for a daily frequency to remove dead hairs.

    On the other hand, it is rare that you have to give your dog a bath: this is only necessary if you come into contact with a dirty or harmful substance.

    In addition, being a very active breed of dog, their claws tend to wear out naturally, and therefore rarely need to be trimmed.

    Looking at your teeth, pose no particular risk. All you need to do is brush your dog's teeth once a week.

    In general, the Australian Kelpie It is a fairly easy dog ​​to take care of. Above all, it is their great need for exercise and intellectual stimulation that makes them a demanding dog on a daily basis.

    Uses and activities”Australian Kelpie”

    It was originally developed as a sheepdog to herd and guide livestock, the Australian Kelpie has since become a versatile companion. Of course, also found in sheepdog competitions, but also as a police sniffing dog, psychological support dog, guide dog for the blind, but also simply as a family dog. In summary, it is a versatile animal that likes to keep busy and easily adapts to different contexts.

    In Australia, but the Kelpie still primarily a sheepdog, it is also increasingly used as a therapy and companion dog. In fact, his sensitivity and need to be in the company of humans make him an exceptionally attentive dog.

    In Sweden, Holland and Finland, they are used particularly as search and rescue dogs during accidents and disasters.

    How much does a “Australian Kelpie”?

    In Australia, a puppy of Australian Kelpie normally sold for about 580 Australian dollars (a few 350 EUR). Most of the individuals offered belong to working dog lines.

    In other parts of the world, depending on lineage and pedigree, the price of a puppy Australian Kelpie is between 750 and 3.000 EUR. As individuals sold outside of Australia mainly come from show dog lines, the price range is quite wide because the price goes up quickly if the puppy comes from a line with a reputation for having distinguished itself in the field.

    Characteristics "Australian Kelpie"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Australian Kelpie" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images "Australian Kelpie"

    Photos:

    1 – Diesel, a pure-bred Australian Kelpie by my davepaku, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – Australian Kelpie, liver & tan by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – Kelpie australiano by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/kelpie-australiano-perro-ovejas-4217941/
    4 – AUSTRALIAN KELPIE, KORAD SE UCH Deepeyes Dance With Dragons III by Swedish Fair from Sweden, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    5 – Kelpie australiano by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/nube-roja-kelpie-perro-pastor-2992780/
    6 – Chocolate Female Kelpie by Spinefly, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Videos "Australian Kelpie"

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs
    • AKC – PASTORAGE


    FCI breed standard "Australian Kelpie"

    FCIFCI - Australian Kelpie
    Kelpie

    Alternative names:

      1. Kelpie (English).
      2. Kelpie (French).
      3. Kelpie (German).
      4. Kelpie (Portuguese).
      5. Kelpie (Spanish).

    Kuvasz
    Hungría FCI 54 - Sheepdogs.

    The Kuvasz (PL. Kuvaszok) It is an ancient Hungarian breed of sheepdog.

    Kuvasz

    Content

    Characteristics "Kuvasz"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Kuvasz" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    History

    The Kuvasz is an ancient guardian breed of herds that originated in Hungary, although their distant ancestors were probably type dogs Tibetan Mastiff.

    While the Komondor was used on the grounds lower with drier climates, the Kuvasz was used in the wet grasslands of the highest mountains and the two were an integral part of the Hungarian economy. Later, during the century 15, the Kuvasz became a prized animal, the dog belonged to the Royal Court of the King Matthias Corvinus. Y, Since the Kingdom was offered to visiting dignitaries as a Royal gift Kuvasz puppies, Legend has it that the King was more confident their dogs than in their own Councillors. After the death of the King, the popularity of the breed among the nobles decreased, But even so the dog still their traditional role in the protection of livestock.

    At the end of World War II, almost all the Kuvasz in Hungary had been killed. The dogs were used for the protection of their families, reason why were actively sought and killed by German and Soviet soldiers, while at the same time, some German soldiers were a large number of copies to their homes. After the Soviet invasion and the end of the war, the breed was almost extinct in Hungary.

    The word Kuvasz, probably, it comes from the Turkish "Kavas" meaning guard, soldier or a protector. One theory posits that the Word may have its origin in ancient farmers of Russia-related, the Chuvash, that has contributed many words to the Hungarian language.

    For a long time, the property of the Kuvasz was restricted, but they were finally used by the shepherds as guardians of the flock. That is the job they are known for today.. The dog's white fur allowed the shepherd to easily distinguish it from a wolf while mixing with the herd.

    Physical characteristics

    The Kuvasz should be of good size, solidly built and with a dignified air. The skull should be slightly arched and not too long, wedge-shaped snout. Leads the small ears hanging in the form of V. The body is rather long, with the slightly outgoing ribs. The legs are strong and not too long. The tail is long, slightly curved at the tip, which wears a beautiful plume. The coat is long, rough and undulating. The color has to be pure white, Although the white ivory can be accepted.

    Although the skin is white, the pigmentation of the skin of Kuvasz should be dark and the nose should be black. The eyes must have an almendrada form. The females usually weigh between 35 and 50 kg, While males weigh in 50 - 70 kg, tieneto a bone structure medium. The height at the cross in the males is of 71 - 76 cm and the females of 66 - 70 cm..

    For a casual observer, the Kuvasz may be similar to a Pyrenean Shepherd, to the Akbash, a dog “Maremma Shepherd”, a Samoyed, a Pudelhund white mixed with a Labrador Retriever, or some slovak dog like him Polish Tatra Sheepdog.

    As with many livestock guardian dogs, the color of the layer of the Kuvasz serves a functional purpose and is an essential breed criterion. To develop the breed a purpose clear in the Kuvasz was to realise a mantle of color, to provide pastors distinguish the dog of wolves attacking animals at night. The Komondor, a close relative of the Kuvasz, It has a white coat for the same reason.

    The Kuvasz lose a lot of hair from time to time. The rest of care are complicated. We must bear in mind that it is a dog of strong personality, which is why their education must be early and can be put to the test the patience of the educator. You need a suitable space of movement and exercise.

    Hair: short, smooth, closed and thick on the head and on the front of the extremities. in the trunk, brazos, tie and tail is long and wavy, and often forms ridges and locks. it's pretty rough, a little stiff and in no case felt. the undercoat is fine and woolly.

    Color: white.

    Size: males of 71 - 75 cm.; females of 66 - 70 cm..

    Character and skills

    The Kuvasz he is a tireless keeper of flocks, defending the predators. Previously it had been used also as a hunting dog to pursue wolves, wild boars and bears. It is also a great guardian. In his country the police and army use it as Assistant. In recent decades it has become also companion dog.

    Good working dog, reliable watchdog, Pleasant Home Companion, so is the Kuvasz.

    It has been used as a livestock guardian, but in recent years can be found in households as pet.

    The Kuvasz he is a smart dog and is generally said to have a clown sense of humor, that can last throughout adolescence and adulthood. They are very loyal but patients animals who appreciate human attention, but it also needs its space, they are very independent animals.

    According to the classification made by Stanley Coren after analyzing the responses of more of 200 work of the AKC judges ("The intelligence of dogs", Stanley city, Ediciones B, 1995), the Kuvasz is the No. 42 from the list.

    Despite his intelligence, It should not be perceived as easy to train. Her independent personality can make the training a difficult task that, You can exhaust the patience, even for experienced owners. As a result, It is not recommended for beginners and those who do not have time to train and socialize in a manner appropriate to their Kuvasz.

    On the other hand, many of these qualities make the Kuvasz excellent guardians for sheep or large farms. The Kuvasz has a very special and close relationship with his owner.

    It is a sober and suffered dog, It resists weathering in the toughest conditions, Frequent brushing is therefore, necessary to keep their fur clean. A Kuvasz should not smell bad, This is usually a sign of illness or poor nutrition.

    Homemade dog is friendly, affectionate and intelligent, and above all an excellent guardian, brave and quiet, suspicious and even reserved with strangers. Under its dignified appearance hides a playful temperament which makes him a loyal friend of children.

    It is generally a healthy and robust breed whose life expectancy is about 12 or 14 years.

    Kuvasz Health

    In the Kuvaszok, more serious health problems include hip dysplasia, osteocondrosis (a joint disorder that damages cartilage and bone) and a propensity for cruciate ligament injury. An eye disease called progressive retinal atrophy (ARP) is a potential concern, just like hypothyroidism (a common hormonal disease in dogs in which the thyroid gland does not make enough thyroxine) and vonWillebrand's disease (a disorder of blood clotting).

    Not all of these diseases are detectable in a growing puppy, and it can be difficult to predict whether an animal will be free from these diseases, so you need to find a reputable breeder who commit to raise healthier animals possible. Must be able to produce an independent certification that the parents of the dog (and grandparents, etc.) They have been examined to detect these defects and considered healthy for breeding. That's where they enter medical records.

    Do not buy a puppy from a breeder who cannot provide you with written documentation showing that the parents were exempt from health problems affecting the breed.. If the breeder tells you that the tests are not necessary because they have never had problems with their lines, that the dogs have been “reviewed by the veterinarian”, or offers you any other excuse to skimp on genetic testing of your dogs, leave immediately.

    Careful breeders examine their breeding dogs for genetic diseases and breed only the healthiest, best-looking specimens, but sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas. A puppy can develop one of these diseases despite good breeding practices. Advances in veterinary medicine mean that in most cases dogs can still live a good life. If you are going to have a puppy, ask the breeder about the ages of the dogs in his lines and what are the most common causes of death.

    Remember that after you have welcomed a new puppy into your home, It has the power to protect one of the most common health problems: the obesity. Keeping a Kuvasz at the right weight is one of the easiest ways to extend its life.. Make the most of diet and exercise to help ensure a healthier dog for life.

    observations and advice

    not a very well-known dog and, therefore, it is difficult to find a puppy of this breed. However, it is more widely used than Komondor, whose cloak scares many potential buyers. In fact, Kuvasz's hair is more difficult to care for, Since it must be brushed periodically to avoid the formation of knots, although it should be washed as little as possible.

    Kuvasz toilet

    The Kuvasz has a beautiful white double coat that loosens dirt but also loosens hair. Brush it weekly with a pin brush to remove dead hair and keep skin and coat healthy. Trim the hair between the toes to keep your feet looking good. Its coat repels water and removes dirt easily with brushing, so a bath is rarely necessary.

    When summer comes, don't think your Kuvasz has suddenly developed a disease causing hair loss. It is normal for the Kuvasz to lose most of its long coat in hot weather.

    The rest are basic care. Cut nails as needed, normally each week the. Brush your teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good general health and fresh breath.

    Images "Kuvasz"

    Videos "Kuvasz"

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs
    • AKC – PASTORAGE
    • ANKC – Group 5 (working dogs)
    • CKC – Group 7 – Herding dogs
    • ​KC – Pastoral
    • NZKC – Working dog
    • UKC – Herding dogs


    FCI breed standard "Kuvasz"

    FCIFCI - Kuvasz
    Kuvasz

    Alternative names:

      1. Hungarian Kuvasz (English).
      2. Kuvasz (French).
      3. Kuvasz (German).
      4. Pastor Húngaro (Portuguese).
      5. Kuvaszok (Spanish).

    Photos:

    1 – kuvasz by Vkoves / Public domain
    2 – KUVASZ by Swedish Fair from Sweden / CC BY
    3 – Kuvasz Prince of The Dogs Kennel by Kuvaszprince / CC BY-SA
    4 – 7.5 months old kuvasz bitch by Sprays / Public domain
    5 – Female kuvasz in Ópusztaszer, Hungary by DenesFeri / CC BY-SA
    6 – Nine-week-old Kuvasz dog by Vkovesz / Public domain

    Kromfohrlander
    Germany FCI 192 . Kromfohrlander

    Kromfohrlander

    The Kromfohrlander (nicknamed Länder or Krom) It is a breed of dog originating in Germany company.

    Content

    History

    The Kromfohrlander it is a modern breed, born of the intervention of the United States in Germany after World War II. The exact story varies. A story tells that the founding dog of the breed, Peter, was a scruffy canine mascot that was found by American troops in northern France. Your ancestry could be a mix of Grand basset griffon vendéen and Fox Terrier (wire).

    Somehow, Peter parted ways with the troops, but he was rescued by a woman named Ilse Schleifenbaum. She adopted him, and in the natural course of things, Peter had an affair with Fifi, a Fox Terrier (wire) black and white. Her cubs, Shaggy y Witch, they looked a lot like their father in looks and temperament. Ilse decided that her qualities were worth reproducing and called the dogs “krom fohr” (“crooked groove”), by the local landscape.

    Another version of the history of the race is that Peter traveled with the troops and they handed him over to Frau Schleifenbaum. She raised him with her own dog, described as resembling a Fawn Brittany Griffon, producing five litters bearing their father's stamp. Be that as it may, the International Cynological Federation recognized them as a distinct breed in 1955.

    The first Kromfohrlander imported to the United States was Button von der Britzer Muhle in 1997. A female followed, Finca vom Kahlharz, in 1999. The United Kennel Club recognized the breed a few years earlier, in 1996, classifying it originally as Terrier, but then reassigning her to companion dog status in 2013. However, was not up 2012 when the Kromfohrlander began to be registered with the Stock Service of the American Kennel Club Foundation (AKC FSS).

    Currently, in Germany, a few 200 dogs of Kromfohrländer per year are under the umbrella of the VDH. Faced with the problem of inbreeding, in 2010 the breeding association was founded ProKromfohrländer e.V., you want to systematically counteract with selective crosses and other measures. For example, the Dansk-Svensk Gårdshund, a very similar Danish-Swedish dog breed provisionally recognized by the FCI, is being crossed to improve the breeding base. Taking into account the history of the breeding of the Kromfohrländer and the physical and psychological characteristics of both breeds of dogs, it seems that it is a good way. By the way, name Kromfohrländer comes from a valley near Siegen, that it's called Krom Fohr = Krumme Furche.

    The Kromfohrländer It is one of the newer German dog breeds, practically unknown outside its borders.

    Physical characteristics

    The Kromfohrländer It is a breed of medium-sized companion dog . There are two different types of hair: rough hair (Rauhaar) and smooth hair (Glatthaar). This is what the provisions of the standard say about the general appearance. The standard says about the color of the coat:

    Basic color white; Light brown markings, reddish brown to very dark brown in the form of spots of different sizes or like a saddle. Black hair ends with brown undercoat are allowed. In the head: light brown spots, reddish brown to dark brown on the cheeks, above the eyes and in the ears. Largely symmetrically subdivided with white markings extending to the forehead or nape (symmetrical mask with glow).

    As a result of extreme inbreeding, the dogs in practice became increasingly pale in terms of their brown tones. That is why the Fox Terrier (wire) they crossed in the decade of 1960 to enhance colors. A Kromfohrländer has manageable dimensions, matching her cheerful charisma, friendly and lively .

    Weight and height

  • Male size: 38 – 46 cm.
  • Female size: 38 – 46 cm.
  • Male weight: 11 – 16 kg
  • Female weight: 9 – 14 kg
  • Character and skills

    The Kromfohrländer purebred is an adaptable dog, sensitive and with terrier blood.

    It is a true family dog. He follows her where he can. At the same time, presents features of “unique dog”. Within his town there are always one or two people to whom he is especially attached. Especially close friendships can develop here, even intimate, if your humans allow it. So the world is alright for the dog, yes and while these his faithful friends are there. He is faithfully dedicated to them. Without them he is restless and only looks towards the door, when the master or loves her finally arrive.

    With a little good education and guidance, he is a very sociable family dog, who is also very good at living with children. At the same time, he is quite reserved with strangers.

    Some bark very discreetly, others report each movement. Both on the leash and on your own turf, the Kromfohrländer sometimes tends to megalomania. This appears to be an inheritance from the Terrier. Here your caregivers must show clear leadership. Only with the development of your own personality, usually at two years, becomes more relaxed in dealing with the outside world. Another advantage of Kromfohrländer is that he barely has hunting instinct. This makes walks or hikes in nature with him very relaxing.

    Health

    The Kromfohrlander is generally healthy, with a life expectancy of 12 - 14 years.

    All dogs have the potential to developgenetic health problems, Like all people, they have the potential to inherit a particular disease. – Do not walk – from any breeder that does not offer a health guarantee to their puppies, to tell you that the race is 100 percent healthy and having no known problems or telling you that their puppies are isolated from the main body. from home for health reasons A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in their lines.

    Health problems that can be observed in the breed include:

    • Autoimmune thyroiditis (thyroid disease)
    • Cistinuria, a genetic defect that allows the accumulation of cystine, an amino acid, in urine.
    • Epilepsy
    • keratosis, stiffening of the foot pad caused by an excess of a protein called keratin
    • Patellar luxation, an orthopedic condition that involves the kneecap slipping out of place

    Ask the breeder what problems he has experienced in his lines - problems such as autoimmune thyroiditis may not appear until the dog is middle-aged or older.

    Careful breeders screen their breeding dogs for genetic diseases and breed only the healthiest and most attractive specimens, But sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas and a puppy develops one of these diseases despite good breeding practices. Advances in veterinary medicine mean that, in many cases, thedogsThey can still live a good life. If you're going to have a puppy, ask the breeder about the ages of the dogs in their lines and what caused their death.

    If a breeder tells you they don't need to do these tests or that their dogs don't need health certifications because they have never had problems in their lines, that their dogs have been checked by a vet or give any other excuse to skimp on genetic testing. dog, walk away immediately.

    Remember that after you have brought a new puppy into your home, has the power to protect you from one of the most common canine health problems: theObesity.Keep a Kromfohrländer at a proper weight is one of the easiest ways to help ensure a healthier dog for life.

    Grooming

    The coat of the Kromfohrländer can be rough or smooth, and each type of coat can vary in length. Wire-haired dogs, or rough fur, they always have beards, which makes them look pretty and scruffy. The hair is thick and rough in texture. Beneath him is a short soft cape.

    Smooth-haired dogs have feathers in their ears, chest and legs and a nice feathered tail. Your body hair can be short or long, and finishes off a short and smooth undercoat.

    The Kromfohrländer lose hair, but not in excess. People who live with dogs say that regular sweeping and vacuuming is enough to keep their fur under control.

    Fur tends to shed dirt easily, and dogs don't usually smell unless they've wallowed in something that smells bad. Bathe them when necessary. Depending on whether a Kromfohrländer spends a lot of time outdoors, as well as in your furniture, that can mean weekly, monthly or quarterly.

    The rest are basic care. Trim your nails every week or two, or when necessary. Brush teeth frequently - with a veterinarian approved pet toothpaste- for general good health and fresh breath.

    Characteristics "Kromfohrlander"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Kromfohrlander" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images "Kromfohrlander"

    Photos:
    1 – "Kromfohrlander" by Ellarie, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – A "Kromfohrlander", wirehaired subtype, lying on the grass. by Marc Rünger, CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – "Kromfohrlander" Dog 2013 Helsinki 13-15/12/2013 by Tomasyna, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – "Kromfohrlander" by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/perro-kromfohrl%C3%A4nder-raza-de-perro-4417896/
    5 – "Kromfohrlander" by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/perro-kromfohrl%C3%A4nder-oto%C3%B1o-4417894/
    6 – "Kromfohrlander" by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/perro-kromfohrl%C3%A4nder-raza-de-perro-4417897/

    Videos "Kromfohrlander"

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 9: Section 10: Kromfohrlander
    • AKCToy
    • UKC – Group 8 – Companion dog


    FCI breed standard "Kromfohrlander"

    FCIFCI - Kromfohrlander
    Kromfohrlander

    Alternative names:

      1. Länder, Kromi (English).
      2. Kromfohrländer (French).
      3. Kromfohrländer (German).
      4. Kromfohrländer (Portuguese).
      5. Länder, Krom (Spanish).

    Komondor
    Hungria FCI 53 - Sheepdogs

    The Komondor It is a breed of guard dog and pastor, originally from Hungary. Its main feature is the peculiar appearance of its fur, that falls in tufts like dreadlocks.

    Komondor

    Content

    Characteristics "Komondor"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Komondor" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    Rated 2 out of 5
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 1 out of 5
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    Rated 4 out of 5
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    Rated 3 out of 5
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    Rated 5 out of 5
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    History

    The Komondor is a breed of dog originally from Hungary, where it has been fulfilling its mission as a herding dog for more than 1000 years. Its long white fur allows it to blend in with the flocks of sheep it cares for and which it especially resembles.. So you can catch threatening predators by surprise, including impressive opponents such as bears or wolves.

    It probably originated from the dogs that came to Hungary with the Magyars, nomads who came from Central Asia around the year 900 d.C. and they took their dogs to tend their flocks of cattle and sheep. Other experts argue that the ancestors of Komondor they arrived with the cumans, another Turkish nomadic people who, after the Mongol invasion of 1237, took refuge in present-day Hungary.

    It is this last hypothesis that we find in the name of the breed, since the term “Komondor” comes from “Quman-dur“, that means “Cuman dog”. Although researchers have found the remains of these dogs in Cuman cemeteries dating back to the 13th century, the oldest written description dates from the 16th century.

    At the end of the 17th century it was very popular in Hungary, and has remained so ever since. Raised and selected for their courage and strength, It was used mainly in the field to monitor farms, and in the mountains to protect the flocks of sheep. Hungarians are very proud of this dog, who is credited with the considerable decrease in the number of wolves in his country, and that it was not crossed or modified until the middle of the 20th century.

    Komondor entered the United States between the wars, and the American Kennel Club (AKC) recognized the breed in 1937. However, World War II and then the Cold War put an end to Hungary's imports.

    In more general terms, the breed suffered greatly during these difficult times, seeing that their number decreased considerably. During World War II, many of their representatives were assassinated by the German military, since it was impossible for them to access the farms and houses of the country while this imposing guard dog protected them. Obviously, conflicts also limited its export to other countries.

    In the Decade of 1960, Hungarian and American breeders were able to renew their ties, so the import of the Komondor to the United States. While the race was on the brink of extinction (even in their country of origin, mostly due to the consequences of the war), saw their number grow considerably and their notoriety do the same, both in Hungary and abroad.

    In the United States, attempts in the west of the country to use him as a herder are promising, and its use throughout the country has been increasing considerably. Logically, el United Kennel Club (UKC), another reference canine organization in the country, recognized it as an official breed in 1983.

    In Europe, over the years 50, the Komondor was crossed with him South Russian Ovcharka, to get new bloodlines. It is also at this time - and more precisely in 1954- When the Komondor was recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI).

    At last, at the end of the 20th century, there was a new crossing with other breeds of sheepdogs such as the Catalan Sheepdog, the Pyrenean Shepherd, the Bergamasco Shepherd or the Monkey dog.

    However, this is a rare breed of dog, regardless of the country. In fact, even in the country where a large proportion of the population is located, the United States, it is not very common. For example, just occupy around the place 160 (of 190) in the ranking of the most popular dogs in the United States, based on number of annual AKC registrations.

    In France, it is also discreet, since the average number of annual registrations in the Livre des Origines Français (LOF) it's around of 15 since the beginning of the 21st century. It has even experienced a certain decline, since this number was more or less in the thirties around the nineties. Not much better, for example, en el Reino Unido, where the number of registrations per year with The Kennel Club rarely exceeds ten.

    Physical characteristics

    The Komondor it is a large and strongly built dog. Your outward appearance, that of a winner and his majestic posture arouse respect in the observer and eventually also fear. Not flattering by nature. The robust body is covered by long hair, always bushy without exception, matted, tufted. Seen in profile, the body is a rectangle lying, almost a square. Protruding above the body, the head appears very densely hairy. The tail is carried hanging with the tip bent almost reaching the horizontal.

    Hair: thick and bushy, holding to be felted or strung (in the latter case it is not felted). Presence of sunpelo.

    Color: White, white profile.

    Size: males, of 65 – 80 cm., for a weight of 50 – 60 kg; females, of 55 -70 cm., for a weight of 40 – 50 cm..

    Observations and tips.

    The cloak may seem difficult to care for, but it doesn't really need any care. It should not even be brushed because its hardiness must be kept intact. For hygiene reasons, must bathe regularly.

    Character and skills

    Unwavering courage in defending and caring for the herds under her charge, also from his territory and his master's house. Attack silently and boldly. Consider your district as if it belonged to you, in which it does not admit any strange being. Is distrustful. Your day goes by happily when you can spend it controlling your territory. During the night it remains in permanent movement.

    With good training and in expert hands it can be a good defense dog, although quite conflicting with other dogs, and can bite a man if he is not socialized from the earliest age. Fortunately, it is very docile and a signal from its owner is enough to stop it when it decides to attack.

    Komondor toilet

    Komondor's coat begins to lace up when he is eight months to one year old. The coat does not come off much, but the laces must be separated regularly to maintain their appearance, and the coat attracts the dirt. Once a Komondor passes the puppy stage, its coat will probably never have its pristine whiteness before. The coat should never be dirty, tangled or foul-smelling.

    To avoid problems, ask the breeder to show you how to care for the coat. Trimming the hair around the mouth and cleaning the dog's face after meals is one way to help reduce odor..

    The rest are basic care. Trim nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep ears clean and dry. Brush your teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good general health and fresh breath.

    Komondor Health

    The Komondor they are generally healthy, but the conditions that are sometimes seen in the breed include hip dysplasia, eye problems like entropion (a deformity of the eyelid), and juvenile falls, and swelling, also known as gastric torsion or gastric dilatation volvulus.

    Do not buy a puppy from a breeder who cannot provide you with written documentation showing that the parents were exempted from health problems affecting the breed. Have dogs undergo a “veterinary checkup” It is not a substitute for testing genetic health.

    Remember that after bringing a new puppy home, It has the power to protect one of the most common health problems: the obesity. Keep a KomondorA proper weight is one of the easiest ways to extend your life. To take the most of preventive skills to help ensure a healthier dog for life.

    Images "Komondor"

    Videos "Komondor"

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs
    • AKC – PASTORAGE
    • ANKC – Group 5 (working dogs)
    • CKC – Group 7 – Herding dogs
    • ​KC – Pastoral
    • NZKC – Working dog
    • UKC – Herding dogs


    FCI breed standard "Komondor"

    FCIFCI - Komondor
    Komondor

    Alternative names:

      1. Hungarian Commonmop, Hungarian Sheepdog, Mop Dog (English).
      2. Komondor (French).
      3. Komondor (German).
      4. Komondor (Portuguese).
      5. Komondor Húngaro, Ovejero Húngaro / Perro Guardián (Spanish).

    Photos:

    1 – A Komondor lying down by David Blaine from Spokane, USA / CC BY
    2 – Komondor Halfhegtarens Warlock (Flea by Kari / CC BY-SA
    3 – Ch. Gillian’s Quintessential Quincy (born April 17, 2007), a male Komondor at the working group judging in the 2007 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Komondor_Westminster_Dog_Show.jpg
    4 – www.petsadviser.com, rather than Flickr if you use this photo. Thanks for your cooperation. 2015 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show, New York City.

    Kishu
    Japón FCI 318 - Asian Spitz and related breeds

    Kishu

    The Kishu of Japanese hunting are characterized by their resistance, intelligence, great courage and, usually, a strong hunting instinct.

    Content

    History

    The Kishu has its origin several thousand years ago in the mountains of the “Kii Peninsula“, a region of Japan that extends over present-day Mie prefectures, Wakayama y Nara. In the past, the dogs did not have a uniform name, they were differentiated and named according to individual sections of the mountainous region of the “Kii Peninsula”: Kumano Inu (kumano dog), Taji Inu (taji dog), Ouchiyama Inu (Ouchiyama dog).

    From Hidaka to Arita the Kishus they were white and their names were Hidaka-Ken. In 1934 all these dogs were grouped under the name of the region and were called Kishu. Due to the remoteness of the mountainous regions, there were no crosses with other races or other race-changing phenomena in the Kishu Ken. For this reason, the Kishu it is one of the most original breeds of Japan, and one of the oldest dog breeds in the world.

    In 1934 the breed was declared a natural monument of Japan and is therefore under state protection. Until the seventies it was forbidden to sell Kishu of Japan. Dogs could only be passed as gifts.

    Although early in the breeding around the 70 percent of Kishus they weren't white, this is today the most common color within the breed. This is partly due to the fact that white dogs are easier to recognize when hunting.. Outside of Japan the breed has barely spread. There are a handful of breeders in the US.. and only a few dozen in Europe. The Kishu has some similarities with the Shikoku, the Kai Ken and especially with the Hokkaido, that are also not outside of Japan.

    Kishu physical characteristics

    The Kishu measures approximately 46 centimeters tall, and weighs around 28 kg, is a medium-sized dog. The fur color is generally white. The fur is short, straight and thick with a layer of thickness. The ears are inclined forward and are rather small. This breed is strong, flexible and user-friendly.

    Kishu's character and abilities

    The Kishu is a hunting dog. In the Kishu region, dogs were used to hunt wild boar, Deer, bears, hares and birds. According to the game, there were three directions of Kishus: Deer, hare and wild boar / bear. The Kishu roe deer and hare hunter had a slightly lighter complexion which favored them in hunting. Due to the non-optimal suitability of the breed, especially for hunting hares and small prey, this category did not prevail. Today almost all Kishu Kens historically originate from hunting wild boar (and secondarily also) of bears. These Kishu Kens they have a stronger physique, more pronounced musculature and a wild to sharp disposition.

    In the old way of hunting, the hunter stayed in a place with only one dog and waited for the prey. Later hunting methods prefer that the game be brought by the Kishu Ken. The dog follows the game independently and silently. Like most Nordic hunting dogs, the Kishu only reports when you have placed the game. The dog's task is “keep hunting under control” until the hunter can shoot from a short distance. Especially German hunters are often skeptical or incredulous about the abilities of the Kishu Ken to hunt the physically superior boar. In Japan, However, the skills of Kishu Ken they are highly valued. His ferocity and indomitable attitude make him so popular for wild boar hunting in Japan.. In Japan there has been an expression for decades that illustrates the special suitability of the Kishus as hunters:
    ichiju – ikku” – “a weapon – a dog”.

    Character:

    Representatives of this Japanese hunting breed are characterized by their resistance, intelligence, great courage and, usually, a strong hunting instinct. They are considered as one-person dogs, who form a strong bond with their two-legged companion and behave loyally. The kishus tend to dominate behavior, which can lead to problems with congeners, especially among males. His dominance is sometimes displayed on his own four walls, where they often want to have everything in sight. The Kishus they are not submissive to their owners and always keep their own head. This leads to the fact that they normally only perform tasks when they see meaning in them.. Towards strangers they behave aloof to shy. They are conditionally suitable as watchdogs.

    Kishu education

    It takes a lot of knowledge and patience to educate a Kishu, because intelligent animals tend to be stubborn and domineering. However, if you are consistent and have the necessary calm, the Kishu they will recognize you. Toughness is out of place in education. Don't expect submissive behavior from this proud four-legged friend. Pay attention to the control and management of hunting behavior, sometimes very distinctive. However, keep in mind that it is difficult to let a Kishu without a leash, because even optimally trained representatives of the breed are often not available when they watch the hunt.

    Work to confidently keep it at bay when you encounter the game. In addition, the four-legged friend's social compatibility should be the center of attention during parenting. Puppy play classes and dog schools in general offer a good opportunity, because here the young man Kishu can already come into contact with conspecifics of different sizes and thus strengthen their social skills. Please, note that the Kishu you must be physically and mentally exhausted if you do not want to engage in an unpleasant alternative activity – for example, destroying home furnishings or poaching.

    Kishu Health

    Some kishus have a tendency to hypothyroidism, namely, an insufficient supply of thyroid hormones, usually due to limited thyroid function. Symptoms include fatigue and reduced performance. The owners of a Kishu should have their thyroid gland examined by a vet if these symptoms occur. This disease is not life threatening and can usually be treated well with administration, mostly daily, of an appropriate medication. Because of the shape of your eyes, the breed also has a greater genetic disposition for eyelid malpositions, what can, However, be corrected by surgery. Dogs Kishu they also have a tendency to food and environmental allergies. In all other respects, This Japanese breed is considered robust and has an average life expectancy of 13 years.

    The Diet of Kishu

    The best health precaution, in addition to buying from a responsible breeder, It is a high quality and appropriate nutrition for this breed. This specifically means that you should choose a dog food in which meat is the main component and is listed accordingly at the top of the claim. The grain should not be included – not just a bottom fill, it can also trigger allergies in some Kishus. If fed high-quality feed from the beginning, the risk of food intolerances is reduced. Even with representatives of the breed that were not seen before, no sudden food changes should be made, but offer a new food slowly. Mix increasing amounts of the unfamiliar food with the familiar one and watch for your dog to show intolerance reactions. Of course, fresh drinking water should always be available for your Kishu.

    If it is suspected that you Kishu have a food allergy, a unique diet makes sense to find out what your pet is sensitive to. For this you must be patient and consult your veterinarian, because you only need to give a certain food for a predetermined period of time. If the complaints improve with feeding, you can try another feeding. If symptoms get worse, contact your veterinarian to clarify the subsequent procedure. This way you can find out which ingredients you are allergic to. Kishu. Attention: No treatments should be given during this time if possible.

    Kishu care

    Brushing once a week is usually enough to keep this breed's coat in optimal condition.. However, during the coat change twice a year, you should use the brush more often to remove dead hairs. This also has the positive side effect of the quadruped losing less fur on the floor.. Dirt can be brushed off as soon as it has dried, or washed with a damp cloth. Compared to other breeds, the Kishus they are considered very clean dogs. When you groom your dog at least once a week, take a look at their ears to clean them with a dog ear cleaner, if required, and check its claws. The latter should be shortened if they become too long. This is usually only the case for Kishus older that move less, or dogs that walk mainly on very soft ground.

    Where can I find my desired Kishu?

    The breed is very rarely found outside of Japan. However, there may be a dog breeder living in your region who has dedicated their work to this breed. In addition to a handful of breeders in the US. and russia, there are a few in europe, especially in the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Poland, Finland and Lithuania. In Germany no official litters of Kishu in recent years. So get ready for long trips, if you have decided to adopt a Kishu – and learn more about adopting a puppy abroad before. Make sure to avoid propagandists who are trying to sell you a puppy of Kishu – they are usually only interested in making a quick profit and you will hardly get a Kishu in this way.

    It is unlikely that a Kishu adult outside of Japan, you should be very lucky if you are looking for a purebred dog. However, even if you have fallen in love with a Kishu, it might make sense to look for similar Spitz-type breeds or corresponding hybrids in animal shelters – this also applies to puppies, of course. The chance of success is much higher and you've also given a homeless four-legged friend a new home. Find out in advance about the known history and character of the potential new family member – often, as in the case of their own Kishu, some experience with dogs is important here to allow a successful coexistence and avoid communication problems between the animal and the human.

    Characteristics "Kishu"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Kishu" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Training ?

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    Tendency to flee ?

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    Hair loss force ?

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    Suitable as a guard dog ?

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    Videos "Kishu"

    Kishu (Kishu Inu) / Breed of dog
    Kishu Ken (Kishu Inu)

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 5: Dogs type Spitz and primitive type – Section 5: Asian Spitz and related breeds.


    FCI breed standard "Kishu"

    FCIFCI - Kishu
    Kishu

    Alternative names:

      1. Kishu-Ken, Kishu-Inu (English).
      2. Kishu-Ken, Kishu-Inu (French).
      3. 紀州犬, Kishū-Inu, Kishu-Ken (German).
      4. Kishu-Ken, Kishu-Inu (Portuguese).
      5. Kishu-Ken, Kishu-Inu (Spanish).

    Kerry Blue Terrier
    Irlanda FCI 3 . Large and medium sized Terriers

    Kerry Blue Terrier

    The Kerry Blue Terrier he is a thoroughbred terrier, brave, alert and with a penetrating expression.

    Content

    History

    The Kerry Blue Terrier it is one of the irish national dogs. Its existence is documented since the 18th century, but it is suspected that he was home in County Kerry long before that. Regarding the origin of the breed, Legend has it that this intelligent dog got its blackish blue color by crossing hounds with lines of Irish Terrier.

    In feudal times, Irish shepherds and farmers were not allowed to hunt with wolfhounds.. They solved the problem by crossbreeding that gave their terriers the characteristics of a Wolfdog..

    The Kerry Blue Terrier He was raised as a Pied Piper of Hamelin, guard dog and herding dog. An Irish proverb says that a Kerry Blue Terrier replaces four shepherds. The agile dog was also particularly useful for hunting otters and badgers..

    The appearance of the breed has undergone several changes over the centuries. Meanwhile in 1847 a Kerry Blue Terrier dark blue in color was still considered exemplary in 1847, Monochrome fur with dark markings was established in the 20th century. The FCI standard valid today dates from the year 2005.

    Physical characteristics

    The Kerry Blue Terrier has a majestic body, muscular and slightly elongated, that impresses with its balanced appearance. His back is even and fairly long, moderately broad and deep chest. With its soft, lush and curly fur, the Kerry Blue Terrier It is considered one of the most attractive terrier breeds.

    Typical of the breed Kerry Blue Terrier it's his flat nose and long hair on his forehead and muzzle.

    Puppies are born with a black-brown or dark black coat. Only at the age of about three the Kerry Blue Terrier It has its typical coloration. The coat has no undercoat. A blue coat color is allowed in any shade, black marks are allowed. Tan or pure black markings are only allowed until the age of 18 months.

    Other appearance features in summary:

    • Head: Strong skull, rich fur, medium length front, black nose.
    • Ears: pointing forward or falling, underlining the typical terrier expression
    • Eyes: medium-sized, dark to brown with a piercing expression
    • neck: moderately long
    • lower limbs: straight with well-muscled thighs and strong hock
    • legs: compact with round pads and black claws

    Size and weight:

    Height to the cross:

    For males between 45,5 - 49,5 cm. (18 - 19,5 inches).
    For the females between 44,5 - 48 cm. (17,5 - 19 inches).

    Weight:

    For the males of 15 - 18 kg (33 - 40 English pounds).
    For females proportionally less.

    Character and skills

    The Kerry Blue Terrier he is a thoroughbred terrier, brave, alert and with a penetrating expression. The elegant looking animal does not tend to bark and is not brusque. The Kerry Blue Terrier They are happy, loyal, family and children.

    They are exceptionally open to strangers and need lots of petting at home. To the Kerry Blue Terrier loves to work. However, no need to keep the four-legged friend constantly busy at home.

    Animals are very intelligent and eager to learn, briosos, but in no way nervous or aggressive. Strong self-confidence and strong willpower are typical traits that characterize all breeds of terrier and require constant firmness from the owner..

    Accommodation of “Kerry Blue Terrier”

    Since the Kerry Blue Terrier builds a close relationship with the owner and his family, a kennel position is inappropriate. He likes to participate in domestic life and is a faithful family dog, watchful and child friendly.

    The four-legged friend is very active and needs two or three hours of exercise a day. Dog sports do justice to the momentum of the Kerry Blue Terrier to move and strengthen the bond with the owner.

    Obedience is also a great activity for this smart and particularly attentive breed of dog.. Obedience is the school of subordination, which is especially valuable in a terrier. In this dog sport it depends on the correct and fast execution of an exercise sequence. Perfect teamwork between dog and owner is required.

    The Kerry Blue Terrier they are wonderfully suitable for difficult hunting tasks such as badger hunting or underwater otter hunting. When objects are recovered from the water, most of the Kerry Blue Terriers they prove to be good swimmers and are in no way inferior to a Retriever.

    The four-legged friends of this breed reject the other dogs a bit and therefore should be better kept individually.. If you like peace and tranquility at home, you shouldn't have at Kerry Blue Terrier along with a cat.

    Feeding the “Kerry Blue Terrier”

    Like any other breed of dog, the Kerry Blue Terrier you need a balanced diet appropriate for your species. Must consist of animal protein, remarkable muscle meat and vitamin-rich guts, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. Feeding fish occasionally provides the dog with essential omega fatty acids 3 and ensures that the coat stays shiny and smooth.

    The size of the daily ration depends on the age, condition and level of exercise of your four-legged friend and the quality of the food. It should be divided into two meals so as not to overload your stomach. It is better not to feed your dog before walks or canine sports. Then the food tastes much better.

    The choice of dry or wet food is at the discretion of the owner, but a mixture of both is highly recommended. Here is a decision aid.

    When high-quality dry food is given, the recommended daily amount for a Kerry Blue Terrier adult is on average 1,5 cups. It is important that the dog always has enough fresh water available. Once again, a small lazy dog ​​needs less food than an active animal.

    An especially appropriate form of feeding for the species, although somewhat more expensive, it's fresh food, in which the dog feeds on meat, raw fruit and vegetables. You can prepare food for your Kerry Blue Terrier yourself or you can use frozen prepared meals.

    Of course, your quadruped not only needs chewable products like bones made from cowhide, no wood root chips, for example of the coffee tree, horse tendons or cow ears for dental care. The popular pig ears are high in fat and therefore, they should only rarely come to the dog's table.

    Education and care “Kerry Blue Terrier”

    If you decide to buy one Kerry Blue Terrier, you must plan early enough to attend a dog school.

    After all, your new housemate is a true terrier with a very stubborn personality. However, is certified to be easier to handle and more compliant than representatives of other terrier breeds.

    Especially promising are training methods that don't punish, but they reward desirable behavior accordingly. A procedure that at the same time promotes the close relationship of your four-legged friend with you.

    One of these methods is the proven Clicker Training, which is described here in more detail.

    The training of a Kerry Blue Terrier includes intensive recovery training. After all, the four-legged friend has a clear hunting instinct and without consistent training will hunt down anything that comes his way.

    His stubborn willpower can only be achieved with uncompromising subordination.

    The very good intelligence of Kerry Blue Terrier requires variety in training. Constant repetitions quickly bore him and make the self-confident four-legged friend look for a more interesting occupation.

    Characteristics "Kerry Blue Terrier"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Kerry Blue Terrier" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

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    Affection Level ⓘ

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    Need to exercise ⓘ

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    Social Needs ⓘ

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    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

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    Images "Kerry Blue Terrier"

    Photos:

    1 – Kerry Blue Terrier by https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Alofok
    2 – Two Kerry Blue Terrier, the left one, named Ceallach Blue Ivanhoe is on this photo about 14 years old and light grey. She have made the full color change. On the right is a about one year old Kerry Blue Terrier, called Edbrios Highlander. In this age the breed is just starting with changing the color of the coat. by © Hilarmont (Kempten) / CC BY-SA 3.0 OF
    3 – Kerry Blue Terrier dog by Eponym / CC BY-SA
    4 – Kerry Blue Terrier by Swedish Fair from Sweden / CC BY
    5 – Kerry Blue Terrier during dogs show in Katowice, Poland by Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA
    6 – Kerry Blue Terrier, exhibition in Spodek, Katowice by Pleple2000 / CC BY-SA

    Videos "Kerry Blue Terrier"

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Terriers 1 Large and medium-sized terriers.
    • AKC – Terriers
    • ANKC – Terriers
    • CKC – Terriers
    • ​KC – Terriers
    • NZKC – Terriers
    • UKC – Terriers


    FCI breed standard "Kerry Blue Terrier"

    FCIFCI - Kerry Blue Terrier
    Kerry

    Alternative names:

      1. Irish Blue Terrier, Kerry (English).
      2. Terrier Kerry Blue (French).
      3. Kerry (German).
      4. Irish Blue terrier (Portuguese).
      5. Kerry (Spanish).

    Keeshond
    Holanda FCI 97 . European Spitz

    Keeshond

    Even today the Keeshond is a breed known for its faithfulness and loyalty.

    Content

    History

    ¿Son “Wolfsspitz” and “Keeshond” identical?

    This question repeatedly leads to confusion among experts and laymen alike.. Although most cynologists today use the Dutch name Keeshond and the german name Wolfsspitz as a synonym for the same breed of dog, a closer look reveals some differences between Wolfsspitz and Keeshond. For example, the Wolfsspitz is usually slightly larger than the Keeshond, while the latter has a slightly longer and even bulkier coat. But how is it possible that such differences exist?

    A look at history helps

    To understand the development of Wolfsspitz or Keeshond, the origin of the dog breed is worth taking a look at. Because it is true that both variants have a common origin and this goes back a long time. The Spitz, probably descended from the Stone Age peat dog, It is considered one of the oldest dog breeds in Germany and, thanks to his outstanding achievements as a house dog, yard and guard, has become an indispensable everyday companion for many generations.

    Dutch People's Party mascot

    The dutch Cornelis “Kees” of Geyzelar, the leader of the Dutch People's Party, he also had an extremely loyal companion in his Wolfspitz. In 1781 the dog of Kees became a symbol of the patriotic revolution. Since then dogs of this type were called “Keeshond” in Holland. Today this name is used in the Netherlands as a generic term for the five variants of the German Spitz. For a more exact differentiation, name extensions are used here, as “Dwergkeeshond” (= spitz enano), “Grote Keeshond” (= large spitz) or “Wolfsgrijze Keeshond” (= spitz lobo).

    From Germany and the Netherlands to the whole world

    From Germany and the Netherlands, the breed eventually made its way to other European countries and the US., where, depending on the origin of the dogs, the name of Keeshond or Wolfsspitz. Over time, two different breeding lines were developed, each of which preferred different characteristics. In direct comparison with the Keeshond dutch and the Wolfsspitz German, subtle differences are observed, like a smaller stick size and a longer fur on the Keeshond against longer runs and a slightly shorter coat on the Wolfsspitz. However, an exact differentiation of both phenotypes was never successful due to the abundance of similarities.

    Depending on the country, the terms Keeshond or Wolfsspitz are therefore used very differently. While “Keeshound” is used in the Netherlands as a generic term for “Spitz“, the name in Great Britain and in the US. refers exclusively to the variant of the Wolfsspitz. In scandinavia, both names are common and represent different variants. German cynologists and breeders often use the name “Wolfsspitz” to describe both types. To differentiate it from “Keeshound“, that was developed more abroad, the German Wolfsspitz is sometimes also called the “old german type”.

    Physical characteristics

    The docile and friendly nature of the Keeshond contrasts with its original appearance, almost wild. The dense coat, average length, has abundant undercoat and is silver gray with black hair tips. The cloudy gray fur, reminiscent of the drawing of a wild wolf, is typical of this breed of dog, which also carries the “Wolf” in her name.

    With a height at the cross of 43 - 55 cm el Keeshond is one of the largest representatives of the German Spitz. Compared to other dog breeds, is of medium height.

    As is typical of a Spitz, the Keeshond also has a pointed snout, like that of a fox. The muzzle and ears are usually black, the bushy mane surrounding the shoulder ring is a lighter silver gray and darkens again on the back and belly. The tail is very bushy and is carried confidently from the back.

    Character and skills

    In order not to cause further confusion in the following breed description, we use the names of the breed “Keeshond” and “Wolfsspitz” as synonyms at this point. After all, both variants are hardly distinguished in the description of their character and appearance. But what is it that really distinguishes the character of these dogs?

    Faithful and loving guard dog

    Even today the Keeshond is known for his faithfulness and loyalty. Along with their high level of care, his distrust of strangers and his early attack, these characteristics made it an excellent and extremely popular watchdog among farmers and other large landowners. Even as today's family dog ​​and companion, has retained his loyal and caring nature and vigilance. The Keeshond he is extremely in need of love and always seeks the closeness of his humans. Of course, being alone is not in his nature. Thanks to its pronounced “will to please”, namely, the desire to please their humans and their undemanding nature, can fortunately accompany his humans (almost) everywhere. It is capable of adapting to the living conditions and daily life of its owners and hardly demands anything from its owners., as long as you know your loved ones closely.

    Uncomplicated family dog

    Properly, it also does not demand much of its movement and is also satisfied with “laziest days”. However, is very open to long walks or even dog sports. If you are allowed to share these experiences together with your human, the Keeshond proves to be an extremely lively and spirited companion, who is sometimes even said to have a certain high spirit. Therefore, in the case of young children it is better not to leave it unattended (which applies to almost all dog breeds). However, the Keeshond it is an uncomplicated family dog, who tends to get along very well with children and other pets.

    Education

    However, so that your balance and frugality are developed to the maximum, a good and consistent education is required, and this applies to all dogs in principle. Apart from learning the most important basic commands, it is often a matter of limiting your barking pleasure. The Keeshond, that carries the guard in the blood, attacks early and tends to become a thief, especially when bored. However, by socializing as soon as possible, consistently showing their limits and working harder to use their temperament, you can significantly reduce their barking and make sure your Keeshond only hit when really necessary. At the same time, you would do well to accustom your loving four-legged friend to being alone as soon as possible, even for a short time.

    Basically, the Keeshond is considered very docile, intelligent and above all people-oriented. If the dog-human relationship is correct, namely, if the necessary mutual trust prevails, you Keeshond will always try to please you and will soon dismiss any behavior you don't like.

    Care

    Despite the dense fur, spending on care is kept within limits with the Keeshond. The undercoat is not prone to knots or tangles, so it is enough to brush it regularly and briefly. An advantage of Keeshond is that their fur has very little odor. So you don't have to worry about strong dog smells with this breed.

    As with all dogs, the eyes, the legs, teeth and ears should be checked and cleaned regularly. You should also get annual checkups at the vet, vaccinations and deworming.

    Keeshond Health

    Breed-typical diseases are not known to occur in the Keeshond. The original dog breed is very robust and undemanding. An age of 15 years and more is not uncommon for him. This is probably due to the fact that the breed has never been overgrown. Although it was quite popular in difficult times, especially during WWII, due to its frugality, the wild and original Keeshond never became a “fashion dog”.

    Breeding and buying Keeshond

    Until today, the Keeshond it is a rather rare breed of dog. So it may take a while to find breeders of Keeshond they are expecting puppies. Use this time to optimally prepare for your new four-legged roommate.. In addition to the necessary initial equipment, like a bowl and a blanket for the dog, it should also clarify important issues like: “Who will take care of my dog ​​if I have to travel or I am sick?”, “What vaccines are necessary?” and “What food does my dog ​​need?”. If he Keeshond it's your first dog, you should learn the most important basics about dog training and breeding before you buy it. In addition to informational texts from the Internet or books, It is often very helpful to talk to experienced dog breeders or owners. You can make contacts, for example, with a registered dog club for him German Spitz, dog schools and breeders.

    Wolfsspitz nutrition

    An important question that dog owners must ask themselves over and over again is, What dog food does my four legged friend need? Although it is considered that Keeshond It is not very demanding and it is said that they were content with a potato a day during World War II, you need to make sure your dog receives all the important nutrients. Nutritional requirements don't just vary from dog to dog, they also depend on the age of the dog. For example, a puppy that is still growing will naturally need a different food than an adult dog or an elderly man who spends most of his time lying on his blanket. In addition, the amount and type of exercise, as well as the size, weight and health, will affect the dog's needs. In case of doubt, consult your veterinarian or breeder to determine your dog's exact needs.

    Dry food, wet food or BARF method?

    There are now several dry or wet food suppliers offering food mixes that are specifically tailored to the needs of a breed., specific age or body size. Pay attention to the high proportion of high quality meat and vegetables in the feed. You should avoid meat scraps in the feed that do not provide the dog with any significant content. Another indication of inferior quality is an excessively high proportion of cereals. Although the risk of being overweight in the Keeshond bigger is not as high as in the spitz enano, for example, also starts comparatively fast – like all German Spitz. A healthy alternative to conventional dog food is the BARF, but this feeding method requires some knowledge and experience.

    Characteristics "Keeshond"

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed "Keeshond" you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Training ?

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    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI:
    • Group :
    • Section : . .

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 5 – Section 4 European Spitz.
    • AKC – Non-Sporting
    • ANKC – Non-Sporting
    • CKC – Non-Sporting
    • ​KC – Utility dogs
    • NZKC – Non-Sporting
    • UKC – Northern races


    FCI breed standard "Keeshond"

    FCIFCI - Keeshond
    Keeshond

    Alternative names:

      1. Kees, Dutch Barge Dog, Smiling Dutchman, German Spitz, Deutscher Wolfspitz, Wolfspitz (English).
      2. spitz loup, keeshond (French).
      3. (German).
      4. Spitz alemão, Chien Loup, Spitz lobo (Portuguese).
      5. Wolfspitz, Deutscher Wolfsspitz, Dutch Barge Dog (Spanish).
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