Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers
Eslovaquia FCI 320 . Braque Type

Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers in an obedient and easy to train dog.

Content

History

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers is a relatively new breed. It dates back to the end of the decade of 1950, in Czechoslovakia after World War II and is believed to have been developed using the Weimaraner, the German Wirehaired Pointer and the Český fousek.

At any given time, the Slovaks who developed the breed asked the Club Weimaraner from Germany to recognize this dog under the name of Rough-haired Weimaraner, but the request was rejected.

The resulting dog is a true wonder, that combines the talents of a hunting dog (on the plains, in the woods and in the water), a working dog and a companion dog. Adapts to all climates.

Photo: Slovakian Wire-haired Pointing Dog by Ing. Urban Michal (breeders HP), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it's a tall braco, solidly built and not too heavy. This breed is bred to be a working dog, with nobility in its forms. Tail is cut to half length when permitted by law. It stands rather high, worn at rest and in horizontal action. The eyes are almond-shaped, amber, with a clever expression. In puppies and young dogs, are blue. The floppy ears are placed over the eye, they are rounded and not too long.

Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers
“Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers” during the dog show in Rybnik – Stone, Poland

The undercoat consists of a short, fine down that normally falls off in summer. The top layer is about 4 cm long, hard, straight and well laid. At the bottom of the muzzle, hairs are longer and softer and form a mustache. Above the eyes, are more pronounced and are obliquely erect. The forehead and occiput are covered with short, hard hair. They are short and soft on the ears. The tail is well provided with hair, but it is not brushed. The basic color is “grey”: is a sand shaded with brown. White markings are allowed on the tips of the legs and on the chest. Smaller or larger dark spots can mark gray. There is also a speckled coat.

Character and skills

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers described in the FCI standard as easy to train and compliant. They are selected for their work characteristics such as Pointer dogs. They hunt on the plains, forests and water. They work mainly after the shot, searching and recovering the game.

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it's animated, happy and eager to please. He has a lot of energy and is very intelligent, but gets bored easily. This can sometimes make training a bit difficult, and should work to make training sessions fun, interesting and not very long. They need a firm and consistent hand in discipline with structure and limits. Harsh words or physical punishment should be avoided. They have a strong bond with their families, and may develop separation anxiety without proper conditioning.

the Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers they are the happiest doing things with their owner. This makes the breed a great candidate as a canine companion for owners who love walks., cycling or jogging. It is imperative that they have opportunities to run free, preferably in a fenced area, since his hunting instinct is very strong, and the dog will not be able to resist the urge to chase the prey.

Health

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers it is a generally healthy breed, and responsible breeders examine their breeders for health conditions such as elbow and hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy and cataracts.

Grooming

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers requires only minimal grooming to maintain good condition. Cleaning them with a damp cloth is usually sufficient between baths. Using a grooming glove or comb on your coat during fall season can help keep the amount of hair shedding low in your home.. Toenails should be trimmed every four weeks. A dental care regimen should start at an early age to avoid problems later in life.

Characteristics “Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

5.0 rating
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers”

Dog Breed Video: Slovakian Rough Haired Pointer
Slovakian wire haired pointer – training

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 320
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • ​KCgundog
  • AKCGroup: Foundation Stock Service

FCI breed standard “Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers”

FCIFCI – “Slovakian Wirehaired Pointers”
FCI hard hair Slovak arm

Alternative names:

    1. Slovak Rough-haired Pointer, Slovakian Wirehaired Pointer (English).
    2. (Nom d’origine : Slovensky Hrubosrsty Stavac), Griffon d’Arrêt Slovaque à poil dur (French).
    3. SHS, Slovenský hrubosrstý stavač (German).
    4. Braco eslovaco de pêlo duro, (em eslovaco: Slovenský hrubosrsty stavac) (Portuguese).
    5. Grifón de muestra eslovaco de pelo duro (Spanish).

Saint Germain Pointer
Francia FCI 115 . Braque Type

Saint Germain Pointer

The Saint Germain Pointer it is little known outside the French borders.

Content

History

A versatile hunting dog that has been used not only for aiming, but also to throw and recover, the Saint Germain Pointer can work with a variety of hunting, including rabbits and pheasants. Unlike most hunting dogs, traditionally, this breed has been popular at shows and has been bred to have a very uniform and specific appearance.

Originally bred in France mixing Pointer with the French Pointing Dog - Gascogne type, larger size, This breed is believed to have developed in the early 1830 and claims to have a very elegant heritage. King Charles X of France was given two dogs Pointer who were very talented hunters. The female, call miss, she was raised with a dog Braque Francais local, and the legacy of Saint Germain Pointer started. Initially, the breed was called Compiegne Pointers due to the location of the kennels in which they were raised, but this name was later altered when the kennels were moved to the region of Saint Germain. Many of the dogs produced were shown at dog shows throughout France and, at that time, they were the race of Pointer most displayed in her native country.

The race Saint Germain Pointer was initially very popular and in 1913 a club was formed that aimed to increase its prevalence in France, as well as improve the breed. Unfortunately, the size of the breed's population Saint Germain Pointer was greatly reduced in every world war. They have never fully recovered from the drastic decline in population size that occurred in the first half of the 20th century., but they are still a breed that has a loyal follower and are not in danger of extinction today.

En los últimos años, the Pointer enter the genetic pool of Saint Germain Pointer to increase their numbers and add some genetic diversity. Even though few, if there is any, of the breed members have been exported internationally, the UKC granted full recognition to the breed in 2006 within your group of hunting dogs.

Photo: Braque_saint-germain at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

Braco Saint Germain
Braque saint-germain at the World Dog Show in Poznań by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

The appearance of Saint Germain Pointer is particularly important for breeders, although it is mainly a hunting dog. Historically, have participated in a large number of French dog shows. Breed members must be of medium build, with good muscles and heavy bones. The dog's skull should be round and the same length as its muzzle.

Your pink nose should have wide open nostrils, while your big golden eyes should show a placid and relaxed expression. Their ears are curved at the tip and should not reach beyond eye level. The shoulders of the Saint Germain Pointer they are impressively long and their limbs must be robust and heavy. They have a broad chest and a straight back, although your rump will bow slightly. The dog's sharp tail is carried at a distinctive horizontal angle when in motion.

The short coat of the Saint Germain Pointer should be faded white with orange markings, and the ears are preferred to be orange everywhere. Unlike in the Pointer, black hair is not tolerated. The males measure between 56 and 62 height cm, while the smaller females reach heights between 53 and 60 cm.. Most members of the breed will weigh between 18 and 27 kg.

Character and skills

While it is true that Saint Germain Pointer has traditionally excelled on the show floor, is primarily a hunting dog and, as such, has the character expected of a working animal. This breed is easy to train and loves to be kept active and given a task to do. They must have a “soft mouth”, meaning they do not hurt or harm the prey they retrieve. They also tend to work in packs, which means that they normally get along with other dogs. Although it is undeniable that they have a natural instinct to chase small animals, anecdotally they get along well with the small pets in their house that they have been introduced to since childhood.

The Saint Germain Pointer he is truly a family dog ​​and does best when kept indoors with human company. He is particularly affectionate towards those he trusts and will bond closely with each member of his family. They are not typically a breed that displays any aggression, which means they are adapted to children, though they wouldn't be good watchdogs. While it is true that this breed will be willing to befriend any child it meets, Caution is advised with very young children who may not be able to resist brisk greetings and rowdy play!

Education

More than many other dog breeds, the Saint Germain Pointer can be a real treat to train. He is a dog willing to please his master and has the intelligence to complete most of the tasks entrusted to him with relative ease.. Trainers will be most successful when they focus on the breed's most natural behaviors, like recovery.

It is often said that the Saint Germain Pointer it is a hardy dog ​​that is much less sensitive than other closely related breeds. Trainers have the option of using firmer methods than they might expect, However, will continue to achieve the best results with the use of positive reinforcement techniques (instead of negatives).

Exercise

Not far behind when it comes to exercise, the Saint Germain Pointer is a dog that loves to be out of the house. Has great endurance when working and is able to travel long distances for long periods of time without seeming to tire. If kept solely as a companion animal, owners should be able to provide an hour or two of solid exercise each day and should also keep the dog stimulated with various games and training sessions.

Any attempt to keep this breed in a small apartment or house or to exercise it for less time than recommended, will likely lead to a frustrated dog that will become a difficult pet. Anxiety is likely to develop in these situations, hyperactivity and destructive behaviors.

Health

Unfortunately, there is no specific information on the health of the Saint Germain Pointer, and to date there have been no studies on the breed. A working dog, it is generally accepted as a hardy breed. The prudent owner would be aware of these possible health conditions:

Hip Dysplasia

    Hip scoring should be performed by responsible breeders to ensure that the small population of the Saint Germain Pointer stay healthy. A simple x-ray of the hips will allow a vet to assess the quality of the hip joints and inform the breeder if they are good enough to allow breeding.

Ear infections

    When the ear canal becomes clogged with a buildup of smelly debris, an infection is likely present. Ears may also be red, hot and sensitive. Affected dogs tend to shake their heads and rub their faces against the ground. Infections occur mainly due to the proliferation of bacteria and yeast, although they can also be due to a foreign body, like a grass seed inside the ear canal or ear mites.

Grooming

The short coat of the Saint Germain Pointer does not need to be brushed more than once or twice a week. Toenails may need to be trimmed every few months, particularly if you don't walk on hard surfaces. The breed's clear claws make claw clipping easy, since the cut is visible, making it more avoidable than in dogs with dark pigmented claws.

The Most Important Grooming Duty An Owner Should Not Neglect, is the maintenance of good ear hygiene. The ears should be cleaned every one to two weeks with a dog ear cleaner. Owners should also ensure that the ears are dry inside and out after being exposed to water..

Characteristics “Saint Germain Pointer”

Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Saint Germain Pointer” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

Adaptation ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Dog friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Hair loss ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Affection Level ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Need to exercise ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Social Needs ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Apartment ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Grooming ⓘ

1.0 rating
1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Stranger Friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Barking Tendencies ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Health Issues ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Territorial ⓘ

3.0 rating
3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Cat Friendly ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

intelligence ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

versatility ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Child Friendly ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Watchdog Ability ⓘ

2.0 rating
2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Playfulness ⓘ

4.0 rating
4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Videos “Saint Germain Pointer”

Saint Germain Pointer

Saint Germain Pointer Dog Breed – Braque Saint Germain

Type and recognitions:

  • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 115
  • Group 7: Pointing Dogs.
  • Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type. With working trial.

Federations:

  • FCI – Group 7: Pointing Dogs. – Section 1: Continental Pointing Dogs. 1.1: Braque Type
  • UKCGundog

FCI breed standard “Saint Germain Pointer”

FCIFCI – “Saint Germain Pointer”
Braco Saint-Germain FCI

Alternative names:

    1. St. Germain Pointing Dog (English).
    2. Braque Saint-Germain (French).
    3. Braque Charles bzw. Braque Compiegne (German).
    4. (em francês: Braque Saint-Germain) (Portuguese).
    5. Braco de Saint Germain (Spanish).

Small swiss hound
Suiza FCI 60 . Small-sized Hounds

Small Bernese hound
Small Bernese hound

The dog Small swiss hound, little stimulated, often becomes an annoying pet that can be difficult to train.

Content

History

In the early 20th century, hunting began to change in Switzerland. Private hunting grounds were introduced and the standard size of the Swiss Hound he was too fast and enthusiastic to hunt properly within these smaller hunting grounds. The hunters decided to develop a different breed of hunting that could hunt efficiently and effectively within the closed private hunting grounds.. Many people think that Small swiss hound it's just a smaller version of the Swiss Hound. While this is partly true, They are a different race that originated from crossing the Swiss Hound with the Basset Hound. The ultimate goal was to develop a breed that was shorter and smaller., but also had the same four color variants as the Swiss Hound. The resulting dogs were expected to have a strong sense of smell for nose work and a melodious voice to sound the alarm when hunting..

The Small swiss hound He is an outstanding hunter and has the ability to track scents for miles over rough terrain. The Small swiss hound became the hunting dog of people hunting on private land.

The United Kennel Club recognized the Small swiss hound in 2006. The Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) accepted them and adopted the official breed standard under the name Schweizer Niederlaufhund in 2015.

The Small swiss hound still a popular hunting companion in his native Switzerland.

Photo: Small Bernese Hound Smooth-coated male by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Physical characteristics

In proportion smaller than the Swiss Hound. Its body shape is rectangular, moderately long, and strong conformation. Medium size head, thin, elegant, with friendly facial expression
and attentive. His ears are very long, low insertion, and he wears them folded. Thin and strong limbs. When walking calmly, he has his tail hanging, in activity bends it slightly upwards.

The Small swiss hound comes in four different varieties. The only difference between the varieties is the color, but each variety has its own name.

Variants Small swiss hound

Small Jura houndSmall Bernese houndSmall Schwyz houndSmall Lucerne hound
Small hound of Juraequeño de Jura
Small Jura hound
Small Bernese hound
Small Bernese hound
Small Schwyz hound
Small Schwyz hound
Small Lucerne hound
Small Lucerne hound
  • The Small Jura hound has a smooth coat that is black with tan markings found over the eyes.
    The Small Jura hound has only one coat and may only have a small amount of white on its body.
  • The Small Bernese hound has two types of fur:
    the smooth coat and the rough coat.
    The rough coat has a single hard coat and a small beard.
    The Small Bernese hound it's black and white with fiery marks over its eyes; many call it tricolor.
  • The Small Schwyz hound has a smooth, unique coat that is predominantly white with yellow-red spots; orange-red spots are also acceptable.
  • The Small Lucerne hound has a smooth and unique coat that is predominantly white but speckled with black or gray giving the illusion of a blue body. They have black spots with tan markings over their eyes.
  • Photos:

    1 – Small Bernese Hound Smooth-coated male by Canarian, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – Jura low-run dog by Bhv The Max
    3 – This dog is a small Schwyz Hound by pets.ch
    4 – Little Lucerne Hound by carlosh catalog

    Character and skills

    When he's hunting, the Small swiss hound is tireless and relentless, exhibiting impressive endurance and strength of character. They tend to be lively and excitable, eager to do their job. The majority of the Small swiss hound they are happy to hunt regardless, without any royal order from his master.

    Despite being bred to hunt, most breed members can transition from working hound to family pet easily and are generally affectionate and demonstrative of their owners. They are good friends with children and other dogs, but they cannot be trusted with small animals, including cats and rabbits.

    Individual temperaments vary, and while some may be quiet and peaceful guests of the house, others may be excitable and jumpy. Dogs with more energy can often be taught to settle indoors once they have been properly exercised.. Ideally, the exercise should be done in the form of hunting, as this not only burns excess energy but also occupies your inquisitive mind. The dog Small swiss hound, little stimulated, often becomes an annoying pet that can be difficult to train.

    Not being an aggressive dog, the Small swiss hound should not be used as a guard dog as it does not tend to scare off intruders and does not usually feel the need to guard your property.

    Training “Small swiss hound”

    The phrase “the small dog syndrome” can be mentioned when talking about Small swiss hound, as they have a reputation for acting like large dogs in small dog bodies. Full of confidence, lively and independent, this is not a breed for the novice trainer. Obedience work can be a particular challenge, as they have a free-spirited character and a mind of their own.

    Coaches must be firm and inflexible, keeping your training sessions short and interesting to keep the dog's interest. How this breed likes to assume a dominant position in the home, he should be taught his place from an early age, to avoid any bad behavior.

    Most dogs Small swiss hound are still used as hunting dogs in Switzerland today, meaning your exercise requirements are easily met during hunting season. In the case of non-working dogs, or when the hunting season is over, owners should take time to meet the needs of this active hound.

    A rural setting is the ideal place for Small swiss hound, who needs wide terrain to explore and does not enjoy being confined. It is essential that your property is securely fenced to avoid solo adventures.

    Health “Small swiss hound”

    There are not many diseases that affect the Small swiss hound more than other races, but there are a handful of conditions that should be watched in individuals:

    Ear infections

    Hanging ears are prone to developing ear infections, particularly if a dog spends a lot of time outside wet and muddy. Keeping your ears clean can prevent this from becoming a problem.

    Hip Dysplasia

    Malformed hip joints can lead to lifelong discomfort and reduced mobility. X-rays of the hips (a process called “hip score”) should be performed when a breeding dog is over one year of age to ensure that its hips are of good enough quality to be passed on.

    Grooming “Small swiss hound”

    Although there are a number of different hair types within the breed, all are easy to maintain and need little in the way of grooming. Weekly brushing will suffice. The Small swiss hound you will only need to be bathed a few times a year. If owners feel the need to disguise their “odor to dog” they can use dry shampoo, avoiding the risk of drying out their skin and coat.

    Ears of the Small swiss hound should be cleaned weekly and ideally should be checked daily for signs of infection. They must be completely dried after getting wet.

    Characteristics “Small swiss hound”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Small swiss hound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos “Small swiss hound”

    Swiss low-legged dog + Schweizer Laufhund + Orange hound
    Schweizer Laufhund CERVA

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 60
    • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.3: Small-sized Hounds. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.3: Small-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds

    FCI breed standard “Small swiss hound”

    FCIFCI – “Small swiss hound”
    Small Swiss Hound FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Schweizerischer Niederlaufhund (English).
      2. Schweizerischer Niederlaufhund (French).
      3. Schweizer Niederlaufhund (German).
      4. Schweizerischer Niederlaufhund (Portuguese).
      5. (en suizo, Schweizerischer Niederlaufhund) (Spanish).

    Swiss Hound
    Suiza FCI 59 . Medium-sized Hounds

    Schwyz Hound
    Schwyz Hound

    In the breed standard, the temperament of the Swiss Hound is described as “Vivacious and passionate about hunting, sensitive, docile and very attached to his master”.

    Content

    History

    It is said that the Swiss Hound is among the oldest members of the Group of Hounds. According to a 15th century letter to Ernst, Elector of Saxony (1441-86), Swiss working dogs were among the best. 17th century images show packs of hounds “with the same color and the same size, large heads and very long ears”.

    Three centuries later, the german dog writer Richard Strebel wrote in “Die Deutschen Hunde” (German dog breeds, 1903-05) that hounds that lived separately in a restricted area of ​​Switzerland therefore developed separately.

    In the decade of 1890, it seemed that purebred hounds were marked for death in Switzerland, despite the breeding of the Schwyz Hound, Bernese Hound and Lucerne Hound. Some hounds were exported to Scandinavia and, thanks to the crossing with native hounds, the Stövares (scandinavian hounds) they were blooming. But at the same time, the Thurgauer Laufhund quietly disappeared in Switzerland, and the Aargauer Laufhund gave way to Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound).

    In 1903, J. Dust del Swiss Kennel Club founded the Schweizerische Laufhunde-Club (Swiss Hound Club) and in 1907 an appeal was made to save the Swiss hound of extinction. Then something remarkable happened: the breed club bought good quality Swiss hounds and gave them to prudent breeders and hunters. Test rules and regulations were developed and a series of obligations were established: a) only one dog at a time when hunting; b) the dog had to be under control when hunting; c) a dog that disappeared while hunting had to return to its master within half an hour; y d) the dog was to return as soon as the horn sounded, regardless of whether the dog was looking. Using these rules, the breed club tried to exclude disobedient dogs and forced owners to properly breed and train their dogs.

    Four varieties

    The development of Swiss Hound started in the decade of 1930, but it took time and effort. In 1937, only five hounds were entered in the Swiss herd book. The Dr. O. Vollenweider managed to gather 11 hound collectors in the city of Soleura, in northwestern Switzerland. Suitable dogs were selected for breeding and, in 1933, a breed standard was published. In the standard, the varieties were distinguished by coat color and pattern.

    In 1944, 150 Swiss hounds were entered in a hound exhibition. (As a neutral country, Switzerland did not participate in WWII) It was no longer forbidden to work with dogs that gave tongue, and bloodhounds of more than 20 inches (50 centimeters) to the cross.

    Attempts to save or restore the Laufhund de Argovia they were unsuccessful; in 1933, the breed standard was canceled. Four varieties remained: the Bernese Hound, the Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound), the Lucerne Hound and the Schwyz Hound. Their names connect them with cities and areas of Switzerland (Berne, Lucerne, Jura), or with Switzerland.

    It is said that between 1902 and 1922, a few 1.200 swiss hounds, mainly Schwyz Hound white-yellow, they were raised in Norway. Some years, there were more Swiss hounds outside of Switzerland than in their home country. In 1993, about 1.000 copies of Lucerne Hound they lived in sweden.

    France is another importer. Seventy-five Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound) enrolled in an exhibition in Lyon in 1976. It is not surprising that the Jura is predominantly found in France and Switzerland, and that it extends to Germany. Since the 15th century, Swiss hounds were also exported to Italy. According to Räber, they frequently crossed paths with his Italian cousin, the Italian short-haired Segugio.

    Photo: XXXVIII Wystawa krajowa psów rasowych w Częstochowie. Gończy ze Schwyz: Ella Haniccina Zahradka z hodowli Z Pastorowej Sfory należąca do Mariusza i Wioletty Antoszczuk by chained, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Swiss Hound varieties:

    1 Bernese Hound

    Bernese Hound

    The Bernese Hound is mainly used for hunting hare.

    The Swiss Hound has a very ancient origin. Its existence in Switzerland since Roman times is verified thanks to a

    Read more

    2 Jura Hound (Bruno Jura Hound)

    Bruno Jura Hound

    The Jura Hound It is very distant with strangers and needs firm handling if kept as pets.

    In the year of 1882 a standard was established for each of the five

    Read more

    3 Lucerne Hound

    Lucerne Hound

    The Lucerne Hound is a lively dog, but gentle and docile. Very attached to his master.

    The breed was originally bred in the Lucerne area, Switzerland. Already in appearance it is closely related to the

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    4 Schwyz Hound

    Schwyz Hound

    The Schwyz Hound is a very lively and energetic breed that requires a significant amount of daily exercise.

    The Schwyz Hound has ancient origins, the details are a bit confusing though. The dogs of

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    Shetland Sheepdog
    Escocia FCI 88 . Sheepdogs.

    Shetland Sheepdog

    The Shetland Sheepdog it's really friendly, lovely with children, intelligent and loyal.

    Content

    History

    In the 19th century, in the North Shetland Islands of Scotland, the ancestors of Shetland Sheepdog, often called Sheltie, they helped flocks of sheep and sounded the alarm when strangers approached their farm.

    However, the exact origins of this dog are as dark as the mist that covers his homeland. Its resemblance to him Rough Collie supports the theory that it is descended from these dogs, believed to have been imported from Scotland. However, Colleys breeders and various specialists refute this claim.

    For them, the Sheltie would have developed in isolation on these islands, and they would be the result of different crosses. The races most frequently cited as contributors to its creation are the Icelandic Sheepdog, the Yakki de Groenlandia (an extinct race), the Cavalier King Charles spaniel, the Pomeranian and the Border Collie.

    In any case, at the beginning of the 20th century it was often crossed Rough Collie, which reinforced the resemblance between the two races.

    What is certain is that its small size was the result of the most rational selection work. Similar to the “Pony of Shetland”, known for its miniature size, locals gave preference to animals that needed little food, a rare commodity in this difficult region.

    Although the Shetland Sheepdog it was especially appreciated in its native islands for its qualities of a sheepdog and alert, it was mainly his appearance that allowed him to get out of there. Visitors to England in the late 19th century were delighted with the small size and texture of the dog's coat. Shetland Sheepdog, and soon they wanted to take something home, which they did. Soon, some locals decided to start breeding for export, selecting breeders for height and coat. More and more individuals set out to conquer Britain and then the rest of the world. However, there were neither breed standards nor consultations between the different breeders, so the race developed in directions sometimes very distant from each other.

    Things changed after the official recognition in 1909 by the Kennel Club, the leading organization in Great Britain. The name chosen was simply the name by which the dog had been known until then, the Shetland Sheepdog. This recognition helped to stabilize the breed by establishing a well-defined framework in which the different breeders had to work..

    However, the chosen name was not to the liking of the colleys breeders, who pressured them and won their case in 1914: then it was officially renamed as Shetland Sheepdog.

    In the meantime, the first specimens had arrived in the United States and, already in 1911, the American Kennel Club (AKC) also accepted it. Was not up 1948 that the United Kennel Club (UKC), the other reference organization in the United States, he did the same. It was followed by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) in 1954, as well as by all other important institutions, including the Canadian Kennel Club (CCC).

    Although the Shetland Sheepdog is now common all over the world, paradoxically it has become rare on its home island, where it has been replaced by the Border Collie for grazing.

    This decline can also be seen in the rest of Britain. For example, Annual Kennel Club enrollments have dropped from more than 1300 less than 800 in less than a decade.

    The phenomenon is also occurring in the United States, where he now occupies the position 25 (of a little less than 200) on the AKC popularity rankings, based on the annual number of people registered in the organization. In other words, has lost a lot of ground compared to the decades of 1980 and 1990, in which he was almost constantly among the 10 first, reaching a maximum of 40.000 records in 1993. The fall is slow but steady, since at the beginning of 2010, I was still in the 20 first positions.

    The race “Father” of the Shetland Sheepdog "o"Sheltie"how often nickname", they are the Border Collie.

    Physical characteristics

    The Sheltie they have a double mantle, What makes this breed peleche much more than other dogs. Long hair covering the thick and soft layer base, is repellent to water, While the layer base provides relief to heat and cold.

    There are three main colors: Sable, It ranges from the Golden to mahogany; Tri-color, formed by the black, White and Tan, and blue mirlo, composite grayscale, white, black and Tan.

    Black and white: is less common but still acceptable.

    Sand: the best-known color, dominates over other colors. The shadow Sabre, or mahogany can sometimes be confused with the Sheltie tricolor because of the large amount of dark shading in their coats. Another name for him Sheltie “shading”, is trifactorado sable and white. This name comes from the mixture of a tricolor and a sable and white. Other acceptable but less common color is Sable Merle, which sometimes can be difficult to distinguish between the regular sable after the time of puppy. The saber mirlo has patches of dark brown on a light brown background compared to the black and grey blue Merle.

    There are other two colors that are a bit rare, which are unacceptable in the ring. The White Color-headed (most of white head “normally” marked), It is the product of two dogs crossed white facotrados. Double Merle, the product of the crossing of two Sheltie bluebird, they can be crossed but have a high incidence of deafness or blindness than other colors.

    The ideal height at the cross, in males 37,5 cm.. The females. 35,5 cm.. One greater diversion of 2,5 cm above or below these measures is regarded as highly undesirable.

    Character and skills

    It is an excellent companion dog, highly loyal. It is joyful, intelligent and always ready to obey. The Sheltie is love, loyal and affectionate with the family and of course, on the sidelines, with strangers; for this reason the Sheltie must be socialized. Some may be very reserved. This breed is very well with children if they raise with them from an early age; However, its small size makes it easy for a child to accidentally harm them, This monitoring is necessary. Well consider bringing an adult Sheltie for a House with young children, they may not be compatible.

    Some Sheltie tend to show a similar to a Terrier personality that tends to be hyperactive, and always ready, However this temperament is not sanctioned in the breed standard. Some may be shy, but this temperament is specifically discouraged by the standard. The trend towards shyness, It can be reduced with proper socialization. The average Sheltie is an excellent watch dog, giving alarm barks when a person is at the door or pass a car on the street.

    The herding instinct is strong in many Sheltie. Love to chase and pasture including, squirrels, ducks, pigeons and children. The Sheltie love run in large open areas.

    They normally love to play. They are better with a sensitive owner, but firm. The Sheltie is, first and foremost, a smart pastor and love to keep them busy, Although his level of activity, usually, It coincides with the level of its owner. As they are very intelligent, they are highly trainable. Lack of exercise and intellectual stimulation, It can lead to undesirable behaviors, including excessive barking, phobias and nervousness. Fortunately the annoying behaviors may decrease largely by an hour of exercise to make the dog with its owner.

    In its category, the breed dominates Dog Agility competition. They also look at obedience competition, Flyball, Grazing, Tracking and proof of talent.

    It is a very intelligent dog, According to Dr. Stanley city, expert on animal intelligence. The Sheltie It is one of the dogs brightest occupying the position number 6 in the Ranking of 132 evaluated races. His research found that an average Sheltie could understand a new command in less of 5 repetitions and yields to the command for the first time the 95% of the times or more.

    Health

    Similar to the Rough Collie, There is a tendency to inherit malformations and diseases in the eye. Each puppy should have his eyes examined by a qualified eye veterinarian. Some lines may be susceptible to hypothyroidism, Epilepsy, Hip Dysplasia, or skin allergies. The life expectancy of the Sheltie is between 10 and 15 years, Although some in some it may be more, and in others may be less.

    Von Willebrand disease is an inherited bleeding disorder. The Sheltie breed, affected dogs, as a general rule, they do not live long. The Sheltie carry type III Von Willebrand, which, It is the most severe of the three levels. There are DNA tests that were developed to find the disease in dogs Sheltie. It can be done at any age and will showcase one of the following results: affected, carrier or affected not. The Sheltie may also suffer from hypothyroidism, It is the low functioning of the thyroid gland. Clinical symptoms include, loss of hair, on low weight and faintness.

    Although small breed dogs are unlikely to be affected by hip dysplasia, It has been identified in some specimens of Sheltie. Occurs when the head of the femur and the acetabulum do not fit correctly, This causes pain and/or lameness. Hip Dysplasia is thought to be genetic; Many breeders sent to test their dogs to certify that they are free from this.

    Characteristics “Shetland Sheepdog”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Shetland Sheepdog” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 88
    • Group 1: Sheepdogs and Cattledogs (except Swiss Cattledogs).
    • Section 1: Sheepdogs. With working trial.
    • FCI – Group 1 Herding dogs, Section 1 Sheepdogs
    • AKC – PASTORAGE
    • ANKC – Group 5 (Working dogs)
    • CKC – Group 5 (Pastoral)
    • ​KC – Pastoral
    • NZKC – Work
    • UKCScenthounds

    FCI breed standard “Shetland Sheepdog”

    FCIFCI – “Shetland Sheepdog”
    Shetland Sheepdog FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Shetland Collie, Dwarf Scotch Shepherd, Sheltie (English).
      2. Shetland, Sheltie (French).
      3. Sheltie (German).
      4. Sheltie (Portuguese).
      5. Miniature Collie, Sheltie (Spanish).

    Smaland Hound
    Suecia FCI 129 - Medium-sized Hounds

    Smaland Hound

    The Smaland Hound It is used for hunting hare and fox; It is not a pack dog and is not used for deer hunting.

    Content

    History

    The history of Smaland Hound starts in the county of Smaland, in southern Sweden; there existed a great variety of hounds in the 19th century. Some, of german origin, Polish or Baltic, had arrived in the company of soldiers returning after the great wars between 1611 and 1678.

    These hunting dogs were later crossed with local farm dogs type Spitz and english hounds, becoming the ancestors of Smaland Hound. The size, tail color and length varied at that time: some dogs were black and tan, others red or yellow. However, white markings were common. Some cubs were born with short tails.

    During the early years of the 20th century, great efforts were made to rebuild the type of the old Smalandsstövare, especially the short-tailed variety. The first standard, written in 1921, allowed dogs to have both short and long tails. It was first decided that the color would be black and tan, but red and yellow were allowed, as well as the white spots.

    The Smaland Hound received continuous infusions of new blood, sometimes using strong lines from other dog breeds. The new blood was last used in the 1990s. 1950, When, for a short period, dogs of unknown origin were registered, but accepted type, as Smaland Hound.

    Photo: Smalandsstovare by amoreaquattrozampe.it

    Physical characteristics “Smaland Hound”

    Smaland-Stövare
    Smaland-Stövare

    The Smaland Hound he is a robust dog, similar to Rottweiler, and elegant looking. His eyes are dark brown with a calm expression. Ears are stuck high, slightly raised when the dog is paying attention. They are carried hanging, with rounded ends. The tail is placed in the extension of the line of the back, straight or slightly saber-shaped. May be short at birth.

    Hair: average length, rough, well attached to the body; thicker in the back and neckline. The undercoat is colored: black and fiery (all shades range from amber to reddish brown). Small white spots are allowed on the bib and fingers.

    Size: males 46-54 cm. (ideal 50 cm.); females 42-54 cm. (ideal 45 cm.).

    Character and skills “Smaland Hound”

    These Hounds form a strong bond with their owners, being loyal and devoted, kind and loving, which also makes them great companions at home.

    When they hunt, they are used mainly for hunting fox and hare. He is gifted with exceptional talent, he is a brave and determined dog.

    At home, is a gentle, calm and affectionate family companion. They are known to be territorial and distrustful of strangers, which makes them good watchdogs that will not fail to warn their masters of marauders.

    The Smaland Hound is very intelligent and they learn easily. He gets along well with his peers if they have grown up together, but it must be presented with delicacy and attention to other dogs and other animals.

    It is a dog that needs a lot of time in the presence of its master, you need space and the ability to expend your energy. Therefore, it is not a dog for owners who are absent or who do not have enough time to dedicate to it.

    The breed needs space and is therefore not suitable for apartment living.

    Characteristics “Smaland Hound”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Smaland Hound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Videos “Smaland Hound”

    Smålandsstövare / Smalands Hound / Smalandstevare

    harjakt med smålandsstövare diva

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 129
    • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds

    FCI breed standard “Smaland Hound”

    “Smaland Hound” FCI Smaland Hound FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. (Swedish: Smålandsstövare) (English).
      2. Smålandsstövare (French).
      3. Småland-Bracke, Smålandsstövare (German).
      4. Smalandsstovare (Portuguese).
      5. Cazador de Småland (sueco: Smålandsstövare) (Spanish).

    Schiller Hound
    Suecia FCI 131 - Medium-sized Hounds

    Schiller Hound

    Its diffusion is regular in its country of origin, but very small abroad.

    Content

    History

    The Schiller Hound It is a working breed that has existed in Sweden since the Middle Ages. However, the breed was not really established and recognized until 1952. This recognition is due in large part to a breeder, Per Schiller, who gave the breed its name.

    In 1886, at the first Swedish dog show, they were shown 189 hounds. Among them were Tamburini and Ralla I, a brother and sister belonging to Per Schiller. They descended from the famous bloodhounds of the Kaflas estate. These dogs probably came from southern Germany: rather small, fawn in color with black fur and slight white markings.

    The Schiller Hound they were then based on the crossing of Swiss dogs, Germans and Austrians, as well as in British hunting dogs, especially the Harriers, to produce a fast and light breed that quickly acquired its type. curiously, Per Schiller worked alongside a Swedish doctor named Adolf Hamilton, and also led to the development of a similar dog named Hamilton Hound, that can be differentiated from Schiller Hound for its tricolor coat.

    Still very rare outside of his native country, the Schiller Hound was recognized by the Swedish Kennel Club in 1907.

    The Schiller Hound has been traditionally used as a sniffing dog, although some describe it as a hunting dog. The breed is known for both its speed and superior olfactory ability; able to quickly track its prey and then howl loudly when its master approaches, alerting of its position. It is a hardy dog ​​that can tolerate cold Swedish winters well.. Often, work individually rather than in a pack and typically hunt rabbits and foxes. Even today, many dogs still work as hunters, although they are equally good household pets.

    Photos: Schiller Hound during International show of dogs in Katowice – Spodek, Poland by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Physical characteristics

    The conformation of Schiller Hound it's that of an athletic dog, and with his well-muscled body and strong limbs, you are clearly well suited to your job role. Its head is relatively small but long and has a well defined stop. The bridge of your nose should be straight and the nose itself is black with wide nostrils. His dark brown eyes are bright and alert, set deep in your face. Its medium-sized, high-set ears hang close to its face and do not extend beyond its lower jaw. Its long and thin limbs are parallel and are surely one of the main reasons for its impressive speed; giving them a very long stride. Their body is rectangular in shape and they have a deep chest with a robust and solid back.. Its long, tapered tail should not be carried too high in the exhibition ring..

    The Schillerstövare's shiny, straight coat fits perfectly against its skin. The top coat is actually quite tough, although the shorter fur on his face and ears is softer to the touch. Predominantly tan in color, the coat also has a prominent black coat. Only small white spots are allowed on the coat. Their fur is expertly designed to protect them in icy weather conditions.

    The Schiller Hound It is a medium to large sized hound for hunting fox and hare, what does it measure 53-61 cm to the withers and weighs 18-25 kg . The coat is rough and not too short, and it's close to the body.

    Character and skills

    These vivacious dogs live life to the fullest and are a pleasure to be around. Always alert, need a lot of attention and crave human company. The Schiller Hound they will form a close bond with their family, and although they tolerate children well, require supervision when with younger children, as they can be quite disruptive.

    The Schiller Hound are normally kept indoors and can be calm and polite housemates, although they can bark melodiously at times. The watchful nature of this dog means that it will always alert its owner to any unannounced guests., However, they are not territorial enough to be used as guard dogs. This dog's distrust of new people can be a problem, although this can usually be overcome by early and thorough socialization.

    Although it is not conventionally worked in packs of dogs, the Schiller Hound can socialize well with other dogs if given the opportunity. Of course, smaller animals are not safe in your company and are likely to be viewed as little more than prey.

    Health

    Most members of the breed live into adolescence and tend to enjoy good health.. There are a couple of conditions to consider when it comes to Schiller Hound:

    Hip Dysplasia

    Malformed hips result in an uneven gait, lifelong muscle loss and discomfort. Affected canines are treated with a variety of therapies, including physiotherapy, hydrotherapy and pharmaceutical pain relief. Prudent screening programs in adult dogs of breeding age can help reduce the overall incidence in the population. If a dog of breeding age scores low on the hip, must be neutered and removed from the kennel.

    Ear infections

    The floppy ears of hunting dogs are a magnet for infection as they create moist environments within the ear canal for bacteria and yeast to thrive.. Keeping your ears clear and dry can reduce the potential for infection. If wax builds up, an ear cleaner should be used. Infections should not be allowed to become infected and should be treated as soon as they are noticed. Chronic and whiny infections can pose a real challenge to healing and make the dog very uncomfortable and unhappy while they persist.

    Characteristics “Schiller Hound”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Schiller Hound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    1.0 rating
    1 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    5.0 rating
    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images “Schiller Hound”

    photos:

    1 – A female Schiller Hound by Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – A female Schiller Hound by Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – Schiller Hound (Schiller's wanted poster) International Dog Show in Katowice 28 – 30. 03.2008 by Lilly Mreal name: Małgorzata Miłaszewska, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – Schiller Hound during dogs show in Katowice, Poland by Lilly M, CC BY-SA 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons
    5 – Sabueso Schiller by https://pixabay.com/es/photos/cachorro-hound-schillerst%C3%B6vare-837998/
    6 – Schiller Hound (Schiller's wanted poster) International Dog Show in Katowice 28 – 30. 03.2008 by Lilly Mreal name: Małgorzata Miłaszewska, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Videos “Schiller Hound”

    Schillerstøveren Cora jager hare som unghund.
    Uttak på hare med Schillerstøveren Tilda

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 131
    • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.

    FCI breed standard “Schiller Hound”

    “Schiller Hound” FCI Schiller FCI Hound

    Alternative names:

      1. Schiller Bracke, Schillerstövare (English).
      2. Schillerstövare (French).
      3. Schiller-Bracke, Schillerstövare (German).
      4. Schillerstövare (Portuguese).
      5. Schillerstövare (Spanish).

    Slovakian Hound
    Eslovaquia FCI 244 - Medium-sized Hounds

    Slovakian Hound

    Noted for his extraordinary sense of direction, which is considered the best among the canine breeds.

    Content

    History

    It has remote and completely unknown origins: its official recognition dates back to after World War II, but the race already existed for centuries.

    While there are no historical records, The Slovenský Kopov is widely believed to have existed in central Europe for many hundreds of years and to have descended from other local breeds, including the Austrian Black and Tan Hound and the Polish Hound.

    Not widely kept for any purpose other than hunting, the Slovakian Hound He has honed his hunting skills over the centuries and is respected within Slovakia for his tracking ability and endurance. Despite its proven track record in the field, rarely seen internationally. curiously, when seen internationally, sometimes it is called “Black Forest Dog”, a completely wrong name, since the Slovakian Hound it's not now, and has never been, native to the Black Forest region.

    Like many other breeds of dogs of the time, the population of the Slovakian Hound decreased dramatically during the World Wars period. It is attributed to a Slovak named Koloman Snail having brought the race from the brink of extinction at this time, by establishing successful breeding programs nationwide.

    Officially accepted as a breed in the decade of 1870, the first club of the breed Slovakian Hound was recently formed in 1988, in the capital of Bratislava. The Slovakian Hound it is so popular in its birthplace that it has been named the national breed of Slovakia.

    Photo: Slovakian Hound during dog’s show in Racibórz,Poland by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Physical characteristics

    Always black with fire marks, the Slovakian Hound have solid bones despite their fairly slight stature. The body is in the shape of an elongated rectangle. His eyes reflect vivacity and courage. They are dark and almond-shaped. The ears are of medium length, rounded at the tip and falls flat against the head. This dog is notable for its constancy in following a cool trail or trail for hours, giving the voice without hesitation. They are also distinguished by their bite, so they are used in their native country to hunt wild boars and other carnivores.

    He is endowed with a lively temperament. Your sense of direction is extraordinarily well developed.

    Hair is 2-5 cm long, medium thick, well lying, dense. Longer in the back, neck and tail. The undercoat is dense, especially during the winter months; However, it should not be absent in summer either.

    SIZE AND WEIGHT :

    Males 45-50 cm.

    Females 40-45 cm.

    Weight: 15-20 kg

    Character and skills

    This determined hunter must be tenacious when on the road and courageous when facing the animals he hunts., like wild boar and deer. They have excellent olfactory abilities and will painstakingly trace a scent back to the source. An independent animal who is happy to work with minimal human interaction, the Slovakian Hound need little direction. Despite this, they are obedient, and they will happily follow their master's plans when necessary.

    The Slovakian Hound it's a good watchdog, as he is continuously alert and observant. This, along with the fact that they become devoted to their owners, means they are often protective, and can be used successfully as watchdogs, becoming potentially aggressive if the situation calls for it. Barking can be a problem and is a common complaint of many owners. Excessive barking can be prevented by ensuring that the Slovakian Hound are not insufficiently exercised and have lots of activities and jobs to fill your day.

    Health

    The Slovakian Hound it is a very resistant dog. In the country of origin the owner has a dog, rarely from, who does not live in a kennel but in contact with the master from morning to night, often used as a general purpose dog, taking care of the house as well as the livestock, and of course hunting. It is adapted to outdoor life and has an iron constitution.

    Care and maintenance

    The Slovakian Hound it is a very resistant dog, no particular grooming problems. Short hair, when he comes back from hunting he will be the happiest in the world if you give him the necessary brushstroke for a superficial cleaning at the level of the spikes, caught between the pads, ticks possibly not yet hooked.

    He will quickly get used to coming to you for this cleaning because he is looking for contact with his master.

    Qualities

    It's a farm dog, the quintessential farm dog. Bad guys just do that. The good ones are able to give the voice, to take the lead by yelling or barking directly at any stranger before coming into view. A good Slovakian Hound should give voice instantly. Not after ten minutes (Although, depending on the conditions…). The smell of Slovakian Hound it's excellent, as fine as that of the best Hounds, but his hunting style leads him to voice only in the moment, and of course staring.

    The Slovakian Hound is a search engine, a hunting finder. Hunting instinct is among the best hounds, really very developed, out of the ordinary as in some Warren hound and some representatives of primitive races.

    Farm dog, you don't need to see the animal, the wild boar to bark after, like some pointing dogs that only bark at sight, or to the noise. With experience, depending on the origins, will start barking after turning around to make sure the animal is ten meters away, or more. Once you have fired the bark it will zoom in pretty quickly, but always with care, always staying safe. The Slovakian Hound is not a brave and daring specialist like some races of German Hunting Terrier or pointing dogs, who are inevitably injured frequently. With the, used in its specificity, theoretically, no need for a boar vest, because he knows how to handle attacks. Some are never hurt, if used properly, alone or as a couple.

    The Slovakian Hound it is a dog that is easy to start with the boar. Because it's in their nature, to bark, and the only animal that does not flee automatically but goes to meet is the wild boar. If you are used to hunting in hunts where wild boars are rare but deer are numerous, you will enjoy easily guiding your animals for half an hour or more, but as soon as you notice that there is a wild boar in the area, will leave this animal too elusive to go and do what it was designed to do.

    A good Slovakian Hound, alone or as a couple, rarely caught by a wild boar. Otherwise, in dog teams he becomes a vulnerable dog like any other because his passion is terrible, and there, better equip it with a vest…

    Characteristics “Slovakian Hound”

    Coexistence is important that you have with your new friend. Before considering the acquisition of a dog of the breed “Slovakian Hound” you know certain factors. Not all breeds of dogs are apt to live in an apartment, You must take into account their character, their need for exercise, their interaction with other pets, your care and if you have young children, their level of tolerance towards them.

    Adaptation ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Dog friendly ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Hair loss ⓘ

    3.0 rating
    3 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Affection Level ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Need to exercise ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Social Needs ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Apartment ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Grooming ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Stranger Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Barking Tendencies ⓘ

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    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Health Issues ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Territorial ⓘ

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    5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Cat Friendly ⓘ

    2.0 rating
    2 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    intelligence ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    versatility ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Child Friendly ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Watchdog Ability ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Playfulness ⓘ

    4.0 rating
    4 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

    Images “Slovakian Hound”

    Photos:

    1 – SLOVENSKÝ KOPOV Rantafejs Cezary Av Fileddy MyDOG, Nordens största hundevenemang: www.mydog.se by Swedish Fair from Sweden, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    2 – A female Slovakian Hound. by Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    3 – Slovakian Hound during dog’s show in Racibórz,Poland by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    4 – Slovakian Hound during dog’s show in Racibórz,Poland by Pleple2000, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
    5 – Slovakian Hound during dogs show in Katowice, Poland by Lilly M, CC BY-SA 2.5, via Wikimedia Commons
    6 – Chien courant slovaque sur fond blanc by Desaix83, from the work of Canarian, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

    Videos “Slovakian Hound”

    Type and recognitions:

    • CLASSIFICATION FCI: 244
    • Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds.
    • Section 1: Scent hounds – 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds. With working trial.

    Federations:

    • FCI – Group 6: Scent hounds, and related breeds. – Section 1.2: Medium-sized Hounds.
    • UKCScenthounds

    FCI breed standard “Slovakian Hound”

    “Slovakian Hound” FCI Slovak Hound FCI

    Alternative names:

      1. Black Forest Hound, Slovak Hound (English).
      2. (slovenský kopov en slovaque) (French).
      3. Slowakische Schwarzwildbracke (German).
      4. Cão da floresta (Portuguese).
      5. Cazador eslovaco (Spanish).